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Masters Degrees (Reconstruction And Development)

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Development Studies is an important research and teaching area within the Social Policy field at LSBU. Read more
Development Studies is an important research and teaching area within the Social Policy field at LSBU. 75% of our research into Social Work and Social Policy was awarded the quality rating of 3* out of 4* for 'environment' - quality that is defined as conducive to producing research of internationally excellent quality, in terms of its vitality and sustainability (Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014).

The MSc Development Studies course is interdisciplinary and innovatory. It is designed for those who wish to pursue careers with governments, non-governmental organisations, international agencies, public and private organisations and enterprises. It provides a thorough grounding in the development field, and its emphasis on research enables students to specialise in their particular areas of interest.

The MSc Development Studies is led by Professor John Taylor: an internationally renowned expert in social development and poverty reduction. Professor Taylor has undertaken research for the UK's Department of International Development, the World Bank, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), UNICEF, national and international NGOs.

See the current research projects tied to the International Development, Emergencies and Refugee Studies (IDEARS) Research Group:
http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/research/research-interests/sites/international-development-emergencies-refugee-studies-group

Through the use of case studies you'll analyse a range of issues, crucial for Development policy and practice, such as:
- Globalisation: markets, trade and the global economy;
- Trade and Aid: the role of international institutions and agencies;
- Strategies for Industrialisation: economic growth and human development;
- Social Development: livelihoods, poverty and poverty reduction;
- Developing the Rural Sector: Agrarian Policies, migration and urbanisation;
- Environmental policies and sustainable development;
- Political empowerment, participation, and human rights.

The MSc develops the skills required to undertake development research, focusing on appropriate methodologies, data collection, policy and project design and implementation. A research dissertation forms a central part of your work on the course.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/development-studies-msc

Modules

- Contemporary issues in development
The module aims to provide a comprehensive and detailed introduction to the contemporary challenges facing developing countries in the coming years. Topics vary from one year to the next, but currently the focus is on issues of poverty and poverty reduction; aid and its effectiveness; debt and debt servicing; governance and transparency; the environmental impact of development; patterns of inequality; the impact of urbanisation; and more generally, on changing economic relations within the world economy following the 2008-9 global crisis and subsequent events. The module also assesses the main developing strategies followed by selected middle and low-income countries, with detailed case studies drawn from Asia, Africa and Latin America. It also examines these topics from a gender perspective.

- Human development in a globalised world
This module focuses initially on the roles and inter-relations between corporations, governments, international agencies, multilateral institutions, corporations and non-governmental organisations in the global economy. It then goes on to examine these inter-relations in relation to the shifting power relations in the global economy. It aims in particular to examine the relations between growth, capacities for improving human capital, infrastructure development, livelihoods improvement and poverty reduction. The conclusions of the module feed into the case studies analysed in the Semester Two Economies in Transition module.

- Research methods for development
A series of lectures introduces students to the main epistemological approaches to research and key research strategies, and focuses on mixed-methods research (MMR). In parallel, students will participate in tutor-led workshops to develop data summary and analysis skills with specific computer-based packages.

- Economies in transition: strategies for industrialisation
The Module Analyses and assesses the main development strategies implemented by developing countries in recent years, focusing on case studies from Africa, Latin America and Asia, outlining their key achievements and problem areas. This analysis then forms the basis for examining the possibilities for and outcomes of different types of industrialisation in the coming years, within a global context. The module combines detailed case study examples from particular types of industrialising economy, including examples from the rural, services, and raw material extractive sectors.

- Forced migration and resettlement
The module introduces the key concepts in Forced Migration and Development and different categories of forced migrants--asylum-seekers, refugees, IDPs, oustees and disaster victims. It examines the multiple and complex nature of Forced Migration, evaluates the responses of the international, inter-governmental, non-governmental and governmental responses to the short-medium and long-term needs of forced migrants and the poor sections of the host population. It critically analyses and evaluates the positive and negative impacts of forced migrants on host commmoduleies. How forced migrants (re)-construct their commmoduleies and livelihoods in countries of asylum and places of destination, as well in countries and places of origin in the context of post-conflict reconstruction are also examined in detail.

- Human rights in the developing world

- Research dissertation (triple module)

The MSc also offers a series of workshops in project design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation, providing these essential skills for student's Development careers

Employability

A humanities masters has the real advantage of opening up careers in a number of professions such as teaching, social work, administration and higher level education. Graduates have forged exciting careers in research-related work, public relations, advertising, retail, management and media-related work.

Previous students have entered careers in many fields working for international organisations such as the United Nations and its constituent organisations, the World Bank, the International Labour Organisation and the World Health Organisation. Many students take up posts in their home countries within government, non-government and civil society organisations, or with non-governmental development organisations in the UK, in addition to teaching posts in universities and colleges specialising in Development research and practice.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

The MSc has excellent relations with Development Agencies and NGO working in the development field. Students from these organisations are regularly enrolled on the course and members of these organisations gave regular presentations to MSc students.

Research in the Development field

Recent and current research by staff includes projects funded by the World Health Organisation, the World Bank, the United Nations Children's Fund, the United Nations Development Programme, the UK Department for International Development, and the Economic and Social Research Council.

In recent years, staff members have conducted research in Bangladesh, Brazil, China, East Timor, Eritrea, Ethiopia, the Gambia, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan, Somalia, Sudan, Uganda and Zambia. Staff teaching on the MSc regularly publish books and articles both on development issues, and on the countries in which they have expertise.

Teaching and learning

- Study hours
Class contact time is typically 12 hours per week on the full-time mode of the MSc, and six hours on the part-time mode plus individual tutorial and independent study. This accumulates to typically two days a week, afternoons and evenings typically two evenings a week.

All staff members teaching on the course have considerable experience of working and conducting research in developing countries. They have all published work on Development issues and are well known in their respective fields.

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This programme responds to the growing demands made on the humanitarian and development sectors by intensive urbanisation. This course has been established by the research and consultancy group on International Development, Emergencies and Refugees (IDEARS) - part of the Weeks Centre at LSBU. Read more
This programme responds to the growing demands made on the humanitarian and development sectors by intensive urbanisation. This course has been established by the research and consultancy group on International Development, Emergencies and Refugees (IDEARS) - part of the Weeks Centre at LSBU. If you wish to pursue a career with government, non-governmental organisations, international agencies, public and private organisations and enterprises, this course is for you.

