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Masters Degrees (Reasoning)

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Our MA in Reasoning offers an opportunity to study topics related to reasoning and inference as a specialised discipline within philosophy. Read more
Our MA in Reasoning offers an opportunity to study topics related to reasoning and inference as a specialised discipline within philosophy. Reasoning is the process of forming conclusions, inferences or judgements. This MA programme covers areas such as cognitive science and artificial intelligence (AI); scientific, mathematical, logical, causal and inductive reasoning; philosophy of mind, logic and language. Offered with the Department of Philosophy, the programme enables you to either focus exclusively on philosophical topics or study reasoning-related topics in psychology, computing, statistics, law, social policy, biosciences and history.

The programme is ideal for philosophy graduates who would like to widen their knowledge of reason-related topics (psychology, legal, machine, scientific reasoning), graduates with previous training in a reason-related topic who wishes to pursue an enquiry into its philosophical foundations, or those who wish to pursue these interests at postgraduate level for its own sake, as well as for those who wish to explore areas of specialisation in preparation for a PhD.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/philosophy/postgraduate/taught-reasoning.html

Format and assessment

The flexibility of this programme ensures that you are able to negotiate your own path of study through a range of modules which take into account your background and reflects the research specialisms of the teaching staff who are nationally, and internationally, recognised in their fields.

Assessment is by coursework essays of 4,000 words and the dissertation of 8-10,000 words.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in philosophy is a valuable and flexible qualification, which allows you to develop skills in logical thinking, critical evaluation, persuasion, writing and independent thought.

Graduates have gone on to positions in journalism, administration in the civil service, education, advertising and a range of managerial positions. Some go on to pursue research in the area, many continuing with PhDs at Kent or other higher education institutions.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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Research profile. At the Centre for Intelligent Systems and their Applications (CISA) we enable computer systems to reproduce or complement human abilities, work with people, and support collaboration between humans. Read more

Research profile

At the Centre for Intelligent Systems and their Applications (CISA) we enable computer systems to reproduce or complement human abilities, work with people, and support collaboration between humans. We conduct world-leading research in the foundations of Artificial Intelligence (knowledge representation and reasoning, emergence of meaning, theory and ontology change, creativity, mathematical proof) and in intelligent collaborative systems (multiagent systems, social computation, scientific collaboration platforms, web semantics and linked data).

Our research methods are inspired by developing formal models of knowledge, reasoning, and interaction that can be used to understand and automate aspects of human intelligence, but are also understandable and usable to the human designers and users of AI systems.

To achieve this, we combine theoretical research into computational models, architectures, and algorithms with a strong element of applied research. This has led to a strong track record in using our methods to address real-world problems in healthcare, scientific collaboration, social computing, emergency systems, transportation, engineering, aerospace and others.

You'll find a wide range of research areas within CISA conducted in the four research groups the Institute currently hosts:

  • Agents and Multiagent Systems
  • Mathematical Reasoning
  • Planning & Activity Management
  • Data-Intensive Research

CISA includes one of the most innovative collaborations between research and business - our Artificial Intelligence Applications Institute (AIAI). Through its resources and the engagement of CISA staff and students in consultancy, training and joint projects, we help companies and government agencies to apply newly researched techniques.

Training and support

You will carry out research work within a research group under the guidance of a supervisor. You may also attend taught courses that are relevant to your research topic, as prescribed by your supervisor. You will be expected to attend seminars and meetings of relevant research groups. Periodic reviews of progress are conducted to assist with research planning.

A programme of transferable skills courses facilitates broader professional development in a wide range of topics, from writing and presentation skills to entrepreneurship and career strategies.

The School of Informatics holds a Silver Athena SWAN award, in recognition of our commitment to advance the representation of women in science, mathematics, engineering and technology. The School is deploying a range of strategies to help female staff and students of all stages in their careers and we seek regular feedback from our research community on our performance.

Facilities

The award-winning Informatics Forum is an international research facility for computing and related areas. It houses more than 400 research staff and students, providing office, meeting and social spaces.

It also contains two robotics labs, an instrumented multimedia room, eye-tracking and motion capture systems, and a full recording studio amongst other research facilities. Its spectacular atrium plays host to many events, from industry showcases and student hackathons to major research conferences.

Nearby teaching facilities include computer and teaching labs with more than 250 machines, 24-hour access to IT facilities for students, and comprehensive support provided by dedicated computing staff.

