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Masters Degrees (Reconciliation)

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A cross-border course - Belfast and Dublin After registration in Dublin at the start of the course, teaching takes place in Belfast over two teaching terms, September to December and January to early April. Read more
A cross-border course - Belfast and Dublin After registration in Dublin at the start of the course, teaching takes place in Belfast over two teaching terms, September to December and January to early April. The second term includes a residential Spring School in Dublin. For the remainder of the programme, including the summer dissertation period, April-September students may be based in either Belfast or Dublin depending on their research interests. A one term (twelve week) programme is available and is ideal for those on sabbatical, or for those who prefer a shorter period of study.
Course Description:
This innovative cross-border programme allows M.Phil. students to take a broader joint course Master in Conflict Resolution and Reconciliation, or a specialist option for either a Master in Conflict Resolution or a Master in Reconciliation Studies. The Conflict Resolution specialism develops skills in conflict analysis and conflict intervention for both established practitioners and those seeking to develop new expertise in conflict management, conflict resolution and conflict transformation. The Reconciliation specialism offers an inter-disciplinary approach to the challenges of social reconciliation in the aftermath of political conflict, drawing on social research, politics, theology and ethics. Particular attention is given to ethnic conflicts, and the role of religion in such conflicts and in peacebuilding and reconciliation. Case studies typically include: Northern Ireland; South Africa; Zimbabwe; Rwanda; El Salvador; Guatemala; Israel/Palestine; and Sri Lanka. The programme equips graduates for work with local and international organisations, and provides transferable skills for a wide variety of careers, including mediation, diplomacy, policy, advocacy, journalism, teaching and Ph.D. research.

Students are required to take a 10 ECTS core module in Research Skills, a further 50 ECTS of taught modules, and a 30 ECTS research dissertation. In the Conflict Resolution specialism, students are required to take the core module, Conflict Analysis and Models of Intervention. In the Reconciliation specialism, students are required to take the core module, Dynamics of Reconciliation. Optional modules worth 10 ECTS include: Conflict Resolution Skills, Conflict Transformation, Conflict Resolution Lessons from Comparative Peace Processes, Social Research for Transformation, Reconciliation in Northern Ireland, Theology of Reconciliation, Community Learning and Reflective Practice in Northern Ireland, and Post-Conflict Justice and Truth Commissions. Optional modules worth 5 ECTS include: Guided Research Project and South Africa: The Ethics of Truth and Reconciliation. Modules are generally assessed on written work of 3,000-5,000 words, to be submitted according to the internal deadlines distributed at the beginning of each academic year, with final submission date by 1 May. Subject to satisfactory performance in the written work, students may proceed to the submission of the dissertation. Students who do not reach that standard, but who nonetheless are judged by the Court of Examiners to have reached a satisfactory level of performance, may be recommended for the award of a Postgraduate Diploma, without further assessment. The 30 ECTS dissertation is 15,000-20,000 words, and to be submitted by 1 August. The dissertation is required for all M.Phil. students.

Further details on the specialist tracks are available on the School website http://www.tcd.ie/ise/resolution/

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This Belfast-based degree is an innovative cross-border programme which takes an inter-disciplinary approach to the challenges of social reconciliation in the aftermath of armed conflict. Read more
This Belfast-based degree is an innovative cross-border programme which takes an inter-disciplinary approach to the challenges of social reconciliation in the aftermath of armed conflict. The programme grows out of and addresses the needs and experiences of people in Northern Ireland. Particular attention is given to ethnic conflicts and the role of religion in such conflicts. It is designed to address the challenge of developing a fuller, more complex and more systematic understanding of theoretical and practical approaches to reconciliation. Thirty years of violence have taught people some costly wisdom about reconciliation, which needs both to be consolidated and further applied in Northern Ireland and to be offered to others who have experienced similar conflicts. Reciprocally, the Reconciliation Studies programme will also be probing conflicts around the world for lessons to be applied in Northern Ireland and more widely. The programme also includes a one-week Spring School in Dublin.

