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Masters Degrees (Record Production)

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We stand at the forefront of the academic study of musictechnology in general and record production in particular. This course investigates the theoretical and practical production of recorded popular music. Read more
We stand at the forefront of the academic study of musictechnology in general and record production in particular. This course investigates the theoretical and practical production of recorded popular music.

Investigating the production of popular recorded music from both a theoretical and practical standpoint, you will learn to combine a creative vision of the whole project with the practical management of the technical and artistic process.

Situated within one of the largest university music technology departments in the world, the course is led by a team of world-renowned record producers, composers, arrangers and engineers all involved in the recording industry.

Course detail

Designed to combine the technical skills of advanced recording techniques, digital signal processing and mixing with 'human skills' such as managing sessions, pre-production, developing your career, communication and performance in the studio.

Deconstruct and analyse the process of record production to develop the knowledge and skills necessary in understanding the contemporary, fast-changing music industry or as a springboard to further postgraduate study.

Modules

• Developing Your Career
• Advanced Recording Techniques
• The Development of Audio Technology
• Manipulating Sounds
• Performing in the Studio
• Combining Sounds
• Research Methods
• Dissertation/Project.

Format

Modules comprise a combination of lectures, workshops, seminars and tutorials. There are also master classes from staff, visiting lecturers and practitioners.

Assessment

There are often at least two assignments for each module. We assess modules in a variety of ways. Written work is usually in the form of essays, critical self-reflections and learning journals. Practical assessment varies according to the nature of the practice – for example, CD recordings, although there will always be a substantial written component in the assessment.

Career and study progression

Graduates from this course work in a wide range of professional roles. For example, as sound engineers, post-production engineers, recording artists, studio managers, company directors, product developers, product demonstrators, producers, composers and re-mixers. Our students have gone on to work with many prominent artists, including Lady Gaga, Peter Gabriel, Bloc Party and Blondie, and organisations such as the BBC, Norsk Films, The London Synthesis Orchestra and Warner Brothers.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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Production Managers are the key to any smooth running production. Production Management calls on a variety of skills from budgeting and scheduling to managing crews. Read more
Production Managers are the key to any smooth running production. Production Management calls on a variety of skills from budgeting and scheduling to managing crews.

Quick Facts

- 12 Month Course
- Full-time
- Course starts in September
- Next intake: September 2016
- UK and EEA applicants only
- Two scholarships from Sargent-Disc available

-Course developed to meet Industry demand
- Alternates Industry-recognised training modules with practical experience
- Plenty of hands-on practice – in both locations and in studios
- Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 12 MAY 2016

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/diploma/production-management-film

COURSE OVERVIEW

This course commences in September each year. So what does it take to be a Production Manager? An individual who can multi-task, be dynamic, communicate well and stay calm under pressure. Someone who is creative with budgets but keeps a sharp eye on the bottom line; someone who knows enough about Health and Safety to protect the cast and crew but not detract from getting the right shot; someone who knows about the best locations at the best price - and who knows production from start to finish!

This course combines intensive training with practical experience on fiction films, TV Entertainment shows, documentary and animation films at the NFTS and industry work experience placements.

Career Progression

Most production managers are freelance, moving from contract to contract, and may find themselves working anywhere in the UK, or even abroad. As a production manager, you could also work for independent production companies on feature films, documentaries, or TV shows, become a Line Producer or progress to Head of Production.

New NFTS graduates are sought-after and typically find employment soon after completing their courses. NFTS alumni are some of the most successful people working in UK film and television today, and many of our students make contacts while at the NFTS which continue in the professional world.

*12-month course; next intake September

Sargent-Disc (http://www.sargent-disc.com/sargent-disc-uk/news-insights/news/nfts-scholarship-update.aspx) generously provide two scholarships worth £3875 to support the training of talented individuals in the field of Production Management for Film & TV.

CURRICULUM

Covering the key skills required by Production Managers in today’s rapidly-changing environment, this course alternates workshops with practical experience on a range of NFTS productions including TV entertainment shows (live and multi-camera studio shoots), dramas, animation and documentary films.

The course has been developed to meet industry demand and NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors. Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School and productions are given cash production budgets.

The course covers these key skills recognised by the Industry:

- Extensive instruction and practice on scheduling & budgeting
- Health & Safety training including Production Safety Passport qualification
- Production Management for location and studio shoots
- First Aid for Film & TV Production
- Cash flow management and cost reporting
- Location Management
- Shooting abroad
- Research
- Contracts, copyright and legal
- Child licensing
- Post Production routes & delivery for film & television

This course includes work experience opportunities throughout the year and an industry placement at the end of the course. Previous students have enjoyed placements at Film4, Eon, Carnival Films, Endemol, Kudos, Dragonfly and Revolution Films. Television productions include Big Brother, Come Dine With Me, The BBC Proms, Babylon, 24-Live Another Day and Downton Abbey and feature films such as the Bond films:SkyFall and Spectre, Assassin’s Creed, and Star Wars: The Force Awakens.

TUTORS

Head of Production Management is Bex Hopkins who has worked in film and television production since 1999. Her short films have won many festival prizes including the LFF Turner Classic Movie Best Short Film award and BAFTA nominations for Nits and Lucky. Her feature film Mad, Sad & Bad premiered at EIFF 2009 and was released in 2010. She has taught on the Production Management diploma since 2010.

Other tutors include successful Line Producers and Production Managers; Jo Farr (Calendar Girls and Love and Other Disasters), Paul Sarony (Hideously Kinky, Bhaji on the Beach, Mrs Brown, Vampire Academy, and The Adventurer:The Curse of the Midas Box), Linda Stradling (I Shouldn’t be Alive, Seconds From Disaster, Horizon, Megastructures and author of the book ‘Production Management in TV & Film’) and Tina Jaffray (Weakest Link, Record Breakers, Blue Peter, London 2012 Olympic & Paralympic ceremonies, Vikings Live from the British Museum).

APPLY WITH

Please tell us of an event/production/gathering that you have organized. Include information on whether you had a budget and if so how successful you were in keeping to it; what preparation you did and what you would have done differently. No more than two pages (A4 paper)

HOW TO APPLY

You can apply directly to us at the NFTS by clicking on the link below:

- APPLY FOR PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT FOR FILM AND TELEVISION COURSE - https://nfts.co.uk/sign-me-up/apply-now/?nid=42

You can apply online, or download a word document of the application form to submit via email
When selecting your course, please ensure that you have read the entry requirements and details of the supporting materials that should accompany your application.

TIMING YOUR APPLICATION

We are happy to receive applications 24/7 and 365 days a year up until the deadline. That said, there is no particular advantage to submitting your application very early. The important thing is that your application shows us your latest work and tell us about your most recent filmmaking experiences.

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The MA Songwriting and Production course is delivered in the context of a dynamic contemporary music and cultural scene in Wales. Read more
The MA Songwriting and Production course is delivered in the context of a dynamic contemporary music and cultural scene in Wales. You will study close to a range of music venues, recording, radio, TV and film studios, as well as many music organisations, and with access to high profile, successful musicians and other industry professionals.

This innovative degree will enable you to make connections and collaborations within the world of both professional songwriting, and the wider music culture. Designed for those interested in lyrics, music and studio production, you’ll learn a range of creative techniques, as well as the history of popular song and the world of music publishing. For your final project, you will create an original portfolio of work to be showcased at the state-of-the art ATRiuM Building, situated in Cardiff – the vibrant capital city of Wales, a thriving international hub for music and the creative industries.

On completion, graduates will have the expertise and experience to work professionally within a range of different contexts. Taught by practising songwriters, producers, and published academics, the course is also delivered through a series of master classes from industry professionals.

