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Masters Degrees (Refugees)

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Forced migration is a global phenomenon and an area of increasing concern. On this course you will study the multiple factors associated with refugee crises and the economic, political, social, cultural, and environment pressures which lie behind the search for asylum. Read more
Forced migration is a global phenomenon and an area of increasing concern. On this course you will study the multiple factors associated with refugee crises and the economic, political, social, cultural, and environment pressures which lie behind the search for asylum.

One of the major factors that makes our course stand out from others is that we focus on the perspective of the refugee. Forced migrants confront major obstacles in their attempt to find sanctuary.

Although the majority of refugees are in countries of the developing world, structures of exclusion are most fully developed in the post-industrial societies, notably within Europe.

The course highlights problems associated with limitations of asylum rights in the European states and the climate of hostility towards refugees from countries outside Western Europe. It also considers alternative, positive, approaches to asylum rights.

WHAT YOU WILL STUDY

The core modules give you a wide-ranging introduction to forced migration and a detailed study of research methods. You will also have the opportunity to study specialist options on social, cultural, political, legal and psychosocial aspects of refugee studies and community development.

A distinguishing feature of the course is its emphasis on the lived experience of refugees and of refugee communities. You will develop a full appreciation of refugee experiences, achievements and needs.

You will study refugees from the point of view of the law, politics and anthropology and you will analyse their experiences on a global and local scale.

The course looks at how non-governmental organisations and the United Nations work with refugees and also how some people have sought to criminalise them.

The course will equip you with advanced skills in interdisciplinary analysis and research.

You will learn from the first-hand experience of refugees and people who have worked with refugees.

Your studies will focus on two core modules: Introduction to Forced Migration and Research Methods, and two specialist option modules in the area of social, cultural, political, legal and psychosocial aspects of refugee studies and community development. This will prepare you to begin a dissertation during the summer term for submission in September.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

This course is suited to people who are working in areas concerned with human rights, legal representation of refugees, counseling, education, social and community issues and refugee welfare.

If you are already working in this area, the course will give you the confidence and experience to apply for more senior positions.
If you are aiming to enter the field for the first time, it will give you the skills to apply for roles with NGOs, government departments or other organisations working closely with refugees.

Our course will also prepare students who wish to undertake further research in the fields of forced migration and diasporic studies; legal studies; and social policy.

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This unique course adopts a multi-disciplinary approach to refugee studies and community development and is based at a university with significant refugee communities in its local area in east London. Read more
This unique course adopts a multi-disciplinary approach to refugee studies and community development and is based at a university with significant refugee communities in its local area in east London.

Our approach encompasses politics, international relations, development studies, sociology, anthropology, social policy, psychology and cultural and legal theory.

We examine key issues involving forced migration as well as social, cultural, political and psychosocial aspects of community development with special reference to refugee communities in east London.

What makes our course different is that we focus on the experience of refugees and of refugee communities.
Our course will give you a deep appreciation of refugees’ experiences, achievements and needs.

It will equip you with the knowledge and skills to work in professions relating to counseling, social and community issues, refugee welfare, human rights, and legal representation of refugees.

WHAT YOU WILL STUDY

Forced migrants confront major obstacles in their attempt to find sanctuary. Although the majority of refugees are in countries of the developing world, structures of exclusion are most fully developed in the post-industrial societies, notably in Europe.

Your work will focus on developing an appreciation of refugee experiences, achievements and needs by approaching refugees as social actors.

You will study three core modules: Introduction to forced migration, Refugee studies and community development, and Research methods.

The course also offers you the opportunity to study one specialist option on social, cultural, political, legal and psychosocial aspects of refugee studies and community development.

This will prepare you to begin a dissertation during the summer term for submission in September.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

This course will appeal to professionals and practitioners who are interested in refugees and community development, both locally and internationally.

It will give you the skills and knowledge to play an important role in NGOs, social service departments and local and international charities.

It is particularly suited to people who are professionally concerned with counseling, education, social and community issues and refugee welfare, as well as human rights, the legal representation of refugees.

If you are already working in any of these areas, the course will give you the confidence and experience to apply for more senior positions. If you are looking to enter the field for the first time, it will give you the skills to apply for jobs.

The course also provides the perfect preparation for students who wish to undertake further research in the fields of forced migration and diasporic studies, ethnicity, social, psychosocial and cultural theory, legal studies and social policy.

MODULES

The following are the core and optional requirements for this programme:

Introduction to Forced Migration (Core)
Forced Migration and Community Development (Core)
Research Methods (Core)
Approaches to Public and Community Service(Option)
Current Issues in Forced Migration(Option)
Governance (Option)
International Human Rights (Option)
International Refugee Law (Option)
Migration, Citizenship & Social Policy (Option)
Psycho-Social Perspectives On Forced Migration (Option)
Volunteering, Voluntarism and Voluntary Action (Option)
*University Wide Option (Option)
Dissertation (Core)

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This programme provides a comprehensive introduction to understanding contemporary research on global migrations and social justice. Read more
This programme provides a comprehensive introduction to understanding contemporary research on global migrations and social justice. Unique in Scotland, it addresses questions such as who moves and why, who is allowed to settle and where, what are the roles of states, institutions and civil societies in these processes.

Why this programme

● The programme draws on recognised expertise in migration studies, sociology, anthropology, history, criminology, human geography, policy and politics, ethics, as well as a wide variety of country and regional expertise.

