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Masters Degrees (Reconstruction And Development)

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The Violence, Conflict and Development programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The Violence, Conflict and Development programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. We welcome those who have worked in the field of development and/or conflict, but we also welcome applications from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in the major themes of the programme and a strong first degree, preferably in a social science.

The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs.

As the pioneering programme of its kind internationally, this MSc programme develops detailed empirical knowledge and analytical skills for understanding the complex linkages between violent conflict and development, both historically and today. It enables students to explore these linkages both within specific country and regional contexts and in the context of global interdependencies and the ways these affect peace, war, and non-war violence.

The programme introduces students to competing analytical approaches. It is multi-disciplinary though shaped by a particular interest in political economy. It encourages deep case study knowledge. And it offers students the ability to tailor their choice of optional courses and dissertation research to their own interests.

The MSc in Violence, Conflict and Development draws on the exceptional expertise at SOAS in different disciplinary understanding of development challenges and processes as well as the strong commitment among all teaching staff to area expertise. Staff teaching on this programme are research active and have a range of links to international organisations.

The programme is of interest for development practitioners, activists, and students with a scholarly interest in the patterns of violence internationally, in how violence affects development, and in how the uneven processes of development themselves may both generate violence and generate mechanisms for containing violence.

Highlights include:

- Zoe's Blog! (http://vcd-soas.blogspot.co.uk/) A convenor's-eye view of the MSc Violence, Conflict and Development programme

- Exploration of the long history of theories of human violence

- Relationships between violence and long-run historical change

- The concept of a continuum of violence

- The relevance of historical and more recent evidence that the process of structural change involved in ‘development’ is inherently conflictual and often violent

- To what extent democratisation is a mechanism for securing perpetual peace

- The challenges of understanding gender based violence

- Whether abundant natural resources, or high levels of inequality, or clear markers of religious or ethnic difference are clear sources of violent conflict

- How highly localised violent conflicts are connected to processes of global economic development

- The challenges of post-conflict reconstruction and ‘war to peace transitions’

- The role of NGOs in causes of, dynamics of, and responses to conflict

- Explaining the prevalence of high levels of non-war violence

- Explanations of the political economy of – and alternative perspectives on – terrorism

- Students can draw on SOAS's unique expertise to specialise further in particular regions or topics. Please see Postgraduate modules for details on core and optional modules.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscviolconfdev/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Political Economy of Violence, Conflict and Development. They then select one of three ‘development’ modules: Political Economy of Development; Theory, Policy and Practice of Development; or Anthropology of Development. Through these modules, students build their analytical skills and their knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies. A distinctive feature of the core module is that students put together a group case study presentation.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules). By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 97kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscviolconfdev/file101806.pdf

Materials

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

MSc Violence, Conflict & Development postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek. These include analytical skills, presentation skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Graduates from MsC Violence, Conflict & Development have gone on to work in a range of different organisations, including Development and Human Rights Organisations, and many have continuted in the field of research.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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If development aid is just a waste of money, how can we find a better way to improve the livelihoods of people? With regions and countries fighting for land, water, and resources, how can we help people recover from conflict and war? How can we transform the right to food, water, and a clean environment into reality? These are just a few examples of issues relating to development studies. Read more

MSc International Development Studies

If development aid is just a waste of money, how can we find a better way to improve the livelihoods of people? With regions and countries fighting for land, water, and resources, how can we help people recover from conflict and war? How can we transform the right to food, water, and a clean environment into reality? These are just a few examples of issues relating to development studies.

The International Development Studies programme allows you to develop a critical understanding of development theories. You will learn to plan and conduct research. You acquire the skills to translate your finding into development policies, intervention strategies and institutional innovations. You will learn to include the diverging views of various stakeholders and to work in multidisciplinary teams.

Programme summary

This programme deals with worldwide processes of development and change related to livelihoods, agro-food networks and the environment in a dynamic international context. Special attention is given to exclusion processes, equity, unequal access to resources and sustainability. Social, economic, political, technological, and environmental change is studied from various perspectives and at different levels. You will develop a critical understanding of recent development theories, learn to plan and conduct research, and acquire skills to translate research findings into recommendations for policies and intervention strategies. You will learn to include the diverging views of various stakeholders and to work in multidisciplinary teams. Depending on your previous education, you can follow one of the specialisations. .

Specialisations

Students can choose one of the following three specialisations after consultation with the study advisor. The selected specialisation mainly depends on your academic background.