If you choose to study on a creative postgraduate course at the University of South Wales, you will also benefit from being part of a vibrant international student community.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1558-ma-songwriting-and-production

What you will study

Selection of Modules include:
- Songwriting 1: Skills and Strategies
- Digital Music Production
- History, Analysis, Repertoire and Theory
- Research Paradigms
- Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship
- Research and Practice in the Creative and Cultural Industries
- Songwriting 2: Creative Co-writing
- Recording
- Performance: Practice and Presentation
- Major Project Portfolio OR Research Project (Learning Through Employment)

Research methods, business practice, publishing and promotion are embedded in all modules.

Common Modules:
The Faculty understands the importance of a strong grounding in research knowledge and skills, enterprise and innovation as part of a balanced postgraduate education.

We also recognise that each student has different requirements of their postgraduate experience.

You can choose to study one of the following three, 20 credit common modules. Each of these has a different focus, enabling you to select the module that will be most beneficial to you.

- Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship
This module aims to develop your knowledge of the methods to identify, develop and manage enterprise and innovation in the creative sector. It will then help you apply this to your own entrepreneurial project.

- Research and Practice in the Creative and Cultural Industries
The focus of this module is on the development of research knowledge and skills, while also encouraging critical engagement with approaches to creative practice. You will also explore ideas, debates and issues in the creative and cultural industries.

- Research Paradigms
This module focuses on research paradigms and their theoretical underpinnings. It also looks at key conceptual tools drawn from a wide range of subject areas relevant to postgraduate research in the creative industries.

PLEASE NOTE: Modules are subject to change.

Learning and teaching methods

The course incorporates desktop and studio-based production processes, with key business skills such as publishing, promotion, distribution and session planning.

Emphasis is on practical activities and encouraging you to find your own voice when developing material. Teaching sessions take place in a supportive environment, where students provide feedback on each others work. Practical sessions are underpinned by skills development and an understanding of theories about best practice in songwriting and production.

The course embraces singer/performer songwriters, as well as those who do not wish to perform their own material; solo and group outputs; creative collaboration; and material produced in studio/digital environments. The degree can also be studied by distance learning; UK and international students may choose to study using their own studio base and equipment.

“In an ever-changing industry where listening formats, recording processes and budgets are constantly evolving, songwriting and production are still a good way for a musician to have a long, fulfilling and successful career. It is hugely encouraging to see the University of South Wales offering [songwriting and production] to masters degree level. Creative areas can often be solitary places, so the opportunity to learn from others and share ideas in a creative environment such as the ATRiuM should prove an invaluable experience.”
Greg Haver, Record Producer – The Manic Street Preachers

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

In addition to working professionally as a songwriter or in song production, potential careers for graduates of this course could include working as facilitators in community and arts outreach activities, as educators in formal teaching settings, and as practitioners
such as performers, producers and writers.

There are also opportunities as researchers, administrators/managers of organisations, festivals and music events, or within music journalism and publishing, A & R, radio, freelance production, music promotion, or as part of other media production teams such as advertising, event management and games.

Assessment methods

Learning activities focus on the needs of individual students and are designed to accommodate students with a range of ambitions in relation to different kinds of approaches to songwriting and song production. Emphasis is placed on practical activities and on encouraging students to find their own voice when developing their material.

Teaching sessions take place in a supportive environment, where students provide feedback on each others work. Practical sessions are underpinned by skills development and an understanding of theories about/best practices in songwriting and song production.

‘I’d like to support the MA Songwriting course. It being the only course of its kind in Wales it will be a hugely valuable addition to the ATRiuM choice of courses. The teaching staff’s experience with writing and the music industry will also be a valuable asset to the course … I often meet students who study at the Atrium and the breadth of courses, and the skills they are developing and injecting back into Welsh music should be applauded. I look forward to hearing more output from this course, and the songwriters of the future coming from it onto our airwaves.’
Bethan Elfyn, DJ BBC Radio Wales

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This 15 month course - the only one of its kind in the UK - has been developed in response to film and television industry demands for suitably trained production sound professionals. Read more
This 15 month course - the only one of its kind in the UK - has been developed in response to film and television industry demands for suitably trained production sound professionals. The course is delivered in partnership with the BBC.

Quick Facts

- 15 Month Course
- Full-time
- Course starts in September
- Next intake: September 2016
- UK and EEA applicants only

- Unique course in UK.
- Location and studio sound recording on real productions.
- Music recording in studio.
- Multi-camera television studio production.
- Fisher Boom training.
- Introduction to post production techniques.
- Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.

TO APPLY CONTACT REGISTRY - https://nfts.co.uk/contact-us

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/diploma/production-sound-film-television

Entry requirements

A proven interest in sound - particularly recorded sound - a lively interest in film, television and music and a willingness to work as part of a team are essential. We are looking for people who are practically minded and who have a good general education although there are no specific educational requirements for this course. Interpersonal skills are as important as practical ones, because sound recordists need to be able to work effectively as part of a team. You’ll also need to be fit and have plenty of energy, as sound recording can be physically demanding. While we don’t select applicants on the basis of their ability to drive, we strongly recommend that you learn to drive, as a clean, current, driving license will be essential in your future career. You will require an EEA passport in order to apply for this course.

COURSE OVERVIEW

This course commences in September each year. The Production Sound for Film and Television Diploma in partnership with the BBC offers an unrivalled opportunity to learn the practical skills required for a career in this field, and covers:

- location sound recording techniques for drama and documentary
- sound production for multi-camera television
- music recording in the studio and on location

*15-month course; next intake September

Now well-established, the Production Sound Diploma course enjoys an excellent reputation within the Industry and each year’s students rapidly find work on completing the course. Graduates have been employed as sound assistants and boom operators on recent television productions including Ashes to Ashes, Midsomer Murders, Lewis, New Tricks, Holby City, Cranford, Jane Eyre, Gavin & Stacey, Life Begins, Judge John Deed, Downton Abbey, Fresh Meat, Spooks and Merlin.

Graduate work on feature films includes Syriana, Extraordinary Rendition, The Hills Have Eyes II, The Mutant Chronicles, Clash Of the Titans 2, Never Let Me Go, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2, World War Z, Sherlock Holmes : A Game of Shadows, The Iron Lady, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (2012).

The BBC provide an internship at the BBC for all students. Students on the course are called BBC Sound Scholars.

CURRICULUM

The course starts in September with a term of intensive workshops and exercises that prepare students to record sound on shoots with MA students in the following Spring and Summer terms. Alongside location and studio shoots for both documentary, fiction films and television productions, the programme of workshops and tuition continues throughout the course.

Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

TUTORS

The course leader and Head of Production Sound at the NFTS is BAFTA nominated sound recordist Fraser Barber, who has 45 credits on popular TV programmes such as Silent Witness, The Tunnel, Full Circle With Michael Palin, Mike Basset England Manager, Black Mirror, and Little Dorrit.

ALUMNI

Joanna Andrews (Ashes to Ashes, Spooks, Criminal Justice, Cranford), Tom Harrison (Reggie Perrin, Gavin & Stacey, Clash of the Titans 2), Jodie Campbell (Never Let Me Go, Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows), Sarah Howe (New Tricks, Lewis, Merlin) and Tom Fennell (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2, World War Z) studied at the NFTS.

APPLY WITH

- Please tell us of an event or production that you have recorded or one that you have experienced and would like to have recorded. Include information on what preparation you did and what you would have done differently. What inspired you about the event? No more than one page (A4 paper)
- If you have any work that you would like to share with us please post it to us on a DVD. However, this is not essential since you may not have had the opportunity to create something yet.

HOW TO APPLY

The application deadline has now passed, however there may still be a chance to apply. Please contact registry via email stating your name, course of interest and contact details:

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MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment. Read more
MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment.

Our MA is distinguished from traditional courses in that it specifically addresses the diversity and crossover of today's film and television culture with the aim of producing adaptive thinkers and highly creative practitioners. Our academic focus engages and interrogates film and television's status in the 21st century, which is often defined in terms of the digital age and digital culture.

