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Masters Degrees (Refugee)

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This unique course adopts a multi-disciplinary approach to refugee studies and community development and is based at a university with significant refugee communities in its local area in east London. Read more
This unique course adopts a multi-disciplinary approach to refugee studies and community development and is based at a university with significant refugee communities in its local area in east London.

Our approach encompasses politics, international relations, development studies, sociology, anthropology, social policy, psychology and cultural and legal theory.

We examine key issues involving forced migration as well as social, cultural, political and psychosocial aspects of community development with special reference to refugee communities in east London.

What makes our course different is that we focus on the experience of refugees and of refugee communities.
Our course will give you a deep appreciation of refugees’ experiences, achievements and needs.

It will equip you with the knowledge and skills to work in professions relating to counseling, social and community issues, refugee welfare, human rights, and legal representation of refugees.

WHAT YOU WILL STUDY

Forced migrants confront major obstacles in their attempt to find sanctuary. Although the majority of refugees are in countries of the developing world, structures of exclusion are most fully developed in the post-industrial societies, notably in Europe.

Your work will focus on developing an appreciation of refugee experiences, achievements and needs by approaching refugees as social actors.

You will study three core modules: Introduction to forced migration, Refugee studies and community development, and Research methods.

The course also offers you the opportunity to study one specialist option on social, cultural, political, legal and psychosocial aspects of refugee studies and community development.

This will prepare you to begin a dissertation during the summer term for submission in September.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

This course will appeal to professionals and practitioners who are interested in refugees and community development, both locally and internationally.

It will give you the skills and knowledge to play an important role in NGOs, social service departments and local and international charities.

It is particularly suited to people who are professionally concerned with counseling, education, social and community issues and refugee welfare, as well as human rights, the legal representation of refugees.

If you are already working in any of these areas, the course will give you the confidence and experience to apply for more senior positions. If you are looking to enter the field for the first time, it will give you the skills to apply for jobs.

The course also provides the perfect preparation for students who wish to undertake further research in the fields of forced migration and diasporic studies, ethnicity, social, psychosocial and cultural theory, legal studies and social policy.

MODULES

The following are the core and optional requirements for this programme:

Introduction to Forced Migration (Core)
Forced Migration and Community Development (Core)
Research Methods (Core)
Approaches to Public and Community Service(Option)
Current Issues in Forced Migration(Option)
Governance (Option)
International Human Rights (Option)
International Refugee Law (Option)
Migration, Citizenship & Social Policy (Option)
Psycho-Social Perspectives On Forced Migration (Option)
Volunteering, Voluntarism and Voluntary Action (Option)
*University Wide Option (Option)
Dissertation (Core)

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Disaster and refugee health issues are relevant to health professionals working in urban environments, rural and remote areas, and developing countries. Read more

What is disaster and refugee health?

Disaster and refugee health issues are relevant to health professionals working in urban environments, rural and remote areas, and developing countries.

Who is this course for?

A highly-trained team of health care providers is essential in providing a coordinated and informed response to disaster and refugee health issues. This course is for health professionals and graduates looking to develop the skills and knowledge to work in this field.

Course learning outcomes

Graduates of the Graduate Certificate of Disaster and Refugee Health will be able to:
*Integrate and apply a specialised body of theoretical and technical knowledge in the discipline of refugee health, with depth in the political, demographic, epidemiological, organisational and cultural factors in the provision of health care in the emergency phase of humanitarian response to refugee crises
*Integrate and apply a specialised body of theoretical and technical knowledge in the planning and response to disasters across diverse contexts with depth in risk assessment, priorities of care, recovery, resilience, political, ethical, cultural, legal, epidemiological impact, psychological, organisational roles and responsibilities
*Review, analyse, consolidate and synthesise information, data and evidence to devise appropriate strategies to accurately assess the needs and resources required for humanitarian aid provision in emergency refugee situations
*Review, analyse, consolidate and synthesise information, data and evidence to devise appropriate strategies to risk assessment, prioritise response, work with a range of organisations, and deliver care in a disaster context
*Exercise high-level judgment in the design of public health strategies to reduce excess morbidity and mortality in both emergency refugee situations and disasters
*Communicate theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions through advanced literacy and numeracy skills to specialist and non‐specialist audiences
*Demonstrate personal autonomy and accountability for their own future personal and professional development and contribute to the professional development of others, by engaging in critical reflective practice in relation to knowledge, skills and attitudes and their application to disaster and refugee health.

Award title

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE OF DISASTER AND REFUGEE HEALTH (GCertDisasRefugHlth)

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 3a - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*IELTS – 7.0 (no component lower than 6.5), OR
*TOEFL – 577 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 5.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 100 (minimum writing score of 23), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 72

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 3a – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University provides several programs unique to Australia. We have:
*The Anton Breinl Centre for Public Health and Tropical Medicine is one of the leading tropical research facilities in the world
*teaching staff awarded the Australian Learning Teaching Councils’ National Citation for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning
*brand new Mosquito Research Facility
*cutting-edge teaching laboratories.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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Forced migration is a global phenomenon and an area of increasing concern. On this course you will study the multiple factors associated with refugee crises and the economic, political, social, cultural, and environment pressures which lie behind the search for asylum. Read more
Forced migration is a global phenomenon and an area of increasing concern. On this course you will study the multiple factors associated with refugee crises and the economic, political, social, cultural, and environment pressures which lie behind the search for asylum.

One of the major factors that makes our course stand out from others is that we focus on the perspective of the refugee. Forced migrants confront major obstacles in their attempt to find sanctuary.

Although the majority of refugees are in countries of the developing world, structures of exclusion are most fully developed in the post-industrial societies, notably within Europe.