Among our entrepreneurial initiatives is Informatics Ventures, set up in 2008 to support globally ambitious software companies in Scotland and nurture a technology cluster to rival Boston, Pittsburgh, Kyoto and Silicon Valley.

Career opportunities

While your research studies are a perfect route to a career in academia, your degree could also take you into the commercial world of applied AI and collaborative systems.

Software developers using AI technologies are among those who rely on the insights of our research. NASA and animation company Pixar are just two of the organisations that have recently employed our graduates.



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The MSc Mathematics Education focuses in detail on important issues emerging from research into the teaching and learning of Mathematics at all levels, particularly with regards to developing understanding in Mathematis. Read more
The MSc Mathematics Education focuses in detail on important issues emerging from research into the teaching and learning of Mathematics at all levels, particularly with regards to developing understanding in Mathematis. The course builds on existing research taking place here in the Durham University School of Education, conducted by Dr Patrick Barmby.

Facts

Find out more about entry requirements, duration of the course and tuition fees here. (Note: this link will direct you to the University's central course tool. Use the link provided to return to the School of Education homepage.)

How will I be taught?

Teaching on the specialised core modules takes place in three full days, taught at weekends. This allows full-time and part-time, home and international students to meet. The teaching involves a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical activities.

You will be assessed using a variety of methods, including presentations, written assignments and portfolios.

What will I learn?

You will take Research Methods in Education (30 credits) and two other core modules: Developing Understanding in Mathematics and Representations and Reasoning in Mathematics. You will also choose one additional module from across those running in the School of Education. You will also research and write up a 15,000 word dissertation within the field of Mathematics Education. This is a supervised piece of work supported by specialists in the field.

The two core modules are:

-Developing Understanding in Mathematics

The module focuses on the notion of understanding in Mathematics in relation to learning theories and linking these ideas to broader issues such as problem solving, creativity, misconceptions and assessment. The implications of the research literature on these issues are examined in terms of pedagogical practice.

Assignments include a presentation on key issues from the research in a specific area of Mathematics (30%) and a 3,500 word assignment relating the theory of developing understanding to practice in schools with implications for teaching (70%).

-Representations and Reasoning in Mathematics

The module focuses on the use of mathematical representations in the teaching of Mathematics, relating the use of these to learning theories and relating these ideas more broadly to mathematical thinking and reasoning. Key representations that are used in both primary and secondary Mathematics classrooms are examined.

Assignments include a portfolio examining the use of a particular mathematical representation in the classroom (30%) and a 3,500 word assignment relating the theory of the use of mathematical representations to practice in schools with implications for teaching (70%).

The optional modules available for you to choose from are:

21st Century Technology (30 credits)
Arts in Education (30 credits)
Classroom Assessment (30 credits)
Judgement based assessment (30 credits)
Enhancing Teaching and Learning through Productive Thinking (30 credits)
Curriculum Analysis (30 credits)
Standardised Test and Exams (30 credits)
Intercultural and International Education (30 credits)
Intercultural Communication (30 credits)
Improving Computer Education (30 credits)
Management, Leadership and Change (30 credits)
Policy Studies (30 credits)
Psychology of the Learner (30 credits)
Special Educational Needs and Inclusion: Rhetoric or Reality? (30 credits)
Learning and Teaching in Science (30 credits)
Physics as an Additional Subject Specialism (30 credits)
Chemistry as an Additional Subject Specialism (30 credits)

Who will teach me?

Dr Patrick Barmby is a Lecturer in Primary Mathematics at the Durham University School of Education. In the past, he has published on a broad range of areas, including attitudes towards science and teacher recruitment and retention. However, his main areas of research are the notion of understanding in Mathematics, the role of representations in understanding and reasoning in Mathematics and teacher subject knowledge in Mathematics. Along with colleagues, Patrick wrote the textbook for primary teachers, Primary Mathematics: Teaching for Understanding, published in 2009 by Open University Press. This was based on his research work on understanding, reasoning and representations in Mathematics. Patrick and colleagues received research funding from the Nuffield Foundation for the project ‘Visual representations in the primary classroom', which aims to develop primary teachers' use of visual representations particularly for multiplication and fractions.

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The continual thread throughout this programme will be the enhancement of argumentation skills. Read more
The continual thread throughout this programme will be the enhancement of argumentation skills: from an examination of legal systems, to the considered identification of the law and the forensic analysis of the court’s reasoning, to the comprehensive application of the law, and then to the convincing communication of one’s reasoning both in writing and orally.