On the course you will be required to examine, interpret and contest the notion of digital culture historically, socially, politically and artistically through both your research and creative practice. You will interrogate the increasingly blurred boundaries between film and television, art and technology, production and consumption, with the outcome being a fracturing of traditional categorisations. We reflect an era in which screenwriters Aaron Sorkin (Newsroom, The West Wing) and Lena Dunham (Girls, Tiny Furniture) experiment with dialogue and narrative, while conceptual artists Sam Taylor-Wood (Nowhere Boy, Love You More) and Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave, Shame) have shifted from the art gallery to the cinema. Directors such as Ben Wheatley (A Field in England, Sightseers) and companies such as Curzon and Film4 are making use of multi-platform release schedules, and brands including HBO, Amazon and Netflix are shaping the very nature of not only what, but how, we watch. MA Film & Television understands this fundamentally shifting zeitgeist.

In examining industrial structure and visual form you will theorise the shifting dynamics of an age where anyone with a phone and a laptop has the ability to record, edit and disseminate visual projects. Such 'democratisation' has arguably made both creative uniqueness and clear industry pathways less discernable, but has provided a new and fruitful framework for those who have the ideas, talent, dedication and adaptability to embrace such immense transitional potential. However, despite these multitudinous transformations attributed to digital culture, the ethos of our MA contends that fundamental skills remain the basis of both sound academic work and creative practice. Rather than being fearful of what is to come, or nostalgic for the past, this course gives you the confidence to look at film and television critically, and acquire cutting edge creative skills in order to produce intelligent, innovative and inspirational visual work.

Our philosophy is one of flexibility, so you'll shape the curriculum around your own interests, whether in theory, creative practice, or a combination of the two. Drawn from the fundamentals of history, theory and criticism, our theoretical strand develops tomorrow's cineastes, cultural commentators, journalists and academics. This also underpins our approach to practice. The most successful film and television makers are students of their chosen medium, highly knowledgeable of historical legacy and social-political context. You'll not only learn how to develop, write, produce, shoot, record, direct and edit well, but why, philosophically and creatively, your ideas are worth being made.

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/film-television-ma

How the course is taught

Our passion is reflected both in the teaching and research track record of our academics, our industry connections and visiting speakers, and the quality of our film and television professionals. Crossing disciplinary areas such as cultural studies, sociology, journalism, English, philosophy and, of course, film and television studies, our MA offers academically-minded students comprehensive supervision and guidance for moving onto PhD research.

Industry and academic links

We have a strong visiting lecturer programme with recent guests including critics Dr Mark Kermode, Professor Linda Ruth Williams and Dr Will Brooker. Our practice tutors are active writers, producers, directors, editors, sound designers and cinematographers who create substantive work across all screen media. We have a wide range of contacts and industry specialists who contribute to the course, including Tony Grisoni (writer of Southcliffe, Red Riding, and How I Live Now), Mary Burke (producer of For Those in Peril, Berberian Sound Studio and The Midnight Beast), and James Henry (writer for Campus and Green Wing).

Falmouth University also recently hosted the Channel 4 Talent Day and we are active in developing work placements and internships for our students. We have sent many of students to Warp Films and TwoFour since 2009, and regularly update our webpages with work experience opportunities and jobs. Our graduates have proceeded to further study and jobs across the film and television industry, for HBO, Sky, ITV, Disney and have worked on major feature films, most recently including About Time (Richard Curtis, 2013) The World's End (Edgar Wright, 2013), The Double (Richard Ayoade, 2014) and Disney's forthcoming Cinderella (Kenneth Branagh, 2015). Falmouth University's MA in Film & Television is for students who to place themselves at the cutting edge of screen culture.

Course outline

The course is divided into three semesters of 15 weeks. Each semester offers the fundamentals vital to every academic and practitioner, and elective choices so you can shape your own learning.

What you'll do

- Study block 1
Foundation
The first semester consists of three core units, offering a diverse entry point to all aspects of the study of film and television, and the interrelationship of theory and practice:

Theorising Contemporary Film & Television Culture (Theory)

In this module you will explore the theoretical conceptualisations of film and television in the context of contemporary academic thought and popular discourse around the concept of digital culture. We will start from a point of questioning the multi-layered and contested effects of digital culture on film and television as discrete forms. You will consider the interrelationship and fusion between media in terms of production, distribution and exhibition examining the advent of new forms of representation and interaction. But we will also look at how traditional notion of film and television are being preserved and even being popular as a reaction to the effects of the digital. The module will also assess and interrogate the economic and technological developments of a more integrated and interactive media environment in terms of the cross-pollination of form and content, and socio-cultural effects on contemporary audiences.

Film & Television Industry Case Study (Theory/Practice)

In this module you will explore the industrial parameters of contemporary film and television based around the experience and expertise of current professionals. The module will utilise the School of Film & Television's many industry links to bring in guest speakers from the BBC, Channel 4, Sky, TwoFour Broadcast, Warp Films, Sheffield Doc Fest, Cornwall Film Festival, Doc Heads, BFI, Pinewood Studios, Dogbite and EngineHouse VFX. You will then have an opportunity to question these professionals about their respective sectors as a basis for a case study. Alternatively, you can investigate the sector/practitioner of your own choosing, with tutor support. The module will also contain workshops on the fundamentals of creative industry research and methodology. The module is designed so that you learn both the challenges and values of networking, and researching specific job roles and industry backgrounds in order to effectively plot your own career trajectory.

Creative Practices (Practice)

This module will engage you in the production workflow, focusing on how creative, professional and technical roles shape a final film or television project. Your weekly seminars and workshops will guide you through pre-production, production and post-production processes, enabling you to devise, develop and produce a short filmed project as part of a small crew of four to six students. You will, therefore, develop your technical skills and production practices in order to devise and deploy modes of creative practice which may include, but are not limited to, research and development, screenwriting, production management, producing, directing, cinematography, lighting, editing and the recording and design of sound.

- Study block 2
Specialisms
The second semester gives you the opportunity to specialise, choosing from a ranging of theory, practice or combination modules. Assessment of combination modules is either through an academic essay or a practice project. Potential optional modules include:

- Cultural Studies to Digital Sociology (Theory/Practice)
- Screen Futures (Theory/Practice)
- Globalisation in Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Factual Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Screenwriting for Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Work Placement (Theory/Practice)

- Study block 3
Expertise
Depending on your chosen specialism, in the third semester you'll produce either:

- Dissertation (Theory)
- Film & Production Portfolio (Theory/Practice)
- Conceptual Project (Theory/Practice)

Facilities

The purpose-built film school facilities include:

- 116-seat cinema, with Christie M Series HD projection (as used in Vue cinemas) and 7.2 surround sound

- Equipment store with a range of Blackmagic, Red, Panasonic, JVC, GoPro, Canon DSLR and C100 cameras and lenses, jibs, tracks and dollies

- Digital production suites equipped with Final Draft (screenwriting), Movie Magic (production management) and a range of edit software, including Adobe Creative Cloud/Suite, Final Cut and AVID

- Avid Unity MediaNetwork Edit server

- Recording and sound edit studios equipped with Pro Tools audio editing and Foley traps

- 14x8m TV studio with three studio cameras, full gallery facility, Chromatte grey screen, blue/green screen and full lighting rig

- Centroid 3D (Pinewood-networked) Motion Capture studio/research lab

- Virtual Studio using the latest technology

- 23,500-title TV and film library

Experience you'll get

- Highly flexible, student-focused curriculum

- Mentoring with industry professionals

- Opportunities for placement and work experience

- Creative environment for collaboration

- Using industry-standard software

- A vibrant visiting speaker programme

- Student experience-centred ethos

Assessment

- Continuous assessment with no formal examinations
- Core theory based on written assignments
- Core practice assessed on visual project and accompanying portfolios
- Elective modules all with theory/practice options
- Dissertation and/or major project in final semester

Careers

- Research, teaching or postgraduate study in art/humanities subject areas

- All technical/creative roles linked with direction, production, cinematography, editing, sound, lighting; writing for the screen; film and television criticism; research for film and TV

- Film and TV marketing, distribution and sales – digital and social media content/distribution

- Film festival and arts curatorship – media-based project management

Find out how to apply here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/apply

Visiting Us

We hold open days throughout the year so you can meet current students and staff, view our campuses and facilities, and find out more about studying at Falmouth.