Students take at least five of the eight courses offered and are assessed on four of them. The courses include Dynamics of Reconciliation; Theology of Reconciliation; Conflict Transformation; Northern Ireland – Conflict and Reconciliation; Social Research Methods; Resources of Reconciliation in World Religions; When the Fighting Stops: Transitional Justice and Truth Commissions; and Conflict and Collective Identity: Ethnicity, Nationalism and Religion. Students also participate in a one-week Spring School in Dublin, which varies in content from year to year. In addition seminars will be organised in support of the programme.

Assessment: The assessment consists of four 5,000-6,000 word essays: students submit an essay on the first course ‘Dynamics of Reconciliation’, at least one from courses 2, 3 or 4, and two others – to be completed by 1st May, and an 18,000-20,000 word dissertation to be completed by 15th September.

All students are registered on a common Masters programme and follow the same assessment procedures for the four essays required. Subject to satisfactory performance in the four essays, students may proceed to submission of a dissertation for the M.Phil. degree. Students who do not reach that standard, but who nonetheless are judged by the Court of Examiners to have reached a satisfactory level of performance, may be recommended for the award of a Postgraduate Diploma, without further assessment.

Admission Requirement:
Applicants should normally have an honors degree at second-class level or above. Students not meeting these criteria may exceptionally be considered at the discretion of the Dean of Graduate Studies.

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MA Peace and Conflict studies is delivered by the Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations. It is the centre’s flagship programme building on the legacy of Coventry as a city for peace and reconciliation. Read more
MA Peace and Conflict studies is delivered by the Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations. It is the centre’s flagship programme building on the legacy of Coventry as a city for peace and reconciliation. You will not only learn about the value of peace and conflict studies but will also be inspired by the city’s reputation and legacy.

This programme provides students with in-depth knowledge and understanding of peace and conflict theories, issues and practices, and an ability to apply theory and case studies to the practices of peacebuilding in complex situations. With opportunities to develop critically reflective peace-making practices in a friendly and supporting learning environment, the programme promotes breadth and depth of intellectual enquiry and is underpinned with a concern for integrity and courage.

You will also develop a valuable range of transferable key skills and personal attributes for a wide variety of careers in related field such as international development, in charities and policy settings.

Qualifications available:
-Postgraduate Certificate in Peace and Conflict Studies (8 months by blended/distance-learning)
-Postgraduate Diploma in Peace and Conflict Studies (16 months by blended/distance-learning)
-Full Term MA Peace and Conflict Studies (24 months by blended/distance-learning)
-Fast-Track MA (APEL) Peace and Conflict Studies (15 months)

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

The MA Peace and Conflict Studies is a high-quality postgraduate qualification, shaped by research-active staff and informed by a concern for the real world, providing an opportunity to study in a highly interactive and supportive learning environment. You will develop a reflective learning skill for both intellectual enquiry and professional development.

We will provide you:
-An opportunity to achieve an MA in 15 months with accreditation of prior experiential learning (APEL). Enabling professionals to obtain academic credits based on their professional experience
-Access to a professional network of individuals working in various roles related to peacebuilding internationally
-Research informed curriculum and teaching. Our courses are global, from the content of the programme and the staff leading them, to the diverse backgrounds of our participants
-A flexible blended learning approach, combining intensive workshops, online learning and small group tutorials, allowing you to fit your studies around other commitments
-Access to Coventry University e-learning resources

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

Alongside the MA-route (180M credits), this programme can also be studied at Postgraduate Certificate (60M credits) and Postgraduate Diploma level (120M credits), and is offered via blended learning or distance learning. The three different qualifications on offer are sequential, and can therefore lead into one another, following the successful completion of the earlier portion.

At Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) stage, you will study three mandatory modules:
-Peace, Conflict and Security in the 21st Century
-Philosophies of Non-Violence and Reconciliation
-Peacebuilding: Theories into Practice

At Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) stage you will undertake one core module, Project Management in Practice, and two elective modules from the following list:
-Environment, Peace and Conflict
-Religion, Peace and Conflict
-Gender, Peace and Conflict.
-Migration, Displacement and Belonging
-Privatisation of International Security
-Comparative Peace Processes

At MA Stage, you will undertake a dissertation in an area of study which you would like to explore in more depth, with support from a supervisor.

CTPSR BURSARIES

Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations are pleased to offer a limited number of partial bursaries towards tuition fees, available to overseas students who wish to pursue an MA in Maritime Security or Peace and Conflict Studies.

Eligibility
-Complete a bursary application form including a detailed statement of support which should not exceed 500 words by 28 April 2017.
-Demonstrate capacity and commitment to undertake and complete the programme.
-Explain how the programme is aligned to your future aspirations and how it will benefit your professional development.

Limitations
-Please note that this scholarship cannot be combined with any other CTPSR scholarship.
-The decision to award is at the sole discretion of the Centre. The Centre reserves the right to determine the number of scholarships to award from this category.
-Bursaries will only be awarded if your admissions application is successful.

How to Apply
Students wishing to apply for a bursary should complete an application form and submit this to by no later than 28 April 2017.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

The MA in Peace and Conflict Studies is taught by experts in the broad field of peace and conflict studies and is informed by their research, practice and activism. As such, the programme is able to provide a deeper insight into both theoretical and practical perspectives of the contemporary peacebuilding challenges.

Further to this, the course ultimately seeks to create a learning community, where ideas can be interchanged and debated amongst academic staff, alumni, and current students, lasting well beyond the timespan of the academic programme itself.

If you are already a practitioner, you will have the opportunity to broaden your professional network, which is very likely to be useful to you in the workplace, whilst also gaining a formal accredited postgraduate qualification, which may be required for further progression in your career. If you are an individual with an interest in peace and conflict, this course will equip you with the skills and knowledge necessary to enter into jobs within a broad spectrum of organisations, including: international non-government organisations, multi-national government organisations like the United Nations, regional communities such as the European Union or the Economic Community of West African States, faith group organisations, community organisations, the private sector, think tanks, and indeed also academia.

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmdispconfres/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Dispute and Conflict Resolution specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAC104 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration- 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian Case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
- The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAD104 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian Case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. the assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmhrconfjust/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Human Rights, Conflict and Justice specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit)
International Human Rights Clinic - 15PLAC145 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Units)
Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Units)
International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Units)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below.

Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAD150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAD112 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAD119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission by during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law.

It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmintlaw/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Climate Change Law and Policy - 15PLAC154 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Colonialism, Empire and International Law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
- International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
- Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
- The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Climate Change Law and Policy - 15PLAD154 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAD118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD167 (1 Unit)
- International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAD119 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The MA in Dispute Resolution and Conflict allows students to study the full spectrum of legal methods of solving disputes and managing conflicts, taking a broad view of conflict and law, and examining both the local, regional and international areas, including international tribunals and post-conflict reconciliation and reconstruction. Read more
The MA in Dispute Resolution and Conflict allows students to study the full spectrum of legal methods of solving disputes and managing conflicts, taking a broad view of conflict and law, and examining both the local, regional and international areas, including international tribunals and post-conflict reconciliation and reconstruction. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on modules offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/ma/madisconfres/

Structure

To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme.

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following courses associated with the Dispute and Conflict Resolution specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAC104 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: The Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals- 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
- The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
- Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit)

The Department

Key facts:
- LLB (QLD), BA (joint honours), LLM, MA & research degrees

- unique focus on both the developed and developing world

- research and teaching strengths in comparative, regional, international & global law

School of Law in UK top 5 for proportion of publications judged to be 'world-leading':
18 December 2014: the School was also graded in the top 20 nationally for its research environment. Find out more...