● You will get access to cutting-edge academic research on migration with an emphasis on social justice and learning from non-academic work in this area.

● It offers innovative and wide ranging learning and teaching approaches from lectures and seminars, to project work, workshops and field based activities, along with assessment methods with practical options for collaborative and arts-based projects.

● The programme is supported through GRAMNet, the University of Glasgow’s internationally recognised research network for Refugees, Asylum and Migration in Scotland. You will benefit from the provisions offered by GRAMNet, such as training, seminars, opportunities for knowledge exchange and spaces for dissemination.

● The programme features guest lectures and input from leading migration academics as well as practitioners working in this area.

Programme structure

You will take three core and three optional courses as well as complete a dissertation or a practical project. Courses will be delivered via lectures and seminars supported by appropriate multi-media material, such as monographs, videos, podcasts, journal articles, reports and survey data. Coursework will involve project work, workshops and field based activities.

The dissertation options have been designed to bring together practice and academic learning, allowing you to reflect on the experience of being directly and actively engaged with service providers and asylum seekers, refugees and migrants, working alongside them to explore how research may be transformative for organisations, individuals and communities.

Core courses

• Global migrations: histories, structures, experiences
• Public social science for social justice
• Research design.

Optional courses

• Access, equity, health
• Century of the refugee: refugees and statelessness in comparative perspective, 1900-2000
• Immigration and asylum law
• Migration, mobility and settlement: Post-Soviet migrations
• Migration, mobility and settlement: Central and East European migration to the UK and Scotland
• Racism and modernity
• Texts for diversity: language across learning for children with English as an additional language .
• Some courses might not be available every year. You may also be able to choose from courses in the other subjects in the School of • Social & Political Sciences.

Resources and facilities

In addition to a long history of large communities of migrants setting in the city Glasgow is host to the UK’s largest population of refugees and asylum seekers under dispersal policy. Across the city there is a large number of organisations working with migrants, refugees and asylum seekers in a variety of ways. Within this distinctive context, GRAMNet - the University of Glasgow’s internationally renowned Glasgow Refugee Asylum and Migration Network - brings together researchers, practitioners, NGOs and policy makers with a focus on examining the social and cultural effects of migration. At its heart is a focus on social and intercultural values, social justice and critical engagement with questions around migration. The network’s reputation for developing and applying innovative participatory methodologies to address complex questions is internationally renowned.

Please refer to the website for

Background and Aims

http://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/globalmigrationssocialjusticemsc/#/backgroundandaims

Career prospects

On completing the programme, you will be equipped to apply your learning to a wide range of opportunities locally, nationally and internationally. This might include working with policy-making bodies, local and national governments, community organisations, NGOs and third sector organisations. The emphasis on applied learning makes this programme relevant to a range of professional settings where graduates may be working with asylum seekers, refugees and migrants, for example in education, social work, housing, equalities, campaigning and advocacy work, community development, human rights advocacy work, social research. It will also provide the necessary foundations for further study through doctoral research.

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This programme examines global migrations and social justice by addressing questions such as who moves and why, who is allowed to settle and where, what are the roles of states, institutions and civil societies in these processes. Read more
This programme examines global migrations and social justice by addressing questions such as who moves and why, who is allowed to settle and where, what are the roles of states, institutions and civil societies in these processes. It provides advanced training in social science research methodology to fulfil Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC) postgraduate research training requirements.

[[Why this programme}}

● The programme draws on recognised expertise in migration studies, sociology, anthropology, history, criminology, human geography, policy and politics and ethics as well as a wide variety of country and regional expertise.

● You will get access to cutting-edge academic research on migration with an emphasis on social justice and learning from non-academic work in this area.

● You will be taught research methods by expert staff from a wide range of disciplines, allowing you to benefit from specialist knowledge and methodology.

● The programme is supported through GRAMNet, the University of Glasgow’s internationally recognised research network for Refugees, Asylum and Migration in Scotland. You will benefit from the provisions offered by GRAMNet, such as training, seminars, opportunities for knowledge exchange and spaces for dissemination.

● The programme is the only Masters programme in Scotland with a focus on migration studies and social justice.

● This degree is taught jointly with the MSc Global Migrations & Social Justice, which has a stronger focus on the subject, with less emphasis on research methods.

Programme structure

You will take five core and one optional course as well as complete a dissertation or a practical project.

Core courses

• Global migrations: Histories, structures, experiences.
• Public social science for social justice
• Research design
• Qualitative methods
• Quantitative data analysis.

Optional courses

• Access, equity, health
• Century of the refugee: refugees and statelessness in comparative perspective, 1900-2000
• Immigration and asylum law
• Migration, mobility and settlement: Post-Soviet Migrations
• Migration, mobility and settlement: Central and East European migration to the UK and Scotland
• Racism and modernity
• Texts for diversity: language across learning for children with English as an additional language.
• Some courses might not be available every year. You may also be able to choose from courses in the other subjects in the School of • Social & Political Sciences.

Resources and facilities

In addition to a long history of large communities of migrants setting in the city Glasgow is host to the UK’s largest population of refugees and asylum seekers under dispersal policy. Across the city there is a large number of organisations working with migrants, refugees and asylum seekers in a variety of ways. Within this distinctive context, GRAMNet - the University of Glasgow’s internationally renowned Glasgow Refugee Asylum and Migration Network - brings together researchers, practitioners, NGOs and policy makers with a focus on examining the social and cultural effects of migration. At its heart is a focus on social and intercultural values, social justice and critical engagement with questions around migration. The network’s reputation for developing and applying innovative participatory methodologies to address complex questions is internationally renowned.