Rapidly urbanising world

Ours is a rapidly urbanising world: by 2010 over half the world's population lived in cities. Urbanization is fastest in the developing world, where both primary and secondary cities are rapidly expanding. It is predicted that by 2020 more Africans will live in urban than in rural areas, and in China, by 2023. Except in countries emerging from war, urbanisation is closely linked to economic growth, although urban poverty levels continue to rise.

This rapid growth, particularly in the light of its links to the flight from rural poverty and the development of a massive informal sector, has posed immense challenges to all urban systems. In many Asian, Latin American and African cities 30-70% of the population lives in slums and more than 90% of new jobs are in the informal sector. In transition countries, already highly urbanised, the changing political and economic framework has led to widespread poverty. Everywhere, urban roads, utilities, education and health services, and governance processes are heavily strained. While cities experience high levels of investment, it is often uneven.

This context is now widely recognized among all major actors, with policy and programmes targeting the urban sector now a growth area. The challenge for development professionals, whether working in donor agencies, NGOs, governments or private practice, is to understand the broad economic and political context of urbanization, develop analyses of complex urban trends, opportunities and problems, and be able to draw on a range of appropriate interventions. People seeking work or progression in development practice will be moving into a growth area if they can demonstrate familiarity with urban issues and policies in developing countries.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/msc-development-and-urbanisation

Modules

You'll explore urban issues, strongly linked to analyses of broader development issues, which will prepare them for roles in development agencies, NGOs, urban management or community work. It provides a thorough grounding in the broad agendas of poverty reduction and its global context. At the same time it provides a thorough understanding of rapidly changing urban settings and enables students to acquire practical development planning skills for an urban setting. An emphasis on research as well as practical skills allows students to specialise in their particular areas of interest.

- Economies in transition
The module analyses and assesses the main development strategies implemented by developing countries in recent years, focusing on case studies from Africa, Latin America and Asia, outlining their key achievements and problem areas. This analysis then forms the basis for examining the possibilities for and outcomes of different types of industrialisation in the coming years, within a global context. The module combines detailed case study examples from particular types of industrialising economy, including examples from the rural, services, and raw material extractive sectors.

- Human development in a globalising world
This module focuses initially on the roles and inter-relations between corporations, governments, international agencies, multilateral institutions, corporations and non-governmental organisations in the global economy. It then goes on to examine these inter-relations in relation to the shifting power relations in the global economy. It aims in particular to examine the relations between growth, capacities for improving human capital, infrastructure development, livelihoods improvement and poverty reduction. The conclusions of the module feed into the case studies analysed in the Semester Two Economies in Transition module.

- Forced migration and development
The module introduces the key concepts in Forced Migration and Development and different categories of forced migrants--asylum-seekers, refugees, IDPs, oustees and disaster victims. It examines the multiple and complex nature of Forced Migration, evaluates the responses of the international, inter-governmental, non-governmental and governmental responses to the short-medium and long-term needs of forced migrants and the poor sections of the host population. It critically analyses and evaluates the positive and negative impacts of forced migrants on host commmoduleies. How forced migrants (re)-construct their commmoduleies and livelihoods in countries of asylum and places of destination, as well in countries and places of origin in the context of post-conflict reconstruction are also examined in detail.

- Urban challenges
The module addresses a wide range of topical and interlinked issues relevant to the evolution, tensions, economies, societies, cultures and demographies of developing-country cities; and the evolving frameworks for aid, governance, planning and management of their economic, social and physical space. It will draw on expertise of colleagues in practice and advocacy to explicate the links between theory and practice; and on seminars and special events to deepen understanding of the links between urban, and broader development contexts.

- Urban project
In this module students will develop a project in a developing-country city. In Part One of the project, students work in groups to develop a project background portfolio. In Part Two individual students propose a development plan for part of the project site which will focus on livelihoods, public space, housing, infrastructure, or Community development. Projects will be presented in class, but also uploaded on a website.

- Research methods
A series of lectures introduces students to the main epistemological approaches to research and key research strategies in the Development field, and focuses on mixed-methods research (MMR). In parallel, students will participate in tutor-led workshops to develop data summary and analysis skills with specific computer-based packages.

Employability

Students on our MSc Development and Urbanisation course will benefit from the renewed international interest in the urban sphere. Previous graduates have entered careers with a wide range of employers, working for international organisations, such as, the United Nations and its constituent organisations, the World Bank, the International Labour Organisation and the World Health Organisation.

Many take up important posts in their home countries within government, non-government and civil society organisations or non-governmental development organisations in the UK, such as Christian Aid and Oxfam, in addition to teaching posts in universities and colleges specialising in Development research and practice.

For students interested in further academic development or mid-career progression, successful completion of the MSc provides eligibility for our large and lively Mphil programme.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Teaching and learning

- Dissertation and voluntary work placement
Part of the dissertation may be replaced with a voluntary work placement in one of our partner organisations. Through the use of case studies you will analyse a comprehensive range of development issues, such as: markets, trade and the global economy; the role of international institutions and agencies; human development; poverty and poverty reduction; social provision in developing countries; rural development and urbanisation; environmental policies and sustainable development; empowerment and participation; migration.

Through a specialist theoretical module you'll also acquire a thorough grounding in urban development issues and their links to a broad development agenda; and this will be followed by a project module which will enable you to apply the theory and understand the necessary skills to plan, execute and monitor an urban development project. The course also develops the skills required to undertake development research, focusing on appropriate methodologies, data collection, policy design and implementation.

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The Violence, Conflict and Development programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The Violence, Conflict and Development programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. We welcome those who have worked in the field of development and/or conflict, but we also welcome applications from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in the major themes of the programme and a strong first degree, preferably in a social science.

The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs.

As the pioneering programme of its kind internationally, this MSc programme develops detailed empirical knowledge and analytical skills for understanding the complex linkages between violent conflict and development, both historically and today. It enables students to explore these linkages both within specific country and regional contexts and in the context of global interdependencies and the ways these affect peace, war, and non-war violence.