Our strengths:
We have unrivalled expertise in comparative law (China, Africa, South/South-East Asia, the Middle East), complemented by specialists in international and transnational law, human rights, transnational commercial law, environmental law and socio-legal method.

Facts and figures

- We are introducing student exchange programmes with leading universities in the US and China

- We achieve one of the highest percentages of training contracts with Magic Circle Law firms awarded to UK Law Schools

Teaching:
- 91% satisfaction for teaching (National Student Survey 2012/13): 96% of law students agreed that our staff are good at explaining things and 91% said their course was ‘intellectually stimulating’

- Excellent staff/student ratio

- Ranked 10th in UK (Guardian University Guide 2015)

Research:
- Thriving research culture with a packed schedule of seminars and conferences across our research centres and specialisms

- Close links with the internationally-renowned Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) and the Van Vollenhoven Institute, Leiden University

- Each year a number of distinguished Lawyers join SOAS as Research Fellows

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules.

A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject. Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmlawdevgov/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or for years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law, Development and Governance specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAC134 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law- 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAC177 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Colonialism, Empire and International Law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit)
- EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAD118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAD134 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law- 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAD177 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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International Peace Studies examines the sources of war and armed conflict and suggests methods of preventing and resolving them through processes of peacemaking and peacebuilding. Read more
International Peace Studies examines the sources of war and armed conflict and suggests methods of preventing and resolving them through processes of peacemaking and peacebuilding. The course combines perspectives from international relations, ethics and conflict resolution to reflect critically upon the wide range of social, political and economic issues associated with peace and political violence. A week-long Mediation Summer School provides an opportunity to develop practical skills in the area of conflict resolution and mediation. There is also the option to participate in various field trips in Ireland and abroad. Students are required to take the two core modules as well as four modules from the list of modules. A sufficient number of optional modules must be taken to fulfil credit requirements. A. Core Modules The Politics of Peace and Conflict Research Methods B. Students must take four modules from the following list of options: International Politics Ethics in International Affairs Conflict Resolution and Nonviolence Armed Conflict, Peace-building and Development The United Nations and Peacekeeping Human Rights in Theory and Practice Gender, War and Peace Northern Ireland: Conflict, Religion and the Politics of Peace The Politics of the Idea of Europe Race and Ethnicity, Theoretical Concepts Ethnic Conflict, Peace and the State NGOs in Theory and Practice: Internship Module Some changes to the structure and content of this course may be made during 2012-13. Prospective candidates should contact the Executive Officer for information on new developments. Teaching takes place in Dublin over two terms. A one term, non-degree course is available and is ideal for those on sabbatical, or for those who prefer a shorter period of study. There is also the option of attending single modules. Modules from the M.Phil. in Intercultural Theology and Interreligious Studies and the M.Phil. in Conflict Resolution and Reconciliation are open to students on the M.Phil. in International Peace Studies. Students seeking to be assessed for their work on a module in either of the two other courses must first secure the permission of the relevant course coordinators. Dissertation: A research dissertation (15,000 – 20,000 words) to be supervised by an appropriate member of staff and to be submitted by 16 August.

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This degree offered by the Human Rights Consortium (http://www.sas.ac.uk/hrc/graduate-study/ma-human-rights) is the longest-running interdisciplinary, practice-oriented human rights MA programme in the UK. Read more
This degree offered by the Human Rights Consortium (http://www.sas.ac.uk/hrc/graduate-study/ma-human-rights) is the longest-running interdisciplinary, practice-oriented human rights MA programme in the UK. Its priority is to provide students with practical skills essential to working as human rights practitioners, including advocacy, fundraising and research. The degree develops students as human rights professionals and is therefore particularly suitable for individuals who are, or seek to become, human rights practitioners in the NGO, governmental and inter-govermental sectors This degree addresses essential questions and debates within the field of human rights, such as: where do rights come from? What are their foundations and justifications? Can the discourse of rights secure social justice?