For

Background and Aims

please check out the website http://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/globalmigrationssocialjusticemres/#/backgroundandaims

[[Career Prospects ]]
http://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/globalmigrationssocialjusticemres/#/careerprospects

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This masters will develop your critical engagement with the theories and practices of forced migration and development studies. In-depth knowledge of both disciplines is critical to understand and explain the causes and consequences of forced migration. Read more
This masters will develop your critical engagement with the theories and practices of forced migration and development studies. In-depth knowledge of both disciplines is critical to understand and explain the causes and consequences of forced migration.

Taught by internationally recognised members of staff with a range of innovative research experiences, the course is interdisciplinary. It requires the use of theoretical and methodological insights, knowledge and perspectives of different disciplines. This provides opportunities for in-depth understanding and explanation of the problem of Forced Migration and its interface with other social science disciplines, such as development studies, law, sociology, anthropology, political science and psychology.

Starting in both in September and January, this programme aims to develop your critical engagement with the theories and practices of forced migration and development studies. In-depth knowledge of both disciplines is critical to understanding and explaining the causes and consequences of forced migration, analysing, critiquing and evaluating host governments’, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees’ (UNCHR) and NGOs’ policies on protection, assistance, reception and settlement strategies, as well as the short and long-term responses of inter -governmental organisations, such as the World Bank and others.

Throughout the course, you’ll also engage in volunteering. Students have volunteered in different organisations , including the UK Refugee Council, British Red Cross, UNHCR, Chance UK, Naz Project London and Eaves in South London. These organisations provide support, advice and advocacy to asylum-seekers, including women who’ve experienced violence, such as trafficking, prostitution, domestic and sexual violence.

MSc Refugee Studies is led by Professor Gaim Kibreab, an internationally recognised expert on forced migration, resettlement, repatriation and development, conflict, environment, water resources governance, post-conflict reconstruction, gender and development, livelihoods, governance and civil society.

Modules

International Refugee Law
Asylum policy in the EU and Member States
Forced Migration and Human Rights
Forced Migration and Development
Contemporary Issues in Development
Research methods for development
Dissertation (triple module)

Study hours

Year 1 class contact time is typically 16 hours per week plus individual tutorial time and independent study. This accumulates to typically two days and two evenings a week.

Assessment

All modules apart from the dissertation are assessed by 5,000 word pieces of coursework.

Employability

The aims and outcomes of this course are designed to develop your knowledge and skills that are relevant to working with forced migrants, including asylum-seekers, refugees, IDPs, oustees and other categories of forced migrants and also for working in refugee-producing and hosting countries world-wide, inter-governmental organisations, such as the UNHCR, non-governmental orgisations, immigration lawyers, lobbying and advocacy groups. The Home Office and immigration authorities in the EU and member states are potential employers of our graduates.

Previous students have entered careers in many fields working for international organisations such as the United Nations and its constituent organisations. Through our pool of visiting lecturers and practitioners, the MSc Refugee Studies networks with activists, academics and practitioners. These networks provide students an opportunity not only to learn about job opportunities but also establish contacts that may prove to be useful in search of employment opportunities. Students’ employability is enhanced by developing their transferable and problem-solving analytical and evaluative skills. Some graduates of the MSc Refugee Studies have established their own NGOs and are serving asylum-seekers, refugees and internally displaced persons in their countries of origin.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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Do you or are you looking to work with refugees, asylum seekers or other displaced groups of people? How can you care for these people more effectively? How can therapeutic dimensions of care and psychosocial perspectives help to understand the multi-dimensional complexities of the refugee experience?. Read more
Do you or are you looking to work with refugees, asylum seekers or other displaced groups of people? How can you care for these people more effectively? How can therapeutic dimensions of care and psychosocial perspectives help to understand the multi-dimensional complexities of the refugee experience?

The multidisciplinary expertise of our university and the therapeutic professionalism of the Tavistock Centre combine to bring you this innovative twin-site Masters (two modules are taught at the Tavistock Centre in London and two modules at our Colchester campus) in the study of refugee care.

The central focus of our MA Refugee Care is to introduce a therapeutic dimension and a psychosocial perspective to working with this group of people, and is the only postgraduate course to offer a combination of modules with this emphasis, making a clear distinction between being therapeutic in working with refugees, instead of offering psychotherapy to them.

The course includes a thoughtful combination of practical and experiential elements, such as placements and institutional observations, to support a sound theoretical framework to understand the complexities of the refugee experience, such as family and societal factors, interactions with various services, institutions and organisations, and the inter-personal dynamics involved between refugees and their workers.

Our course is offered one year full-time, two years part-time or modular (up to five years), and teaching is for 25 weeks (over two and a half terms from October to mid-May). It is also possible to apply for a doctoral programme in refugee care, completing this MA first (without the dissertation) and then continuing to work on your PhD thesis (for an additional two years full-time or four years part-time).

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Developed in association with the renowned human rights barrister, Geoffrey Robertson, QC, and distinguished colleagues of the world-famous Doughty Street Chambers, this innovative programme examines some of the key challenges in the field of International Human Rights. Read more
Developed in association with the renowned human rights barrister, Geoffrey Robertson, QC, and distinguished colleagues of the world-famous Doughty Street Chambers, this innovative programme examines some of the key challenges in the field of International Human Rights.