Sociology of Development
This specialisation focuses on social transformation processes, especially the local consequences of globalisation and environmental change, and the way people cope with uncertain circumstances. Themes studied include natural resource degradation, refugees, migration, post-disaster reconstruction, social unrest, poverty, and lack of access to resources crucial to the livelihoods of people. This specialisation applies sociological and anthropological perspectives to development problems with special attention given to understanding the differing interests and views of numerous actors. You can choose a major in Disaster Studies, Environmental Policy, Sociology of Development and Change, or Rural Sociology.

Economics of Development
The central themes in this specialisation are the role of agriculture in development, food security and the global food crisis, regional economic issues, sustainable use of natural resources, rural-urban income disparities, and issues related to poverty and the role of institutions. These themes are examined from a microeconomic perspective to gain insight into the behaviour of individuals and institutions, as well as from a macroeconomic perspective to obtain insight into development processes at regional and national levels. You can major in Agricultural Economics and Rural Policy, Development Economics, Environmental Economics and Natural Resources, or Regional Economics.

Communication, Technology and Policy
In this specialisation, social transformation and sustainable development are examined with a specific focus on communication, technological innovations, and policy processes. An important theme is how technologies and policies are developed in the interaction between various parties (e.g. governments, social organisations, and citizens) and the role of communication in these processes. Another theme is the relationship between technological change (in the agricultural and food sectors), institutional processes and social transformation. You can choose a major in Knowledge, Technology and Innovation, Law and Governance, or Strategic Communication.

Your future career

Graduates are employed in various (inter-) national organisations as a programme/ project coordinator, trainer, consultant, advisor, policymaker or researcher. You could work, for example, as policymaker in a government or semi-governmental institute, as programme coordinator or advisor in an international (non-)governmentalorganisation or (consultancy) company, or as researcher and/or teacher at a university or research institute. Examples of organisations include: FAO, World Bank, European Union, UTZ Certified, Oxfam Novib, Rabobank Foundation, CARE, Sustainalytics and UNICEF.

Alumnus Luckmore Jalisi.
“I have really benefitted from what I learnt during my studies. This master has opened doors for me." Luckmore did the specialisation Sociology of Development and conducted both his internship and thesis research in a refugee camp in Uganda. These experiences were important in getting him his job as Youth and Governance Advisor at ActionAid in Liberia. “I support postconflict youth development programmes based on a human rights approach, and develop monitoring & evaluation tools for governance and youth development work. I draw on the knowledge and skills acquired during my studies and my classmates from Wageningen remain valuable contacts in my network.”

Related programmes:
MSc Development and Rural Innovation
Health and Society (specialisation)
MSc Applied Communication Science
MSc International Land and Water Management
MSc Leisure, Tourism and Environment
MSc Management, Economics and Consumer Studies

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Passionate about making a difference to universal issues?. Be part of a new generation of practitioners and scholars who are solving some of the most challenging problems facing the world today. Read more

Passionate about making a difference to universal issues?

Be part of a new generation of practitioners and scholars who are solving some of the most challenging problems facing the world today. A Master of International Development will introduce you to the latest theories on sustainable development and cross-cultural practice in terms of dealing with issues like poverty, empowerment and gender.

The course will intricately hone your practice-led research skills and prepare you for a rewarding career in the charity sector or in public development agencies like World Vision, Oxfam and the Australian Red Cross.

Study a Master of International Development at UC and you will:

  • develop the skills to engage with contemporary development theory
  • acquire knowledge about development issues across the world, especially with under-privileged communities
  • explore participatory approaches to planning, management, monitoring and the evaluation of development projects
  • acquire knowledge and understanding of the politics of different aspects of development processes, practices and advocacy.

Typical Study Pattern

Year 1

Semester 1

Semester 2

Year 2

Semester 1

Semester 2

Career opportunities

Opportunities exist for Master of International Development graduates in a range of sectors, including in:

  • non-government organisations and the charity sector
  • public development agencies like World Vision Australia, Oxfam Save the Children Plan, TEAR Australia, Australian Red Cross and AUSAID
  • strategic direction roles for multinational business
  • government agencies
  • academia


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The Division of Peace Studies and the Bradford Centre for International Development each have a strong set of Master’s programmes; alongside undergraduate, postgraduate research, and Research and Knowledge Transfer programmes. Read more
The Division of Peace Studies and the Bradford Centre for International Development each have a strong set of Master’s programmes; alongside undergraduate, postgraduate research, and Research and Knowledge Transfer programmes. Both have high international reputations in their respective areas, in terms of teaching, research and policy and programme engagement.

