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The course is designed to give you the ability to use and collect biological records and subject them to critical analysis. In Year 1, you will study the compulsory unit Managing Biological Records, which runs over four weekends from October to January with each weekend running from Friday evening to Sunday at 4.00pm. Read more

Description

The course is designed to give you the ability to use and collect biological records and subject them to critical analysis.

In Year 1, you will study the compulsory unit Managing Biological Records, which runs over four weekends from October to January with each weekend running from Friday evening to Sunday at 4.00pm. This is based at Preston Montford Field Centre near Shrewsbury.

In the spring and summer you can choose from a number of field-based units, each of which takes place over a long (three day) weekend running from Friday evening to Monday at 4.00pm. If you stop after successful completion of these units, you will be awarded the Postgraduate Certificate in Biological Recording.

The second year follows a very similar pattern, with the compulsory unit being Research Methods in Biological Recording over four winter weekends, then three more spring and summer units. If you stop after successful completion of these units, you will be awarded the Postgraduate Diploma in Biological Recording. Successful completion of a dissertation will then result in the MSc degree.

Core Units - Year 1

- Managing Biological Recording

Option Units - Year 1

- Identifying Difficult Invertebrate Groups
- Identifying Bryophytes for Recording and Conservation
- Identifying Difficult Higher Plant Groups
- Bird Survey Techniques
- Identification and Survey Techniques
- Site Assessments Using Vegetation and Invertebrates

Core Units - Year 2

- Research Methods in Biological Recording

Option Units - Year 2

The following Year 1 option units are also available in Year 2:
- Identifying Difficult Invertebrate Groups
- Identifying Bryophytes for Recording and Conservation
- Identifying Difficult Higher Plant Groups
- Bird Survey Techniques
- Identification and Survey Techniques
- Site Assessment using Vegetation and Invertebrates

The following option units are available only in Year 2:
- Site Assessment using Invertebrates
- Site Assessment using Vegetation

Core Units - Year 3

- Masters Project

Study pattern

All assessment is continuous there are some essays, presentations, practical assignments such as collection and preparation of voucher specimens, construction of identification keys, site evaluations, identification tests, production of posters and mock journal papers, all of which test your knowledge and critical understanding of biological recording theory and practice.

Career prospects

Our students have an excellent record of promotion and recruitment to jobs in ecology and biological recording, especially those with an emphasis on high quality field skills and record interpretation.

Careers support is available from the moment you join us, throughout your time here, and for up to three years after the completion of your course. We have a range of services available through the School of Science and the Environment and the University Careers Service including dedicated careers and employability advisors.

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Embrace your interest in film, television and music by becoming a skilled professional in sound recording. We have an excellent reputation for teaching film and music, with many of our graduates going on to win BAFTA's and Oscars. Read more
Embrace your interest in film, television and music by becoming a skilled professional in sound recording.

We have an excellent reputation for teaching film and music, with many of our graduates going on to win BAFTA's and Oscars.

You might be a budding filmmaker, journalist, photographer or documentary director, or simply have a creative passion for recording sound. Whatever your motivation, we will teach you professional techniques in music recording and post production so that you can record high-quality sound for the moving image.

This short course - taught over four weekends in the year - is a fantastic opportunity to learn from experienced film and recording professionals in state-of-the-art studios. We?re dedicated to providing you with hands-on, practical experience by giving you opportunities to produce your own work and explore the creative possibilities in sound recording and mixing.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/soundrecording_apd

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

There is a strong demand for well-trained soundrecording professionals and we provide the skills to help you on your way tobecoming an expert in quality sound broadcasting. If you would like to continueyour studies in this area there are opportunities to move onto one of our masterscourses such as Music for the Moving Image or Sound Design.

- Audio Editor
- Audio Engineer
- Studio Manager
- Composer for Film and Television

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You'll be learning at our Northern Film School ? the first film school in the UK to receive JAMES accreditation. JAMES, a professional body that represents organisations across the media sector, described us as 'a benchmark against which all other film courses need to be measured'.

Taught over four weekends in the year - Saturday to Monday - we've designed this course so it fits easily into your lifestyle, requiring minimum time off work.

You'll have access to a suite of professional music studios, including recording rooms, audio booths, instruments, portable audio recorders and a lab with soundcard and mixer. You'll be able to access an impressive range of facilities at our Northern Film School, including production studios, edit suites, production offices, and film and script archive.

We also offer exciting short study opportunities in film, music and performing arts, taught during Easter and Summer. These creative workshops, ranging from two days to a week, are a great way to build your expertise for professional use, embrace a subject you're passionate about, or develop your skills before applying for one of our postgraduate qualifications.

Core Modules

Studio Skills
You will gain a strong understanding of the creative possibilities of the studio environment through the development of a musical product.

Studio and Sound Location
We will equip you with the theory and the techniques for recording and mixing sound for film, television and radio.

Laura Taylor

Senior Lecturer

"Our courses prepare you for an industry that is ever-changing, demanding and highly competitive. You will emerge with a strong understanding of your specialism, and with a focused approach towards personal development and career planning."

Specialist sound tutor Laura Taylor has worked for the BBC, Channel 5, ITV Yorkshire and Discovery Channel. She has experience in live television, post production sound and commercial and community radio, and has worked within the educational and community sector. Laura has very close links with community radio station ELFM and the Soundmill Studios in Leeds.

Facilities

- Sound recording & editing facilities
You'll have access to a suite of professional music studios, including film composition and audio post production rooms, instruments, together with portable field recording equipment and extensive computer workstation facilities.

A comprehensive range of audio editing, composition and sound processing software is available.

- Northern Film School
You will also be able to access an impressive range of facilities at our Northern Film School, including production studios, edit suites, production offices, and film and script archive.

- Library
Our Library is open 24/7, every day of the year. However you like to work, we have got you covered with group and silent study areas, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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The Master of Fine Arts in Recording Arts and Technologies offers preparation for advanced work in audio production, recording, and integrated electronic media. Read more
The Master of Fine Arts in Recording Arts and Technologies offers preparation for advanced work in audio production, recording, and integrated electronic media. Coursework helps students develop a strong foundation in audio production and an understanding of the theoretical concepts of closely related disciplines. The program is designed to foster creativity and features a strong technical component utilizing the latest advancements in software and hardware. A diverse range of technical and artistic projects are produced, culminating in a final project of professional caliber. The degree plan also offers preparation for select graduates to teach at the postsecondary level in the field of audio recording and production. Creativity is one of the primary qualities sought in new students for the six-semester program. This creative background may be in audio engineering or in a field closely related to what might be described as "entertainment technology."

The Department of Recording Industry offers the Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) in Recording Arts and Technologies.