The programme introduces students to competing analytical approaches. It is multi-disciplinary though shaped by a particular interest in political economy. It encourages deep case study knowledge. And it offers students the ability to tailor their choice of optional courses and dissertation research to their own interests.

The MSc in Violence, Conflict and Development draws on the exceptional expertise at SOAS in different disciplinary understanding of development challenges and processes as well as the strong commitment among all teaching staff to area expertise. Staff teaching on this programme are research active and have a range of links to international organisations.

The programme is of interest for development practitioners, activists, and students with a scholarly interest in the patterns of violence internationally, in how violence affects development, and in how the uneven processes of development themselves may both generate violence and generate mechanisms for containing violence.

Highlights include:

- Zoe's Blog! (http://vcd-soas.blogspot.co.uk/) A convenor's-eye view of the MSc Violence, Conflict and Development programme

- Exploration of the long history of theories of human violence

- Relationships between violence and long-run historical change

- The concept of a continuum of violence

- The relevance of historical and more recent evidence that the process of structural change involved in ‘development’ is inherently conflictual and often violent

- To what extent democratisation is a mechanism for securing perpetual peace

- The challenges of understanding gender based violence

- Whether abundant natural resources, or high levels of inequality, or clear markers of religious or ethnic difference are clear sources of violent conflict

- How highly localised violent conflicts are connected to processes of global economic development

- The challenges of post-conflict reconstruction and ‘war to peace transitions’

- The role of NGOs in causes of, dynamics of, and responses to conflict

- Explaining the prevalence of high levels of non-war violence

- Explanations of the political economy of – and alternative perspectives on – terrorism

- Students can draw on SOAS's unique expertise to specialise further in particular regions or topics. Please see Postgraduate modules for details on core and optional modules.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscviolconfdev/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Political Economy of Violence, Conflict and Development. They then select one of three ‘development’ modules: Political Economy of Development; Theory, Policy and Practice of Development; or Anthropology of Development. Through these modules, students build their analytical skills and their knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies. A distinctive feature of the core module is that students put together a group case study presentation.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules). By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 97kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscviolconfdev/file101806.pdf

Materials

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

MSc Violence, Conflict & Development postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek. These include analytical skills, presentation skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Graduates from MsC Violence, Conflict & Development have gone on to work in a range of different organisations, including Development and Human Rights Organisations, and many have continuted in the field of research.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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If development aid is just a waste of money, how can we find a better way to improve the livelihoods of people? With regions and countries fighting for land, water, and resources, how can we help people recover from conflict and war? How can we transform the right to food, water, and a clean environment into reality? These are just a few examples of issues relating to development studies. Read more

MSc International Development Studies

If development aid is just a waste of money, how can we find a better way to improve the livelihoods of people? With regions and countries fighting for land, water, and resources, how can we help people recover from conflict and war? How can we transform the right to food, water, and a clean environment into reality? These are just a few examples of issues relating to development studies.

The International Development Studies programme allows you to develop a critical understanding of development theories. You will learn to plan and conduct research. You acquire the skills to translate your finding into development policies, intervention strategies and institutional innovations. You will learn to include the diverging views of various stakeholders and to work in multidisciplinary teams.

Programme summary

This programme deals with worldwide processes of development and change related to livelihoods, agro-food networks and the environment in a dynamic international context. Special attention is given to exclusion processes, equity, unequal access to resources and sustainability. Social, economic, political, technological, and environmental change is studied from various perspectives and at different levels. You will develop a critical understanding of recent development theories, learn to plan and conduct research, and acquire skills to translate research findings into recommendations for policies and intervention strategies. You will learn to include the diverging views of various stakeholders and to work in multidisciplinary teams. Depending on your previous education, you can follow one of the specialisations. .

Specialisations

Students can choose one of the following three specialisations after consultation with the study advisor. The selected specialisation mainly depends on your academic background.

Sociology of Development
This specialisation focuses on social transformation processes, especially the local consequences of globalisation and environmental change, and the way people cope with uncertain circumstances. Themes studied include natural resource degradation, refugees, migration, post-disaster reconstruction, social unrest, poverty, and lack of access to resources crucial to the livelihoods of people. This specialisation applies sociological and anthropological perspectives to development problems with special attention given to understanding the differing interests and views of numerous actors. You can choose a major in Disaster Studies, Environmental Policy, Sociology of Development and Change, or Rural Sociology.

Economics of Development
The central themes in this specialisation are the role of agriculture in development, food security and the global food crisis, regional economic issues, sustainable use of natural resources, rural-urban income disparities, and issues related to poverty and the role of institutions. These themes are examined from a microeconomic perspective to gain insight into the behaviour of individuals and institutions, as well as from a macroeconomic perspective to obtain insight into development processes at regional and national levels. You can major in Agricultural Economics and Rural Policy, Development Economics, Environmental Economics and Natural Resources, or Regional Economics.

Communication, Technology and Policy
In this specialisation, social transformation and sustainable development are examined with a specific focus on communication, technological innovations, and policy processes. An important theme is how technologies and policies are developed in the interaction between various parties (e.g. governments, social organisations, and citizens) and the role of communication in these processes. Another theme is the relationship between technological change (in the agricultural and food sectors), institutional processes and social transformation. You can choose a major in Knowledge, Technology and Innovation, Law and Governance, or Strategic Communication.

Your future career

Graduates are employed in various (inter-) national organisations as a programme/ project coordinator, trainer, consultant, advisor, policymaker or researcher. You could work, for example, as policymaker in a government or semi-governmental institute, as programme coordinator or advisor in an international (non-)governmentalorganisation or (consultancy) company, or as researcher and/or teacher at a university or research institute. Examples of organisations include: FAO, World Bank, European Union, UTZ Certified, Oxfam Novib, Rabobank Foundation, CARE, Sustainalytics and UNICEF.

Alumnus Luckmore Jalisi.
“I have really benefitted from what I learnt during my studies. This master has opened doors for me." Luckmore did the specialisation Sociology of Development and conducted both his internship and thesis research in a refugee camp in Uganda. These experiences were important in getting him his job as Youth and Governance Advisor at ActionAid in Liberia. “I support postconflict youth development programmes based on a human rights approach, and develop monitoring & evaluation tools for governance and youth development work. I draw on the knowledge and skills acquired during my studies and my classmates from Wageningen remain valuable contacts in my network.”