By way of broad overview, during the programme, you will acquire knowledge of legal systems including both common-law and civil law systems, legal reasoning, research theories and strategies, legal argumentation and debating techniques, theories of logic and rhetoric, and will develop and enhance your written and oral advocacy skills.
The aim of this programme is to develop your knowledge, analysis, argumentation, writing and research skills through an understanding of theoretical concepts and practical application. The approach to the programme will be one of experiential learning.

Students are required to take modules to the value of 120 credits. The modules for this programme include:
◦Comparative Legal Systems in Context (22.5 credits)
◦Legal Research Theories, Strategies and Methodologies (22.5 credits)
◦The Art of the Oral Argument (22.5 credits)
◦The Art of the Written Argument (22.5 credits)
◦Dissertation of 10,000 words (30 credits).

You may also be interested in the following existing LLM modules which may be available.
◦International Mooting; Written and Oral Advocacy (22.5 credits)
◦International Commercial Arbitration (Skills and Advocacy) QLLP033 (22.5 credits)
◦Dissertation (of either 22.5 or 45 credits)
◦Legal Reasoning in Theory and Practice QLLM185 (22.5 credits)
◦The Legal Mind: The Practice and Politics of Legal Reasoning QLLM148 (45 credits).

You will study the programme over 12 months, on a full-time basis, or 24 months, on a part-time basis. The programme will be delivered by weekly classes or intensive several day workshops. Components of this programme may also be offered in standalone intensive workshops.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be identified as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

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The University of Northampton is passionate about transforming children’s lives and inspiring change. Our Postgraduate Certificate in Primary Mathematics Specialist programme has the ambitious target of ensuring that every school in our region has access to a teacher trained at Masters level. Read more
The University of Northampton is passionate about transforming children’s lives and inspiring change. Our Postgraduate Certificate in Primary Mathematics Specialist programme has the ambitious target of ensuring that every school in our region has access to a teacher trained at Masters level.

The programme is a two-year Masters level course through which participating teachers extend their knowledge, skills and understanding of mathematics and related pedagogy, and develop the skills to support other colleagues in mathematics. The University of Northampton has been successfully leading the programme across a wide range of local authorities since 2009, with over 640 successful graduates.

This course is for serving teachers and aims to transform teaching and learning in mathematics. Each teacher develops their own subject and pedagogical knowledge. No pre-existing specialist knowledge of mathematics is assumed, so this course is suitable for all teachers of primary mathematics. Within this course there is a strong focus on promoting reasoning and problem solving in primary mathematics. This course will provide teachers with the professional recognition of specialist teacher of mathematics and enhance confidence in teaching and leading the subject. Teachers currently on the programme have found it rewarding and stimulating.

Course content

The course provides Masters level professional development for teachers in the curriculum area of mathematics. The content is focused on developing connectionist pedagogical approaches to teaching and learning in primary mathematics. This programme is especially relevant since it focuses on developing aspects such as fluency, reasoning and mastery that reflects current government agendas. The aims of the course provide opportunities for the teachers to:
-Broaden and deepen mathematics subject and pedagogical knowledge through critically analysing the connections and structures within mathematics.
-Deepen understanding of how pupils develop understanding of mathematics through analysing mathematical thinking and reasoning with a range of pedagogical approaches.
-Critically analyse and evaluate their own and their pupils’ learning of mathematical thinking and reasoning.
-Develop professional collaborative and leadership skills using a peer coaching approach to improve teaching and learning of mathematics in their school.
-Further develop leadership skills by undertaking a whole-schoold evelopment project to improve a particular aspect of mathematics teaching and learning within their own school.

Course modules (16/17)

-Subject and Pedagogical Knowledge in the Teaching of algebra and geometry
-Subject and Pedagogical Knowledge in the Teaching of number, calculation, measures and data handling

Methods of Learning

The course covers several methods of study which include:
-Face-to-face university-led tutition delivered through two residential weekend events. (These are included in the tuition fees for the accomodation and meals) Regular local network meetings each year.
-Autonomous learning is an important aspect of masters level study. This is achieved through work at the University and at school including: directed mathematical tasks pedagogical research.
-Engagement with online materials such as library resources.
-Engagement with online discussions and face to face discussions.
-Analytical and critical approaches to relating theory to practice with particular reference to work in school.