Find out more - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/open-days

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The course gives students the opportunity to develop their existing creative music production skills using our experienced staff and world-class facilities as resources. Read more
The course gives students the opportunity to develop their existing creative music production skills using our experienced staff and world-class facilities as resources. Students who complete the award will be equipped with the skillsets necessary to compete for work related to music and sound production in the highly competitive environments of the creative industries.

Music production today not only involves being able to record, mix, and edit music in a variety of different genres and situations; it also involves an understanding of composition and arranging, an ability to work in different software environments with a high level of competence, an understanding of performance practices in different contexts, and an understanding of the relationships between music, sound and other media.

There are opportunities to develop all of these skills on the award, always with an emphasis on creativity and a focus on rigorous academic underpinning. Successful students will thus be afforded the opportunity to progress to further postgraduate research should they wish to do so.

Course content

Semester One
-Modern Composition in Context
-Audio Visual Composition
-Negotiated Study: Music
-Option module (Options include Advanced Recording Techniques, Mixing Techniques, Acoustics, Mastering and Signal Processing)

Semester Two
-Research Methods for Music
-Performance Practices
-Creative Music Software Design
-Option module (Options include Pro Tools for Music Production, Mastering Techniques, Electronics for Musicians)

Graduate destinations

Just some of the routes taken by our students after graduating:
-Software engineering (SSL)
-Environmental acoustics (RPS Group Acoustic Consultants, Hann Tucker Associates)
-Education
-Live sound
-Film sound

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The course is aimed equally at composers of electronic music in the traditional sense, and contemporary artists who may combine the role of composer with producer, engineer, musician and DJ. Read more
The course is aimed equally at composers of electronic music in the traditional sense, and contemporary artists who may combine the role of composer with producer, engineer, musician and DJ. London College of Music (LCM) at the University of West London is at the forefront of the academic study of music technology in general - and popular electronic music composition in particular.

Course detail

The course encompasses a broad range of electronic music, from popular electronic dance music styles to art forms such as electroacoustic music. It assumes you have a level of competence in composition or music sequencing and production. Composition studies include one-to-one tutorials in an area of electronic music that you will negotiate with your lecturer.

You will also examine the history and concepts of electronic music, the creation of sound installations and live performances, together with options that include the theory and practice of sequencing, sound synthesis, sampling, production techniques and the use of Max/MSP.

This course helps you build a wide range of skills, knowledge and creative strategies essential for a successful career in the contemporary, fast-changing music industry - or as a springboard to further postgraduate study at PhD level.

Modules

Depending on the route you choose, the core modules you study will be:

• Practical Composition one and two
• Orchestration and Arranging
• Conducting

Or

• Electronic Music Composition one and two
• Developing your Career
• Interactive Music Technology
• Research Methods
• Dissertation or Project

Optional modules include:

• Stylistic Composition (pre 1900)
• Stylistic Composition (post 1900)
• Multi-track Recording and Mixing for Surround
• Film and TV Score Production
• Advanced Non-linear Recording
• Combining Sounds
• Digital Audio Interface Design for Music
• The Development of Audio Technology
• Manipulating Sounds.

Format

The department's extensive research in this subject area means our teaching is informed directly by the world's most up-to-date ideas on the academic study of record production. Also, our teaching staff are renowned for their professional expertise.

Teaching involves a combination of lectures, practical workshops, seminars and tutorial discussions. Our teaching rooms are equipped with ProTools HD systems, Audient mixing consoles and C24 control surfaces, and lectures involve frequent practical demonstrations and examples.

The contact hours for the course are concentrated into two days for full-time and one day for part-time students. For the rest of week you will book your own studio and computer time to complete your assignments and develop your composing skills, network, create music with other LCM students and engage in self-directed study. The course runs for a complete year - normally September to September - in full-time mode and two years for part-time.

Career and study progression

This course will equip you with an enviable set of skills that will enable you to succeed in the fast-changing music industry.

Some examples of the professional roles graduates have progressed to after completing the course include:
• Composer
• Sound Designer
• Remixer.

After completing the course you can continue your studies with either a PhD or DMus at the University of West London.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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Future-proof your creative skills with the Master of Creative Industries. Read more

Overview

Future-proof your creative skills with the Master of Creative Industries.

This degree prepares you for a career in both media and creative industries by teaching you a range of practical and entrepreneurial knowledge and skills so you can produce, publish, distribute and promote media and creative projects in a real-world context.

You will be mentored by industry award-winning academics and high-level experts from the music and screen industries, and have access to world-class production facilities for screen, music and digital media production.

Core units address:
- digital media strategies
- creative entrepreneurship
- the design and delivery of projects for a range of platforms and media

There are also two specialisations on offer which deepen students' production skills in their chosen area of focus:
- audio and music production explores the techniques and art of recording, providing you with an understanding of the processes, practices and issues involved in the production of recorded music.

- screen media production explores contemporary screen production ideas and practices with particular emphasis on shifting practices in our networked, digital world. Screen Media Production combines research critical reflection and production.

See the website http://courses.mq.edu.au/international/postgraduate/master/master-of-creative-industries

Key benefits

- Learn from award-winning writers, filmmakers, documentary program makers, broadcasters and audio and music specialists, including Kathryn Millard (internationally recognised and highly awarded writer and filmmaker), Maree Delofski (recipient of NSW Premier's History Award and an Australian Film Institute [AFI] nominee), and Julian Knowles (award winning composer, performer and producer)
- Builds on your previous studies and professional experience
- Gives you the skills to produce, release and promote your projects
- Develops your entrepreneurship skills and understanding of the online environment
- You will work on practical projects in world-class production facilities

Suitable for

Are you an arts, media or other graduate who wants to develop more focused creative media skills? The Master of Creative Industries allows you to hone your craft with the help of respected industry professionals.

Recognition of prior learning

Course Duration
- 1.5 year program
Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline;
Bachelor degree in any discipline and work experience in a relevant area;
Work experience in a relevant area.

- 1 year program
Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline and work experience in a relevant area;
Bachelor degree in any discipline and Honours or Graduate Diploma in a relevant discipline;
Honours or Graduate Diploma in relevant discipline and work experience in a relevant area at senior level;
Work experience in a relevant area at a senior level.

- Relevant disciplines
Arts/Humanities, Performing Arts, Visual Arts, Graphic and Design Studies, Communication and Media Studies, Studies in Human Society, Language and Literature, Political Science and Policy Studies.

- Relevant areas
Music or Media industries, production.

English language requirements

IELTS of 6.5 overall with minimum 6.0 in each band, or equivalent

All applicants for undergraduate or postgraduate coursework studies at Macquarie University are required to provide evidence of proficiency in English.
For more information see English Language Requirements. http://mq.edu.au/study/international/how_to_apply/english_language_requirements/

You may satisfy the English language requirements if you have completed:
- senior secondary studies equivalent to the NSW HSC
- one year of Australian or comparable tertiary study in a country of qualification

Careers

Career Opportunities
Our graduates find work and freelance across the music, media and screen industries – in record production, sound design, film and television, radio, online production, documentary screen, independent film, cross-platform production, multimedia or digital agencies, and in broadcast and community media.