Related programmes:
MSc Development and Rural Innovation
Health and Society (specialisation)
MSc Applied Communication Science
MSc International Land and Water Management
MSc Leisure, Tourism and Environment
MSc Management, Economics and Consumer Studies

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The Division of Peace Studies and the Bradford Centre for International Development each have a strong set of Master’s programmes; alongside undergraduate, postgraduate research, and Research and Knowledge Transfer programmes. Read more
The Division of Peace Studies and the Bradford Centre for International Development each have a strong set of Master’s programmes; alongside undergraduate, postgraduate research, and Research and Knowledge Transfer programmes. Both have high international reputations in their respective areas, in terms of teaching, research and policy and programme engagement.

The MA in Peace, Conflict and Development Studies aims to combine the strengths of these two Divisions in providing a structured, innovative and challenging taught MA programme on the important interrelationships between peace, conflict and development. It offers a comprehensive introduction and analysis of the interrelationships between development, conflict and security in developing and transitional societies.

It covers: development theory, policy and programming debates; interrelationships between insecurity, poverty and development; peace and peacebuilding (including conflict prevention and post-conflict reconstruction); human security issues; natural resource conflict, co-operation and management; environment and security in developing and fragile political contexts; and conflict-sensitive development principles and practices. It also equips its students with practical skills in order to design and manage projects and programmes in the field.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/peace-conflict-and-development-ma-part-time

Why Bradford?

The MA in Peace, Conflict and Development Studies aims to combine the strengths of these two Divisions: Peace Studies and Development (known as Bradford Centre for International Development). They are both long established within the University of Bradford and both have high international reputations in their respective areas, in terms of teaching, research and policy and programme engagement.

Modules

Core modules
-Issues in Development Theory
-Introduction to Peace Studies
-Natural Resource Governance, Conflict and Co-operation
-Dissertation

Option modules
-Fragile States and the Security-Development Nexus
-Conflict Resolution Theory
-International Politics and Security Studies
-Introduction to African Politics
-Peacekeeping, Peacebuilding and Statebuilding
-Gender, Conflict and Development
-Cities in Conflict
-Applied Conflict Resolution Skills
-African Security Studies
-African Study Visit
-Issues in Development Policy
-Public Policy Analysis and Management
-Sustainable Tourism Development

Work experience

Students are able to opt for a ‘Professional Practice’ module that encourages students to undertake a voluntary placement with a view to gaining experience of working in a team and managing change.

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Students will benefit from practical skills-based training as well as academic education, in relation to engagement with key contemporary policy and programme debates of the key international and national organisations involved in peace, conflict and development. They will benefit from the strong international engagement of the relevant teaching staff in these debates, and the networks that these bring.

The MA in Peace, Conflict and Development Studies combines theoretical and academic debates on these interrelationships with examinations of the relevant policy and programming issues, so it is relevant for decision-makers and stakeholders within developing, fragile or conflict-affected countries and for those concerned with international aid and assistance.

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This course examines contemporary and established analytical and conceptual frameworks relating to poverty, conflict analysis and the reconstruction of conflict and disaster-affected societies. Read more
This course examines contemporary and established analytical and conceptual frameworks relating to poverty, conflict analysis and the reconstruction of conflict and disaster-affected societies. It looks at policies and practices, by which individuals, communities and organisations seek to reduce poverty, understand conflict and initiate humanitarian interventions.

Aims

-Provide you with an opportunity to deepen your critical understanding of key theoretical and practical issues relating to poverty analysis and reduction, conflict analysis and reconstruction
-Provide you with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to critically analyse key theoretical and practical issues relating to poverty, conflict and reconstruction and make judgements about related policies and their implementation
-Provide critical insights into the key strategies, policies and practices currently employed to promote development and poverty reduction
-Develop professionally-oriented skills related to formulating, investigating and implementing different practical approaches to poverty, conflict and reconstruction
-Provide a wide range of options for advanced training in areas of specialist expertise relevant to poverty, conflict and reconstruction
-Develop advanced competencies in transferable areas, including developing reasoned arguments, gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources, undertaking both team-based and independent work to deadlines, and both written and verbal forms of communication
-Assist you in developing your specialist area of expertise within the field of poverty, conflict and reconstruction, and applying your understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is covered by the course fee. Recent fieldtrip locations have included Uganda, Ghana, Sri Lanka and India.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. We cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. Planning will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

The taught elements of the programme, carrying 120 credits overall is continuously assessed by a variety of methods (project based reports, essays), involving largely individual submissions, but also elements of group work.

Participants must also complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice approved by the Programme Directors. Students are encouraged to base their dissertations on topics of direct professional concern to themselves.

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for employment in a range of development-related fields, including research, policy and practice. A wide range of transferable skills will be developed, including analytical and professional skills. Many of our alumni have gone onto careers in public service, the NGO/charitable and private sectors at national and international levels, as policy officers, managers, consultants or development practitioners - while others have pursued further academic study leading to a PhD and academic careers. Since its foundation, the Global Development Institute has trained over 7000 individuals from 170 different countries.

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Change the neighbourhood, the world, or the organization with North America’s only MBA in Community Economic Development. A desire for change is what steered you here to Cape Breton University, to the Shannon School of Business and our innovative MBA in Community Economic Development (CED). Read more
Change the neighbourhood, the world, or the organization with North America’s only MBA in Community Economic Development.

A desire for change is what steered you here to Cape Breton University, to the Shannon School of Business and our innovative MBA in Community Economic Development (CED). The only MBA program in the Americas with community at its core; one that delivers advanced business knowledge and skills to make a difference in the local and global community.

Our one-of-a kind MBA in CED is designed for a new generation of leaders; for learners who aspire to be instruments of change in the public and corporate sectors and in not-for-profit organizations. Our MBA in CED offers a leading edge curriculum that includes all business subjects found in traditional MBA programs, with an emphasis on economic development, leadership, governance, and management of change. Specializing options include electives in Strategic Leadership, Peace Building, Public Administration, First Nations, Sustainability or International Business.