The course highlights problems associated with limitations of asylum rights in the European states and the climate of hostility towards refugees from countries outside Western Europe. It also considers alternative, positive, approaches to asylum rights.

WHAT YOU WILL STUDY

The core modules give you a wide-ranging introduction to forced migration and a detailed study of research methods. You will also have the opportunity to study specialist options on social, cultural, political, legal and psychosocial aspects of refugee studies and community development.

A distinguishing feature of the course is its emphasis on the lived experience of refugees and of refugee communities. You will develop a full appreciation of refugee experiences, achievements and needs.

You will study refugees from the point of view of the law, politics and anthropology and you will analyse their experiences on a global and local scale.

The course looks at how non-governmental organisations and the United Nations work with refugees and also how some people have sought to criminalise them.

The course will equip you with advanced skills in interdisciplinary analysis and research.

You will learn from the first-hand experience of refugees and people who have worked with refugees.

Your studies will focus on two core modules: Introduction to Forced Migration and Research Methods, and two specialist option modules in the area of social, cultural, political, legal and psychosocial aspects of refugee studies and community development. This will prepare you to begin a dissertation during the summer term for submission in September.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

This course is suited to people who are working in areas concerned with human rights, legal representation of refugees, counseling, education, social and community issues and refugee welfare.

If you are already working in this area, the course will give you the confidence and experience to apply for more senior positions.
If you are aiming to enter the field for the first time, it will give you the skills to apply for roles with NGOs, government departments or other organisations working closely with refugees.

Our course will also prepare students who wish to undertake further research in the fields of forced migration and diasporic studies; legal studies; and social policy.

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This masters will develop your critical engagement with the theories and practices of forced migration and development studies. In-depth knowledge of both disciplines is critical to understand and explain the causes and consequences of forced migration. Read more
This masters will develop your critical engagement with the theories and practices of forced migration and development studies. In-depth knowledge of both disciplines is critical to understand and explain the causes and consequences of forced migration.

Taught by internationally recognised members of staff with a range of innovative research experiences, the course is interdisciplinary. It requires the use of theoretical and methodological insights, knowledge and perspectives of different disciplines. This provides opportunities for in-depth understanding and explanation of the problem of Forced Migration and its interface with other social science disciplines, such as development studies, law, sociology, anthropology, political science and psychology.

Starting in both in September and January, this programme aims to develop your critical engagement with the theories and practices of forced migration and development studies. In-depth knowledge of both disciplines is critical to understanding and explaining the causes and consequences of forced migration, analysing, critiquing and evaluating host governments’, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees’ (UNCHR) and NGOs’ policies on protection, assistance, reception and settlement strategies, as well as the short and long-term responses of inter -governmental organisations, such as the World Bank and others.

Throughout the course, you’ll also engage in volunteering. Students have volunteered in different organisations , including the UK Refugee Council, British Red Cross, UNHCR, Chance UK, Naz Project London and Eaves in South London. These organisations provide support, advice and advocacy to asylum-seekers, including women who’ve experienced violence, such as trafficking, prostitution, domestic and sexual violence.

MSc Refugee Studies is led by Professor Gaim Kibreab, an internationally recognised expert on forced migration, resettlement, repatriation and development, conflict, environment, water resources governance, post-conflict reconstruction, gender and development, livelihoods, governance and civil society.

Modules

International Refugee Law
Asylum policy in the EU and Member States
Forced Migration and Human Rights
Forced Migration and Development
Contemporary Issues in Development
Research methods for development
Dissertation (triple module)

Study hours

Year 1 class contact time is typically 16 hours per week plus individual tutorial time and independent study. This accumulates to typically two days and two evenings a week.

Assessment

All modules apart from the dissertation are assessed by 5,000 word pieces of coursework.

Employability

The aims and outcomes of this course are designed to develop your knowledge and skills that are relevant to working with forced migrants, including asylum-seekers, refugees, IDPs, oustees and other categories of forced migrants and also for working in refugee-producing and hosting countries world-wide, inter-governmental organisations, such as the UNHCR, non-governmental orgisations, immigration lawyers, lobbying and advocacy groups. The Home Office and immigration authorities in the EU and member states are potential employers of our graduates.

Previous students have entered careers in many fields working for international organisations such as the United Nations and its constituent organisations. Through our pool of visiting lecturers and practitioners, the MSc Refugee Studies networks with activists, academics and practitioners. These networks provide students an opportunity not only to learn about job opportunities but also establish contacts that may prove to be useful in search of employment opportunities. Students’ employability is enhanced by developing their transferable and problem-solving analytical and evaluative skills. Some graduates of the MSc Refugee Studies have established their own NGOs and are serving asylum-seekers, refugees and internally displaced persons in their countries of origin.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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Gain a prestigious MA in Refugee Protection & Forced Migration Studies. by distance learning. The MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies provides a rigorous theoretical and practical understanding of the field of international refugee law and forced migration. Read more

Gain a prestigious MA in Refugee Protection & Forced Migration Studies

by distance learning

The MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies provides a rigorous theoretical and practical understanding of the field of international refugee law and forced migration. It is unique in being the only programme of its type offered by distance learning.

An introduction

The MA degree will enable you to acquire a solid legal, practical and theoretical understanding of refugee protection and forced migration, developing expertise through a choice of elective modules. You will hone your self-reliance in dealing with - and critiquing - law, policy and practice in the field, and will also learn how to gather, organise and deploy evidence to form balanced judgements and develop policy recommendations.

Who is the course for?

This Masters is relevant to those who already work in the area, for whom a Masters qualification would enable them to progress to higher level work within the sector, whether in multilaterals, governments or NGOs.