Schedule

-Teaching activities, workshops and seminars, online tutorial and support: 30 study hours
-Directed tasks and network sessions: 50 study hours
-Directed reading: 50 study hours
-Self-directed study: 70 study hours
-Assessment activity: 100 study hours

The teaching activities and workshops are achieved mainly through two weekend residential events each year (making four weekends altogether). For 2016-17 the first two residential weekends are on 5th/6th November 2016 and 4th/5th March 2017.

Assessments

The first year of the programme has two assignments. The first is a reflective discussion of your own mathematical learning with an activity, which you then relate to children’s learning for the same activity. The second assignment is a small project to coach or mentor a colleague within school. For this assignment you will reflect on the impact on teaching and learning for the colleague but also on your own development as a leader of mathematics in school.

The second year has one assignment. This is a small-scale research project that develops an aspect of mathematics across your school. You will use and reflect upon approaches to teaching and learning from the course to improve an aspect of mathematics in your own school. You will also present your whole-school project with a small presentation at the final network meeting. For all of the assignments you will receive personal tutorials and feedback on draft assignments.

Facilities and Special Features

The key feature of this course, and the main reason for its success, is that this programme provides a direct impact upon teaching and learning across the whole school. While this is continuing professional development for one teacher, there is a process of enabling the teacher to lead change in mathematics teaching across the whole school.

Careers

This programme allows teachers to gain a Post Graduate Certificate in mathematics specialist teaching. It has enabled teachers to gain recognition as excellent teachers and leaders of primary mathematics teaching and learning. Some teachers have progressed and gained employment specifically as leaders of mathematics in schools. Others have set up their own companies producing teaching and learning resources based on the principles of the programme. Some teachers have also gained further modules towards a full masters degree. This year some of the first graduates of this programme will be receiving their Masters Degree in Mathematics Education.

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This course is aimed at applicants who have already studied for a degree and want to pursue a professional qualification in physiotherapy. Read more

This course is aimed at applicants who have already studied for a degree and want to pursue a professional qualification in physiotherapy. On this course you learn to be a highly skilled physiotherapist with an advanced level of clinical reasoning, critical thinking and reflection at one of the largest and most established physiotherapy educational departments in the UK.

Sheffield Hallam physiotherapy education is known for its high quality teaching and excellent clinical placement opportunities which has been reflected in recent National Student Survey (NSS) feedback. Your lessons take place in our purpose built modern facilities, clinical skills practical suites and you make use of our state-of-the-art technologies such as Simulation, Simman, virtual reality suits and a mock ward environment.

On this course you develop key transferable skills that enable you to become a qualified physiotherapist. In addition to this you gain a wealth of attributes such as • advanced exercise prescription • advanced clinical reasoning • leadership • advanced complex case management • shared learning in interprofessional education, and further develop your research skills while completing a piece of primary research.

The course consists of University based teaching, which includes practicals and seminars, online materials, blogs, webinars, videos, discussion forums and clinical placements in a variety of settings. An opportunity to experience physiotherapy overseas or in a highly specialised setting may be available in the final full time placement

Sheffield Hallam is known for its research and offers a vibrant community for postgraduates to work closely with experienced academics and service users to develop their knowledge and expertise. You have the opportunity to complete an advanced exercise prescription module.

Students completing this course have excellent career prospects thanks to strong links with physiotherapy providers locally and nationally. This course fosters excellent employability opportunities meaning you stand out from others with your advanced Masters level skills. Your Masters learning / advanced clinical skills and leadership qualities enables you to enhance your career pathway.

Professional recognition

This course is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and accredited by the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Graduates are eligible to apply to register with the HCPC and apply to become members of the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. You must be registered with the HCPC in order to practise as a physiotherapist in the UK.

On completion of the intermediate awards - PgDiploma/PgCertificate in Rehabilitation, you will not be eligible to apply for HCPC registration as a Physiotherapist.

Course structure

Year one modules

  • induction
  • introduction to professional practice
  • advanced exercise prescription
  • clinical reasoning in physiotherapy
  • foundation placement• intermediate placement
  • researching for practice

Year two modules

  • advanced clinical reasoning in physiotherapy
  • dissertation
  • advanced placement
  • elective placement
  • advanced complex case management

Plus one of the following specialist modules

  • concepts of learning and teaching
  • pain management
  • personalised study module
  • leadership module: leading people

Assessment

Various methods of assessment throughout the course               

Employability

Physiotherapists are employed in a variety of locations, providing opportunities in areas such as • industry • professional sport • private practice • National Health Service • education • research • working overseas.