A limited number of students, typically 12-14, are accepted each year for fall admission. The quality of the creative portfolio is usually the determining factor in admission.

A previous degree in audio engineering/music technology isn't required, but some students with little or no audio background may be asked to complete foundation audio courses in the summer before starting the program.

Residents from the following states are eligible to enroll in this program at MTSU at the in-state tuition rate through Academic Common Market agreements: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia.

The M.F.A. program normally has two or three graduate assistantships to award each fall.

Career

This M.F.A. helps foster and develop creativity and trains students in technology for advanced work in audio/music engineering or related fields that could be described as "entertainment technology." Graduates can use the degree program to excel in professional pursuits such as:

Audio post-production engineer
Audio studio design and installation
Broadcast audio
Independent audio contractor
Live sound engineer
Manufacturer audio product specialist
Mastering engineer
Media specialist
Recording studio engineer
Recording studio manager
Retail audio sales
Sound design for film/video
University professor

Employers of MTSU alumni include:

Alabama State University
Art Institute of Tennessee
Asbury University
Belmont University
Brickhouse Records
Butler University
Clair Brothers
CNN
GC Pro
Hope College
Jeff Slaughter Ministries
Middle Tennessee State University
National Public Radio (NPR)
New England School of Communications
Old Dominion University
Sweetwater
Tennessee Digital Video
Truphonic Recording Studios
Yamaha Corporation of America

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This MA will consolidate your audio skills as a film and television sound recordist and designer. You will develop your sound storytelling skills through targeted workshops and their subsequent application in the context of live filmmaking projects- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-filmmaking-sound-recording-design/. Read more
This MA will consolidate your audio skills as a film and television sound recordist and designer. You will develop your sound storytelling skills through targeted workshops and their subsequent application in the context of live filmmaking projects- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-filmmaking-sound-recording-design/

What we offer

This Masters, a pathway of the MA Filmmaking, is housed in a new purpose-built media facility equipped with state-of-the art teaching spaces including film and photography studios equipped with Arri lighting and Greenscreen, Avid Media Composer, Final Cut Pro and Adobe Premiere Film Editing, Animation, Digital Special Effects, Pro Tools Audio Postproduction and Foley suites.

We have studio spaces, and extensive production facilities and informal rehearsal and meeting spaces where you can discuss and collaborate with producers and your shoot team.

You work on at least one film per term in your specialist role, culminating in a major production towards the end of the degree. In addition to your specialist area, you attend classes in related disciplines such as Film Directing and Editing and collaborate with students across specialisations on film projects. This framework is designed to stimulate collaborative practice by providing you with a breadth of filmmaking knowledge combined with a high level of expertise in your chosen filmmaking discipline.

Sound and music collaborations

Goldsmiths also has an excellent with fully-equipped music recording studios and mixing facilities and students collaborate there on both acoustic and electronic composition. In addition, MA Filmmaking students collaborate with staff and students on the MA in Music Composition for the Screen at the Royal College of Music.

Notable composers who have mentored our students include Miguel Mera, Vasco Hexel and Michael McAvoy. Goldsmiths' new can also provide exciting opportunities for collaboration in installation and interactive work.

Our students say...

"The Goldsmiths MA in Filmmaking was a real eye-opener into the world of film production and I am very grateful to have had the chance to experience it."

"I very much enjoyed the workshops from visiting professionals; the sessions with Sound Designer David Heinemann were particularly inspiring."

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Department of Media & Communications.

Modules & Structure

You work in depth on at least one film per term in your specialist role, culminating in a major production towards the end of the degree. You will also lead and take part in a number of other sound-based and music-based projects in Screen Lab. This collaborative framework is designed to stimulate collaborative practice by providing you with a breadth of filmmaking knowledge combined with a high level of expertise in sound recording and design.

For two terms you will spend a full day a week in specialised contact with your specific programme convenor, plus a further day in Screen Lab working with colleagues across the programme in a Talent Campus-style project-led learning structure with:

Masterclasses
Pitches
Role-plays
Exercises aimed at using your skills specialism in a variety of live shoot situations
You will also have a variety of research projects to undertake, as well as other module options.

The third term will be taken up with your final substantive project, and in writing up a process paper on your work and research over the year.

Screen Lab

You will also advance your collaborative skills by working in teams with fiction and documentary producers and directors, edit, cinematography and music students, on a variety of projects and at least three scheduled films across the year.

You will leave the programme with a diverse portfolio of performed work that may span a variety of formats – music video, web series drama, documentary, campaign/commercial, experimental art pieces and feature-scale short fiction films.

Screen School options

As well as your Sound Recording, Post-Production and Design specialism, you will undertake three short courses to enhance your other skills and critical approaches.

If you are passionate about fashioning an exciting career for yourself as a filmmaker in an environment that promotes innovative filmmaking, this course is for you.

Skills & careers

On completing the programme, you will be equipped to enter the global job market, armed with an enhanced understanding of your practical, intellectual and creative capacities as a film sound recordist and sound designer.

Possibly the most important skill we furnish you with is the rigorous discipline of working collaboratively under pressure as part of a creative team on challenging projects.

In addition to your practical filmmaking skills, we enable you to develop a variety of transferable intellectual, organisational and communication skills to equip you for a broad range of employment opportunities across the arts and media landscape (film, television, online, the creative arts, advertising and related hybrid forms).

Our graduates

Our alumni are active in the film, media and cultural industries around the world as:

Fiction and Documentary Sound Designers
Dubbing Mixers
Sound Recordists

Other entry requirements

Please note that unless you are exempted (Please check your status with our Admissions Team: ) overseas students require an English language qualification of IELTS 7.0 in order to be considered for a place on the MA Filmmaking programme.

If you have not yet achieved IELTS 7.0, we advise you to sit your IELTS exam at the earliest opportunity and to submit your application immediately after receiving your result. The annual IELTS deadline for the programme is April 30th.

Because funding deadlines and requirements vary around the world, applications are considered on a rolling basis and places on the programme fill up across the recruitment cycle. For this reason, we strongly advise you to submit your completed application as early as you can.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering offers a master of science in metallurgical engineering. Visit the website http://mte.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/. Read more
The Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering offers a master of science in metallurgical engineering.

Visit the website http://mte.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

The program options include coursework only or by a combination of coursework and approved thesis work. Most on-campus students supported on assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis on a research topic.

Plan I is the standard master’s degree plan. However, in exceptional cases, a student who has the approval of his or her supervisory committee may follow Plan II. A student who believes there are valid reasons for using Plan II must submit a written request detailing these reasons to the department head no later than midterm of the first semester in residence.