See the website http://courses.mq.edu.au/international/postgraduate/master/master-of-creative-industries

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Be part of a lively popular music research community that embraces everything from metal music to film scores with the opportunity to work alongside performers… Read more
Be part of a lively popular music research community that embraces everything from metal music to film scores with the opportunity to work alongside performers, composers and studio experts.This course is about the here and now - you will study everything from folk to jazz, right through to rock, hip-hop and dance, developing your knowledge of contemporary popular music.You'll join peers from backgrounds in cultural studies, sociology, music and the creative arts to explore today's local live music scene and its connection to the wider national and international industry. From getting out into the Leeds area and conducting ethnographic research into local gigs and events, to composing scores for film and television, you'll discover how a wide variety of communities fuse together to create what is recognised as a vibrant and expanding scene.Whether it's developing your music editing techniques in our studios, or organising events and liaising with artists at Leeds Festival, you'll gain the hands-on experience employers are looking for, gathering evidence for your major research project.This course is the perfect springboard to make contacts, help you discover the interconnectivity of popular music and culture, and really engage with a vibrant and varied scene which covers everything from metal right through to country.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/popularmusicandculture_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

With more festivals and independent producers and artists than ever before, the need for live music and industry professionals has soared.

Employment opportunities could be open to you in sound engineering, performance, teaching, song writing, production, music for film and television, music journalism, marketing and PR, and events organisation.

Alternatively you may wish to further your research by studying for a PhD.

- Performer
- Songwriter
- Sound Technician
- Events Organiser

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

As well as having access to modern, professional music studios, you'll benefit from being taught by a highly skilled and experienced teaching team, including Professor Karl Spracklen who is Secretary of the International Society for Metal Music Studies and the Editor of Metal Music Studies. You'll also have the chance to network with industry professionals during our guest lecture series. Previous speakers have included Leeds Festival boss Melvin Benn and chart-toppers Rudimental. We also have fantastic links with local and national music, arts and festival organisations, which help ensure you get the most from your course.

Core Modules

Popular Music as Leisure & Culture
Examine the importance of popular music as a form of leisure and culture. You will explore music subcultures through sociology, cultural geography, cultural studies and leisure theory.

Researching Popular Music & Culture
Develop an understanding of the strategies used in the study of popular music and culture, drawing on advanced approaches from sociology, musicology, cultural studies, ethnography, leisure and other relevant areas.

Popular Music Analysis
Examine performance, record production, video and reception and the meaning of music for your small scale, individual research project which focuses on the analysis of popular music artefacts.

Popular Music in Contemporary Culture
Engage in debate and discussion of how, where and why certain strands of musical productivity and creativity remain constantly part of the vocabulary of popular music.

Final Individual Project
Combine your learning into a significant piece of work, the nature of which will be determined by yourself and the course team.

Option Modules

Studio Production Skills
Produce a series of sound design projects and create your own systems for the purpose of manipulating/processing sound which will demonstrate your understanding of the concepts behind the tools used for sound design.

Creative Music Production
Develop a broad understanding of the creative possibilities of the studio environment by investigating a range of theoretical, technical, and creative approaches to the production process.

Music Industries in Context
Develop a range of theoretical perspectives drawing on contemporary research into the ecology of the music industries and how different stakeholders across the music sector work together.

Music Industries in Practice
Investigate a host of contemporary issues affecting the practice of operating in the music industries, focusing on one key area determined by your own interests.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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This course combines the teaching and research strengths of our School. We train you in methods that will support the oil industry's efforts to maximise recovery from oil and gas fields and extend the life of existing fields. Read more
This course combines the teaching and research strengths of our School. We train you in methods that will support the oil industry's efforts to maximise recovery from oil and gas fields and extend the life of existing fields.

This Petroleum Geoscience course pathway meets industry's demand for skilled personnel by training graduates with specialist, research-based knowledge in appraisal, development and production as well as the fundamentals of reservoir engineering.

The course concentrates on how to characterise and model a reservoir and fluid flows. We also explore the impact of recovery mechanisms and dynamic displacement. You will also take units in seismic interpretation.

Career opportunities

The petroleum industry is the largest employer of earth science graduates, with good employment prospects in the United Kingdom and overseas in oil companies, consultancies, service companies, government bodies, the financial sector, and in teaching and research. During the research project students normally have the opportunity to work within sponsor oil company offices, gaining valuable industrial experience. The MSc course has a very strong track record for employability.

In semester 1, we typically have oil companies visiting the School to provide careers information and seek applications (typically BG, BP, Shell, ConocoPhillips, Exxon, Hess, Talsiman, Neftex, Fugro etc). Some also interview in the University. This is in addition to the University career fairs and other employment events.

Petroleum Geoscience and Engineering at the University of Manchester has well-established links with the petroleum industry. Research is funded by a large number of international oil companies. Guest speakers are invited on a regular basis to the department. There is also an AAPG Student Chapter , PESGB Student Chapter, SPE Chapter and EAGE Chapter, which arrange meetings throughout the year.

Many of the academic staff teaching on the course have considerable petroleum industry experience or consult for the oil industry. In addition the teaching team has a very strong group of external lecturers, who are all active consultants or employees in the petroleum industry, and who bring considerable expertise and industrial links.

BP staff teach on the course, Shell teaches the 'Malampaya oil game' which offers an insight into the industry.

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Embrace your interest in film, television and music by becoming a skilled professional in sound recording. We have an excellent reputation for teaching film and music, with many of our graduates going on to win BAFTA's and Oscars. Read more
Embrace your interest in film, television and music by becoming a skilled professional in sound recording.

We have an excellent reputation for teaching film and music, with many of our graduates going on to win BAFTA's and Oscars.

You might be a budding filmmaker, journalist, photographer or documentary director, or simply have a creative passion for recording sound. Whatever your motivation, we will teach you professional techniques in music recording and post production so that you can record high-quality sound for the moving image.

This short course - taught over four weekends in the year - is a fantastic opportunity to learn from experienced film and recording professionals in state-of-the-art studios. We?re dedicated to providing you with hands-on, practical experience by giving you opportunities to produce your own work and explore the creative possibilities in sound recording and mixing.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/soundrecording_apd

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

There is a strong demand for well-trained soundrecording professionals and we provide the skills to help you on your way tobecoming an expert in quality sound broadcasting. If you would like to continueyour studies in this area there are opportunities to move onto one of our masterscourses such as Music for the Moving Image or Sound Design.

- Audio Editor
- Audio Engineer
- Studio Manager
- Composer for Film and Television

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You'll be learning at our Northern Film School ? the first film school in the UK to receive JAMES accreditation. JAMES, a professional body that represents organisations across the media sector, described us as 'a benchmark against which all other film courses need to be measured'.

Taught over four weekends in the year - Saturday to Monday - we've designed this course so it fits easily into your lifestyle, requiring minimum time off work.

You'll have access to a suite of professional music studios, including recording rooms, audio booths, instruments, portable audio recorders and a lab with soundcard and mixer. You'll be able to access an impressive range of facilities at our Northern Film School, including production studios, edit suites, production offices, and film and script archive.

We also offer exciting short study opportunities in film, music and performing arts, taught during Easter and Summer. These creative workshops, ranging from two days to a week, are a great way to build your expertise for professional use, embrace a subject you're passionate about, or develop your skills before applying for one of our postgraduate qualifications.

Core Modules

Studio Skills
You will gain a strong understanding of the creative possibilities of the studio environment through the development of a musical product.

Studio and Sound Location
We will equip you with the theory and the techniques for recording and mixing sound for film, television and radio.

Laura Taylor

Senior Lecturer

"Our courses prepare you for an industry that is ever-changing, demanding and highly competitive. You will emerge with a strong understanding of your specialism, and with a focused approach towards personal development and career planning."