During the course you build on a wide base of transferable clinical skills which may enable you to specialise in a specific area of Physiotherapy following successful graduation.

Opportunities to work in research in physiotherapy are expanding and many previous students have used their masters as a stepping stone to doctorial study in the UK or overseas, or teaching in higher education.

Further information on physiotherapy is available on the NHS careers web site at http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk



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Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence. Read more

Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence

Are you interested in applications of Artificial Intelligence in communication techniques? Are you triggered by the question of how human reasoning can be represented in computer systems? Would you like to work for a company like Google or Philips? Then our interdisciplinary Master’s track Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence is your right choice!

The CSAI program draws on breakthrough discoveries and insights in the two closely related scientific disciplines Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence. Cognitive Science is the study of human reasoning, emotions, language, perception, attention, and memory. Artificial Intelligence is the study and design of computers and software that are capable of intelligent behavior.

Are you interested in applications of Artificial Intelligence in communication techniques? Are you triggered by the question of how human reasoning can be represented in computer systems? Would you like to work for a company like Google or Philips? Then our interdisciplinary Master’s track Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence is your right choice!

The CSAI program draws on breakthrough discoveries and insights in the two closely related scientific disciplines Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence. Cognitive Science is the study of human reasoning, emotions, language, perception, attention, and memory. Artificial Intelligence is the study and design of computers and software that are capable of intelligent behavior.

Career Prospects Communication Design

Graduates will be able to contribute to advancements in working fields like artificial intelligence and robotics, data science, data mining, knowledge technology and decision support systems.

This is a small selection of positions you may apply for after you have completed your programme:

•Intelligent Software Developer

•Web Analyst

•Social Media Analyst

•Data Journalist

•Social Robot Developer

•Web Data Entrepreneur

•E-Health and Healthcare Quality Analyst



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From software agents used in networking systems to embedded systems in unmanned vehicles, intelligent systems are being adopted more and more often. Read more

From software agents used in networking systems to embedded systems in unmanned vehicles, intelligent systems are being adopted more and more often. This programme will equip you with specialist knowledge in this exciting field and allow you to explore a range of topics in computer science.

Core modules will give you a foundation in topics like systems programming and algorithms, as well as the basics of machine learning and knowledge representation. You’ll also choose from optional modules focusing on topics like bio-inspired computing or text analytics, or broaden your approach with topics like mobile app development.

You’ll gain a broad perspective on intelligent systems, covering evolutionary models, statistical and symbolic machine learning algorithms, qualitative reasoning, image processing, language understanding and bio-computation as well as essential principles and practices in the design, implementation and usability of intelligent systems.

Specialist facilities

You’ll benefit from world-class facilities to support your learning. State-of-the-art visualisation labs including a powerwall, a benchtop display with tracking system, WorldViz PPT optical tracking system and Intersense InertiaCube orientation tracker are all among the specialist facilities we have within the School of Computing.

We also have Ascension Flock of Birds tracking systems, three DOF and 6DOF Phantom force feedback devices, Twin Immersion Corp CyberGloves, a cloud computing testbed, rendering cluster and labs containing both Microsoft and Linux platforms among others. It’s an exciting environment in which to gain a range of skills and experience cutting-edge technology.

Course content

Core modules in Semester 1 will lay the foundations of the programme by giving you an understanding of the key topics of algorithms and systems programming, as well as the basic principles of automated reasoning, machine learning and how computers can be made to represent knowledge.

From there you’ll have the chance to tailor your studies to suit your own preferences. You’ll choose from a wide range of optional modules on diverse topics such as image analysis, cloud computing, graph theory and developing mobile apps.

Over the summer months you’ll also work on your research project. This gives you the chance to work as an integral part of one of our active research groups, focusing on a specialist topic in computer science and selecting the appropriate research methods.

Want to find out more about your modules?