All graduate students, during the first part and the last part of their programs, will be required to satisfactorily complete MTE 595/MTE 596. This hour of required credit is in addition to the other degree requirements.

Course Descriptions

MTE 519 Principles of Casting and Solidification Processing. Three hours.
Overview of the principles of solidification processing, the evolution of solidification microstructure, segregation, and defects, and the use of analytical and computational tools for the design, understanding, and use of solidification processes.

MTE 520 Simulation of Casting Processes Three hours.
This course will cover the rationale and approach of numerical simulation techniques, casting simulation and casting process design, and specifically the prediction of solidification, mold filling, microstructure, shrinkage, microporosity, distortion and hot tearing. Students will learn casting simulation through lectures and hands-on laboratory/tutorial sessions.

MTE 539 Metallurgy of Welding. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 380 or permission of the instructor.
Thermal, chemical, and mechanical aspects of welding using the fusion welding process. The metallurgical aspects of welding, including microstructure and properties of the weld, are also covered. Various topics on recent trends in welding research.

MTE 542 Magnetic Recording Media. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 271.
Basic ferromagnetism, preparation and properties of magnetic recording materials, magnetic particles, thin magnetic films, soft and hard film media, multilayered magnetoresistive media, and magneto-optical disk media.

MTE 546 Macroscopic Transport in Materials Processing. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 353 or permission of the instructor.
Elements of laminar and turbulent flow; heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation; and mass transfer in laminar and in turbulent flow; mathematical modeling of transport phenomena in metallurgical systems including melting and refining processes, solidification processes, packed bed systems, and fluidized bed systems.

MTE 547 Intro to Comp Mat. Science Three hours.
This course introduces computational techniques for simulating materials. It covers principles of quantum and statistical mechanics, modeling strategies and formulation of various aspects of materials structure, and solution techniques with particular reference to Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamic methods.

MTE 549 Powder Metallurgy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 380 or permission of the instructor.
Describing the various types of powder processing and how these affect properties of the components made. Current issues in the subject area from high-production to nanomaterials will be discussed.

MTE 550 Plasma Processing of Thin Films: Basics and Applications. Three hours.
Prerequisite: By permission of instructor.
Fundamental physics and materials science of plasma processes for thin film deposition and etch are covered. Topics include evaporation, sputtering (special emphasis), ion beam deposition, chemical vapor deposition, and reactive ion etching. Applications to semiconductor devices, displays, and data storage are discussed.

MTE 556 Advanced Mechanical Behavior of Materials I: Strengthening Methods in Solids. Three hours. Same as AEM 556.
Prerequisite: MTE 455 or permission of the instructor.
Topics include elementary elasticity, plasticity, and dislocation theory; strengthening by dislocation substructure, and solid solution strengthening; precipitation and dispersion strengthening; fiber reinforcement; martensitic strengthening; grain-size strengthening; order hardening; dual phase microstructures, etc.

MTE 562 Metallurgical Thermodynamics. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 362 or permission of instructor.
Laws of thermodynamics, equilibria, chemical potentials and equilibria in heterogeneous systems, activity functions, chemical reactions, phase diagrams, and electrochemical equilibria; thermodynamic models and computations; and application to metallurgical processes.

MTE 574 Phase Transformation in Solids. Three hours.
Prerequisites: MTE 373 and or permission of the instructor.
Topics include applied thermodynamics, nucleation theory, diffusional growth, and precipitation.

MTE 579 Advanced Physical Metallurgy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Graduate-level treatments of the fundamentals of symmetry, crystallography, crystal structures, defects in crystals (including dislocation theory), and atomic diffusion.

MTE 583 Advanced Structure of Metals. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
The use of X-ray analysis for the study of single crystals and deformation texture of polycrystalline materials.

MTE 585 Materials at Elevated Temperatures. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Influence of temperatures on behavior and properties of materials.

MTE 587 Corrosion Science and Engineering. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 271 and CH 102 or permission of the instructor.
Fundamental causes of corrosion problems and failures. Emphasis is placed on tools and knowledge necessary for predicting corrosion, measuring corrosion rates, and combining this with prevention and materials selection.

MTE 591:592 Special Problems (Area). One to three hours.
Advanced work of an investigative nature. Credit awarded is based on the work accomplished.

MTE 595:596 Seminar. One hour.
Discussion of current advances and research in metallurgical engineering; presented by graduate students and the staff.

MTE 598 Research Not Related to Thesis. One to six hours.

MTE 599 Master's Thesis Research. One to twelve hours. Pass/fail.

MTE 622 Solidification Processes and Microstructures Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 519
This course will cover the fundamentals of microstructure formation and microstructure control during the solidification of alloys and composites.

MTE 643 Magnetic Recording. Three hours.
Prerequisite: ECE 341 or MTE 271.
Static magnetic fields; inductive head fields; playback process in recording; recording process; recording noise; and MR heads.

MTE 644 Optical Data Storage. Three hours.
Prerequisite: ECE 341 or MTE 271.
Characteristics of optical disk systems; read-only (CD-ROM) systems; write-once (WORM) disks; erasable disks; M-O recording materials; optical heads; laser diodes; focus and tracking servos; and signal channels.

MTE 655 Electron Microscopy of Materials. One to four hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 481 or permission of the instructor.
Topics include basic principles of operation of the transmission electron microscope, principles of electron diffraction, image interpretation, and various analytical electron-microscopy techniques as they apply to crystalline materials.

MTE 670 Scanning Electron Microscopy. Three hours
Theory, construction, and operation of the scanning electron microscope. Both imaging and x-ray spectroscopy are covered. Emphasis is placed on application and uses in metallurgical engineering and materials-related fields.

MTE 680 Advanced Phase Diagrams. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 362 or permission of the instructor.
Advanced phase studies of binary, ternary, and more complex systems; experimental methods of construction and interpretation.

MTE 684 Fundamentals of Solid State Engineering. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Modern physics, physics with calculus, or by permission of the instructor.
Fundamentals of solid state physics and quantum mechanics are covered to explain the physical principles underlying the design and operation of semiconductor devices. The second part covers applications to semiconductor microdevices and nanodevices such as diodes, transistors, lasers, and photodetectors incorporating quantum structures.

MTE 691:692 Special Problems (Area). One to six hours.
Credit awarded is based on the amount of work undertaken.

MTE 693 Selected Topics (Area). One to six hours.
Topics of current research in thermodynamics of melts, phase equilibra, computer modeling of solidification, electrodynamics of molten metals, corrosion phenomena, microstructural evolution, and specialized alloy systems, nanomaterials, fuel cells, and composite materials.