It will also appeal to people hoping to establish themselves in the sector - these could be people making a career change or those at an early stage of their careers.

It is also relevant to sector professionals, to provide a deeper understanding of the issues facing refugees and refugee aid organisations.

We are hoping to create a virtual meeting place for students, academics and practitioners from all parts of the globe.

How will the course benefit me?

The programme is designed to develop both academic and vocational skills and experience.

It will enable you not only to think constructively about related policy and law, but to develop actual policy recommendations.

The 'practice based' module provides the opportunity to explore of some of the key vocational aspects relevant to the sector including topics such as advocacy, campaigning, fundraising, policy, law and communications. You can then choose to focus on a specific area for your examined piece of work. In the case of fundraising, for example, you could submit a funding bid that will be assessed by a tutor with significant practical experience in the grants and trusts sector.

Other modules on the course focus on asylum law and policy in specific regions of the world, such as Latin America and Africa or the European Union, whilst others focus on specific thematic issues such as statelessness, internal displacement, healthcare, gender and sexual identity.

Overall the course seeking to provide students with a solid legal, practical and theoretical understanding of refugee protection and forced migration.

How you study

You study this online programme wherever you are in the world and access the course content through a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). The VLE also gives you access to:

- Associate Tutors who provide expert academic guidance throughout your studies

- academically rigorous and up-to-date learning materials and resources

- online tasks and assessments ('e-tivities') plus seen examinations for each of the modules

- peer to peer learning in online discussion forums

- world-class online library facilities.

Ask a question

To ask a question about this programme, please contact out Student Advice Centre using this form.



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Do you or are you looking to work with refugees, asylum seekers or other displaced groups of people? How can you care for these people more effectively? How can therapeutic dimensions of care and psychosocial perspectives help to understand the multi-dimensional complexities of the refugee experience?. Read more
Do you or are you looking to work with refugees, asylum seekers or other displaced groups of people? How can you care for these people more effectively? How can therapeutic dimensions of care and psychosocial perspectives help to understand the multi-dimensional complexities of the refugee experience?

The multidisciplinary expertise of our university and the therapeutic professionalism of the Tavistock Centre combine to bring you this innovative twin-site Masters (two modules are taught at the Tavistock Centre in London and two modules at our Colchester campus) in the study of refugee care.

The central focus of our MA Refugee Care is to introduce a therapeutic dimension and a psychosocial perspective to working with this group of people, and is the only postgraduate course to offer a combination of modules with this emphasis, making a clear distinction between being therapeutic in working with refugees, instead of offering psychotherapy to them.

The course includes a thoughtful combination of practical and experiential elements, such as placements and institutional observations, to support a sound theoretical framework to understand the complexities of the refugee experience, such as family and societal factors, interactions with various services, institutions and organisations, and the inter-personal dynamics involved between refugees and their workers.

Our course is offered one year full-time, two years part-time or modular (up to five years), and teaching is for 25 weeks (over two and a half terms from October to mid-May). It is also possible to apply for a doctoral programme in refugee care, completing this MA first (without the dissertation) and then continuing to work on your PhD thesis (for an additional two years full-time or four years part-time).

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The LLM in Immigration Law will provide you with the opportunity to study legal responses to the global phenomenon of immigration at international, supranational and domestic levels and to understand the rationale and operation of the law in context. Read more

Overview

The LLM in Immigration Law will provide you with the opportunity to study legal responses to the global phenomenon of immigration at international, supranational and domestic levels and to understand the rationale and operation of the law in context.

This Master of Laws programme offers a comprehensive overview of the major legal and theoretical issues concerning immigration law and policy from a domestic, comparative, European and international perspective. Modules include international migration and refugee law, European migration law, comparative immigration law, cultural diversity and the law, and migration and security. This LLM is unique globally as it is taught by leading academics in the field and you will be exposed to insights from legal practitioners, international organisations and NGOs.

The East End of London is a historic site of migration and displays the interplay between migration and human rights, on the one hand, and migration and security, on the other hand, as well as the transnational nature of the phenomenon of human mobility across borders in a globalised world. The programme adds to the existing expertise offered by the School of Law in human rights, public law, legal theory, and public international law. Our academics are engaged in leading research into the areas covered within the programme.

This programme will:
◦Allow you to gain the most up to date knowledge of developments in the area of international and comparative immigration and refugee law.
◦Deliver knowledge and analysis of a range of concerns of relevance to professional communities involved in the field.
◦Enable you to understand the formal legal dimensions of your subjects as well as the more contextual political, historical and socio-legal dimensions.
◦Give you exposure to an array of experts who have research as well as policy led focus on the issues at stake.

Modules:

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Immigration Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.

◦ QLLM100 EU Immigration Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM170 Cultural Diversity and Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM172 Comparative Immigration and Nationality Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM174 Migration, Security and Human Rights (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM176 International Refugee Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM177 International Migration Law (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM193 Free Movement of Persons in the European Union (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM321 Ethics of Migration and Asylum (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)

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With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students. The LLM International Human Rights and Development offers a mixture of international human rights law, development studies and refugee studies modules. Read more
With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students.

The LLM International Human Rights and Development offers a mixture of international human rights law, development studies and refugee studies modules. You'll explore contemporary debates in the context of specific countries and themes.

You'll gain knowledge of the protection of international human rights within the context of international development and refugee practice and the role of a rights-based approach to international development practice.

Events

The Law Department hosts annual events such as updates on Human Rights delivered by our Visiting Professors, Sir Geoffrey Bindman, Joel Bennthan QC and Imran Khan. We also host the Young Legal Aid Lawyers Question Time and occasional events such as our recent inter-professional conference – Responding to Rape, and meetings and seminars for Burmese human rights campaigners.