International law and human rights have been at the heart of teaching and scholarly work at Regent’s for many years: this new programme offers a truly unique opportunity to be guided by special guests from Doughty Street alongside our talented team of academics.

You will be introduced to a range of topics in the field including, a history of human rights law, international relations, humanitarian intervention, free speech, prohibition of torture and inhumane treatment and international criminal law, with all theory supplemented by cutting edge research and case studies.

Why should I choose this programme?

The issues covered within this programme have never been so pertinent and in demand. The programme will enable you to address some of the contemporary challenges faced in operational environments which aim to protect and promote human rights. The programme informs those already in professional practice or those aspiring to work in this field with the skills and knowledge and the ability to introduce changes that will improve human rights policies at an international, regional and domestic level.

This programme is unique in its close link with practising professionals and real life cases, allowing you to really explore and understand what’s happening in the world today. We have an exceptionally talented team of lecturers including:

‌•Dr. Sara Bazoobandi, an author on food security and Associate Fellow of Chatham House.
‌•Dr. Mireille Hebing, an expert on migration and refugees.
‌•Dr. Neven Andjelic, recently elected to the Advisory Committee on the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities.
‌•Professor Yossi Mekelberg, expert and author on human rights issues ranging from right for self determination, gender, freedom of speech, refugees, collective punishment and house demolitions, rights of minorities and others. Professor Mekelberg has been a member of the London Committee of Human Rights Watch for the last 7 years and is regularly asked to write in international media about abuses of human rights.

As well as being guided by our team of experts, you will benefit directly from visiting lectures from renowned barristers from the Doughty Street Chambers who include:

‌•Geoffrey Robertson, QC
‌•Kirsty Brimelow, QC
‌•Professor Marc Weller
‌•Graeme Hall
‌•Edward Fitzgerald OBE, QC
‌•Professor Geraldine Van Beuren, QC
‌•Andrea Saccucci
‌•Jen Robinson

Engaging with these distinguished professionals will really bring the subject to life and provide you with a deep and comprehensive understanding of human rights law.

Key skills, aims and objectives

You will gain:

A systematic and comprehensive knowledge of international human rights law
The ability to identify and critically evaluate contemporary issues relating to international human rights
An understanding of how theory relates to practice, with extensive use of current and relevant case studies
The ability to interpret principal source materials as well as understanding relevant concepts, cases, statutes and treaties
Exposure to world renowned human rights lawyers who will share their knowledge and experience of working on landmark cases in the field

Future opportunities

This programme will prepare you for a number of careers, in areas such as diplomacy, international relations, domestic and international legal practice, international charities, and non-governmental organisations, as well as practising professionals in law, journalism, politics and economics.

How to apply

Applying to study at RUL is a quick and easy process. We accept direct applications, have no formal application deadlines and there is no application fee.

Step 1 Apply

You can apply in the following ways:

•Apply online
•Apply directly to us using the application form available here http://www.regents.ac.uk/media/1188903/Regents-application-form.pdf
Once you have completed the application form, please send us the following supporting documents, by post, email or fax:

•Copies of academic transcripts and certificates of all academic study undertaken after secondary school
•One letter of academic reference
•A copy of your CV/resumé showing your work experience if applicable.
•A 300 to 500-word personal statement in support of your application, outlining your reasons for applying to your chosen programme and how you feel you will benefit from the course of study
•A copy of your passport photograph (ID) page
•One recent passport-sized, colour photograph, jpeg format (this must be emailed to us at )
•If not a native English speaker, proof of your English proficiency

Please note: most candidates will be assessed for admission on the basis of their submitted application materials. However, RUL reserves the right to invite candidates for interview and to reject those who decline to attend.

Step 2 Making an offer

We will assess whether you meet our minimum entry requirements and will make you an offer by both email and post, or notify you that you have been unsuccessful.

If you have completed your education and have met all the entry requirements, you will be sent an unconditional offer. If you still have to finish your exams, or have yet to submit supporting documentation, we will make you a conditional offer.

You can expect to receive a decision on your application within 10 working days of receipt of your completed application and supporting documents.

Step 3 Accepting the offer

If you wish to accept the offer you must:

•Confirm your acceptance via email/post/telephone/in person
•Pay the registration fee (non-refundable)
•Pay the non-EU advance tuition fee deposit, if applicable (non-refundable)
•Please note: although there is no formal deadline to pay your registration fee or non-EU advance deposit, if you need to apply for an international student visa to study in the UK, then we recommend that you pay these as soon as possible.

Please see here for information on how to pay http://www.regents.ac.uk/study/how-to-pay.aspx

Step 4 Full acceptance and visa

On receipt of your acceptance we will issue the final set of documentation and, where needed, the relevant visa support documentation. To find out if you need a student visa please consult the UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) website for current information: http://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/uk-visas-and-immigration (please note it is your own responsibility to arrange the appropriate visa).

For more information on course structure, admissions and teaching and assessment, please follow this link: http://www.regents.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/programmes/ma-international-human-rights-law.aspx#tab_course-overview

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This innovative MA allows you to explore ways in which drama and theatre might be applied to educational, therapeutic and community contexts. Read more
This innovative MA allows you to explore ways in which drama and theatre might be applied to educational, therapeutic and community contexts. Applied drama/ theatre is an umbrella term which includes the practice of drama in a wide range of settings, such as drama and theatre in education; young people’s theatre; drama, health and healing; reminiscence and heritage theatres; theatre in prisons; theatre for development and community theatre.