The MA in Peace, Conflict and Development Studies aims to combine the strengths of these two Divisions in providing a structured, innovative and challenging taught MA programme on the important interrelationships between peace, conflict and development. It offers a comprehensive introduction and analysis of the interrelationships between development, conflict and security in developing and transitional societies.

It covers: development theory, policy and programming debates; interrelationships between insecurity, poverty and development; peace and peacebuilding (including conflict prevention and post-conflict reconstruction); human security issues; natural resource conflict, co-operation and management; environment and security in developing and fragile political contexts; and conflict-sensitive development principles and practices. It also equips its students with practical skills in order to design and manage projects and programmes in the field.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/peace-conflict-and-development-ma-part-time

Why Bradford?

The MA in Peace, Conflict and Development Studies aims to combine the strengths of these two Divisions: Peace Studies and Development (known as Bradford Centre for International Development). They are both long established within the University of Bradford and both have high international reputations in their respective areas, in terms of teaching, research and policy and programme engagement.

Modules

Core modules
-Issues in Development Theory
-Introduction to Peace Studies
-Natural Resource Governance, Conflict and Co-operation
-Dissertation

Option modules
-Fragile States and the Security-Development Nexus
-Conflict Resolution Theory
-International Politics and Security Studies
-Introduction to African Politics
-Peacekeeping, Peacebuilding and Statebuilding
-Gender, Conflict and Development
-Cities in Conflict
-Applied Conflict Resolution Skills
-African Security Studies
-African Study Visit
-Issues in Development Policy
-Public Policy Analysis and Management
-Sustainable Tourism Development

Work experience

Students are able to opt for a ‘Professional Practice’ module that encourages students to undertake a voluntary placement with a view to gaining experience of working in a team and managing change.

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Students will benefit from practical skills-based training as well as academic education, in relation to engagement with key contemporary policy and programme debates of the key international and national organisations involved in peace, conflict and development. They will benefit from the strong international engagement of the relevant teaching staff in these debates, and the networks that these bring.

The MA in Peace, Conflict and Development Studies combines theoretical and academic debates on these interrelationships with examinations of the relevant policy and programming issues, so it is relevant for decision-makers and stakeholders within developing, fragile or conflict-affected countries and for those concerned with international aid and assistance.

Read less
Passionate about making a difference to universal issues?. Be part of a new generation of practitioners and scholars who are solving some of the most challenging problems facing the world today. Read more

Passionate about making a difference to universal issues?

Be part of a new generation of practitioners and scholars who are solving some of the most challenging problems facing the world today. A Master of International Development will introduce you to the latest theories on sustainable development and cross-cultural practice in terms of dealing with issues like poverty, empowerment and gender.

The course will intricately hone your practice-led research skills and prepare you for a rewarding career in the charity sector or in public development agencies like World Vision, Oxfam and the Australian Red Cross.

Study a Master of International Development at UC and you will:

  • develop the skills to engage with contemporary development theory
  • acquire knowledge about development issues across the world, especially with under-privileged communities
  • explore participatory approaches to planning, management, monitoring and the evaluation of development projects
  • acquire knowledge and understanding of the politics of different aspects of development processes, practices and advocacy.

Typical study pattern

Year 1

Semester 1

Semester 2

Year 2

Semester 1

Semester 2

Career opportunities

Opportunities exist for Master of International Development graduates in a range of sectors, including in:

  • non-government organisations and the charity sector
  • public development agencies like World Vision Australia, Oxfam Save the Children Plan, TEAR Australia, Australian Red Cross and AUSAID
  • strategic direction roles for multinational business
  • government agencies
  • academia


Read less
This course examines contemporary and established analytical and conceptual frameworks relating to poverty, conflict analysis and the reconstruction of conflict and disaster-affected societies. Read more
This course examines contemporary and established analytical and conceptual frameworks relating to poverty, conflict analysis and the reconstruction of conflict and disaster-affected societies. It looks at policies and practices, by which individuals, communities and organisations seek to reduce poverty, understand conflict and initiate humanitarian interventions.