Structure

Degree code: MTCHR
Credit value: 120/180

Required modules:

Understanding Human Rights I: Ideas and Contexts
Securing Human Rights I: Actors and Mechanisms, Skills and Strategies
Translating Human Rights into Law I: The Foundations of International Human Rights Law
Optional modules*:

Understanding Human Rights II: Genocide, Gross Human Rights Violations and Reconciliation (Optional) [10 ECTS]
Securing Human Rights II: Securing Human Rights in Development and in Conflict [10 ECTS]
Translating Human Rights into Law II: Topics in International Human Rights Law [10 ECTS]
The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America [10 ECTS]
Researching Human Rights: Social Research Methods [10 ECTS]
Business and Human Rights [10 ECTS]
Indigenous Peoples, Minorities and Human Rights [10 ECTS]
Citizenship and New Social Movements in Latin America [10 ECTS]
Human Rights and Everyday Life in Latin America [10 ECTS]
*All modules are subject to availability.

Dissertation

All students must complete a minimum of three compulsory modules and three optional modules, plus a 15,000-words dissertation, in order to fulfil the requirement for the MA (totalling 90 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System)). In addition, students may wish to select one extra optional module (equalling 10 ECTS) and / or the internship (20 ECTS) for additional credit, totalling between 110 and 120 credits.

Assessment

The MA is assessed through essays and examinations, along with more innovative forms of assessment such as legal reports, a media project, mock funding proposal presentations and class participation.

Mode of study

Study options: full-time over one year, or part time over 24 months or 36 months.
Part time students may choose at least three optional modules during the spring term of years 1 or 2. Part time students may undertake more than one internship, e.g. in both years and/or during the summer between years 1 and 2.

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Global Health is an attempt to address health problems and issues that transcend national boundaries, and are informed by the circumstances and experiences of countries in differing contexts. Read more
Global Health is an attempt to address health problems and issues that transcend national boundaries, and are informed by the circumstances and experiences of countries in differing contexts. The underlying assumption is that the world's health problems are shared and are best tackled by cooperative action and the sharing of innovative solutions.

The M.Sc. Global Health aims to prepare graduates to contribute on a broader scale to the design, implementation, and management of health programmes, health systems development and health policy. The course augments traditional approaches to public and international health by bringing together perspectives and insights from a range of health and social sciences in understanding and resolving the challenges of global health. These problems may arise, for example, in relief and development programmes in developing countries; in conflict and post-conflict situations; with refugees, asylum seekers and economic migrants; with tourists and business travellers. All countries give rise to inequities in health, wealth, education and human rights, and the interconnectedness of these issues will be a major theme running throughout the course.

The course also lays emphasis on 'local' experiences that resonate globally in the case of Ireland. These include the influence of poverty and rapid social change on health and identity in Ireland; migration and refugee welfare, the consequences of ethnic conflict, the peace process and the challenges of reconciliation for creating inclusive health services. The strongest emphasis within the course is on health in developing countries and the impact of globalisation. We develop a strong emphasis on the influence of socio-cultural, economic and health policy issues.

The programme aims to provide graduates with a greater appreciation of the global interconnectedness of health problems and the range and depth of research methodology that can be used to work through these challenges. The M.Sc. Global Health course is particularly designed for practitioners, policy makers, health system planners, programme managers, analysts and health researchers, who wish to understand the broader and interconnecting causes of many health problems from a global perspective as well as those who aspire to build a career in the global health arena.

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This course offers a distinctive learning experience based on the integration of the fields of theology, biblical studies and Christian practice. Read more
This course offers a distinctive learning experience based on the integration of the fields of theology, biblical studies and Christian practice. Students will engage critically with the intellectual challenges of ministry through the study of key themes in biblical, theological and ministerial studies. The programme is thus framed around a clear interaction between both theory and practice and across a variety of areas of ministerial formation. The M.Theol. aims to maintain a rigorous academic core whilst also broadening the scope of content and assessment to include professional application. Candidates are assessed by a combination of course work, ministry portfolio and dissertation.