MTE 694 Special Project. One to six hours.
Proposing, planning, executing, and presenting the results of an individual project.

MTE 695:696 Seminar. One hour.
Presentations on dissertation-related research or on items of current interest in materials and metallurgical engineering.

MTE 698 Research Not Related to Dissertation. One to six hours.

MTE 699 Doctoral Dissertation Research. Three to twelve hours. Pass/Fail.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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Highly respected qualification in buildings archaeology. Established more than 15 years ago, this course is one of the longest-established and most respected buildings archaeology and buildings history programmes in the UK. Read more
Highly respected qualification in buildings archaeology.

Why choose this course?

Established more than 15 years ago, this course is one of the longest-established and most respected buildings archaeology and buildings history programmes in the UK. It brings together experts in buildings survey and recording, archive research, legislation and policy, conservation, theoretical interpretation and computer modelling to deliver a dynamic course, which will equip you with the specialist skills and knowledge required for a career in researching, managing and conserving historic buildings.
-Learn the specialised skills required for researching, analysing and recording historic buildings.
-Gain experience in rectified photography, photogrammetry and other 3D recording methods, CAD drawing and computer modelling of historic buildings.
-Develop the knowledge and skills essential for careers in the architectural and archaeological sectors.
-Study in the cultural heritage capital of the UK – experience buildings archaeology in action.
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including survey support, archives and libraries.
-Receive careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

The MA in the Archaeology of Buildings is designed to train students in the systematic research, recording, analysis and interpretation of historic buildings.

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training and research projects, the course will:
-Introduce the specialised skills required for the historical research, visual analysis and archaeological recording of buildings.
-Give you a foundational knowledge of the history of architecture in the UK, from c.1000 to the present day.
-Introduce you to current intellectual and professional research priorities in the archaeology of buildings.
-Introduce you to conservation legislation, policy and practice.
-Enable you to develop excellent research and communication skills relating to the research, analysis and interpretation of historic buildings.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for students of Archaeology, History of Art, Architectural History and related subjects, as well as for mid-career professionals seeking to develop or enhance their professional specialism in buildings archaeology.

What can it lead to?

The discipline of buildings archaeology has grown in confidence, with new theoretical and methodological developments allowing archaeologists to record, date, model and present research in exciting new ways. There is significant demand for buildings archaeology professionals in the commercial sector and in national and local heritage organisations.

Course alumni have successfully launched careers in key roles with organisations across the heritage sector, including English Heritage, National Trust, Historic Scotland and Historic Royal Palaces, as well as with local authorities and conservation bodies, conservation architects, archaeological units and commercial developers.

Placement

Work placements provide a valuable opportunity to gain practical experience of working in the professional buildings sector. Your placement will draw on and contribute to the knowledge and experience you have gained on your taught courses, while enabling you to develop new insights, understanding and expertise in buildings archaeology that will be extremely valuable in future employment.

Aims
-To provide students with experience of buildings archaeology in a professional working environment.
-To consolidate students’ knowledge and understanding of buildings archaeology procedures and issues gained from the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing these placements you should have:
-Gained experience and knowledge of how building recording and research inform conservation and heritage practice, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-Developed experience in practical applications, facilitating critical reflection on the theoretical and philosophical issues raised in both core modules.

Placement providers
Although the organisations offering placements change from year to year, according to availability, the following list is a good indication of the choices likely to be available:
-English Heritage
-National Trust
-Council for British Archaeology
-York Civic Trust
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-The Churches Conservation Trust
-Purcell Architects
-Quercus Design
-City of York Council
-Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings
-York Archaeological Trust
-Cathedral and Church Buildings Division

Careers

The MA in the Archaeology of Buildings offers practical skills and research training that provide excellent preparation for a range of careers. By the end of the course you will be able to:
-Record and analyse structures of all types, selecting a level of record appropriate to the end use.
-Execute hand, metric and photographic surveys and present the results in hand drawings, photographs and CAD.
-Recognise and apply the principles of structural analysis to elucidate a building’s history.
-Draw on a sound knowledge of British architectural history and, where appropriate, that of other countries.
-Carry out research using a wide range of archival sources on buildings in the UK and integrate these critically and effectively into the interpretation of buildings.
-Discuss and debate current research agendas in buildings archaeology.
-Direct your own independent work, and also interact with others as a member of a recording or conservation team.
-Communicate the results of research effectively through oral, written and graphic forms of presentation.

Alumni from the course have been employed in a range of commercial and heritage organisations across the UK, including:
-Field Archaeology Specialists (FAS Heritage)
-Oxford Archaeology
-URS Corporation
-Purcell Architects
-AOC Archaeology Group
-Pre-Construct Archaeology
-Headland Archaeology
-Arc Heritage
-York Archaeological trust
-English Heritage
-National Trust
-Historic Scotland
-Historic Royal Palaces
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology)

Others have been employed as freelance building archaeologists, local authority conservation officers and museum professionals.

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This course will enable you to study popular music from a practical perspective with an emphasis on music production and songwriting. Read more
This course will enable you to study popular music from a practical perspective with an emphasis on music production and songwriting. For your final major project you will focus on composition and production within the popular music genre, producing an extended professional-quality album of your popular music compositions/covers.

Key features
-The wide selection of option modules allows you to tailor the course to your interests.
-Several members of staff are engaged practically with the professional production of popular music. You will also have the chance to attend masterclasses and workshops run by national and international producers, performers and composers - such as Youth, Gavin Greenaway, Rick Astley and Steve Martland.
-We have five, state-of-the-art recording studios, including one with a large live room used for professional recordings. We also have two computer laboratories containing iMacs with full music software for sequencing and processing.
-Lunchtime concerts, involving students or visiting artists, take place throughout the year.

What will you study?

You will focus on the production of current popular music, creating and recording tracks using the University's high-quality recording facilities.

You will also explore the composition of popular music, recording techniques and the marketing of popular music. In addition, you will widen your musical knowledge and experience by choosing one option module from an extensive range, including those covering sound design, ensemble performance and composing for film and TV.