Aims

-Provide you with an opportunity to deepen your critical understanding of key theoretical and practical issues relating to poverty analysis and reduction, conflict analysis and reconstruction
-Provide you with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to critically analyse key theoretical and practical issues relating to poverty, conflict and reconstruction and make judgements about related policies and their implementation
-Provide critical insights into the key strategies, policies and practices currently employed to promote development and poverty reduction
-Develop professionally-oriented skills related to formulating, investigating and implementing different practical approaches to poverty, conflict and reconstruction
-Provide a wide range of options for advanced training in areas of specialist expertise relevant to poverty, conflict and reconstruction
-Develop advanced competencies in transferable areas, including developing reasoned arguments, gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources, undertaking both team-based and independent work to deadlines, and both written and verbal forms of communication
-Assist you in developing your specialist area of expertise within the field of poverty, conflict and reconstruction, and applying your understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is covered by the course fee. Recent fieldtrip locations have included Uganda, Ghana, Sri Lanka and India.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. We cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. Planning will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

The taught elements of the programme, carrying 120 credits overall is continuously assessed by a variety of methods (project based reports, essays), involving largely individual submissions, but also elements of group work.

Participants must also complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice approved by the Programme Directors. Students are encouraged to base their dissertations on topics of direct professional concern to themselves.

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for employment in a range of development-related fields, including research, policy and practice. A wide range of transferable skills will be developed, including analytical and professional skills. Many of our alumni have gone onto careers in public service, the NGO/charitable and private sectors at national and international levels, as policy officers, managers, consultants or development practitioners - while others have pursued further academic study leading to a PhD and academic careers. Since its foundation, the Global Development Institute has trained over 7000 individuals from 170 different countries.

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The Human Resources and Development Management pathway is aimed at those who are interested in management in the public, state or NGO sectors in developing, transitional or newly-industrialised countries. Read more
The Human Resources and Development Management pathway is aimed at those who are interested in management in the public, state or NGO sectors in developing, transitional or newly-industrialised countries. This is primarily a public sector management, not a business management, programme, although some of the themes covered are relevant to both sectors. The pathway encourages students to consider and analyse how a changing global environment has shaped the ways in which work is organized and managed and how ideas about leadership and management may be applied differently across cultures and contexts.

The pathway explores the relationship between hard and soft approaches to the analysis and practice of management, for example between human resources management and human resource development, between leadership and management and between vertical bureaucracy and decentralised collaborative management. The pathway considers the interaction between organizational structure, culture, power and motivation in public administration and in international organizations.

Who is the programme for?

The programme is designed for officials, policy analysts and researchers concerned with economic and social development. They may work in central or local government, public enterprises, non-governmental organisations, and research or training organisations. The programme is also appropriate for those who are hoping to enter a career in the field of development.

About the School of Government and Society

The School of Government and Society is one of the leading UK and International centres for governance, politics, international development, sociology, public management, Russian and European studies.

Established in 2008, the School comprises three Departments: Politics and International Studies (POLSIS); International Development (IDD) and Local Government Studies (INLOGOV).

POLSIS: The Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS), one of the largest and most academically vibrant departments of Political Science and International Studies in the UK. In the latest Research Excellence Framework (REF) Politics and International Studies at Birmingham was ranked the 6th best in the power rankings highlighting the large number of staff in POLSIS producing world-leading and internationally excellent research.

IDD: Be part of global effort to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Contribute to conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction. Help build capacity of nations and communities to adapt to climate change. Study with us to gain the skills and knowledge essential for working in international development in the 21st Century.

INLOGOV: The Institute of Local Government Studies (INLOGOV) is the leading academic centre for research and teaching on local governance and strategic public management. We enrich the world of local public service with research evidence and innovative ideas, making a positive difference.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Development at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Development at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Department of Political and Cultural Studies (PCS) boasts a dynamic research environment with a committed staff all of whom are research-active. Academic members of staff on the International Development programme have a very considerable range of research interests on which we offer supervision for research degrees.

Key Features of My by Research in International Development

An MA by Research in International Development offered in PCS gives you the chance to pursue a major research project based around your own passions and interests in International Development, leading to a qualification which can open the door to an academic career or boost employment prospects outside academia. It will give you the freedom to explore a topic of your choosing in International Development and develop a methodology under the close supervision of two experienced academics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes.

Typically, as a student of the International Development research programme, you will work closely with your supervisors, meeting them regularly, in many instances fortnightly, in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time.

Students enrolled in the MA by Research in International Development are required to attend skills and training courses at College and University level. You may also be expected to give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and attend the postgraduate conference of the College of Arts and Humanities which is held in October.

The MA by Research in International Development is ideal for those who want:

- an MA qualification in areas where taught programmes are not offered;

- the experience of a research degree without committing to a PhD at the outset.

Research proposals in International Development are invited on any topic for which staff in PCS can provide supervision. It is a good idea to enter into discussions about your research project with the Department's Director of Postgraduate Research, Professor Roland Axtmann (), before drawing up an initial proposal and starting the application process.