About Our MBA

Flexible delivery: Our MBA in CED fits with your busy life. We offer flexible delivery formats including short, on campus residencies in July and weekend classes in Toronto, Kingston, Saskatoon, Edmonton, or Whitehorse. Full time students can complete the program at our Sydney campus over a 12-month period.

Accessible: Cape Breton University’s MBA in CED is flexible. It is open to those starting their careers and to experienced managers. Our program works well for those who have completed an undergrad program, (not just business) and for those who have extensive business and community experience, but without formal academic credentials. For those who already have a degree in business or commerce, credits may be applied for as many as four foundation courses.

Nationally Recognized Faculty: Faculty members have strong backgrounds in teaching, business and community economic development, in addition to holding high academic credentials. Our faculty are award-winning teachers and includes honorees of the prestigious Order of Canada.

Research Focus: CBU’s MBA program includes a core Research Methodology course and the completion of an applied research project. Preparing this research component enables our students to compete for the coveted $17.5K SSHRC Canada Graduate Studies scholarships or continue their studies in a PhD program. A number of our full-time students have been successful in winning scholarships while others are now enrolled in a PhD program.

Diversity: Our MBA in CED attracts a large number of women, aboriginals and non-business graduates from Canada and around the world.

At the core of this unique program is community. Cape Breton Island is rooted in community-based efforts that overcome obstacles, face difficulties with creativity and use innovation to solve age-old problems. The island heritage includes community economic development giants like Father Jimmy Tompkins, founder of the co-operative and credit union movement in English Canada and is home to growing community ventures like New Dawn Enterprises – the oldest community economic development corporation in Canada.

It is a heritage Cape Breton University is proud to continue.

Options

Strategic Leadership Option
Leadership techniques for advancing organizations and communities; challenges in making changes in an existing organization and understanding the dynamics with various leadership theories and styles.
-MBAC6219 Social Dynamics of Leadership
-MBAC6233 Contemporary Issues: Change Management and Governance

First Nations Option
Delves into community economic development issues facing Indigenous communities across the country. For Aboriginal and non-aboriginal learners.
-MBAC6209 Land Claims, Self-Government and CED
-MBAC6211 The Dynamics of Community Economic Development in First Nations

International Business Option
Advanced content and strategies needed to grow the global organization; builds on modules in the core International Business course.
-MBAC6228 International Marketing
-MBAC6226 International Finance

Peace-Building, Reconstruction and Good-Governance Option
These courses are designed to facilitate a comprehensive understanding of the role of CED in dealing with local and national emergencies and the role of CED in conflict prevention, conflict resolution and post-conflict restoration activities.
-MBAC6215 Emergency Management
-MBAC6217 Conflict Resolution and Community Reconstruction

Public Policy
-MBAC 6221 Public Policy
-MBAC 6223 Government, Business and Third Sector Relations

Sustainability
-MBAC 6227 Environment, Energy, and the Economy: strategies for sustainable futures
-MBAC 6229 Sustainability Marketing

Marketing (2 courses)
-MBAC 6206 Cultural Tourism Marketing
-MBAC 6205 Cultural Tourism Marketing
-MBAC 6228 International Marketing
-MBAC 6229 Sustainability Marketing
-MBAC 6231 Marketing Strategy

Tourism
-MBAC 6205 Cultural Tourism Marketing
-MBAC 6206 Tourism Management & Planning

What to Expect

As a career professional, you have developed an expertise in your field. You have a comprehensive understanding, study the trends and see opportunities that others with less experience, often miss.

An MBA in CED from the Shannon School of Business at Cape Breton University will highlight the interaction between community and business and expose you to development practices and advanced management concepts and skills in a whole new way.

Our graduates are prepared for senior leadership roles. Utilizing their previously acquired professional expertise blended with a new, broad, general management perspective, means decision-making skills are integrated across their entire organization. Courses demand critical analysis and include deliverables, such as marketing plans, business models and plans, development of community plans and organizational strategy.

Program depth-and-breadth characteristics:
-Program requires completion of 16 courses, including an individual research project, 48 credits in total
-Program curriculum focuses on the critical areas for performance of organizations: accounting, marketing, strategy, finance, organizational behavior, leadership, venture analysis
-Core curriculum includes subjects that provide insights in community economic development, such as comparative development, business and community development, economic geography
-Core program has an intense research component, typically found in social science graduate programs, requiring completion of a research methods course and an individual applied research project, accompanied by a mini-thesis of 70-90 pages.
-Curriculum allows for 2 elective courses that provide specialization in First Nations urban and rural economic development, peace-building and community reconstruction, strategic leadership or international business.
-Courses require application of theory and concepts into practical objectives such as marketing plans and business models.
-The classes are often a mixture of early career and mid-career managers. This provides for a unique experience of enriching exchanges of knowledge and ideas. In-class and after-class interaction among students and faculty creates an environment of critical reflection.

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The Human Resources and Development Management pathway is aimed at those who are interested in management in the public, state or NGO sectors in developing, transitional or newly-industrialised countries. Read more
The Human Resources and Development Management pathway is aimed at those who are interested in management in the public, state or NGO sectors in developing, transitional or newly-industrialised countries. This is primarily a public sector management, not a business management, programme, although some of the themes covered are relevant to both sectors. The pathway encourages students to consider and analyse how a changing global environment has shaped the ways in which work is organized and managed and how ideas about leadership and management may be applied differently across cultures and contexts.

The pathway explores the relationship between hard and soft approaches to the analysis and practice of management, for example between human resources management and human resource development, between leadership and management and between vertical bureaucracy and decentralised collaborative management. The pathway considers the interaction between organizational structure, culture, power and motivation in public administration and in international organizations.

Who is the programme for?

The programme is designed for officials, policy analysts and researchers concerned with economic and social development. They may work in central or local government, public enterprises, non-governmental organisations, and research or training organisations. The programme is also appropriate for those who are hoping to enter a career in the field of development.

About the School of Government and Society

The School of Government and Society is one of the leading UK and International centres for governance, politics, international development, sociology, public management, Russian and European studies.