Assessment

Coursework, essays, compositions, productions, and major recording project.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Advanced Production of Popular Music
-Composing and Marketing Popular Music
-Major Project
-Researching Music

Optional modules
-Constructing Music Education in the UK
-Critical Reflection on Musical Performance
-International Music Education: Psychology, Culture and Philosophy
-Special Study: Arranging and Scoring
-Techniques and Technology for Composing for Film and Television
-Current Debates in Music Education
-Jazz Studies
-Live Performance Technologies
-Performance Studies
-The Psychology of Music
-The Studio Musician

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Bath Spa has pioneered the teaching of songwriting, and launched the world's first Songwriting Master’s degree in 2007. Its blend of practical, theoretical and scholarly practice is taught by published, practicing songwriters and academics. Read more
Bath Spa has pioneered the teaching of songwriting, and launched the world's first Songwriting Master’s degree in 2007. Its blend of practical, theoretical and scholarly practice is taught by published, practicing songwriters and academics. The course is aimed at unpublished songwriters wishing to develop their craft to a professional level, or published songwriters wishing to achieve academic accreditation whilst continuing their creative development. Based at our postgraduate centre at Corsham Court, and also offered as a distance learning option, the course maintains strong links with industry through publishers, guest artists and guest lecturers, and offers the chance to consolidate and focus your creative output whilst developing a perspective on your work informed by research. You'll study with us on Mmus Songwriting so that you can:

• Comment critically upon your own and others’ material
• Examine the musicological roots of your craft
• Consider the commercial value of your songs in the marketplace
• Rewrite and collaborate
• Conduct academic research
• Develop technical skills
• Create a professional-standard portfolio of your work
• Establish networks, collaborators and contacts

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course is available on either a full-time (typically one year) or part- time (typically two year) basis. We also offer a low-residency ‘distance learning’ option that will be open to both UK and overseas applicants. The course aims:

• To enable you to write and record songs to a professional level
• To develop critical awareness relating to your own songs and others'
• To develop your ability to perform/present your songs
• To inform you of historical and musicological developments in songwriting
• To enhance your understanding of the market value ((and artistic value) of your own work
• To provide opportunities for you to discuss current developments in songwriting with songwriters, producers and publishers
• To encourage you to develop re-writing and collaborative songwriting skills
• To help you to develop technical skills relevant to songwriting practice
• To develop your academic writing skills at level 7

MODULES

Songwriting Skills: As an essential component of this module you will engage weekly with a series of preparatory creative writing and compositional exercises designed to supply you with the raw creative material from which to increase your lyrical, harmonic and melodic range. These exercises are technique-based and serve to extend your creative palette and songwriting choices. Tutorial and group-playback support engage real-time with critical feedback and professional advice. Online virtual classroom exercises are supported by instruction videos and examine imagery, metaphor, narrative, rhyme, meter, melody, harmonic construction, narrative perspectives, intertextuality and rhetorical principles.

History of Song: Through this module you will gain a systematic and comprehensive knowledge of strategies and form used in popular songwriting. You will also develop an advanced ability to contextualize your own songs. With reference to popular songs written between 1920 and the present day, a series of lectures examines key developments in the musical, lyrical and structural development of song. The teaching approach is analytical and particular attention is paid to strategies used by songwriters to convey ideas.

Context and Methodology: In this module, visiting professional practitioners deliver master-classes to explore particular ecologies within the songwriting profession. In master-classes and seminars, students explore diverse songwriting contexts such as writing for musical theatre, writing for the charts, writing to pitch-sheets and writing for an original performer. Research methods and postgraduate research methodology skills are then utilised to explore a possible blend of contexts identified by the student as being potential markets for their music. Becoming aware of the modalities and nuances of these cultures is the key to successful songwriting. In preparation for the Major Project portfolio, this module serves to refine your eventual work by investigating the cultural, semiotic, linguistic, musicological, economic and pragmatic structures of your intended song culture. This is a key Level 7 module, with a generic research emphasis designed to prepare the student for further postgraduate and doctoral study.

Collaborative Songwriting: This module aims to develop skills in collaborative songwriting, enabling you to experience a variety of collaborative methods, and to explore the relationship between collaborative process and final song product. Although primarily based around a systematic understanding of the creative process of collaboration, the module also helps students to explore collaborative works in their cultural and economic context, including royalty splits, publishing implications, and issues of shared Intellectual Property between joint creators.

Major Project: This double module represents the culmination of the MMus, and a chance for you to work on a substantial album/portfolio project. The module will be largely student-led, with most of the work centered on individual practice. You will receive tutorial support.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

Bath Spa’s approach to the teaching of songwriting combines analysis of existing repertoire with a focus on song crafting technique and students are encouraged to develop by writing new songs throughout the course. Lectures, seminars and tutorials combine to offer a range of expert and peer critique that seeks to enable the student to examine original and known works in a range of critical and technical contexts. Students have access to laptop-based recording equipment and the programme has its own dedicated facilities. The curriculum is supported by a Virtual Learning Environment, so course materials can be accessed from any web link.

Recording Facilities - while our studio facilities are designed to enable the capture of high quality recordings, in keeping with contemporary songwriting industry practice it is anticipated that learners will become self-sufficient in the sense that, following completion of the course, they will be able to repeat the core processes of writing, planning and recording without incurring recording studio expenses. To enable mastery of the home recording process, students have access to laptop based ‘notepad’ setups and industry-standard plug-ins (Stylus, MachFive, BFD, Trilogy, Waves etc) throughout their studies.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

Assessment takes the form of individual assignments for each module. Typical assessments include audio CD, presentation, essay, and evaluative account. Assessment is continuous and there are no written exams.

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The MA Advanced Music Technology course aims to provide students with a higher level of understanding of the practical techniques and theory that underpin traditional and contemporary audio technology. Read more
The MA Advanced Music Technology course aims to provide students with a higher level of understanding of the practical techniques and theory that underpin traditional and contemporary audio technology.

The course boasts an enviable range of studio facilities and staff who are actively engaged in the music industry. It focuses on cutting edge topics from ambient recording through advanced non-linear techniques, to the evolving arena of surround sound mixing and recording, and encompassing multi-media work and interface design. Graduates from the MA will enjoy an augmented skill-set that will place them at a distinct advantage upon entry into this fast paced, competitive and constantly evolving market place.

Course detail

The course is based in studios of fully professional specification, and students will work on both digital and analogue consoles with access to state-of-the-art Pro Tools systems with hi-end plug-ins, along with other advanced technology such as analogue modular synthesizers, Kyma and Ambisonics.

Modules

• Advanced Recording Techniques
• Digital Audio Interface Design for Music
• Developing your Career
• Research Methods
• Multi-track Recording and Mixing for Surround
• Interactive Music Technology
• Advanced Non-linear Recording
• Masters Level Project.

Format

Modules comprise a combination of lectures, workshops, seminars and tutorials. There are also masterclasses from staff, visiting lecturers and practitioners.

Assessment

We assess modules in a variety of ways. Written work is usually in the form of essays, critical self-reflections and learning journals. Practical assessment varies according to the nature of the practice - for example, DVDs for surround recordings, CDs for audio, and some live installations or electro-acoustic performances. There are often at least two assignments for each module. There are no exams currently in the MA Advanced Music Technology course.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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Music Technology is a rapidly evolving field of study with a diverse and expanding range of possibilities. Read more

Aims

Music Technology is a rapidly evolving field of study with a diverse and expanding range of possibilities.