Modules

Core Modules:

Images of development
Research methods
International law and human rights
International law in the developing world
Dissertation

Optional Modules:

International business, trade and less developed countries
International humanitarian law
Forced migration and resettlement
International refugee law
Case management
Advocacy
International criminal law
Forced migration in developing societies

Teaching and learning

The LSBU Law Department has a strong set of experts, consultants and international advisors in the field of Human Rights and hosts a number of annual events and conferences.

Head of the Law Department, Andy Unger, has worked as a consultant in former communist countries such as Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus and Georgia. In the South Caucuses, his most recent working has been with the British East-West Centre, designing and supervising the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office funded projects offering human rights training to lawyers and justice officials in the region.

Senior Lecturer in Law Caron Thatcher has observed elections in many parts of the former Soviet Union including Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Kyrgyzstan and also in Russia itself and monitoring the final election of Mr. Putin in 2004.

Professional links

Through our growing pool of visiting fellows and professors, the Law Department has developed a strong network of contacts with leading law practitioners in the UK. Many members of the Law Department are practitioners, or retain strong links with the legal profession. We enjoy strong links with a number of leading European Law Faculties, including Universitie Cergy Pontoise in France, INHOLLAND University in the Netherlands and Zagreb University in Croatia.

Employability

You'll graduate with the necessary knowledge and skills to work in the fields of law, human rights and development (either in the UK or abroad) as advisors, experts, researchers and policy makers.

With a background in law, you might practise in human rights, immigration and asylum, and public law.

With a development studies background you might go on to practice in the NGO sector employing a rights-based approach to development.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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Migration is increasingly a high-priority issue for governments and organisations around the world. Explore the social, economic and political drivers and consequences of forced and voluntary migration. Read more

Migration is increasingly a high-priority issue for governments and organisations around the world. Explore the social, economic and political drivers and consequences of forced and voluntary migration.

Drawing on several disciplines, including political science, geography and history, you'll discover why and how migration happens and gain an in-depth understanding of the challenges and opportunities it creates. You can choose to examine topics such as the refugee crisis in Europe, labour migration, multiculturalism and immigration as an election issue.

Learning across disciplines

You'll not only gain an in-depth understanding of migration issues, you'll develop your critical thinking, communications and research skills.

If you're a Master's student, you may have the opportunity to do an internship with an organisation involved in migration policy, research or practice. Or you can choose to complete a 60-point research project instead. Take the opportunity to contribute your own perspectives to the study of migration.

Qualification family structure

The Master of Migration is part of a tiered family of qualifications:

  • Master of Migration Studies
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Migration Studies
  • Postgraduate Certificate in Migration Studies

Choose the qualification that suits your career goals, time constraints and financial situation.

Staircasing allows movement in both directions—if you begin by enrolling in the Certificate or Diploma programme you can continue on to complete your Master's. Or if you enrol in the Master's but can't complete it, for whatever reason, you may be awarded the Certificate or Diploma.

What you'll study

The Master of Migration is divided into Part 1 and Part 2.

In Part 1 you'll complete four 30-point courses and you'll have some choice in what you study. In the core course—Approaches to Migration Studies POLS 488—you'll examine how migration is analysed, study the main concepts, theories and debates and prepare a research proposal. In your elective courses you might focus on a particular historical migration flow, explore the challenges of refugee resettlement in New Zealand, study the international or domestic politics of migration or choose to complete an individual research project.

In the second half of your studies, or Part 2, you'll complete a 60-point research essay that builds on your research proposal in Part 1 of the programme. Alternatively, you may have the opportunity to complete an internship and research at a workplace involved in migration.

If you're doing the Diploma, you'll complete Part 1 of the Master's.

Certificate students complete the core course in Part 1 and choose one further course from the MMigS programme.

How you'll learn

For most of your courses you'll attend one three-hour seminar each week that will include classroom discussions and sometimes student presentations.

You'll also complete your own self-directed research under the guidance of your supervisor. You'll meet with them regularly to discuss your progress.

Duration and workload

The MMigS can be completed in one calendar year of full-time study, or in two years part time. You'll need to finish the degree within three years of enrolling.

The PGDipMigS takes two trimesters of full-time study or can be studied over four trimesters part time.

You can complete the PGCertMigS in one trimester, or over two trimesters part time.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

In the heart of it

In the capital city of Wellington, you'll be at the centre of immigration policy and decision-making. Take advantage of Victoria's links with national organisations that deal with migration such as the Office of Ethnic Communities, the Asia New Zealand Foundation and Immigration New Zealand.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues.

You'll have opportunities to attend events, workshops, social functions and seminars such as the Student Learning Postgraduate Seminars skills sessions.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can give you information and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

People with an in-depth knowledge of migration issues are increasingly in demand in governments, NGOs, media and research organisations. You'll be able to apply your understanding of migration in a wide range of professions such as policy analysis, research, international development, community development and refugee resettlement.



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City's MSc in Health Policy helps you understand, navigate and influence the 21st century health and health care environment. City’s MSc Health Policy is the ideal route for graduates looking to start, change or develop their career within the health policy field. Read more
City's MSc in Health Policy helps you understand, navigate and influence the 21st century health and health care environment.

Who is it for?

City’s MSc Health Policy is the ideal route for graduates looking to start, change or develop their career within the health policy field. It combines an international focus and academic rigour with the development of practical, transferable skills that can be applied in a wide range of real-world health policy, planning and management settings.