Established in 2008, the School comprises three Departments: Politics and International Studies (POLSIS); International Development (IDD) and Local Government Studies (INLOGOV).

POLSIS: The Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS), one of the largest and most academically vibrant departments of Political Science and International Studies in the UK. In the latest Research Excellence Framework (REF) Politics and International Studies at Birmingham was ranked the 6th best in the power rankings highlighting the large number of staff in POLSIS producing world-leading and internationally excellent research.

IDD: Be part of global effort to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Contribute to conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction. Help build capacity of nations and communities to adapt to climate change. Study with us to gain the skills and knowledge essential for working in international development in the 21st Century.

INLOGOV: The Institute of Local Government Studies (INLOGOV) is the leading academic centre for research and teaching on local governance and strategic public management. We enrich the world of local public service with research evidence and innovative ideas, making a positive difference.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Development at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Development at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The Department of Political and Cultural Studies (PCS) boasts a dynamic research environment with a committed staff all of whom are research-active. Academic members of staff on the International Development programme have a very considerable range of research interests on which we offer supervision for research degrees.

Key Features of My by Research in International Development

An MA by Research in International Development offered in PCS gives you the chance to pursue a major research project based around your own passions and interests in International Development, leading to a qualification which can open the door to an academic career or boost employment prospects outside academia. It will give you the freedom to explore a topic of your choosing in International Development and develop a methodology under the close supervision of two experienced academics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes.

Typically, as a student of the International Development research programme, you will work closely with your supervisors, meeting them regularly, in many instances fortnightly, in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time.

Students enrolled in the MA by Research in International Development are required to attend skills and training courses at College and University level. You may also be expected to give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and attend the postgraduate conference of the College of Arts and Humanities which is held in October.

The MA by Research in International Development is ideal for those who want:

- an MA qualification in areas where taught programmes are not offered;
- the experience of a research degree without committing to a PhD at the outset.

Research proposals in International Development are invited on any topic for which staff in PCS can provide supervision. It is a good idea to enter into discussions about your research project with the Department's Director of Postgraduate Research, Professor Roland Axtmann (), before drawing up an initial proposal and starting the application process.

Departmental Research Expertise

In the area of International Relations and Development Studies, the department has expertise in:

International Security and Strategic Studies
The international politics of space
Gender, childhood and child soldiers
North- and South East Asia
West Africa
Transitional justice and international crimes
Post-war reconstruction
Multi-nationals and corporate social responsibility
Governance and international development, including aid policy and practice
The role of civil society organisations in development contexts
Human rights and international development
History of military thought and military culture
European diplomatic history

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The current impoverishment of more than 1.4 billion people and the growing levels of inequality at national and international levels present the world with its greatest moral challenge. Read more
The current impoverishment of more than 1.4 billion people and the growing levels of inequality at national and international levels present the world with its greatest moral challenge. The challenge of understanding and tackling the problems of poverty and inequality is therefore an urgent one. This course is designed to help you engage with this challenge in a critical and constructive way, by offering high-level academic training in a vibrant and stimulating environment.

Aims

-Provide critical insights into different theoretical and disciplinary perspectives on how poverty, inequality and development can be understood, measured and explained
-Provide you with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to critically analyse key theoretical and practical issues relating to poverty, inequality and development;
-Provide critical insights into the key strategies, policies and practices currently employed to promote development, equality and poverty reduction
-Provide a wide range of options for advanced training in areas of specialist expertise relevant to poverty, inequality and development;
-Develop advanced competencies in transferable areas, including developing reasoned arguments, gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources, undertaking both team-based and independent work to deadlines, and both written and verbal forms of communication
-Assist you in developing your specialist area of expertise within the field of poverty, inequality and development, and applying your understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation.

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is covered by the course fee. Recent fieldtrip locations have included Uganda, Ghana, Sri Lanka and India.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. We cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. Planning will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

The taught elements of the programme, carrying 120 credits overall is continuously assessed by a variety of methods (project based reports, essays), involving largely individual submissions, but also elements of group work.

Participants must also complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice approved by the Programme Directors. Students are encouraged to base their dissertations on topics of direct professional concern to themselves.

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for employment in a range of development-related fields, including research, policy and practice. A wide range of transferable skills will be developed, including analytical and professional skills. Many of our alumni have gone onto careers in public service, the NGO/charitable and private sectors at national and international levels, as policy officers, managers, consultants or development practitioners - while others have pursued further academic study leading to a PhD and academic careers. Since its foundation, GDI has trained over 7000 individuals from 170 different countries.

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This programme allows you to explore in depth the challenges facing developing and developed countries in the fight against global poverty, as well as to understand the promise and problems of proposed approaches to poverty reduction. Read more
This programme allows you to explore in depth the challenges facing developing and developed countries in the fight against global poverty, as well as to understand the promise and problems of proposed approaches to poverty reduction. Issues covered include: theories and history of development; changing approaches to poverty reduction; practical policy, programme and research skills.

The International Development Department is well-regarded internationally by sponsors, donor agencies, governments and NGOs. Study with us to benefit from:

Expertise in key issues and skills valued by employers
A vibrant, welcoming community
Individual overseas fieldwork or study visit included in fees (on-campus programmes)
Flexible programmes and a wide choice of modules (part-time students also welcome)
A diverse and international student body
Strong support in study and English language skills

Each programme is taught by a team of multi-disciplinary specialists who work closely with students to address individual interests and concerns. Every student is allocated an academic tutor to support them in their academic progress throughout the year. The department has a long history of teaching students from across the world, and recent students have come from 99 different countries and a wide variety of professional and academic backgrounds.

This programme allows you to explore in depth the challenges facing developing and developed countries in the fight against global poverty, as well as to understand the promise and problems of proposed approaches to poverty reduction. Issues covered include: theories and history of development; changing approaches to poverty reduction; practical policy, programme and research skills.

Who is the programme for?

The programme is designed for recent graduates preparing to work in international development and for professionals working for NGOs, donor or government funded development programmes

Programme content

This core pathway is designed for flexibility, allowing you to choose over half of the MSc content from a wide range of optional modules.

Specialist pathways:

Poverty, Inequality and Development
Conflict, Security and Development
International Political Economy and Development
Governance and Statebuilding
Urban Development

About the School of Government and Society

The School of Government and Society is one of the leading UK and International centres for governance, politics, international development, sociology, public management, Russian and European studies.