Departmental Research Expertise

In the area of International Relations and Development Studies, the department has expertise in:

International Security and Strategic Studies

The international politics of space

Gender, childhood and child soldiers

North- and South East Asia

West Africa

Transitional justice and international crimes

Post-war reconstruction

Multi-nationals and corporate social responsibility

Governance and international development, including aid policy and practice

The role of civil society organisations in development contexts

Human rights and international development

History of military thought and military culture

European diplomatic history



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The current impoverishment of more than 1.4 billion people and the growing levels of inequality at national and international levels present the world with its greatest moral challenge. Read more
The current impoverishment of more than 1.4 billion people and the growing levels of inequality at national and international levels present the world with its greatest moral challenge. The challenge of understanding and tackling the problems of poverty and inequality is therefore an urgent one. This course is designed to help you engage with this challenge in a critical and constructive way, by offering high-level academic training in a vibrant and stimulating environment.

Aims

-Provide critical insights into different theoretical and disciplinary perspectives on how poverty, inequality and development can be understood, measured and explained
-Provide you with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to critically analyse key theoretical and practical issues relating to poverty, inequality and development;
-Provide critical insights into the key strategies, policies and practices currently employed to promote development, equality and poverty reduction
-Provide a wide range of options for advanced training in areas of specialist expertise relevant to poverty, inequality and development;
-Develop advanced competencies in transferable areas, including developing reasoned arguments, gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources, undertaking both team-based and independent work to deadlines, and both written and verbal forms of communication
-Assist you in developing your specialist area of expertise within the field of poverty, inequality and development, and applying your understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation.

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is covered by the course fee. Recent fieldtrip locations have included Uganda, Ghana, Sri Lanka and India.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. We cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. Planning will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

The taught elements of the programme, carrying 120 credits overall is continuously assessed by a variety of methods (project based reports, essays), involving largely individual submissions, but also elements of group work.

Participants must also complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice approved by the Programme Directors. Students are encouraged to base their dissertations on topics of direct professional concern to themselves.

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for employment in a range of development-related fields, including research, policy and practice. A wide range of transferable skills will be developed, including analytical and professional skills. Many of our alumni have gone onto careers in public service, the NGO/charitable and private sectors at national and international levels, as policy officers, managers, consultants or development practitioners - while others have pursued further academic study leading to a PhD and academic careers. Since its foundation, GDI has trained over 7000 individuals from 170 different countries.

Read less
This programme allows you to explore in depth the challenges facing developing and developed countries in the fight against global poverty, as well as to understand the promise and problems of proposed approaches to poverty reduction. Read more
This programme allows you to explore in depth the challenges facing developing and developed countries in the fight against global poverty, as well as to understand the promise and problems of proposed approaches to poverty reduction. Issues covered include: theories and history of development; changing approaches to poverty reduction; practical policy, programme and research skills.

The International Development Department is well-regarded internationally by sponsors, donor agencies, governments and NGOs. Study with us to benefit from:

Expertise in key issues and skills valued by employers
A vibrant, welcoming community
Individual overseas fieldwork or study visit included in fees (on-campus programmes)
Flexible programmes and a wide choice of modules (part-time students also welcome)
A diverse and international student body
Strong support in study and English language skills

Each programme is taught by a team of multi-disciplinary specialists who work closely with students to address individual interests and concerns. Every student is allocated an academic tutor to support them in their academic progress throughout the year. The department has a long history of teaching students from across the world, and recent students have come from 99 different countries and a wide variety of professional and academic backgrounds.

This programme allows you to explore in depth the challenges facing developing and developed countries in the fight against global poverty, as well as to understand the promise and problems of proposed approaches to poverty reduction. Issues covered include: theories and history of development; changing approaches to poverty reduction; practical policy, programme and research skills.

Who is the programme for?

The programme is designed for recent graduates preparing to work in international development and for professionals working for NGOs, donor or government funded development programmes

Programme content

This core pathway is designed for flexibility, allowing you to choose over half of the MSc content from a wide range of optional modules.

Specialist pathways:

Poverty, Inequality and Development
Conflict, Security and Development
International Political Economy and Development
Governance and Statebuilding
Urban Development

About the School of Government and Society

The School of Government and Society is one of the leading UK and International centres for governance, politics, international development, sociology, public management, Russian and European studies.

Established in 2008, the School comprises three Departments: Politics and International Studies (POLSIS); International Development (IDD) and Local Government Studies (INLOGOV).