We welcome applications from graduates (UK or international) from any academic discipline. The course is also suitable for established professionals from a wide range of backgrounds, including:
-Medical, nursing and allied health professions
-Health management and administration
-Public health
-National and local government
-National NGOs
-International agencies
-Research institutions and consultancies
-Pharmaceutical, insurance and other health-related industries.

Objectives

Health and health care policy are at the top of the political agenda around the world. People are living longer, consumers are expecting more from their health services and chronic illnesses are becoming prevalent. Medical technology is advancing rapidly, creating ever-increasing demand for the latest treatments.

Health policy affects and is affected by all of these factors. It aims to meet the growing challenges facing health systems by providing answers to such questions as:
-How can we best meet people’s changing health needs?
-How can we control spiralling health costs, while maintaining high quality and comprehensive health services?
-What is the most effective way of organising and paying for health care?
-How can we tackle inequalities in health and access to care?
-How can we measure and improve the performance of health systems?

City’s MSc in Health Policy gives you the knowledge and tools you need to understand, analyse and influence the health policy process, and to operate within an increasingly complex policy environment.

You will analyse the social, political and economic factors that affect policy at a local, national and international level. You will explore how and where policy is made, and who the key players are; and learn how to present your ideas clearly and persuasively to a range of influential stakeholders to bring about change.

Placements

You have the opportunity to do a placement, but it is not a formal requirement of the course. We encourage you to create your own. One recent student worked within the refugee camp in Calais alongside the NGO Doctors of the World as part of her dissertation research on refugee access to health care.

Academic facilities

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

You will learn through a mix of lectures, class discussions and seminars, student presentations, case study analysis, interactive computer-based exercises, a virtual learning environment (Moodle) and self-directed reading.

Lecturers are drawn from City's Schools of Health Sciences and Arts and Social Sciences. A number of distinguished external honorary and guest lecturers have also taught on the programme, including:
-Professor David Oliver (President of the British Geriatrics Society, former National Clinical Director for Older People at the Department of Health, and Visiting Fellow at the King's Fund)
-Professor Paul Burstow (Chair of the Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust, and Minister of State for Care Services in the Coalition Government, 2010-12)
-Brigadier Tim Hodgetts CBE (Medical Director, Defence Medical Services, and former Medical Director, NATO Allied Rapid Reaction Corps)
-Beccy Baird (Fellow in Health Policy, the King's Fund)

City has an international reputation for academic excellence in the areas of health and food policy, health services research, health management, health economics and executive leadership across a broad range of professional disciplines. You will learn from and alongside colleagues who aim to influence health policy and lead health-related initiatives.

Modules are assessed through a combination of written coursework, group work and examination. The assessments reflect the learning objectives of the modules.

Modules

You will take five core taught modules, which cover the main topics and issues within health policy, the health policy process, the principles of policy analysis, and research methods.

You will also choose two or three further elective modules covering a range of related areas, including public health, global health and health management and leadership.

Core modules
-HPM001 The health policy process, politics and power
-PHM004 Social determinants of health
-HPM004 International health systems
-HPM006 Health economics
-HRM020 Foundations in research methods and data analysis*

Elective modules
-HRM001 Introduction to research methods and applied data analysis*
-HPM003 Health policy in Britain
-PHM001 Public health**
-PHM003 Global health**
-HMM002 Strategic management in healthcare†
-HMM008 Health innovation and change†
-HMM026 Finance and enterprise performance†
-HMM022 Management and leadership in healthcare†
-HMM025 Economic evaluation and pharma†
-APM006 Contemporary issues in mental health
-APM017 Engaging technology
-FPM001 Food and public policy

*The core module HRM020 covers basic research skills and enables you to perform entry-level statistics. It forms the first part of the 30-credit module HRM001 Introduction to research methods and applied data analysis, which goes on to cover more advanced research skills. If you choose to take HRM001, this will replace the core module HRM020.

**A maximum of one public health module (PHM001 or PHM003) may be chosen as an elective.

†A maximum of two health management (HMM) modules may be chosen as electives. Depending on module capacity, it may only be possible to take one HMM module.

Dissertation - you will also write a final health policy-related dissertation, on a topic of your choice, of between 12,000 and 15,000 words.

Career prospects

Because health and health care are such high priorities for both the public and policy makers, health policy specialists will continue to be in high demand. Therefore, if you are working or want to work within any health-related organisation in the public, private or third sectors, this course will help you develop the key transferable skills you need to succeed.

Graduates of the MSc Health Policy have gone on to a variety of policy, campaigning/advocacy and research roles within the public sector such as:
-The NHS and international ministries of health.
-NGOs and third-sector organisations including the Patients Association and a number of professional associations.
-The private sector such as consultancy, corporate communications and pharmaceutical companies.

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Our MA in Middle Eastern Studies provides expert research-led teaching in the politics, anthropology and sociology of the modern Middle East and North Africa. Read more

Our MA in Middle Eastern Studies provides expert research-led teaching in the politics, anthropology and sociology of the modern Middle East and North Africa. We offer a broad choice of modules that allow you to pursue your own interests and deepen your understanding and knowledge of one of the most contested and important regions in the world today. We offer a broad choice of modules that allow you to pursue your own interests and deepen your understanding and knowledge of specific topics.

Key benefits

  • Additional academic development, mentoring, and time to develop your intellectual interests.
  • Wide range of optional modules taught by world leading scholars in modern Middle Eastern Studies.
  • Engagement with leading practitioners, including from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, the British Council, the media, civil society organisations.
  • Exposure to latest debates through regular public lectures organised by the department and its research clusters.
  • Opportunity to study Arabic, Turkish, Farsi or Hebrew through King’s Modern Language Centre.
  • Skills workshops with professionals working on the region to enhance employment opportunities.
  • Strong intellectual and methodological foundations for further research.
  • Opportunity to develop communication skills by presenting and disseminating research in written and oral forms to classmates, tutors, and the wider academic community.