This programme is offered only in the part-time mode, with two options:

Mode A which runs for three years and Mode B which runs for 6 years.

Course Content:
The course covers areas including:
The Bible and its Interpretation
• Texts and Communities in Context – Old Testament/Hebrew Bible
• Texts and Communities in Context –New Testament
• Communities of Interpretation - To the Enlightenment Period
• Communities of Interpretation - In the Modern Period and in the Church Today
Theological Reflection and Christian Identity
• Christian Thinking About God
• Jesus the Christ
• Cosmology, Anthropology and the Church
• Theology and Ethics
Christian Practice in Church and Society
• Mission, Culture and Social Context
• Pastoral Studies
• Liturgy, Worship and Spirituality
• Anglican Studies in an Irish Context
• Church Leadership Practice and Practicalities

Students take a total of one of three elective modules.

• Music and Worship
• Faith, Nurture and Christian Education
• Ministry for Reconciliation

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The MA in Human Rights Law allows students to study human rights law, its application and relevance to a broad range of areas and legal issues, including Islamic law, Chinese law, gender, international law, conflict and labour law. Read more
The MA in Human Rights Law allows students to study human rights law, its application and relevance to a broad range of areas and legal issues, including Islamic law, Chinese law, gender, international law, conflict and labour law. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on modules offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/ma/mahumrightslaw/

Structure

To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme.

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following courses associated with the Human Rights specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):

Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAC155 (1 Unit)
Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World – 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit)
International Human Rights Clinic - 15PLAC145 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: The Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):

Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)
The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit)

The Department

Key facts:
- LLB (QLD), BA (joint honours), LLM, MA & research degrees

- unique focus on both the developed and developing world

- research and teaching strengths in comparative, regional, international & global law

School of Law in UK top 5 for proportion of publications judged to be 'world-leading':
18 December 2014: the School was also graded in the top 20 nationally for its research environment. Find out more...

Our strengths:
We have unrivalled expertise in comparative law (China, Africa, South/South-East Asia, the Middle East), complemented by specialists in international and transnational law, human rights, transnational commercial law, environmental law and socio-legal method.

Facts and figures

- We are introducing student exchange programmes with leading universities in the US and China

- We achieve one of the highest percentages of training contracts with Magic Circle Law firms awarded to UK Law Schools

Teaching:
- 91% satisfaction for teaching (National Student Survey 2012/13): 96% of law students agreed that our staff are good at explaining things and 91% said their course was ‘intellectually stimulating’

- Excellent staff/student ratio

- Ranked 10th in UK (Guardian University Guide 2015)

Research:
- Thriving research culture with a packed schedule of seminars and conferences across our research centres and specialisms

- Close links with the internationally-renowned Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) and the Van Vollenhoven Institute, Leiden University

- Each year a number of distinguished Lawyers join SOAS as Research Fellows

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA in International Law allows students to study international law and its application in a broad range of legal areas, including commerce, criminal law, humanitarian law, environmental law, and human rights. Read more
The MA in International Law allows students to study international law and its application in a broad range of legal areas, including commerce, criminal law, humanitarian law, environmental law, and human rights. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on modules offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/ma/maintlaw/

Structure

To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme.

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following courses associated with the International Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):

Climate Change Law and Policy - 15PLAC154 (1 Unit)
International Environmental Law - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: The Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):

Colonialism, Empire and International Law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit)

The Department

Key facts:
- LLB (QLD), BA (joint honours), LLM, MA & research degrees

- unique focus on both the developed and developing world

- research and teaching strengths in comparative, regional, international & global law

School of Law in UK top 5 for proportion of publications judged to be 'world-leading':
18 December 2014: the School was also graded in the top 20 nationally for its research environment. Find out more...