POLSIS: The Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS), one of the largest and most academically vibrant departments of Political Science and International Studies in the UK. In the latest Research Excellence Framework (REF) Politics and International Studies at Birmingham was ranked the 6th best in the power rankings highlighting the large number of staff in POLSIS producing world-leading and internationally excellent research.

IDD: Be part of global effort to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Contribute to conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction. Help build capacity of nations and communities to adapt to climate change. Study with us to gain the skills and knowledge essential for working in international development in the 21st Century.

INLOGOV: The Institute of Local Government Studies (INLOGOV) is the leading academic centre for research and teaching on local governance and strategic public management. We enrich the world of local public service with research evidence and innovative ideas, making a positive difference.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

Read less
Make a positive difference to the lives of people around the world, addressing the global challenges of poverty and violence by linking theory and practice. Read more
Make a positive difference to the lives of people around the world, addressing the global challenges of poverty and violence by linking theory and practice. This is your opportunity to develop your awareness of the relationships between peace, conflict resolution and development, both nationally and internationally.

You will consider issues such as gender, poverty, livelihoods, human rights, the role of civil society and community participation in decisionmaking and governance. From security threats and terrorism to the arms trade and non-violent social movements, you will acquire an in-depth insight into global issues. You will study the political, economic, cultural, environmental and technological changes that influence development decisions.

Our teaching is delivered in small groups of students from around the world. We place a real emphasis on international debate, giving you access to a range of cultural perspectives, and we will provide you with skills in project management and funding, essential for working in the field.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including social work and social policy.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/peaceanddvp_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

You will find employment opportunities in the UK and overseas working for non-governmental organisations, the public sector and the media. Previous graduates from our University have gone on to work as teachers, social workers, journalists, development workers, university lecturers, government consultants and business managers, or have pursued their research interests and taken on PhDs.

- Charity/ Aid Worker
- Government Advisor
- Journalist

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will benefit by being taught by our highly qualified team of academics who are renowned in their fields of research. Our research in peace and development keeps our curriculum fresh and cutting edge.

Staff members have close working links with organisations such as, Oxfam, Amnesty International, Pugwash, The Swiss Small Arms Survey, The Omega Foundation, The Mines Advisory Group, CND, Aegis, Huridocs and the Department for International Development (DfID), and we encourage students to engage with relevant external organisations and conferences.

Core Modules

Critical Perspectives on Peace and War
This provides an introduction to the core theories of war, peace and conflict reconstruction and an analysis of the major drivers, key theorists and practitioners.

Post-conflict Reconstruction and Peace Building
Critically examines and integrates peace and development discourses around post-conflict reconstruction and considers recovery from major disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis.

Global Perspectives on Development
This module critically examines the conceptual framework of international development in a global context, introducing a variety of different perspectives. You will become familiar with 'development orthodoxy' and critiques of it.

Security Paradigms
Deconstructs the truth content of contrasting and often contradictory models of key security issues from the competing state power and human security perspectives.

Developing and Managing Projects
Allows you to apply your learning to an in-depth investigation of a research question of your choice. This might be related to interests you develop during the course or to a topic related to your existing work or career aspirations. You will be supervised by an experienced member of staff who is also an active researcher, and produce a 12-15000 word thesis.

Research Methods
This develops your ability to design suitable research questions, match them to appropriate research methods and apply these in a reflective and ethical way.

Dissertation
Engage in critical depth with a research-based project aligned to your personal interests and professional aspirations.

Dr Rachel Julian

Course Leader

"My previous experience has allowed me to build international professional networks that provide me with insights into the challenges and solutions for a more peaceful and just world, which I thoroughly enjoy sharing with my students. Teaching is exciting because I get to work with courageous people who are changing their communities for the better."

Rachel has been working in peace and conflict resolution for twenty years. Her roles have included peace education, organisation building and non-violence training, and she's been awarded for her work in community activism.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Clinical Skills Suite
The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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This interdisciplinary programme addresses the convergence of security and development issues, and its implications for analysing the reconstruction of war-affected societies. Read more

This interdisciplinary programme addresses the convergence of security and development issues, and its implications for analysing the reconstruction of war-affected societies.

The course bridges the themes of conflict, liberal styles of governance and aid policy. You will analyse the ways in which security, development and humanitarian agents adapt to instability. You will also examine the significance of globalisation for the emergence of internal conflict, and for the development of trans-border economics and the political dynamics they may support.