Specialist sound tutor Laura Taylor has worked for the BBC, Channel 5, ITV Yorkshire and Discovery Channel. She has experience in live television, post production sound and commercial and community radio, and has worked within the educational and community sector. Laura has very close links with community radio station ELFM and the Soundmill Studios in Leeds.

Facilities

- Sound recording & editing facilities
You'll have access to a suite of professional music studios, including film composition and audio post production rooms, instruments, together with portable field recording equipment and extensive computer workstation facilities.

A comprehensive range of audio editing, composition and sound processing software is available.

- Northern Film School
You will also be able to access an impressive range of facilities at our Northern Film School, including production studios, edit suites, production offices, and film and script archive.

- Library
Our Library is open 24/7, every day of the year. However you like to work, we have got you covered with group and silent study areas, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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The MA Multimedia Journalism is Scotland’s leading journalism Masters. It’s NCTJ & BJTC accredited; offers placements with BBC, STV, Record, and Herald; achieves 75% employment; & wins more Scottish Student Journalism Awards than any other Masters. Read more
The MA Multimedia Journalism is Scotland’s leading journalism Masters. It’s NCTJ & BJTC accredited; offers placements with BBC, STV, Record, and Herald; achieves 75% employment; & wins more Scottish Student Journalism Awards than any other Masters.

This timetable-intensive programme will teach you all the skills all journalism employers in all media now expect of all entrants: shorthand; news reporting and feature writing; sub-editing & print production, the essentials of stills photography; radio interviewing, scripting, digital editing, voice presentation, studio self-operation; HD-TV digital video camera shooting, writing to picture, digital editing and studio and piece-to-camera presentation; online news writing, podcasting and web content management.

Why Choose This Programme

-Excellent employment record in journalism: 100% in 09-10; 89% in 08-09; 75% in 10-11.
-Only double-accredited – NCTJ and BJTC – Masters in central Scotland.
-Top university journalism programme in Scotland in NCTJ exam results (Reporting, Media Law, Court Reporting, Government, Shorthand) in both 2009 and 2010.
-Our students won more nominations in each of the 2009, 2010, and 2012 Scottish Student Journalism Awards than all other Scottish university courses put together.
-Agreed work-experience/placement schemes in place with all major Scottish print and broadcast news organisations.
-All journalism lecturers are experienced journalists and/or NCTJ examiners.

What You'll Learn

The MA Multimedia Journalism at GCU includes all the key skills and knowledge you will need to begin a career in journalism.

Shorthand, Government, Law, and News & Online Writing are all compulsory subjects, with classes in these subjects and skills running every week for the entire length of the diploma programme.

In the first trimester, each week you will have practical classes in news reporting and feature writing; sub-editing & print production; and radio/TV/online journalism and production skills; as well as a weekly class studying and reflecting on Journalism in Context.

Then in second trimester the practical balance moves towards more demanding specialist reporting skills (court, council, financial, for example), and live multimedia newsday team productions, plus a specialist option.

The programme therefore is quite intense and the timetable busy, but nevertheless in each trimester almost one-third of the 39 hours in the week's timetable is left free, to enable you to do the reporting work off-campus and self-directed production practice your subjects will require you to put in.

Work Placement

You are guided by a journalist lecturer advisor in seeking and obtaining not less than 10 days’ work experience in a journalism organisation by the end of the diploma, and not less than a further ten days by the end of the Masters.

Mostly this will be undertaken during vacation and assessment weeks, but there are possibilities of individual day shifts and up to one week only during teaching weeks, by negotiation with the programme leader.

Agreements are in place for placements with all major news and journalism organisations in Scotland, across TV , radio, newspapers, magazines and online.

Career Opportunities

Masters graduates have gone on within 6 months of graduation to full time work in TV news, online and multimedia news, newspapers, magazines, radio, online marketing, and public relations, in Scotland, London, Manchester, Leeds, Wales, France, Austria, Georgia and Australia.

Their employers include the BBC, STV, Sky, Sky Sports, France24, Press Association, Glasgow Herald / Evening Times, Deadline News Agency, Edinburgh Evening News, Farmer’s Weekly, Clyde and Forth Press, S1.com, BiP Solutions, Real Radio, Bigmouth Media, North West Evening Mail, Portsmouth News, Western Gazette, Best Scottish Weddings Magazine, The Big Partnership, Scottish Football Association, Connect Communications.

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This course is designed to respond to a growing shortage of workforce in manufacturing sector. Read more

Why take this course?

This course is designed to respond to a growing shortage of workforce in manufacturing sector. It intends to equip our students with relevant and up-to-date knowledge and skills of advanced design tools, materials, manufacturing processes and systems in conjunction with developing efficient operation and effective management skills. Integrating these will ensure our students to develop the technological and practical ability to meet manufacturing demand for product, company and market needs.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Use simulation and modelling application software for virtual design and manufacturing
Utilise our strong links with companies and investigate real industrial problems to enhance your understanding of the profession
Tie in the topic of your individual project with one of our research groups and benefit from the expertise of our actively researching academics

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course has been accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) meeting the standards set by the Engineering Council in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC). It will provide you with some of the underpinning knowledge, understanding and skills for eventual registration as an Incorporated (IEng) or Chartered Engineer (CEng).

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Design
Research and development
Product manufacture
Project management

Module Details

This course aims to provide you with the inter-disciplinary knowledge, attributes and skills necessary to apply the principles of advanced manufacturing systems within the manufacturing industry. You will study several key topics and also complete a four-month individual project tailored to your individual interests that can take place in our own laboratories or, by agreement, in industry.

Here are the units you will study:

Integrated Manufacturing Systems: Systems concepts and techniques are developed in logistics and manufacturing areas with a strong emphasis on simulation techniques and practical case study analysis.

Operations and Quality Management: A strategic approach is used with modern inventory and supply chain management and logistics tools and techniques. Management strategies are developed for quality, including quality systems and quality control.

Advanced Materials: This unit is designed to deal with a wide range of advanced materials for engineering applications. Teaching will address analytical and numerical methods to assess the strength, stiffness, toughness, non-linearity behaviours, vibration and failures of engineering materials for component and structure design.

Supply Chain Management: Supply chain management involves the coordination of production, inventory, location and transportation, among participants in a supply chain. This unit considers the principles and tools of supply chain management, with an emphasis on lean six sigma methods.

Virtual Systems Design and Simulation for Production: This unit is particularly designed to enhance students’ analytical knowledge and practical skills focusing on a sustainable development of systematic approaches and lean production methods to support manufacturing systems analysis, design and performance evaluation with an aid of using advanced computer design and modelling simulation tools.

CAD/CAM Systems: An integrated approach is used towards CAD and CAM. Significant practical hands-on experience is given with commercial level software. Emphasis is placed on case study analysis and system selection and evaluation.

Individual Project: A strong feature that comprises a third of the course. You will be encouraged to undertake projects where possible in industrial companies. However, we also use our extensive resources and staff skills to undertake them within the University.

Programme Assessment

You will be taught through a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials (personal and academic), laboratory sessions and project work. The course has a strong practical emphasis with a significant amount of your time spent our laboratories. We pride ourselves on working at the leading-edge of technology and learning practices.

A range of assessment methods encourages a deeper understanding of engineering and allows you to develop your skills. Here’s how we assess your work:

Written examinations
Coursework
Laboratory-based project work
A major individual project/dissertation

Student Destinations

The demand for more highly skilled manufacturing engineers is always present and it is generally accepted that there is a current shortage of engineers.

This course has a record of almost 100 per cent of our graduates gaining employment in relevant areas such as manufacturing and logistics management, systems engineering, production engineering, design engineering and project management. You could work for a large company, in the Armed Forces or in one of the many small companies within this sector. You could even start your own specialist company.