The MSc in Audio Technology is designed to go beyond the simple provision of training, and to instead enable you to engage with current debates and actively participate in some of the most vibrant areas of contemporary research.

Throughout the course you will be encouraged to demonstrate self-direction and autonomy as you critically explore and define your position within the wider field. One overarching aim is that you should leave the course as not only an adept user of various hardware and software technologies, but as someone able to actively shape and develop their own, responding as necessary to future developments.

Thus, in addition to developing your theoretical and methodological understanding, the MSc in Audio Technology features a strong emphasis on practical work in a number of different (but related) areas. For example, you will study modules in Advanced Studio Practice, Sound on Screen, Music Computing and Musical Human-Computer Interaction. These are supported by a technology-orientated Research and Development module that provides robust foundation for the final Audio Technology Project.

Acting as summary of all that you have learned and a portfolio going forward, the Audio Technology Project provides an opportunity to plan and execute a substantial project in an area of personal specialism or interest. Innovative projects are encouraged, and there exists the potential for interdisciplinary and/or collaboration with practitioners in other fields.

Fees and finance

2015/6 Home/EU International
Full time £5,750 £11,960
Part time £2,875

These fees are applicable for new entrants in 2015/6. Fees are for the academic year only, any subsequent years may be subject to an annual increase, usually in line with inflation.

The University also offers a postgraduate loyalty discount: If you have completed an undergraduate degree at the University of Wolverhampton, you may be eligible for a 20% discount on the first year of a taught postgraduate programme.

Employability

The course will actively equip both graduates and those already in industry with a diverse range of skills to enhance their career prospects. It will also develop a range of opportunities for experience and employment in areas such as studio recording, media production and content creation, video game and software development, education (FE/HE), research assistantships/studentships, and employment in HE institutions.

In addition to subject-specific practical skills, you will also acquire a range of transferable skills relevant for pursuing a research degree. These include critical, analytical, project management and research skills from the study of a broad spectrum of literature, research, and external projects.

Outcomes

- Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of a variety of issues in the expanded field of contemporary music technology, taking an independent and rounded perspective.
- Apply theoretical discourse relating to aspects such as technologised production and performance, reactive/interactive/non-linear media, and computational creativity (etc.) to practice through a systematic understanding of historical, contextual, philosophical, technical and scientific theory.
- Select, interpret, develop and apply a variety of research methodologies appropriate for their work.
- Critically evaluate and use a wide variety of hardware and software technologies, and, where appropriate, develop their own.
- Exercise personal autonomy in learning through effective self-organisation and management of workload in both individual and group scenarios.
- Understand the possibilities afforded by the contemporary, expanded field of music technology (including its gaps and trends), and be able to position their own work, interests and aspirations within this wider context.

Why Wolverhampton?

The course offers an explicit and concerted move away from the notion of “training” in how to use specific software and/or other music technologies in favour of a more balanced synthesis of theory and practice.

The proposal for the Audio Technology Project is developed in the Research and Development module, providing time and opportunity to consider the project’s direction thoroughly, and to explore possibilities for collaborative/interdisciplinary working.

Course staff specialise in both traditional/well-established areas of music technology (studio production, film sound, audio synthesis and processing) and flourishing areas of contemporary research (musical interaction, generative music).

A wide range of career routes are open to graduates of the course. These are largely dependent upon the nature of the work the student chooses to produce, but may include: studio production, sound for games and film/video/animation, interactive media, interaction design, creative software development, design for music technology, post-compulsory and higher education.

The University of Wolverhampton continues to develop state of the art facilities to greatly enhance your learning experience. The Performance Hub, opened in 2011, has a diverse range of fully equipped music teaching, performance and practice rooms (accommodating single person to large band / ensemble), two high-end professional recording studios, and two bespoke technology suites boasting sixty Apple iMacs running industry standard software including Pro Tools, Logic Pro, Max, Pure Data and SuperCollider.

Our two recording studios offer the perfect blend of digital and analogue technologies giving students the opportunity to combine classic analogue recording technique with the flexibility and reliability digital technology provides. As well as a dedicated live room each for recording, for increased flexibility and choice of room acoustic, any of the music rehearsal rooms surrounding each studio can also be patched into the studio's control room.

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This 15 month course - the only one of its kind in the UK - has been developed in response to film and television industry demands for suitably trained production sound professionals. Read more
This 15 month course - the only one of its kind in the UK - has been developed in response to film and television industry demands for suitably trained production sound professionals. The course is delivered in partnership with the BBC.

Quick Facts

- 15 Month Course
- Full-time
- Course starts in September
- Next intake: September 2016
- UK and EEA applicants only

- Unique course in UK.
- Location and studio sound recording on real productions.
- Music recording in studio.
- Multi-camera television studio production.
- Fisher Boom training.
- Introduction to post production techniques.
- Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.

TO APPLY CONTACT REGISTRY - https://nfts.co.uk/contact-us

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/diploma/production-sound-film-television

Entry requirements

A proven interest in sound - particularly recorded sound - a lively interest in film, television and music and a willingness to work as part of a team are essential. We are looking for people who are practically minded and who have a good general education although there are no specific educational requirements for this course. Interpersonal skills are as important as practical ones, because sound recordists need to be able to work effectively as part of a team. You’ll also need to be fit and have plenty of energy, as sound recording can be physically demanding. While we don’t select applicants on the basis of their ability to drive, we strongly recommend that you learn to drive, as a clean, current, driving license will be essential in your future career. You will require an EEA passport in order to apply for this course.

COURSE OVERVIEW

This course commences in September each year. The Production Sound for Film and Television Diploma in partnership with the BBC offers an unrivalled opportunity to learn the practical skills required for a career in this field, and covers:

- location sound recording techniques for drama and documentary
- sound production for multi-camera television
- music recording in the studio and on location

*15-month course; next intake September

Now well-established, the Production Sound Diploma course enjoys an excellent reputation within the Industry and each year’s students rapidly find work on completing the course. Graduates have been employed as sound assistants and boom operators on recent television productions including Ashes to Ashes, Midsomer Murders, Lewis, New Tricks, Holby City, Cranford, Jane Eyre, Gavin & Stacey, Life Begins, Judge John Deed, Downton Abbey, Fresh Meat, Spooks and Merlin.

Graduate work on feature films includes Syriana, Extraordinary Rendition, The Hills Have Eyes II, The Mutant Chronicles, Clash Of the Titans 2, Never Let Me Go, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2, World War Z, Sherlock Holmes : A Game of Shadows, The Iron Lady, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (2012).