This unique programme gives you the opportunity to study regionally differentiated responses to conflict in, for example Africa and Afghanistan, and to discuss issues relating to humanitarian conditionality, containment and the role of international organisations and NGOs.

Our academics are widely recognised as leading experts in their field. The research-led teaching you will benefit from is directly informed by the cutting-edge research that occurs within the Centre for Global Development, which involves more than 60 academics from across the University, as well as the Leeds University Centre for African Studies (LUCAS), which brings together scholars with an active interest in Africa from across different schools and faculties at the University of Leeds.

In addition, colleagues working in the International Relations and Security research group participate in research clusters on ‘The Responsibility to Protect and Protect’ and ‘Contemporary Democracy and Authoritarianism’ as well as the ‘Middle East Research Group’.

Course content

This programme offers you the most depth and breadth of any course that focuses on the increasing merger of development and security issues. It does so by unparalleled case study expertise on political and social reconstruction from war-affected societies across Africa, Asia and the Middle East.

The compulsory and optional modules studied will give you the opportunity to:

  • take part in cutting-edge academic inquiry with a distinct policy relevance
  • study in an intellectually vigorous environment
  • participate in a dynamic research atmosphere
  • broaden your understanding of complex political emergencies
  • pursue a career in the humanitarian or social reconstruction sector.

The compulsory module examines the economic and political elements of contemporary internal and regionalised conflict. You will look at humanitarian, developmental and security policy responses and investigate the organisational adaptations that are emerging among state and non-state actors in relation to such instability.

You will also be able to hone your research and writing skills in your compulsory dissertation – an independent piece of research on your chosen topic.

The wide-ranging list of optional modules means that you can explore a diverse range of related subjects of interest to you.

If you are a part-time student, you will take one compulsory module and choose one optional module in your first year. You will then take the compulsory dissertation module and two optional modules in your second year to complete your programme.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Conflict, Complex Emergencies and Global Governance 30 credits
  • POLIS MA Dissertation 60 credits

Optional modules

  • The Global Politics of Health: Power and Inequity 30 credits
  • Africa in the Contemporary World 30 credits
  • Gender, Globalisation and Development 30 credits
  • Political Economy of Resources and Development 30 credits
  • European Defence and Security Analysis 30 credits
  • The Rise of China 30 credits
  • American Foreign Policy 30 credits
  • Contemporary Politics of the Middle East 30 credits
  • The Politics of the Israel-Palestine Conflict 30 credits
  • Insurgency 15 credits
  • International Political Economy 30 credits
  • Policing Post-Conflict Cities 15 credits
  • International Relations and the Environment 30 credits
  • Terrorism 15 credits
  • Counterterrorism 15 credits
  • Civil War and Intrastate Conflict 30 credits
  • Global Justice 30 credits
  • Research Methods 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Conflict, Development and Security MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Conflict, Development and Security MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Teaching is through a combination of lectures, lively seminar discussions and guided weekly readings. We expect you to participate fully in taught sessions and to study independently, developing your skills and preparing for lectures and seminars. You will also be able to benefit from an impressive range of research talks and seminars led by outside speakers or colleagues from within the department and University.

Assessment

Within modules, assessment currently consists exclusively of assessed essays. At the end of your studies, a 12,000 word dissertation will allow you to pursue your own research interest under close supervision by one of our expert colleagues.

Career opportunities

This programme provides you with an ideal preparation for a career in the international political arena.

Our graduates have pursued a range of exciting and high-profile careers within academia, think tanks and other organisations. These include: teaching and research positions at universities in the UK, US, Europe and Africa; the public sector in the UK (such as UK Border Agency), Europe (including the External Action Service) and Africa (such as police forces); globally operating consultancy and publishing firms; transnational civil society organisations; and the United Nations.

Many graduates continue to pursue their research interests as PhD students.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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The MA in International Development at Richmond University is grounded in the recognition that development is inherently international, and inherently political. Read more

Programme Overview

The MA in International Development at Richmond University is grounded in the recognition that development is inherently international, and inherently political: a concept that cannot be separated from core questions of global governance, international conflict, attempts at conflict resolution, and post-conflict reconstruction, or from issues of human development and human security.
The programme ensures that students understand the history of international development from post war modernization to the Millennium Development Goals, with particular emphasis on building a conception of the impact of global governance on political and economic processes in the developing world.

Aims of the programme

1. Provide an opportunity for participants to deepen their understanding of global governance
2. Provide participants with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to analyse effectively the relationships between international development within the context of modernization, emergence and economic development
3. Develop research skills and a knowledge base for career development or further academic research with emphasis on developing reasoned arguments, information gathering, organization and using evidence from a wide variety of sources,
4. Assist students in developing their specialist area of expertise within development management, and applying their understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation.