Roles our graduates have taken on include:

Manufacturing engineer
Product design engineer
Aerospace engineer
Application engineer

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The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/. Read more
The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/

The established and exciting degree is designed to help you understand digital transformations in media, culture and society and apply this understanding in practice, in the media and creative industries and in further research. You will be equipped with skills that can be applied to current and future developments in digital media, social media, computing and other aspects of technology.

The MA in Digital Media educates aspiring media practitioners and academics as well as early and mid-career professionals who seek to reflect on their roles in a structured and stimulating learning environment designed to give all students up-to-the-minute knowledge of digital media and the skills to apply that knowledge to future developments.

The MA offers two pathways:

-Pathway 1 is a theory programme where you learn about developments in digital media and technology from a wide range of perspectives

-Pathway 2 is a theory and practice programme where you improve your skills, understanding and experience in one of the following areas:

Documentary
Image making
Journalism
Writing

Acclaimed academics and practitioners

Benefit from the experience and expertise of one of the world’s leading media and communications departments. You'll be taught by theorists and practitioners of international standing: Sarah Kember, Joanna Zylinska, Graham Young, Tony Dowmunt, Angela Phillips, Julian Henriques and David Morley.

Work placements and internships

The MA in Digital Media regularly attracts offers of work placements and internships. Recently these have come from Google, The Science Museum and N1creative.com.

Facilities

Our students have access to state-of-the-art facilities including well-equipped lecture and seminar rooms, exhibition spaces, computer facilities and digital media suites.

The department is also currently host to the renowned philosopher of media and technology, Bernard Stiegler and students will have access to his modulein Media Philosophy as well as priority access to the innovative and popular option After New Media. Designed to complement the MA in Digital Media, this course provides a framework for thinking about the current media environment as well as future forms of human and computer interaction.

An established record

The MA in Digital Media has been redefining media theory and practice since 2004. Our students become proficient in:

the history, sociology and philosophy of digital media
the application of critical conceptual skills to specialist areas and future forms of media
multimedia skills in image making (photography, video, animation, graphic art) script writing, journalism and documentary
MA Digital Media students have access the pioneering option ‘After New Media’, a non-assessed online module which explores the themes of self mediation, ethical mediation and intelligent mediation, and develops a framework for thinking about 'life' after new media. As befits a course of this kind we will be combining media, and exploring their pedagogic potential – uniting digital-online technologies with more traditional teaching formats, such as reading groups, seminars and an end of year symposium.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Sarah Kember.

Modules & Structure

The programme consists of:

Two compulsory core modules
Pathway 1 - between two and four option modules (worth 60 credits) OR
Pathway 2 - a two-term practice block (worth 30 credits) and either one or two option modules (worth 30 credits)
The dissertation or the practice/theory project

Assessment

Seen take-home paper; essays; dissertation or practice/theory project and other production work in the area of documentary, image-making, journalism or fiction.

Programme overview

This is an exciting programme which offers a critical, contextual and practical approach to digital media and technology. It problematises approaches to the 'new' media in academic and professional debate, especially those which overemphasise the potential for radical social change led by a homogenised technology itself.

The programme is defined by its resistance to technological determinism and its insistence on the importance of addressing the social and historical contexts within which a range of media technologies are employed. In order to provide a contextual framework and facilitate the conceptualisation of digital media and technologies as fully cultural forms and processes, the programme will draw on a range of disciplines including: media and cultural studies, sociology, anthropology and philosophy. However, the programme will remain focused on key contemporary concerns about the potential role of digital media in society and on refiguring the contours of the 'new' media debate.

The programme offers two pathways. Pathway 1 addresses central theoretical and conceptual concerns relating to digital media. Pathway 2 combines theoretical analysis and practical work, offering students the opportunity to explore new media theories and concepts in practice. Pathway 2 is primarily aimed at students who already have some experience in one of the areas on offer: documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism; writing. It is meant to appeal to media industry professionals who are keen to reflect critically on their practice within a structured learning environment, graduates of practice-based courses but also those who have gained their practical experience in documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism or writing in informal settings.

Programme structure

The first compulsory core course is Digital Media - critical perspectives and this is taught in a small workshop format in the Autumn term. This course functions as a foundation for the second core course and offers students a map of the key debates in digital media. The course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions and is supported by the provision of one-to-one tutorials.

The second compulsory core course is Technology and Cultural Form - debates, models, dialogues and this develops questions of technology, power, politics and subjectivity which were introduced in the first core course. The first part of this course highlights the key conceptual concerns of a contextualised approach to digital media plus the relevant debates and models formulated by key figures in the field. The second part of this course aims to generate a dialogue between theoreticians and practitioners around some of the most intellectually stimulating, contentious and contemporary ideas in the field without necessarily seeking a resolution. This course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions during the Spring term and is supported by the weekly provision of one-to-one tutorials.

Students are required to take options from the lists provided by the Media and Communications, Anthropology, Comparative Literature and Sociology Departments as well as the Centre for Cultural Studies. Examples might include: After New Media, Nature and Culture, Cultural Theory, Globalisation, Risk and Control, Embodiment and Experience, Political Communications. Options are taught primarily through lectures and seminars and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

Each student's option profile is discussed with the programme convenor in order to ensure that the balance of subject-specific topics is appropriate for the individual concerned. Option courses are taught primarily through lectures, seminars and tutorials and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

All students are required to produce either a 12,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor or a practice/theory project in the area of documentary, photography and image making, journalism or fiction. The length of the practical element is dependent on the media and the form used and will be agreed in advance with the supervisor. It will, however, be comparable with practical projects undertaken in practice MA programmes in the relevant field. Students undertaking the practice/theory project will also be expected to submit a 3-4000 word analysis of their practice which locates it within the theoretical debates explored in the MA as a whole. This essay may be presented as a separate document or as an integral part of the project depending on the nature of the project and by a agreement with both theory and practice supervisors.

Programme outcomes

The programme's subject specific learning outcomes require students to analyse and contextualise developments in digital media and technology with reference to key debates in the history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of the media. Students who opt for the practice/theory pathway will also be required to produce material of publishable or broadcast standard and to evaluate the ways in which theoretical and practical insights intersect. All students will develop a wide range of transferable qualities and skills necessary for employment in related or unrelated areas. These are described by the Quality Assurance Agency as: 'the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility, decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations, and the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development'.

By the end of the programme students will be able to:

-Map and critically evaluate key debates in the field of new media
-Analyse and contextualise current and future developments in digital media and technology
-Evaluate and articulate key historical, sociological, anthropological and philosophical approaches to the study of digital media and technology
-Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of at least four differing areas of inquiry
-Demonstrate an advanced level of conceptual knowledge and (where relevant) practical skill appropriate for a sustained piece of work in the field
-Prepare and deliver clearly argued and informed work
-Locate, retrieve and present relevant information for a specific project
-Manage a complex array of competing demands and work effectively to a deadline
-Work resourcefully and independently
-Think critically and/or work practically within a given context

Skills

We provide graduates with skills that are cutting edge: in the critical analysis and/or creative production of digital media; in the disciplinary knowledge and conceptual frameworks necessary for current and future forms of media and technology; in the awareness of how digital media and technologies are re-shaping society from the ways we communicate (through social media and web 2.0) to the increasingly ‘smart’ environments in which we live.

Careers

Our programme provides a theory and practice pathway and prepares students for work in the following areas:

-media and creative industries; advertising, marketing and PR (graduates of the MA Digital Media have found work with Virgin Media, Google, the BBC and other leading organisations worldwide)
-research and academia (graduates from this programme have gone on to study for PhD degrees in higher education institutions around the world and also here with us)
-media production and new media art (graduates have exhibited, published and produced work in photography, journalism, TV, documentary, film and multimedia)

Graduate Ekaterina discusses her career:

"I work for a company, called Visual DNA, which already sounds like life happening After New Media. The company is the largest data provider in Europe and is totally multinational. We actually try to analyse human visual DNA, you memories, feelings, thoughts about the future, anticipations, etc by creating personality quizzes where instead of verbal answers we tend to use images.