This course addresses the 'social turn' at the cutting-edge of contemporary theatre, where new forms of participation are blurring the boundaries between performer and spectator. During the course you will have the opportunity to explore creative and research opportunities in some of these diverse and dynamic contexts and analyse the politics and values of applied drama. You will experience radically different approaches to performance-making in both conventional theatre spaces and in non-theatrical settings, enabling you to consider the relationship between innovative performance practices and work in applied theatre. The programme considers the international dimension of applied and participatory theatre, and the local and global implications of artistic practice.

By the end of this degree you will be well prepared to work in different locations and have developed your own praxis and practical skills as a practitioner, workshop leader and artist.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/dramaandtheatre/coursefinder/maappliedandparticipatorytheatre.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The course is taught by world leading experts in applied theatre, whose published research includes theatre education, theatre and health, theatre and refugees, devised theatre and applied drama/theatre.

- You will have the opportunity to benefit from our industry partnerships and our professional links with theatre companies. Previous students have benefitted from working with Age Exchange Theatre Trust, the Lyric Hammersmith, The Globe Theatre Education, Attic Theatre, Bravo 22 Company and many local schools, museums and hospital settings.

- The 2008 Research Assessment Exercise ranked the majority of the Department's research activities as world-leading (4*) or internationally excellent (3*).

- Royal Holloway has the largest Drama Department in the UK with 25 academic members of staff working at the cutting edge of the discipline.

- We foster an excellent research environment and support a vibrant community of postgraduate and doctoral students.

- You will benefit from a range of unique performance spaces which include a traditional Japanese Noh theatre, the fully equipped Caryl Churchill Theatre and the substantial Victorian Boilerhouse.

Department research and industry highlights

You will benefit from working in partnership with professional practitioners, undertaking placements in different settings and developing your own practice. Previous practical projects have included reminiscence theatre in a day centre for the elderly; theatre with young people at risk of offending; drama and film with young carers; an interfaith installation with students of different religious beliefs; theatre with young people in hospital; theatre with young disabled performers; performance with unaccompanied refugees, and many, many more. Each project is designed and facilitated by students, and professional placements support their development.

Course content and structure

You will study three core course units and complete a dissertation.

Core course units:
The MA in Applied and Participatory theatre will appeal to anyone who is interested in socially engaged art. It is focused on theatre in different institutional, therapeutic and community settings, and raises questions about how artists might encourage public participation in a range of different forms of theatre and performance-making. You will study three core course units and complete a dissertation.

You will follow a course called Applied and Participatory Theatre Workshop where you will develop your skills as a practitioner and artist, as well as engaging in critical debates about the field. The next specialist module is the Independent Practical Project, where you gain valuable professional experience in community settings.

In addition to the two modules above you will study a shared module for all MA students in the Drama and Theatre Department that considers the contexts for theatre and performance, its histories and practices. The details and assessment methods of this course are being updated for the new year and will appear in more detail on the department website once validated.

The fourth module is the dissertation on a chosen subject within your field of study with accompanying Research Methodologies course that supports students in independent research and writing.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- enhanced and applied their skills as reflective theatre practitioners
- explored the scope of theatre studies and its critical and research methodologies
- developed their understanding of contemporary performance practices and its contexts
- explored the links between theory and practice
- developed their ability to undertake independent research and analysis.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of means including essays, performance analyses, evaluative reflections on practice, and practical projects, as well as a final dissertation of 10-14,000 words. Practical projects are sometimes carried out in a group and may include an element of assessment for an individual’s contribution to group working and direction. All students undertake a summer term practical project.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different drama and theatre-related areas, including careers in professional theatre, training and education. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies and many of our students go on to advanced research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Are you involved in – or contemplating – working with migrants, refugees and asylum seekers?. Our course will broaden your understanding of the relevant theories, concepts and policies. Read more
Are you involved in – or contemplating – working with migrants, refugees and asylum seekers?

Our course will broaden your understanding of the relevant theories, concepts and policies. We help you examine migration processes and their consequences for today’s societies. You’ll explore issues of development, rights and diversity that shape migrants’ life chances.

You have the opportunity to follow your own interests within migration, development, human rights and refugees, or within migration, ethnicity, cultural diversity and rights.

This MA draws on the expertise of the Sussex Centre for Migration Research.

How will I study?

Across the autumn and spring terms, you learn through core modules and options. You also take a module that prepares you for further research and a professional career. This is delivered as a series of workshops including one that prepares you for your dissertation.

In the summer term, you undertake supervised dissertation work or a dissertation with placement.

You are assessed by term papers, unseen exams, a case analysis on research methods and a 10,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

ESRC 1+3 and +3 Scholarships (2017)
-A number of ESRC-funded standalone PhD and PhD with Masters scholarships across the social sciences.
-Application deadline: 30 January 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

Many of our graduates have pursued successful careers in:
-International organisations and NGOs (such as UNHCR)
-Local government authorities
-Charities with a migration focus (such as the Refugee Council).

Others have continued their studies with a PhD, becoming scholars in migration studies.

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The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs and students intending to go on to carry out PhD research.The programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs and students intending to go on to carry out PhD research.The programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. We welcome those who have worked in the field of migration and / or development, but we also welcome applications from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in the major themes of the programme and a strong first degree, preferably in a social science.

This innovative new programme in the Department of Development Studies offers students the opportunity to combine study and analysis of critical perspectives on development and the increasingly important and related field of migration studies.

The MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development will focus attention on the political economy of migration from a historical perspective, major trends in migration theories, and different forms of and approaches to the study of migration and displacement. The programme draws on the expertise of staff in development, migration and forced migration contexts from the Development Studies department, and encourages inter-disciplinary dialogue with other relevant departments and centres within SOAS.

The programme’s 20-week core modules will focus on the migration–development nexus, broadly conceived and defined. It will also expose students to a range of interlocking theoretical approaches which set out to account for constructions of and responses to migration and migrants, as well as to the scope and scale of migratory processes. Broadly, Term 1 provides analysis of the institutional, political, social and economic contexts where migration takes place and considers differentiated/mitigated effects. Term 2 builds on this to discuss types of migration via case study and other material, placing more emphasis on migrants’ perspectives and how these are mitigated by ‘contexts’.

Topics and themes include:

Sedentarism and the study of migration
Polities & economies of migration
Colonialism
Nations, states and territory
Globalisation
(Illegal) workers in the global economy
Place and emplacement
Assimilation/acculturation/discrimination
Transnational migrants & mobile lives
Trafficking
Development and migration
Diasporas and development
Refugees and internally displaced persons
Development-induced displacement
Environment and refugees/displacement
Climate change-related migration
Policy responses to migration
Transformations North and South

The MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development will provide a thorough analytical grounding in international migration including different types of forced and voluntary migration, facilitating the development of specialized knowledge of particular case studies, as well as overall trends and theoretical frameworks. A rigorous academic programme, it will also give students the confidence to think in policy relevant terms and will be equally valuable to those proceeding to professional employment in the sector with international organizations, NGOs and government bodies, and for students intending to go on to carry out PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/prog/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Migration, Mobility and Development. A distinctive feature of the core module is that students work together in small groups to produce a migration related research report. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full module or two half modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and possibly use them to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 78kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/prog/file101784.pdf

Materials

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation. Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars, collaborative research projects and supervised individual study projects.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Dissertation work requires students to make use of theoretical and empirical material and relate this to a migration related topic.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Migration, Mobility and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions.

An MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Applications for places on the MA Social Work course for September 2015 are now closed. Please contact us if you’d like to discuss an application for 2016 entry. Read more
Applications for places on the MA Social Work course for September 2015 are now closed. Please contact us if you’d like to discuss an application for 2016 entry.

The fundamental intention of the course programme is to equip students to take up positions within the professionally qualified social work workforce. The overall objective is to provide a programme which satisfies the requirements of the Care Council ‘Framework for the Degree in Social Work in Wales’ (2012). To achieve this, the programme of study includes a suite of core academic modules and a requirement of at least 200 days on placement over the two years. Successful completion qualifies students to begin working as registered social workers.

The modules and practice learning opportunities are designed to provide graduating students with the required knowledge, skills and values to begin practicing as newly qualified social workers. They are based on the QAA Benchmarks for Social Work, and the National Occupational Standards for Social Work.

The programme offers both Welsh and English routes. Students will be able to pursue their studies entirely through the medium of Welsh or English. All the modules will be delivered in Welsh and English, and all assessments can be presented in either Welsh or English.

Download the course leaflet

Careers
After qualification you will be able to work in a wide range of health or social care settings, often working alongside other professionals such as occupational therapists or psychologists, in multidisciplinary teams. As well as statutory social work settings like Children and Families teams, older people teams and community mental health teams, social workers may be employed as hospitals, in community development projects or with non-statutory organisations perhaps supporting refugees and asylum-seekers, or working with young parents in need of support.

Partnership with Employers
The School of Social Sciences works in partnership with Gwynedd, Ynys Môn and Conwy Local Authorities to develop, deliver and manage this Social Work programme. Partner local authorities are involved in recruitment, student selection, contributing to teaching and undertaking assessment of students. The primary partners also provide practice learning opportunities, along with other employing agencies and ensure that students develop a strong understanding of social work practice in North Wales, alongside their academic development

Structure
We believe in providing a wide range of teaching and learning opportunities. These will include participation in lectures, seminars, group work, role play, student-directed learning projects and computer-enhanced learning. Practice learning opportunities enable you to learn from skilled and experienced practitioners within a structured and supportive environment.

Year 1
Social Policy for Social Work Practice
Knowledge and Skills Base for Social Work
The Life Course
Values and Ethics for Social Work Practice
The Research Process
Practice Learning Opportunity
Year 2
Social Work Dissertation
Legal Imperatives for Social Work
Social Work with Children, Young People and Families
Community Care
Practice Learning Opportunity
Dissertation: The Dissertation provides students with an opportunity to conduct a small-scale yet significant piece of individual research supervised by a research supervisor. Students identify a research question, and collect and analyse data that bears on the research question, utilising an appropriate analytical framework. They then address the research question in the light of their findings. The research undertaken is presented in the format of a 20,000 word (max) dissertation employing the usual conventions.

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The challenges of youth and community work are constantly changing. We will help you engage with the policies and ideologies associated with this dynamic area. Read more
The challenges of youth and community work are constantly changing. We will help you engage with the policies and ideologies associated with this dynamic area.

You will examine topics such as the London riots, youth crime and alcohol and drug abuse, allowing you to understand the impact of Government policy on the lives of young people. You will study different approaches to community work and the importance of studying international issues and applying them to situations closer to home.

You will gain practical experience as you bid for funding for a real project and choose a wide variety of option modules to tailor your course to your needs.