Course Modules

Theories of International Development
Principles of International Law & Institutions
International Flows: Labour, Migration and Development

How to Apply

Apply online using the application form available at http://www.richmond.ac.uk/admissions/postgraduate-admissions/ Please send your completed form to us by email to or by mail to the following address: Admission Office, Richmond, the American University in London, Queens Road, Richmond Upon Thames TW10 6JP, UK.

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Study from anywhere in the world with practitioners in government, civil society and the private sector, as well as with people new to development. Read more
Study from anywhere in the world with practitioners in government, civil society and the private sector, as well as with people new to development.

This programme is designed to provide students with an understanding of the evolution of thinking and practice in international development over the last fifty to sixty years.

The core module aims to familiarise students with key concepts (eg development and poverty) and theories (eg modernisation, dependency, neo-liberalism and the ‘crisis’ in development theory) and with the changing roles of international development organisations and states in promoting international development (eg through aid, trade and fiscal, monetary and social policies).

The emphasis throughout will be on encouraging students to reflect critically on what has worked well or not and why. Students will select five optional modules (at 20 credits each) based on their individual interests and career aspirations.

About the School of Government and Society

The School of Government and Society is one of the leading UK and International centres for governance, politics, international development, sociology, public management, Russian and European studies.

Established in 2008, the School comprises three Departments: Politics and International Studies (POLSIS); International Development (IDD) and Local Government Studies (INLOGOV).

POLSIS: The Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS), one of the largest and most academically vibrant departments of Political Science and International Studies in the UK. In the latest Research Excellence Framework (REF) Politics and International Studies at Birmingham was ranked the 6th best in the power rankings highlighting the large number of staff in POLSIS producing world-leading and internationally excellent research.

IDD: Be part of global effort to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Contribute to conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction. Help build capacity of nations and communities to adapt to climate change. Study with us to gain the skills and knowledge essential for working in international development in the 21st Century.

INLOGOV: The Institute of Local Government Studies (INLOGOV) is the leading academic centre for research and teaching on local governance and strategic public management. We enrich the world of local public service with research evidence and innovative ideas, making a positive difference.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The programme is designed for those who want to improve their knowledge and skills in development management, from a wide range of sectors, including central and local government, NGOs and donors, and at the same time to acquire an academic qualification. Read more
The programme is designed for those who want to improve their knowledge and skills in development management, from a wide range of sectors, including central and local government, NGOs and donors, and at the same time to acquire an academic qualification.

It explores:

The nature and purpose of development management
The role and relationships of and between actors in development management (in government, civil society, the private sector, and donors)
The approaches to reforms in developing countries and their management, and appraising their impact on different society interests
Policy making
Public finance
How to adapt public administration concepts to a variety of economic, institutional, geographic and cultural settings
key concepts of democracy, human rights, access to justice and accountability to development management practice

Offered through distance learning, you study via a web-based learning environment, using textbooks and other printed materials, complemented by our extensive electronic library, and an online discussion board where you participate in guided discussion activities with other students and your tutor

The programme is taught by a team of multidisciplinary specialists who work closely with students to address their individual interests and concerns. MSc students have an individual dissertation supervisor.

As a distance learning degree, the MSc Development Management takes a minimum of two years to complete: 18 months for the six taught modules and six months for the dissertation.

The programme does not include any face-to-face element.

About the School of Government and Society

The School of Government and Society is one of the leading UK and International centres for governance, politics, international development, sociology, public management, Russian and European studies.

Established in 2008, the School comprises three Departments: Politics and International Studies (POLSIS); International Development (IDD) and Local Government Studies (INLOGOV).

POLSIS: The Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS), one of the largest and most academically vibrant departments of Political Science and International Studies in the UK. In the latest Research Excellence Framework (REF) Politics and International Studies at Birmingham was ranked the 6th best in the power rankings highlighting the large number of staff in POLSIS producing world-leading and internationally excellent research.

IDD: Be part of global effort to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Contribute to conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction. Help build capacity of nations and communities to adapt to climate change. Study with us to gain the skills and knowledge essential for working in international development in the 21st Century.

INLOGOV: The Institute of Local Government Studies (INLOGOV) is the leading academic centre for research and teaching on local governance and strategic public management. We enrich the world of local public service with research evidence and innovative ideas, making a positive difference.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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