Our strengths:
We have unrivalled expertise in comparative law (China, Africa, South/South-East Asia, the Middle East), complemented by specialists in international and transnational law, human rights, transnational commercial law, environmental law and socio-legal method.

Facts and figures

- We are introducing student exchange programmes with leading universities in the US and China

- We achieve one of the highest percentages of training contracts with Magic Circle Law firms awarded to UK Law Schools

Teaching:
- 91% satisfaction for teaching (National Student Survey 2012/13): 96% of law students agreed that our staff are good at explaining things and 91% said their course was ‘intellectually stimulating’

- Excellent staff/student ratio

- Ranked 10th in UK (Guardian University Guide 2015)

Research:
- Thriving research culture with a packed schedule of seminars and conferences across our research centres and specialisms

- Close links with the internationally-renowned Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) and the Van Vollenhoven Institute, Leiden University

- Each year a number of distinguished Lawyers join SOAS as Research Fellows

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The Faculty of Social Sciences is excited to offer a rigorous one-year international graduate program in Peace and Conflict Management. Read more

The Faculty of Social Sciences is excited to offer a rigorous one-year international graduate program in Peace and Conflict Management. Viewed through both international and regional lenses, the field of conflict management will be explored in its many facets, with special attention paid to the wider Middle East conflict while conceptual, practical and comparative elements of conflict management of other global conflicts are examined.

As a deeply divided society and a country in protracted conflict with other countries in the region, Israel is a unique environment for a program whose goal is to enable students to understand how conflicts unfold from the grassroots level and move up through the halls of government to the international community. Israel supplies excellent field study opportunities that allow students to see how attempts to manage conflicts and promote coexistence, mutual understanding, and peace processes actually develop and take root, and is a real-time hands-on working laboratory for advanced international and Israeli students, offering encounters with ongoing conflicts as well as successful and failed efforts to achieve peace.

Why University of Haifa for your Peace and Conflict Studies?

What you will study

The interdisciplinary program of study includes courses in political science, international relations, psychology, sociology, communications, history and regional studies. Included in the course of study are a number of field trips throughout Israel in order to gain close familiarity with certain aspects of the local conflict. There is also a practicum component in NGOs related to aspects of peace-making and conflict management; thoughtful simulations of decision making processes, negotiations and conflict management; and guest lectures given by activists, practitioners, politicians, diplomats, academics and former military officials.

Over the course of three semesters we will study sources, types and levels of conflicts, where students will become familiar with tools to trace their development. The curriculum takes as its focus courses on conflict management and provides students with practical tools in the fostering of peace processes. Research methodology and a field practicum are also included. For more curriculum information please visit here.

Courses

Core Courses

  • Paths to Peace: Conflict Management, Conflict Resolution, Peacebuilding and Reconciliation
  • Practicum
  • Research Methods in Peace and Conflict Studies
  • Theories and Issues in Intergroup Conflict: A Multidisciplinary Perspective

Elective Courses

  • Conflict and its Resolution at the Community Level
  • Geopolitics of the Middle East
  • Intervention in International Crises: Motivations, Procedures, Results and Implications
  • Leadership and Conflict Management: Cross-Fertilization
  • Multi-Track Diplomacy: Transforming Violent Conflict
  • Peacekeeping Operations: A New Tool for World Order?
  • Social Psychology of Intergroup Conflicts and their Resolution
  • The Law and Ethics of War
  • The Media in Peace and Conflict Management: Seminar
  • The Theory and Practice of International Conflicts, their Management and Resolution
  • The UN Model 
  • Types of Management of Collective Identities in Diverse Societies

Thesis and Non-thesis tracks are available. For more information on the course curriculum and course descriptions please click here

Faculty

The diverse faculty is made up of teaching staff from a variety of disciplines including politics, international relations, psychology, conflict mediation and history. For a full list of factulty staff and their specialisations please visit here.

Scholarships

Click here for more information on financial aid and scholarships. Applicants accepted into this program are eligible for a MASA grant.



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