Expert guest lecturers and staff will offer insights into the evolving nature of youth work in the UK and overseas. You will also study alongside students from a range of backgrounds, giving you a fresh perspective on every day issues.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including social work and social policy

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/communityandyouth_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

With an in-depth understanding of youth and community issues, you'll be able to continue your career development in a management role. Graduates from similar subjects have gone on to work with children who have been excluded from school, refugees, the homeless and in hostels. You could consider mentoring, becoming a youth worker or pursuing a role as a case worker for a charity.

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will benefit from the expertise of our staff and a range of guest lecturers. Previous speakers have included international academics who provided an insight into the differences between youth and community work here and overseas, and a member of OFSTED who spoke about the changing shape of youth work.

The broad scope of our course means you choose your own option modules from across our University, so you can tailor your course to your interests. Whether you want to find out more about criminology, spirituality, cognitive therapy, working with difference or special education needs, we'll endeavour to meet your requirements.

As an added bonus, you'll be studying alongside students from a range of different backgrounds - from new graduates to those who are already working in the community. With this exposure to different views and methods of problem solving, you'll gain a fresh perspective on the issues you deal with day to day.

Core Modules

Historical Perspectives on Youth and Community Work (Policy, Ideology & Practice)
You will get an overview of recent Government policy and its impact on professional practice, then critically analyse this in relation to the values and ethics of youth and community development.

Understanding Social Research and Evaluation
You will gain a theoretical, methodological and practical foundation for social research, enabling you to act as a social researcher to resolve practice based problems.

Management: Current Issues in Practice
Gain an understanding of the challenges faced by managers and leaders in a complex and changing professional context by understanding the tensions that exist between the values of youth and community work and approaches to management and leadership.

Dissertation
An independent piece of original advanced research that you will be expected to plan, implement and report with guidance from a supervisor.

Community Development and Learning
Explore the various models and approaches to community work, and locate them within a historical, ideological and global context. You will study key theorists and critically analyse their application to a range of practice contexts.

Professor Ieuan Ellis

Dean, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences

"We have a long history of providing education across a wide range of professional and academic disciplines in health, applied global ethics, social sciences and related subject areas... The Faculty has a number of areas of research excellence."

Ieuan is responsible for the strategic leadership of the Faculty of Health and Social sciences. He is also a member of Academic Board, and an elected staff representative on the Board of Governors. He is also Chair of the UK Council of Deans of Health and Co-chair of the National Allied Health Professions Advisory Board. After practicing as a chartered physiotherapist in the NHS and private sector, Ieuan entered higher education working initially at Northumbria University prior to joining our University. Ieuan has held a number of leadership and management roles across health and social care education and was awarded a personal chair as Professor in Healthcare Education.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Clinical Skills Suite
The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Gain a prestigious MA in Refugee Protection & Forced Migration Studies. by distance learning. The MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies provides a rigorous theoretical and practical understanding of the field of international refugee law and forced migration. Read more

Gain a prestigious MA in Refugee Protection & Forced Migration Studies

by distance learning

The MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies provides a rigorous theoretical and practical understanding of the field of international refugee law and forced migration. It is unique in being the only programme of its type offered by distance learning.

An introduction

The MA degree will enable you to acquire a solid legal, practical and theoretical understanding of refugee protection and forced migration, developing expertise through a choice of elective modules. You will hone your self-reliance in dealing with - and critiquing - law, policy and practice in the field, and will also learn how to gather, organise and deploy evidence to form balanced judgements and develop policy recommendations.

Who is the course for?

This Masters is relevant to those who already work in the area, for whom a Masters qualification would enable them to progress to higher level work within the sector, whether in multilaterals, governments or NGOs.

It will also appeal to people hoping to establish themselves in the sector - these could be people making a career change or those at an early stage of their careers.

It is also relevant to sector professionals, to provide a deeper understanding of the issues facing refugees and refugee aid organisations.

We are hoping to create a virtual meeting place for students, academics and practitioners from all parts of the globe.

How will the course benefit me?

The programme is designed to develop both academic and vocational skills and experience.

It will enable you not only to think constructively about related policy and law, but to develop actual policy recommendations.

The 'practice based' module provides the opportunity to explore of some of the key vocational aspects relevant to the sector including topics such as advocacy, campaigning, fundraising, policy, law and communications. You can then choose to focus on a specific area for your examined piece of work. In the case of fundraising, for example, you could submit a funding bid that will be assessed by a tutor with significant practical experience in the grants and trusts sector.

Other modules on the course focus on asylum law and policy in specific regions of the world, such as Latin America and Africa or the European Union, whilst others focus on specific thematic issues such as statelessness, internal displacement, healthcare, gender and sexual identity.

Overall the course seeking to provide students with a solid legal, practical and theoretical understanding of refugee protection and forced migration.

How you study

You study this online programme wherever you are in the world and access the course content through a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). The VLE also gives you access to:

- Associate Tutors who provide expert academic guidance throughout your studies

- academically rigorous and up-to-date learning materials and resources

- online tasks and assessments ('e-tivities') plus seen examinations for each of the modules

- peer to peer learning in online discussion forums

- world-class online library facilities.

Ask a question

To ask a question about this programme, please contact out Student Advice Centre using this form.