Description

Our course will introduce you to cutting-edge debates in the social sciences as they relate to the politics and society of the modern Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Our world-leading faculty have extensive experience of conducting research in the region and the course regularly attracts a dynamic student body who have lived and worked in the MENA. This diversity will expose you to new perspectives, and prepare you for a career specialising in the region.

In addition to the expertise that our Department offers, you can draw on the knowledge of a number of departments across King’s, including International Development, Political Economy, European and International Studies, War Studies, History, Theology & Religious Studies and the Russia Institute.

If you are interested in developing your knowledge of the main political, socio-economic and cultural trends in the Middle East, from the legacies of colonialism and continuing international interventions, to the dynamics of political contention over state legitimacy, citizen rights and everyday survival, to the challenges thrown up by the Syrian refugee crisis, then our course is ideal for you.

Course purpose

Our course aims to provide students with an overview of the key debates and issues in regional politics and society, using concepts and theories from social science – from the legacies of colonialism to the ongoing refugee crisis. The emphasis is on familiarising students with a wide range of social and political phenomena in preparation for the optional modules and the MA dissertation.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

For every 20-credit module, we will provide you with two hours of teaching a week during term time, and we expect you to undertake 180 hours of independent study. For your dissertation, we will provide you with 24 hours of methodology training, spread over two terms. You will also undertake 580 hours of independent study.

Taught modules: Full-time students can typically expect six hours of lectures/seminars per week and part-time students can expect four hours of lectures/seminars per week in the first year and two hours of lecture/seminar per week in the second year, plus the dissertation methods course and the dissertation module. 

Dissertation module: You can typically expect 12-sessions worth of the Research Methods course and four contact hours of consultation with a supervisor. 

For self study, the approximate workload for a 20-credit module taught by Middle Eastern Studies is 20 hours of lectures and seminars and 180 hours of self-guided learning. For the dissertation (60 credits), you can expect 580 hours self-study and project work

As part of the two-year schedule, part-time students would usually aim to take the required taught module and two optional modules in Year 1, and two optional modules and the Dissertation module (including the Research Methods course) in Year 2.

Assessment

We assess The Politics of the Contemporary Middle East through essay and class participation. We assess our optional modules through essays and, at the discretion of the mosdule convener, through class participation.

Career prospects

The skills and knowledge which you develop through our course will enhance your employability in an increasingly important field. We will support you in finding work through our excellent career service, and the Department of Middle Eastern Studies hosts its own careers fair. Our students go on to pursue careers at the United Nations, European Union, diplomatic services, journalism, government and a wide variety of different NGOs, or further research in our PhD programme.



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Under which circumstances do immigrants have the right to family reunification in the country of their preference? What are the European Union’s obligations… Read more
Under which circumstances do immigrants have the right to family reunification in the country of their preference? What are the European Union’s obligations under international human rights treaties when dealing with, for example, the refugee-boat problem? And what is the role of Brussels in managing migration within the EU as well as towards Europe? This is a sample of the issues that are dealt with in the Master’s specialisation in Human Rights and Migration.

This specialisation studies legal issues relating to migration and human rights in its theoretical, operational, social and political context. The basis of the programme lies in European legislation and international human rights treaties. This is a lively field of law that constantly develops and changes. Changes in public opinion in a European member state may affect its domestic legal order, which in turn influences European laws and vice versa. This specialisation therefore also focuses on the dynamic interplay between national, European and international law, as well as on the ins and outs of the EU lawmaking process.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/europeanlaw/humanrights

Why study Human Rights and Migration at Radboud University?

- This specialisation focuses on issues of freedom of movement and immigration within the European Union; asylum and immigration appeals and remedies; as well as international human rights law.

- The Netherlands has a long-standing tradition in the field of refugee law and international human rights and with the presence of the International Court of Justice in The Hague, it’s a great country for studying this field of law.

- The staff that teaches students of this Master’s specialisation are recognised experts in the field, who have published widely in the field of European free movement of persons, asylum and immigration, European and international law and international human rights.

- You’ll study at a Law School that is rated number one in the Netherlands for student satisfaction.

- The Faculty of Law in Nijmegen was the first in the Netherlands to set up a dedicated European Law programme. It has built an international reputation in the field of European law, immigration law and private law, and is part of a large network that includes more than fifty universities in Europe, the United States, Asia and Australia.

- The international mix of students gives the classes and project work a multicultural touch. This will give you the extra benefit of gaining multicultural communication skills as well as a multitude of legal and cultural perspectives in this field. By the time you receive your Master's diploma, you’ll have gained excellent skills to work in the Netherlands or in any other country.

- Students of Radboud University regularly take part in international and European Law Moot Court competitions, enabling you to put academic theory into legal practise during your studies.

- You have the option of going abroad, either for an internship or to follow additional courses as an exchange student at our academic partner institutions. This adds to your personal international experience as well as increasing your knowledge further. Our professors have a good network, and are willing to assist you in finding a position that meets your interests.

Career prospects

Graduates of this specialisation are well-qualified to take up positions in law, lobbying or consulting firms anywhere in the world. As the name of the Master’s implies, your area of expertise will be in the legal field of human rights and migration, and specifically where it applies to citizens dealing with the European Union. You’ll also have a thorough, general understanding of the internal and external markets of the European Union and the position of Europe in the world.

- Prospective employers
Prospective employers interested in your expertise include NGOs, governmental organisations including the Immigration and Naturalisation Service, and international organisations such as the European Commission, the United Nations, international courts and tribunals, lobby organisations, councils for refugees and charity foundations. There are also a number of commercial businesses with a need for legal experts with knowledge of free movement of persons in the European Union.