Established in 2008, the School comprises three Departments: Politics and International Studies (POLSIS); International Development (IDD) and Local Government Studies (INLOGOV).

POLSIS: The Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS), one of the largest and most academically vibrant departments of Political Science and International Studies in the UK. In the latest Research Excellence Framework (REF) Politics and International Studies at Birmingham was ranked the 6th best in the power rankings highlighting the large number of staff in POLSIS producing world-leading and internationally excellent research.

IDD: Be part of global effort to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Contribute to conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction. Help build capacity of nations and communities to adapt to climate change. Study with us to gain the skills and knowledge essential for working in international development in the 21st Century.

INLOGOV: The Institute of Local Government Studies (INLOGOV) is the leading academic centre for research and teaching on local governance and strategic public management. We enrich the world of local public service with research evidence and innovative ideas, making a positive difference.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The MA in International Development at Richmond University is grounded in the recognition that development is inherently international, and inherently political. Read more

Programme Overview

The MA in International Development at Richmond University is grounded in the recognition that development is inherently international, and inherently political: a concept that cannot be separated from core questions of global governance, international conflict, attempts at conflict resolution, and post-conflict reconstruction, or from issues of human development and human security.
The programme ensures that students understand the history of international development from post war modernization to the Millennium Development Goals, with particular emphasis on building a conception of the impact of global governance on political and economic processes in the developing world.

Aims of the programme

1. Provide an opportunity for participants to deepen their understanding of global governance
2. Provide participants with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to analyse effectively the relationships between international development within the context of modernization, emergence and economic development
3. Develop research skills and a knowledge base for career development or further academic research with emphasis on developing reasoned arguments, information gathering, organization and using evidence from a wide variety of sources,
4. Assist students in developing their specialist area of expertise within development management, and applying their understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation.

Course Modules

Theories of International Development
Principles of International Law & Institutions
International Flows: Labour, Migration and Development

How to Apply

Apply online using the application form available at http://www.richmond.ac.uk/admissions/postgraduate-admissions/ Please send your completed form to us by email to or by mail to the following address: Admission Office, Richmond, the American University in London, Queens Road, Richmond Upon Thames TW10 6JP, UK.

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Make a positive difference to the lives of people around the world, addressing the global challenges of poverty and violence by linking theory and practice. Read more
Make a positive difference to the lives of people around the world, addressing the global challenges of poverty and violence by linking theory and practice. This is your opportunity to develop your awareness of the relationships between peace, conflict resolution and development, both nationally and internationally.

You will consider issues such as gender, poverty, livelihoods, human rights, the role of civil society and community participation in decisionmaking and governance. From security threats and terrorism to the arms trade and non-violent social movements, you will acquire an in-depth insight into global issues. You will study the political, economic, cultural, environmental and technological changes that influence development decisions.

Our teaching is delivered in small groups of students from around the world. We place a real emphasis on international debate, giving you access to a range of cultural perspectives, and we will provide you with skills in project management and funding, essential for working in the field.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including social work and social policy.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/peaceanddvp_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

You will find employment opportunities in the UK and overseas working for non-governmental organisations, the public sector and the media. Previous graduates from our University have gone on to work as teachers, social workers, journalists, development workers, university lecturers, government consultants and business managers, or have pursued their research interests and taken on PhDs.

- Charity/ Aid Worker
- Government Advisor
- Journalist

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will benefit by being taught by our highly qualified team of academics who are renowned in their fields of research. Our research in peace and development keeps our curriculum fresh and cutting edge.

Staff members have close working links with organisations such as, Oxfam, Amnesty International, Pugwash, The Swiss Small Arms Survey, The Omega Foundation, The Mines Advisory Group, CND, Aegis, Huridocs and the Department for International Development (DfID), and we encourage students to engage with relevant external organisations and conferences.

Core Modules

Critical Perspectives on Peace and War
This provides an introduction to the core theories of war, peace and conflict reconstruction and an analysis of the major drivers, key theorists and practitioners.

Post-conflict Reconstruction and Peace Building
Critically examines and integrates peace and development discourses around post-conflict reconstruction and considers recovery from major disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis.

Global Perspectives on Development
This module critically examines the conceptual framework of international development in a global context, introducing a variety of different perspectives. You will become familiar with 'development orthodoxy' and critiques of it.

Security Paradigms
Deconstructs the truth content of contrasting and often contradictory models of key security issues from the competing state power and human security perspectives.

Developing and Managing Projects
Allows you to apply your learning to an in-depth investigation of a research question of your choice. This might be related to interests you develop during the course or to a topic related to your existing work or career aspirations. You will be supervised by an experienced member of staff who is also an active researcher, and produce a 12-15000 word thesis.

Research Methods
This develops your ability to design suitable research questions, match them to appropriate research methods and apply these in a reflective and ethical way.

Dissertation
Engage in critical depth with a research-based project aligned to your personal interests and professional aspirations.

Dr Rachel Julian

Course Leader

"My previous experience has allowed me to build international professional networks that provide me with insights into the challenges and solutions for a more peaceful and just world, which I thoroughly enjoy sharing with my students. Teaching is exciting because I get to work with courageous people who are changing their communities for the better."

Rachel has been working in peace and conflict resolution for twenty years. Her roles have included peace education, organisation building and non-violence training, and she's been awarded for her work in community activism.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Clinical Skills Suite
The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Study from anywhere in the world with practitioners in government, civil society and the private sector, as well as with people new to development. Read more
Study from anywhere in the world with practitioners in government, civil society and the private sector, as well as with people new to development.

This programme is designed to provide students with an understanding of the evolution of thinking and practice in international development over the last fifty to sixty years.

The core module aims to familiarise students with key concepts (eg development and poverty) and theories (eg modernisation, dependency, neo-liberalism and the ‘crisis’ in development theory) and with the changing roles of international development organisations and states in promoting international development (eg through aid, trade and fiscal, monetary and social policies).

The emphasis throughout will be on encouraging students to reflect critically on what has worked well or not and why. Students will select five optional modules (at 20 credits each) based on their individual interests and career aspirations.