My role is as Creative Developer. It involves working with images from concept to finding/shooting and post-production. My qualifications perfectly matched what they’ve been looking for, Digital Media rocks!

My tip for the new-to-be-graduates is this: physically go to places and companies and talk to people. It really opens up loads of possibilities, and when I tell someone where I’ve graduated from they look impressed, and there is some sort of respect coming from them."

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Oxford University's Master of Studies in Creative Writing is a two-year, part-time master's degree course offering a unique combination of high contact hours, genre specialization, and critical and creative breadth. Read more
Oxford University's Master of Studies in Creative Writing is a two-year, part-time master's degree course offering a unique combination of high contact hours, genre specialization, and critical and creative breadth.

The emphasis of this postgraduate creative writing course is cross-cultural and cross-genre, pointing up the needs and challenges of the contemporary writer who produces his or her creative work in the context of a global writerly and critical community. The master's degree in creative writing offers a clustered learning format of five Residences, two Guided Retreats and one Placement over two years. The research Placement, a distinguishing feature of the course, offers between one and two weeks' hands-on experience of writing in the real world. Students may undertake their placement in a literary agency, a publishing house, the offices of a literary periodical, a theatre company, a screen production company, or other relevant organization. Placement organisations have included Macmillan, Initialise Films, Random House, the BBC, the Literary Review, AM Heath, Pegasus Theatre, the Poetry Society, and Carcanet.

The virtual open event for this programme is available to watch at http://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/cwopenday. The open event features acting Course Director Jane Draycott and course administrator Rebecca Rue, who discuss the programme, its requirements and the student experience. Participants' questions were texted in and answered during the event. A FAQ of all the questions and their answers is available at the top of this section.

The MSt has a blog, a resource for Oxford events, calls for submission, competitions, news, interviews and more, which is available at http://blogs.conted.ox.ac.uk/mstcw/.

"The Oxford MSt enables you to fast-track your career in writing."
- Fortuna Burke

"… the freedom to explore and experiment… has been fundamental to my development as a writer."
- Clare Tetley

"The range and variety of the group … offers truly exciting opportunities for the kind of exchanges that really accelerate your development as a writer."
- Michael Schuller

"What does the course offer? Self-discipline, professionalism and confidence."
- Abigail Green-Dove

"My life has been so enriched and expanded. My writing evolves daily through the tools that you gave me. Not to mention the wonderful friendships formed throughout our two years together."
- Lindsay Moore

"The Masters in Oxford, while encouraging creativity, raised the bar on the quality of the finished work and gave me the discipline to be a professional."
- Bette Adriaanse

"I doubt there’s a more suitable MSt in the United Kingdom for work which challenges boundaries and takes risks."
- Jennifer Thorp

Students and alumni have won a wide range of prizes. These successes include winning the Gregory O’Donoghue Prize, the Writers’ Village International Short Fiction Award 2014, the Parallel Universe Poetry Competition, the Martin Starkie Prize, the International Jane Martin Poetry Prize, the Heritage Arts Radio play competition, the Cascade Pictures Writer’s Couch pitching competition, first prize in the Poetry Book Society Student Poetry Competition, the Miracle Poetry Competition, Best Photography Book Award from POYi (Pictures of the Year international), and the Yeovil Literary Prize for Poetry. Two alumni have won the Oxford University’s DL Chapman Memorial Prize, another was a finalist in the 2013 Writers at Work Fellowship Competition, and another won the London Fringe Festival’s Short Fiction Award. Alumni have been awarded a Toshiba Studentship, a Hawthornden Fellowship, and funded residencies at the Banff Centre, Canada, and at the Expansionists Project, Whitstable.

Students and alumni have had their work shortlisted across the genres for, among others, the Asham Award, the Bridport Prize, the Bridport Prize for Flash Fiction, the Fish Flash Fiction prize, the Yeoville Literary Prize, the Oxonian poetry prize, the Fish Short Story Prize 2013, the Big Issue in the North’s New Writing Award, the Oxonian review, and the Aesthetica Creative Writing Competition. A 2010 graduate was short-listed for the Crime Writers’ Association Debut Dagger award 2011. Two alumni were longlisted for the Dylan Thomas Prize, and one was shortlisted. An alumnus’ debut novel also made the longlist for the Not the Booker Prize.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-creative-writing

Destinations

Many of our graduate students have signed with agents, and each year a number go on to undertake doctoral study in creative writing or English Literature. Our graduates have obtained positions in publishing, media and the creative arts industries, as well as teaching positions in tertiary education.

The MSt has enjoyed a very strong application field since its inception, attracting record interest in recent years from a global constituency of writers. The course`s emphasis on critical analysis as well as on writerly and creative excellence attracts students of commensurately strong academic potential as well as of significant creative promise. This combination of academic rigour and creativity is a central distinctive feature of the course. The resulting emphasis on exploration and the development of an individual writerly voice serve to attract particularly talented students from around the world as well as a strongly diverse group of UK students of varied backgrounds and ethnicity.

Continuing education and life-long learning in Oxford have been formally linked to the collegiate system of the University since 1990, when Kellogg College, the University’s 36th college, was established. Please consult http://www.kellogg.ox.ac.uk/.

Who should apply?

We are looking for writers with a proven record of commitment to their craft. You should be a keen reader, and bring an open-minded, questioning approach to both reading and writing. You will not necessarily have yet achieved publication, but you will have written regularly and read widely over a sustained period. You will be keen to dedicate time and energy and staying-power to harnessing your talent, enlarging your skills, and aiming your writerly production at consistently professional standards. It is likely you will have a first degree, or equivalent, although in some cases other evidence of suitability may be acceptable.

For applicants with a degree from the USA, the minimum GPA we normally seek is 3.6 out of 4.0. We do not seek a Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or GMAT score. Although a GRE or GMAT score is not a formal requirement, if one is available it should be supplied.

The high number of contact hours are concentrated into Residences and Retreats. Students should be at a stage in their writing where, with appropriate guidance, they can undertake agreed assignments, projects and essays between meetings. There is a dedicated Course Website for provision of up-to-date information; contact and exchange between students; and contact between students and tutors. The course, however, is not a ‘distance-learning’ course, and tutors, while being happy to help with questions or problems, do not offer regular weekly ‘office hours’.

The M.St is unlikely to be suitable for those who are just starting out on their writerly and critical development.

If you have any doubts about whether the M.St is right for your stage of development, please consult the website for information on our Undergraduate Diploma in Creative Writing https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/dipcw

What does the course cover?

The first year concentrates equally on prose (fiction and narrative non-fiction), poetry and drama. There is a significant critical reading and analysis component, which is linked to the writerly considerations explored in each of the three genres. Students are expected to engage fully with all three genres, in a spirit of exploration and with the aim of discovering what impact and relevance unaccustomed genres have for the development of their individual writerly voice. This necessarily involves undertaking assignments and exercises in areas that are new to students, and do not relate directly to any work they may have in progress. Students may be able to continue with their own longer term pieces-in-progress but the concentration of year 1 teaching is on producing new work, and the exercises and assignments, which should take priority, reflect this emphasis.

The second year offers specialisation in a single genre, again accompanied by a significant critical element focused around issues of interest to the individual student and related to the genre of choice.

Your specialisation choices are as follows:

- The novel
- Short fiction
- Radio drama
- TV drama
- Screenwriting
- Stage drama
- Poetry
- Narrative non-fiction

In year 2, the specialisation in the genre of students’ choice provides an opportunity for significant concentration on either new work, or, subject to consultation with supervisor, on existing work-in-progress.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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