Our approach to this field

At Radboud University, we strive for clear practical relevance of academic knowledge.
1. Many of our lecturers are also law practitioners. We can therefore not only teach our students the black letter law, but also add our own professional experiences, indicating the strengths and challenges of certain rules, legal instruments or strategies.

2. Guest speakers are regularly invited to share their experiences, enlightening students with real-world scenarios, and providing them with tips on how to deal with cases that don’t follow the official norms.

3. In our research we are engaged in collaborative ventures in this field, such as international and European courts and tribunals as well as NGOs and councils. Therefore, we are informed of the issues that practitioners deal with in their regular work. We respond to their questions by developing research that is relevant.

4. In the Master’s programme in European Law we focus on the law in force, and in accordance with the approach of professionals, focus on justifying decisions in legal terms, in reference to legal rules, principles, and precedents. However, we don’t shy away from critically analysing those rules, principles and precedents, indicating possible alternatives and desired improvements where necessary.


See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/europeanlaw/humanrights

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Developing an eye for the diversity in backgrounds and for the difference in treatments and policies these diversities require. Girls discuss the same problems differently to boys. Read more
Developing an eye for the diversity in backgrounds and for the difference in treatments and policies these diversities require.
Girls discuss the same problems differently to boys. Immigrants frequently exhibit pathology different to natives. How can this be? And how do you deal with this? This Master’s specialisation focuses on the diversities in youth care. Diversities in the area of ethnicity, religion, gender and social-economic class. You will develop an eye for the diversity in backgrounds and for the difference in treatments and policies these diversities require.
The Master’s specialisation in Diversities in Youth Care challenges you to look differently at care giving and welfare policies. You will gain specific knowledge and develop a sixth sense on the health care needs of young people. You will broaden your vision. How come fewer immigrants accept (certain forms of) help? How can you make homosexuality a subject of discussion in certain cultures? You will look beyond your own values and differentiate between your own ethical beliefs and cultural values and universal beliefs.
Upon graduating you will be an expert in the area of diversities in youth care. Besides plenty of knowledge, skills and – if you want – experience abroad, you will have a dose of cultural relativism. Why do we do it like that? How could we do it differently? You can use this in your work as remedial educationalist or policy maker. After graduating you will be able to work in and outside of the Netherlands at (development) organisations and institutions in the fields of youth care, education, adoption and refugee relief.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/youthcare

Why study Diversities in Youth Care at Radboud University?

- You may pick electives from different Master’s programmes like Religious Studies, Cultural Anthropology and Management Science. These electives fit in well with the programme Diversities in Youth Care. More information can be found on the programme outline page.

- There is plenty of opportunity to go abroad for an elective or an internship. Our network includes a university and relief organisations in Bangladesh, foster homes and orphanages in Romania and the Ukraine and schools in several African countries.

- Radboud University has the only education and research institute in the Netherlands within the field of social sciences which specialises in gender and sexuality: Institute for Gender Studies (IGS). This means you will have access to the latest and most relevant research.

- The programme collaborates with the knowledge centre Sekse en Diversiteit in Medisch Onderwijs (SDMO) (i.e. Gender and Diversity in Medical Education) of Radboudumc. We exchange case studies and give one another guest lectures. You will profit from this exchange of knowledge!

Change perspective

This programme will continually challenge you to adjust your point of view. To look beyond your own values. What is the dividing line between your ethical beliefs and those of the other people? And at what point have universal values been seriously affected?
You are taught to look at it from the point of view of a child growing up in poverty, of a homosexual youth, of someone with a Moroccan father and a Dutch mother, of a child living in a reconstituted family or in a family with strong religious beliefs. You are taught to continually look at issues from someone else’s perspective. In other words, to be flexible when it comes to making judgements and having expectations. Changing your perspective is the very core of this programme.

Career prospects

Upon completing this Master’s specialisation, you will be an expert in youth care concerning diverse backgrounds and personal traits. There is a large need for professionals who know how to deal with homosexual immigrants, with children who don’t speak the local language or youths that have been traumatised by war. Such knowledge and experience are gained in this programme. You will have a flexible view of diverse backgrounds and be critical of your own area of expertise. After graduating you will be a remedial educationalist or policy maker with an expertise that organisations are desperately in need of!

Job positions

As a professional in Diversities in Youth Care you can work in and outside of the Netherlands in the area of youth care and development. You can work as a policy maker or researcher in organisations as Unicef, adoption agencies, the EU, local governments or research institutions. You can also work as a remedial educationalist for mental health care organisations, refugee centres or with specific groups of children like refugees or LGBT children.

Our approach to this field

The political and media interest for problems regarding ethnicity, gender and sexuality is huge. How do you deal with it? How do you develop policies? This requires specialist knowledge. Knowledge that goes beyond the borders of a country, a culture and a set of beliefs. The Dutch have a very individualistic approach to happiness while other cultures believe that a happy family unit is more important for one’s own happiness. You will not learn what is wrong and what is right, but how things can be different. This will ensure that the policies you will develop will also be different.

The Master’s specialisation in Diversities in Youth Care will train you to become a specialised caregiver. The programme focuses on social issues in the area of diversity. You can develop a clinical or policymaking approach within youth care and diversities of youth. After graduating you will have knowledge on the role of different backgrounds. Whether it’s about culture, religion or gender, you will be flexible enough to identify various problems and to judge and treat them from the right perspective.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/youthcare

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This new LLM is the only programme of its kind to teach core legal courses from a distinctly transnational perspective. Read more

This new LLM is the only programme of its kind to teach core legal courses from a distinctly transnational perspective. With the globalisation of law at its centre, it prepares graduates for a career in a fast-changing global context, teaching competence to analyse complex legal problems through solid legal doctrine, training in transnational legal cultures, lawyerly practice, legal theory, and law’s global socio-economics.