About the School of Government and Society

The School of Government and Society is one of the leading UK and International centres for governance, politics, international development, sociology, public management, Russian and European studies.

Established in 2008, the School comprises three Departments: Politics and International Studies (POLSIS); International Development (IDD) and Local Government Studies (INLOGOV).

POLSIS: The Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS), one of the largest and most academically vibrant departments of Political Science and International Studies in the UK. In the latest Research Excellence Framework (REF) Politics and International Studies at Birmingham was ranked the 6th best in the power rankings highlighting the large number of staff in POLSIS producing world-leading and internationally excellent research.

IDD: Be part of global effort to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Contribute to conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction. Help build capacity of nations and communities to adapt to climate change. Study with us to gain the skills and knowledge essential for working in international development in the 21st Century.

INLOGOV: The Institute of Local Government Studies (INLOGOV) is the leading academic centre for research and teaching on local governance and strategic public management. We enrich the world of local public service with research evidence and innovative ideas, making a positive difference.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The MSc is designed for practitioners looking to enhance their skills in the context of broader theoretical models, as well as graduates with a career in government, the armed forces, inter-governmental organisations, NGOs or academia in mind. Read more
The MSc is designed for practitioners looking to enhance their skills in the context of broader theoretical models, as well as graduates with a career in government, the armed forces, inter-governmental organisations, NGOs or academia in mind.

The intensive professional workshops are open to practitioners who are not on the MSc programmes as Continuing Professional Development courses, enhancing students' opportunities for networking and learning from other practitioners' perspectives.

Courses are taught by a mixture of academics and practitioners, and cover both critical and problem-solving approaches. Conflict dynamics are analysed drawing on multiple disciplines, including security studies, peace studies, anthropology, law, archaeology, history and political theory. Modules include both traditional term-long modules and short, usually more skills-oriented, continuing professional development courses as well as fieldtrips (e.g. past fieldtrips were organised to Labanon, Napal, Kenya, Sri Lanka and Kosovo).

Student Profiles

“Doing MSc Defence, Development and Diplomacy was an enriching experience for me mainly because of a huge diversity of students participating from all corners of the world having their own unique views on contemporary issues, academically engaged professors with profound knowledge and experience and equally stimulating academic environment of Durham. I was particularly amazed at how professors always motivated us to think critically on contemporary issues and existing knowledge system dealing with them, develop extended understanding of pressing issues that we are facing today, and offer innovative solutions to those problems.” Salina Chaulagain, 2015/16

“Complementing my background in Middle Eastern Studies and Political Science, the MSc DDD has equipped me with tools used by practitioners and taught me to problematise, analyse and empathise with people in a conflict-ridden world.” Clemens Chay, 2014/15

“This programme uniquely addresses the issue of siloed thinking present in the interwoven sectors of defence, development, and diplomacy. The course is grounded on a “critical thinking” versus “problem solving” approach, and unswervingly focuses on the theory-practice connection. Most importantly, though, I cannot say enough about the caliber of my DGSi peer group. I am thankful not only for their friendship, but for the professional insights they will be able to offer in years to come. As a military officer, I am grateful for the ability to pick up the phone and gain a better understanding of the dynamics of a conflict or an operation from one of my former Durham peers.” Eric Davids, 2014/15

Course Structure

With conflicts becoming either increasingly drawn-out, asymmetric wars of attrition or normalise into states of no peace – no war, our understanding of conflict and conflict intervention is shifting. Conflicts are rarely determined by military victory, diplomacy or long-term development, but require to securing populations through a comprehensive approach that sees to their political, and economic, as well as their security-related needs. Their outcome will be determined by how well the different arms of government and civil society, both locally and internationally, can work together and how well they understand each others' perspectives.

This inter-disciplinary and custom designed MSc offers the unique opportunity to look at conflict, conflict intervention and post-conflict reconstruction through the lenses of defence, development and diplomacy.

The MSc is designed for graduates with a career in government, the armed forces, inter-governmental organisations, NGOs or academia in mind, and for practitioners looking to enhance their practical skills while placing these within a broader theoretical perspective.

Five core modules worth 75 credits plus a Dissertation worth 60 credits plus three optional modules to the value of 45 credits.

Core Modules
-Defence, Development and Diplomacy in Conflict: Evolving Actors, Factors and Paradigms
-Conflict Prevention and Sustainable Peace
-Conflict Intervention: International Law, Counter-Insurgency and Conflict Diplomacy
-Post-Conflict Reconstruction: Stabilisation, Development and State-Building
-Capstone Exercise: Humanitarian Intervention Simulation (in MSc-specific roles)
-Dissertation

Optional Modules - Optional module in previous years have included:
-Religion, Culture and Conflict
-Conflict Mediation
-Fieldtrip
-Conflict Sensitive Programme Management
-Re-thinking Counter Terrorism
-Conflict Analysis
-Urban Violence - Urban Peacebuilding
-International Negotiation as Instrument in Conflict Management
-Policing Post-Conflict Cities

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through two-day induction events in which they are informed about the University, the School, the MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MSc degree programme is divided into five core and three optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 60 credits of not more than15,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Although all modules have 18/19 contact hours, the core modules are spread over 9/10 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2-hour sessions which take the form of a one hour lecture and a one hour tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another. The optional modules of the programme are delivered over two full days, through a mixture of lectures, Q&A sessions, seminar discussions, and role plays.

Formative assessment is given on seminar contributions, role plays, and formative essays. Students have the opportunity to meet their lecturers to discuss their marks and other issues arising from their course performance. Students also have the opportunity to attend ‘essay surgeries’ in which they can discuss the structure and content of their essays early in the course.

Students can also meet their module coordinators or programme coordinator during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the latter half of the year, they are required to attend two 4-hour workshops. In addition, they have the opportunity to meet their assigned supervisors for an average of 6 meetings. Students also have access to the MSc Programme Director and the School’s Director of Taught Post Graduate Studies whenever there is a need.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. Students are also fully integrated into the Durham Global Security Institute, which delivers this MSc programme and hosts guest lectures and seminars throughout the year. These events provide students with the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies, and in conflict, peace and security studies.

Throughout the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

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