Take a look at the Advanced Computer Science (Intelligent Systems) module descriptions for more detail on what you will study.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • MSc Project 60 credits
  • Bio-Inspired Computing 15 credits
  • Knowledge Representation and Reasoning 15 credits
  • Image Analysis 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Distributed Systems 10 credits
  • Mobile Application Development 10 credits
  • Machine Learning 10 credits
  • Intelligent Systems and Robotics 20 credits
  • User Adaptive Intelligent Systems 10 credits
  • Data Mining and Text Analytics 10 credits
  • Combinatorial Optimisation 10 credits
  • Graph Algorithms and Complexity Theory 10 credits
  • Big Data Systems 15 credits
  • Data Science 15 credits
  • Algorithms 15 credits
  • Parallel and Concurrent Programming 15 credits
  • Cloud Computing 15 credits
  • Semantic Technologies and Applications 15 credits
  • Scheduling 15 credits
  • Scientific Computation 15 credits
  • Graph Theory: Structure and Algorithms 15 credits

Learning and teaching

Our groundbreaking research feeds directly into teaching, and you’ll have regular contact with staff who are at the forefront of their disciplines. You’ll have regular contact with them through lectures, seminars, tutorials, small group work and project meetings.

Independent study is also important to the programme, as you develop your problem-solving and research skills as well as your subject knowledge.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a range of techniques including case studies, technical reports, presentations, in-class tests, assignments and exams. Optional modules may also use alternative assessment methods.

Projects

The professional project is one of the most satisfying elements of this course. It allows you to apply what you’ve learned to a piece of research focusing on a real-world problem, and it can be used to explore and develop your specific interests.

Recent projects for MSc Advanced Computer Science (Intelligent Systems) students have included:

  • Object-based attention in a biologically inspired network for artificial vision
  • Advanced GIS functionality for animal habitat analysis
  • Codebook construction for feature selection
  • Learning to imitate human actions

A proportion of projects are formally linked to industry, and can include spending time at the collaborator’s site over the summer.

Career opportunities

Computing is an essential component of nearly every daily activity, from the collection, transformation, analysis and dissemination of information in business, through to smart systems embedded in commodity devices, the image processing used in medical diagnosis and the middleware that underpins distributed technologies like cloud computing and the semantic web.

This programme will give you the practical skills to gain entry into many areas of applied computing, working as application developers, system designers and evaluators; but further, links between the taught modules and our research provide our students with added strengths in artificial intelligence, intelligent systems, distributed systems, and the analysis of complex data. As a result, you’ll be well prepared for a range of careers, as well as further research at PhD level.

Graduates have found success in a wide range of careers working as business analysts, software engineers, wed designers and developers, systems engineers, information analysts and app developers. Others have pursued roles in consultancy, finance, marketing and education, or set up their own businesses.



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This programme enables exploration of the theoretical basis of manipulative physiotherapy and its application to the development of your clinical reasoning. Read more
This programme enables exploration of the theoretical basis of manipulative physiotherapy and its application to the development of your clinical reasoning. Using the process of clinical reasoning as its framework, this programme integrates the many approaches to practice in this specialist area. It facilitates an evaluation of existing evidence through the exploration of the assessment and management of neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction.

The programme offers part-time and full-time modes of study, providing you with the opportunity to tailor your learning experience to meet your personal and professional needs.

As a Birmingham student, you will be joining the academic elite and will have the privilege of learning from world-leading experts, as well as your peers. From the outset you will be encouraged to become an independent and self-motivated learner. We want you to be challenged and will encourage you to think for yourself.

Successful completion of the programme qualifies you for membership of the Musculoskeletal Association of Chartered Physiotherapists (MACP) and recognition by the International Federation of Orthopaedic Manipulative Physical Therapists (IFOMPT).

The Advanced Manipulative Physiotherapy Masters programme offers you:

- a route to membership with the MACP and IFOMPT
- the support of a personal tutor and dissertation supervisor
- easy travel access with a dedicated University train station
- the opportunity to gain advanced level competences in your clinical specialty
- flexible study which can be organised around your other commitments

On completion of the Advanced Manipulative Physiotherapy Masters programme you will have the ability to :

- critically evaluate approaches and methodologies for researching theoretical and practical issues relating to clinical practice
- critically evaluate previous professional development and plan future development within the framework of contemporary healthcare practice
- critically analyse the theoretical and conceptual issues underpinning manipulative physiotherapy and the different approaches
- use clinical reasoning skills to enable the effective management of complex clinical presentations
- formulate a justifiable research design and conduct analytically an investigation to address a given problem
- produce a written report worthy of scrutiny in both academic and clinical settings

This course is accredited by:

http://www.ifompt.org/
https://macpweb.org/home/
http://www.csp.org.uk/

About the School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences

We are one of the top-rated sport science departments in the UK. Our School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences is one of the longest established in Europe for scientific research into sport, exercise, health and rehabilitation.