Key benefits

  • Taught by world leaders in their fields with a strong emphasis on rigorous analysis combined with ‘thinking outside the box’.
  • A foundational core module on ‘Transnational Law and Global Governance’ and a ‘Transnational Law Colloquium’ featuring intensive interaction with experts from legal London and global practice and academia.
  • Covering key areas in public law from a transnational law perspective, including human rights, development, refugee law, criminal law, policing & security and the interplay between domestic and international organizations.
  • Covering key areas in transnational private law, including corporate governance, corporate restructuring, commercial arbitration, labour law, business & human rights, and family law.
  • Modules will investigate through an inter-disciplinary lens the co-existence of different normative orders and discuss issues of jurisdiction, legal pluralism, indigenous law and the tension between ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ law with a view to addressing urgent transnational legal problems of poverty, climate change, financial governance and post-conflict justice.

 Description

The pathway will feature a foundational core module on ‘transnational law and global governance’ and a ‘transnational law colloquium’ featuring intensive interaction with experts from legal London and global practice and academia. 

It will cover key areas in public law from a transnational law perspective, including human rights, development, refugee law, criminal law, policing & security and the interplay between domestic and international organizations. 

With view to transnational private law, it covers corporate governance, corporate restructuring, commercial arbitration, labour law, business & human rights, and family law. It will also offer a module in transnational legal theory and legal sociology, 'film and transnational law' as well as a module on law's treatment of global piracy.

The leader of this pathway is Professor Peer Zumbansen.

Course purpose

This new pathway provides an in-depth engagement with core areas of transnational law today, it offers an unprecedented opportunity for students preparing for a career in global private practice, as in-house counsel or international public service, the non-profit sector or an international organisation or with adjudicatory bodies, agencies and networks.

Course format and assessment

In the first and second semester you study your selection of taught modules (half and full). These are in most cases assessed in the third semester (May/June) by written examination, or in some cases by the submission of an assessed essay. 

Please see further details for each individual module in the LLM module list that can be found by clicking here

Dissertation or research essays must be submitted in September, after the May/June examinations.

Career destinations

In a competitive world we can give you the competitive edge to take your career to the next level. That’s why you’ll find our LLM programme is supplemented by opportunities to develop your skills and professional networks.

The result is that students are presented with a wide range of employment destinations when they leave; from positions at the European Central Bank, European Commission and UN to commercial roles as investment bank analysts, tax or public affairs advisers, as well as careers in the legal profession; accountancy; management consultancy; human rights organisations and other voluntary bodies; academia.



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This programme examines global migrations and social justice by addressing questions such as who moves and why, who is allowed to settle and where, what are the roles of states, institutions and civil societies in these processes. Read more
This programme examines global migrations and social justice by addressing questions such as who moves and why, who is allowed to settle and where, what are the roles of states, institutions and civil societies in these processes. It provides advanced training in social science research methodology to fulfil Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC) postgraduate research training requirements.

[[Why this programme}}

● The programme draws on recognised expertise in migration studies, sociology, anthropology, history, criminology, human geography, policy and politics and ethics as well as a wide variety of country and regional expertise.

● You will get access to cutting-edge academic research on migration with an emphasis on social justice and learning from non-academic work in this area.

● You will be taught research methods by expert staff from a wide range of disciplines, allowing you to benefit from specialist knowledge and methodology.

● The programme is supported through GRAMNet, the University of Glasgow’s internationally recognised research network for Refugees, Asylum and Migration in Scotland. You will benefit from the provisions offered by GRAMNet, such as training, seminars, opportunities for knowledge exchange and spaces for dissemination.

● The programme is the only Masters programme in Scotland with a focus on migration studies and social justice.

● This degree is taught jointly with the MSc Global Migrations & Social Justice, which has a stronger focus on the subject, with less emphasis on research methods.

Programme structure

You will take five core and one optional course as well as complete a dissertation or a practical project.

Core courses

• Global migrations: Histories, structures, experiences.
• Public social science for social justice
• Research design
• Qualitative methods
• Quantitative data analysis.

Optional courses

• Access, equity, health
• Century of the refugee: refugees and statelessness in comparative perspective, 1900-2000
• Immigration and asylum law
• Migration, mobility and settlement: Post-Soviet Migrations
• Migration, mobility and settlement: Central and East European migration to the UK and Scotland
• Racism and modernity
• Texts for diversity: language across learning for children with English as an additional language.
• Some courses might not be available every year. You may also be able to choose from courses in the other subjects in the School of • Social & Political Sciences.

Resources and facilities

In addition to a long history of large communities of migrants setting in the city Glasgow is host to the UK’s largest population of refugees and asylum seekers under dispersal policy. Across the city there is a large number of organisations working with migrants, refugees and asylum seekers in a variety of ways. Within this distinctive context, GRAMNet - the University of Glasgow’s internationally renowned Glasgow Refugee Asylum and Migration Network - brings together researchers, practitioners, NGOs and policy makers with a focus on examining the social and cultural effects of migration. At its heart is a focus on social and intercultural values, social justice and critical engagement with questions around migration. The network’s reputation for developing and applying innovative participatory methodologies to address complex questions is internationally renowned.

For

Background and Aims

please check out the website http://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/globalmigrationssocialjusticemres/#/backgroundandaims

[[Career Prospects ]]
http://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/globalmigrationssocialjusticemres/#/careerprospects

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