The BBC provide an internship at the BBC for all students. Students on the course are called BBC Sound Scholars.

CURRICULUM

The course starts in September with a term of intensive workshops and exercises that prepare students to record sound on shoots with MA students in the following Spring and Summer terms. Alongside location and studio shoots for both documentary, fiction films and television productions, the programme of workshops and tuition continues throughout the course.

Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

TUTORS

The course leader and Head of Production Sound at the NFTS is BAFTA nominated sound recordist Fraser Barber, who has 45 credits on popular TV programmes such as Silent Witness, The Tunnel, Full Circle With Michael Palin, Mike Basset England Manager, Black Mirror, and Little Dorrit.

ALUMNI

Joanna Andrews (Ashes to Ashes, Spooks, Criminal Justice, Cranford), Tom Harrison (Reggie Perrin, Gavin & Stacey, Clash of the Titans 2), Jodie Campbell (Never Let Me Go, Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows), Sarah Howe (New Tricks, Lewis, Merlin) and Tom Fennell (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2, World War Z) studied at the NFTS.

APPLY WITH

- Please tell us of an event or production that you have recorded or one that you have experienced and would like to have recorded. Include information on what preparation you did and what you would have done differently. What inspired you about the event? No more than one page (A4 paper)
- If you have any work that you would like to share with us please post it to us on a DVD. However, this is not essential since you may not have had the opportunity to create something yet.

HOW TO APPLY

The application deadline has now passed, however there may still be a chance to apply. Please contact registry via email stating your name, course of interest and contact details:

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This course is due to be revalidated, please continue to check the website for changes to the programme. The MA in Composition and Sonic Art offers a comprehensive introduction to practice-based research methodologies providing an excellent basis for doctoral research and ongoing independent practice. Read more
This course is due to be revalidated, please continue to check the website for changes to the programme.

The MA in Composition and Sonic Art offers a comprehensive introduction to practice-based research methodologies providing an excellent basis for doctoral research and ongoing independent practice.

The course has been designed to allow sound artists and musicians/composers to develop their interests in a vibrant, interdisciplinary context. It encourages students to develop experimental approaches to their work and examines the conceptual and creative role of the sound artist and musician/composer in 21st century art practice.

Key elements include a focus of the role of site, context and location, together with an examination of the relationship between work and audience.

It is one of four taught postgraduate courses for artists, composers and interdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. The other three courses are:
- MA in Contemporary Arts
- MA in Contemporary Arts and Music
- MA in Social Sculpture.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/composition-and-sonic-art/

Why choose this course?

- The School of Arts offers a unified hub for the arts in the Richard Hamilton Building, with state-of-the-art technical facilities and 24-hour studio access.

- A special feature of all four interdisciplinary arts MA courses is the MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment.

- Innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices, including internationally renowned programmes in sonic art and social sculpture.

- A stimulating environment where creative practitioners and writers about the arts and culture work closely together to form specialist research units and interdisciplinary research clusters in areas including the Sonic Art. Popular Music, Opera and Social Sculpture.

- Research and teaching programmes linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, Oxford Contemporary Music, and events such as the annual OXDOX International Documentary Film Festival.

- You have the opportunity to spend a semester at one of the following institutions: the Bauhaus University in Weimar; Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam; or the Vilnius Art Academy.

- The School of Arts has a thriving culture of practice-based PhD research students, linked to our specialist research units. Seventy per cent of these research students began on our MA courses.

- Opportunities for international study, with students recently visiting the United States, Europe and Australia.

Specialist facilities

The MA Composition and Sonic Art is situated in the Richard Hamilton Building, which includes a large lecture theatre, a smaller lecture room, studios and installation rooms, seven practice rooms including a band room (with PA and drum kit), an ensemble practice room and a drum room, two music studios, a music technology room and a research room for postgraduate students. Students also have access to pianos and practice areas elsewhere in the University.

Access to the Richard Hamilton Building is available 24 hours a day for all music students.

The department also has access to the drama studio where performances and installations can take place. This provides a live performance venue with versatile sound, lighting and staging possibilities, including surround sound, projections and raised staging and seating.

Music Technology and IT
The Music Technology room houses 12 PC workstations running Adobe Audition 3.0; Sibelius 6; Cubase Essential 4; Pure Data; Hyperprism; GRM Tools and Composers Desktop Project, alongside general internet, email and office software. Other computer networked facilities are also available.

The music studios are based in the basement of the Richard Hamilton Building. The facilities consist of two large single user electroacoustic studios, two sound proof booths; access to Adobe Audition; Pro-Tools; Cubase Studio and Logic; workstations running Pure Data; Max/MSP; Hyperprism; GRM Tools; CDP; a range of sound-recording equipment; along with the possibility of using the two studios together as separated recording and control rooms. One studio has a pair of Genelec 1037C Shielded Active Monitoring Speakers and the other studio has a pair of Genelec S30C Active Monitoring Speakers.

Sonic Art Research Unit Room
This is a space for postgraduate students and research staff engaged in Composition; Sonic Art; or Sound Art practices to use. There are two Apple Macs running Logic alongside a range of powered speakers, mixing desks; electronic components for the creation of bespoke devices; microphones for field and instrumental recording; and a range of digital recording devices.

Field trips

You are given the opportunity to spend a semester at the Bauhaus University in Weimar.

Attendance pattern

Full-time students meet twice weekly in the first semester - mondays and Tuesdays, and in the second semester, on Tuesdays only.

In the summer Full-time students work to develop their Major Project, which concludes in early October the following year.

Part-time students meet once a week every Tuesday in their first year, and in their seocnd year, once a week on Mondays in Semester 1 and Tuesdays in Semster 2. In Year 2 they work through the summe ron their Major Project which concludes in October of their second year.

Students doing full-time need to be on-site or nearby, at least half the week, and put in about 40 hours per week.

Part-time students are expected to be in at least one day a week, and work in their own time for at least 20 hours per week, on or off site, as appropriate.

Careers

Combining the academic rigour of a traditional programme with practical and vocational components, sonic arts and composition students at Oxford Brookes are well placed for a variety of careers in the creative sector. Many master's students who have developed their practice at postgraduate level will continue as practising sound artists and new music composers, whilst others take up careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests. This includes within teaching further or higher education; the media and new technologies, and cultural administration.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

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-Explore the most advanced studio techniques, technologies and processes at the forefront of current music production. -Unleash your creative potential and cultivate your own individual style to produce original arrangements, mixes, re-mixes and mastering work. Read more
-Explore the most advanced studio techniques, technologies and processes at the forefront of current music production
-Unleash your creative potential and cultivate your own individual style to produce original arrangements, mixes, re-mixes and mastering work
-Deliver comprehensive solutions and support for live sound in a variety of performance settings
-On this postgraduate degree you will create your own A/V interfaces, plug-ins, and programming codes

Why choose this course?