We are proud to be at the forefront of the rapid development of this academic discipline. Our school has achieved an outstanding performance in the Research Excellence Framework 2014 (REF 2014) with 90 percent of its research classified as world leading or internationally excellent, putting us in the top three for research in the sector. These results provide further compelling evidence of the long recognised research strength of Sport and Exercise Sciences at the University of Birmingham.

Thanks to a £16.4 million investment, Birmingham boasts the largest custom built Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences facility in the UK.

This includes teaching and research laboratories for physiology, biochemistry, psychophysiology, biomechanics, sport psychology, motor skills, immunology, muscle mechanics and the neurophysiology of movement.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This course is designed for experienced postgraduate physiotherapists working within neuro-musculoskeletal clinical practice. It is also suitable if you have studied manual therapy at a high level on clinically-based courses, such as with the International Maitland Teachers Association (IMTA). Read more

This course is designed for experienced postgraduate physiotherapists working within neuro-musculoskeletal clinical practice. It is also suitable if you have studied manual therapy at a high level on clinically-based courses, such as with the International Maitland Teachers Association (IMTA). You can have relevant clinically focussed learning recognised and the credits transferred via a recognition of prior learning (RPL) process.

The course enables you to advance your clinical, therapeutic and reasoning skills within the field of neuro-musculoskeletal practice. You engage in debate and develop skills which enhance your ability to facilitate service development and enhance patient care. Successful completion of the course leads to the opportunity to meet the requirements for registration with the Musculoskeletal Association of chartered Physiotherapists (MACP).

The course is structured around two core manual therapy modules that focus on the upper and lower quadrant. The upper quadrant includes key aspects of evidence, theory and reasoning that inform clinical practice. The lower quadrant considers different dysfunctions and also different principles that guide our practice. These modules develop and challenge your clinical handling and reasoning skills.Together these modules form a Postgraduate Certificate in Manual Therapy.

At postgraduate diploma level you choose optional modules relevant to your personal and professional development. This enables you to either increase the breadth of your learning or maintain a focus on developing clinical skills relevant to your physiotherapy practice dependent on your goals. One module which allows you to continue developing advanced clinical skills is the MACP clinical placement in neuro-musculoskeletal physiotherapy.

Your assessments are designed to fulfil the aims and learning outcomes of modules, as well as replicate the challenges you may face within your clinical field. This provides authentic experience and the opportunity to develop skills that are directly transferable to practice.

You learn from enthusiastic tutors including academics who have physiotherapy research published in peer reviewed journals. This includes Dr Stephen May, who is an internationally renowned physiotherapist who has contributed to several well known textbooks including the key text on the McKenzie Approach 'Lumbar Spine: Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy'.

Distance learning study

To aid your professional and clinical development we use a range of online learning and teaching activities, such as interactive tutor and peer group discussions. Experienced tutors also provide regular personal guidance and feedback.

Recognition for prior learning

Physiotherapy students who have successfully completed 2a, 2b, and 3 International Maitland Teachers Association (IMTA) modules can gain credits against specific modules from the MSc Manual Therapy. This can be achieved through the recognition for prior learning (RFPL) process. For more information read our IMTA guidance.

Course structure

The masters (MSc) is achieved by successfully completing the postgraduate diploma plus dissertation (180 credits).

The postgraduate certificate (PgCert) is achieved by successfully completing manual therapy for the upper quadrant and manual therapy for the lower quadrant (60 credits).

The postgraduate diploma (PgDip) is achieved by successfully completing the postgraduate certificate plus 60 credits to include project design and planning (120 credits).

Core modules

  • Manual therapy for the upper quadrant (30 credits)
  • Manual therapy for the lower quadrant (30 credits)
  • Project design and planning (15 credits)
  • Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional modules

You study 45 credits worth of modules, which could include teaching and learning, leadership skills or more clinically relevant topics such as:

  • MACP clinical placement in neuro-musculoskeletal physiotherapy (30 credits)
  • Pain management (15 credits)
  • Musculoskeletal radiographic image interpretation – axial skeleton – acute and emergency care (15 credits)
  • Concepts of learning and teaching (15 credits)
  • The leadership landscape (15 credits)

Assessment

  • presentations
  • practical assessment
  • vivas
  • written assessment

Employability

Previous students have gained employment in physiotherapy in a variety of settings, including

  • the NHS
  • overseas in public sector posts
  • private clinics and private hospitals
  • advanced practice roles, such as emergency department physiotherapist
  • extended scope practitioner (specialist physiotherapists or those who work in an extended role alongside a medical consultant)
  • research
  • teaching.