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This multidisciplinary course draws upon the disciplines of law, criminology and social science. It enables you to gain the experience and skills needed for employment with key human rights organisations and government departments. Read more

This multidisciplinary course draws upon the disciplines of law, criminology and social science. It enables you to gain the experience and skills needed for employment with key human rights organisations and government departments. It also offers international human rights practitioners the opportunity to update their knowledge and further develop intellectual and critical skills.

Key features of the course include opportunities to

  • develop a multidisciplinary understanding of human rights and social justice as they exist today in theory, policy and practice
  • develop an understanding of how human rights organisations work in theory and practice
  • engage with the research work of staff in the Human Rights and Social Justice Research Cluster and the Department of Law and Criminology
  • complete in-depth case studies on key topics in human rights
  • learn from experienced practitioners and policy-makers from local and international human rights organisations

The MA Applied Human Rights combines a robust academic and intellectual learning environment covering law, politics, criminology and and social science with first-hand opportunity of experiencing how human rights organisations work in theory and practice. This course addresses the implications of global changes for human rights practitioners.

During the course you investigate contemporary local and global human rights topics, including • gender violence • children as soldiers • radicalisation and counter-terrorism • deaths in custody • refugees and asylum seekers • global security • torture • poverty.

You also gain the experience and skills needed to carry out in-depth case studies on key contemporary challenges to the human rights regime/

A unique opportunity available on this course is being able to take part in the work of the Helena Kennedy Centre for International Justice on a range of practical human rights projects, public events, case reviews, seminars and workshops.

Throughout your studies you develop a range of intellectual, conceptual and practical skills by analysing complex material and communicating the findings in clear, concise and accessible language. These transferable skills help you develop knowledge of human rights in an applied context. This gives you a sound basis for a career in many areas of human rights policy and practice.

You also learn through guest speakers (previous guest speakers include Shami Chakrabarti and Trevor Phillips) how human rights principles are applied in practical situations, to inform responses to a particular social problem. In addition, we have experts working on various human rights projects (such those for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, British Council, United Nations, Amnesty and Clarion Global) providing real world case studies to provide a strong applied flavour to the course.

You can complete a dissertation which can be based on a topic of your choice, enabling you to specialise in an area of interest, or can choose to plan and take part in a project on human rights.

Course structure

Modules

  • human rights in the 21st century
  • principles of human rights and social justice
  • researching human rights
  • project management for human rights
  • dissertation

Assessment

  • essays
  • reports
  • case studies
  • presentations
  • dissertation

Employability

On the course you gain transferable skills and develop knowledge of human rights and social justice theories and practice to prepare you to work with

  • human rights non-governmental organisations (NGOs)
  • local and central government services
  • research and development organisations 


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Gain an LLM with a specialisation in Human Rights. by distance learning. The LLM (Master of Laws) is an internationally recognised postgraduate law degree comparable to an MBA in business and management. Read more

Gain an LLM with a specialisation in Human Rights

by distance learning

The LLM (Master of Laws) is an internationally recognised postgraduate law degree comparable to an MBA in business and management.

Human Rights Law specialism

You can choose to specialise in Human Rights Law, which is one of the most in-demand specialisations within the Postgraduate Laws programme.

The University of London has a worldwide reputation for research and teaching in human rights law. This specialisation enables you to get to grips with the human rights issues confronting governments, international bodies, individuals and corporations. It addresses the promotion and protection of human rights internationally with options on the human rights of women, children and refugees. The important legal frameworks - the United Nations Protection of Human Rights and the European Convention on Human Rights are also covered.

This specialisation in Human Rights Law is ideal for those working in, or wishing to work in, legal practices which focus on areas such as human rights, public law, family law, immigration, housing, employment and business law; in central and local government; in campaigning groups; or for global organisations such as the UN.

Our students value the many benefits of online distance learning

- A study method designed for highly motivated busy professionals so you can study when and where is convenient to you, without any requirement to attend classes, submit course work or undertake dissertations.

- Becoming part of a global online community of other professionals in your field.

- Options to study over 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 years.

- Gaining a world-class qualification from the internationally-renowned University of London while maintaining your professional and personal commitments.

Developed by academics

The LLM from the University of London International Programmes has been developed by academics within Queen Mary and UCL Law departments, both of which have outstanding reputations.

Over 150 years’ experience in providing distance learning programmes

“I chose the programme for its flexibility. At the same time as indulging my interest in criminal law, I could pursue my interest in human rights, for example. The quality of the programme is exceptional. I knew from the offset that it was going to be good; I didn't realise how good it was going to be.”

How you study

The University provides substantial study materials (print and web-based) to improve and aid your study experience. The programme is self-taught and you can study when you choose. Study materials include:

- A comprehensive Skills Guide.

- Textbook(s) provided for each Course and Readers for most modules to direct your reading.

- Study guides especially written and edited for distance learning purposes, usually by the author of the textbook which will be provided. These offer clear learning outcomes, key skills and self-assessment questions throughout. Sample chapters from study guides are available.

- Postgraduate Laws Student Handbook containing information about libraries and bookshops and websites.

- Regulations containing important information, such as details of the courses and specialisations available, syllabuses and assessment.

You also have access to an online student portal containing:

- Extensive online library resources.

- More than 10 legal databases including Lexis/Nexis® and Westlaw®.

- Dedicated discussion forums for each module - you'll encounter all kinds of people with perspectives from many different areas of the globe, including the legal professions, discover new ways of studying and no doubt make new friends.

Course Description

Please visit here for detailed entry requirements.

Contact us

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact our dedicated Student Advice Centre.



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