Music and Sound Technology in Audio Engineering is designed to provide industry-relevant post-graduate education aimed at forming creative professional for the audio, production, and post-production industry, who wish to pursue careers as creative Audio Engineers within recording, production or live sound settings. Students take hands-on sessions in the University's state-of-the-art facilities, including a top-class SSL studio, guided by dedicated tutors with significant industry experience. The postgraduate curriculum covers all the most relevant and current skills of the field, and sessions and assessment are designed to reproduce, as far as possible and appropriate, the realities of the commercial environment.

We are one of the largest music department in the UK, offering a rich portfolio of forward-looking music programmes uniquely designed to develop the most relevant skills in the current industry. The environment is friendly and supportive, and students benefit from being part of a large community of creatives in all fields: from film, to new media, performance, and fine arts.

Our top-class facilities include:
-2 labs, each with 36 workstations dual monitor Apple Intel
-Large recording studio with latest SSL AWS 900+ SE
-Studio with Yamaha 02R/963 monitoring spaces for surround sound
-Dubbing suite for audio-to-video work
-Foley studio for sound design work
-Sony Game studio
-Multimedia studios
-Anechoic chamber
-TV studio
-460-seat state-of-the-art performance venue with A/V recording facilities

Careers

When you graduate from these awards you will be ideally positioned to act as an interface between various music technologies and composers/producers. You may also consider a range of related positions such as lecturer, technical editor for music technology publications and other similar professions in the music industry or consider further study at doctoral level.

Teaching methods

Lecture, seminars and tutorials are typically scheduled over two consecutive days a week, plus some extra sessions for particular workshops, performance and recording. In addition to scheduled sessions, students are expected to engage in continuous self-directed study and studio practice.

Structure

Core Modules
-Creative Economies
-Creative Music Production (Discourse / Reflection)
-Major Study:Music Projects
-Practice 1: Studio Technology, Practices and Processes
-Practice 2: Audio Engineering
-Research and Enquiry

Optional
-Creative Economies (Online)
-Research and Enquiry (Online)

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Our Postgraduate course in Film Production combines practice, theory, enterprise skills and personal and professional development. Read more
Our Postgraduate course in Film Production combines practice, theory, enterprise skills and personal and professional development. The theory is embedded in the practical teaching, so that for every new skill and convention learned the reason for its application is also explored

MA Film Production aims to emulate a real working environment in which practical learning allows you to ‘learn on the job’ by performing roles in a film production team. This ‘real word’ environment is further enhanced through student collaboration on productions of narrative drama or documentary, using high-end production methods and equipment. Alongside drama and documentary productions, postgraduate Film Production allows you to develop subject specific research skills and apply those to practical work.

INDUSTRY LINKS

Staff maintains links with Warp Films, Arri media, Made Up North, Northwest Vision and Media and many more regional and national production companies and agencies.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Most modules are delivered at the Preston campus, with the main production modules based at the Media Factory, UCLan's £15m purpose built media powerhouse, with outstanding facilities and excellent technical and academic support. Students have access to a range of High Definition production equipment including advanced camera rigs and camera support rigs. The Media Factory also offers ample studio and recording spaces including motion capture, green screen, TV studio, audio recording and mixing studios, dedicated edit suites and many more shared facilities, all of which is accessible 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Assessment is by submission of films produced and written and oral presentations of research outcomes. Students have to meet a set of learning outcomes appropriate to masters level study to pass their modules

GRADUATE CAREERS

Students typically move into production related areas, many of them regularly in the credits of major cinema and TV releases. Some choose to embark on careers in directing, camera or writing.

Students can sit technical undergraduate workshops and seminars as required and have to take part in enterprise based activities run by Futures and Northern Lights.

FURTHER INFORMATION

Based in the £15 million, state-of-the-art Media Factory you will have access to a range of high definition production equipment including advanced camera rigs and camera support rigs. The Media Factory also houses studio and recording spaces including motion capture, green screen, TV studio, audio recording and mixing studios and dedicated editing suites.

UCLan’s postgraduate Film Production course benefits from excellent, regional and national links with film production companies. Experienced industry professionals, academics and external, high profile, guest speakers deliver the course.

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On this course, you’ll gain practical, theoretical and creative experience of sound engineering, music production and audio technology. Read more
On this course, you’ll gain practical, theoretical and creative experience of sound engineering, music production and audio technology. You’ll explore the design, manipulation and production of audio across many platforms, including radio, video, animation, TV, the internet, gaming and digital music and you’ll be use our state-of-the-art recording, radio and TV studios to study a mix of sound engineering and theory modules. The aim of the course is to develop the skills that you’ll need to create and deliver professional audio, whilst under pinning these skills with a sound theoretical background.

Key benefits:

• Study at our state-of-the-art MediaCityUK campus
• Enjoy excellent job prospects in a growing field
• Tap into the expertise of world-class audio-engineering and acoustics researchers

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/digital-media-audio-production

Suitable for

Graduates from courses that feature large elements of audio engineering and production. Please note that this is not a conversion course – we expect students to have prior experience of recording-studio practice.

Programme details

This course entails both practical based and theory modules. The modules are delivered in the recording studios, the audio technology suite, audio post production suite and lecture theatres.

Format

Teaching and learning involves a mix of lectures and practical sound engineering work, involving individual and group learning, There is an emphasis on motivated students' self-study.

Semester 1

• Audio Application Project
• Research in Emerging Technologies

Semester 2

• Spatial Audio And Studio Design
• Sound Synthesis and Audio Theory

Semester 3

• Project

Assessment

Assessment involves a mixture of practical work, report writing and project work. By the end of the course students will have built up a substantial portfolio of audio, video and new media work. Assessment is approximately divided across the course as follows:

• Practical work (30%)
• Report/Assignment (35%)
• Presentation (5%)
• Dissertation - that may entail practical elements (30%)

Career potential

The wide range of skills provided on this course will enhance your employability. Possible career paths include: audio manufacturer research and design, broadcast engineer in audio for radio or TV, audio and visual design and installation, education, interactive media and sonic arts.

Possible career paths include:

• Audio manufacturer research and design
• Broadcast engineer in audio for radio or TV
• Recording studio, live sound engineer, music production
• Music technology retail
• Theatre or film audio engineer
• Musical instrument technology
• Audio and visual design and installation
• Education
• Interactive Media
• Sonic arts

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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