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This programme gives you a solid grounding in issues key to the sustainable development debate. The views of stakeholders such as business groups, environmentalists, government agencies and development institutions will be considered. Read more

This programme gives you a solid grounding in issues key to the sustainable development debate. The views of stakeholders such as business groups, environmentalists, government agencies and development institutions will be considered.

You will acquire the necessary skills to evaluate existing frameworks, inquire into environmental issues in organisations and industries, and develop sensitive business practices.

The programme provides excellent preparation for any corporate-focused environmental career. It provides a route to graduate membership of the Institute of Environmental Management & Assessment. We encourage you to read about the past and present student experiences of our environment and sustainability programmes.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over 12 months and part-time for up to 60 months. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

  • Provide participants with a solid grounding in the sustainable development debate from the wide-range of perspectives, i.e. business groups, environmentalists, government agencies, development institutions, etc.
  • Equip participants to evaluate existing political, socio-economic, ethical, cultural and regulatory frameworks to inform decisions regarding environmental practice
  • Equip participants to develop a sensitive business practice towards environmental and social issues
  • To equip students with the necessary skills for critical inquiry related to environmental issues in organisations and industries

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • Intra and inter-organisational contexts in which corporate environmental strategies are developed
  • Concepts of sustainable development and their usefulness to business ethics
  • Evolving regulatory and policy framework as part of engendering an anticipatory view of environmental management
  • Knowledge of a range of corporate environmental management strategies and control mechanisms
  • Accessing and using environmental data

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Absorb complex environmental information and communicate them effectively through logically constructed argumentsCreatively formulate new ideas (MSc, PGDip and PGCert)
  • Learn the value of teamwork to solve problems that require multi-disciplinary engagement
  • Independent learning and study through self-directed assignments and dissertation
  • Critical reading and analysis of environmental policy and regulation
  • Inductive reasoning: using specific examples/observations and forming a more general principal
  • Deductive reasoning: use stated general premise to reason about specific examples

Professional practical skills

  • Comprehend how corporations build, implement and maintain an Environmental Management System (EMS)
  • To perform an EMS Audit according to the ISO standards
  • Give coherent presentations
  • Lead discussions on complex subject areas
  • See the other side of the argument given that there are varying and often conflicting perspectives in the environment field
  • Competently handle environment information
  • Self-motivation, self-regulation and self-assurance

Key / transferable skills

  • Acquire knowledge and skills to prepare and deliver a structured and successful presentation
  • Write effectively as a means of communicating important ideas
  • Communication of findings and presentation of research to a non-specialist audience
  • Lead discussion of small/large groups
  • Organise and manage a research project
  • Basic to advanced IT skills, depending on type of electives and dissertation topic
  • Willingness to learn

Academics

Several high-profile guest lecturers have assisted with the delivery of some of the modules. CES modules make maximum use of guest lecturers, drawing on the practical skills and experience of key experts from government and industry to complement the theoretical components of the modules offered.

For example, Jonathon Porritt, former chairman of the Sustainable Development Commission, gives a guest lecture on the Sustainable Development Applications module, analysing the standing of sustainable development in business and policy making.

The extensive expertise of CES academics and researchers is also drawn upon in modules. Professor Tim Jackson, advisor to the government and international bodies and author of the seminal book, Prosperity without Growth – economics for a finite planet–also lectures on some CES modules.

Industrial placement

Full-time students are able to undertake an industrial placement module which enables them to spend six to twelve weeks working for a company or NGO, doing the type of work they will aim to find on graduation.

Examples of organisations at which recent industrial placements have taken place include:

  • Minimise Solutions
  • Portsmouth City Council
  • GAP
  • Diocese of London
  • The Radisson
  • LC Energy
  • AECOM
  • Solar Aid
  • NUS

Careers

Graduates go on to a diverse range of careers implementing sustainable development and dealing with the real environmental challenges facing humanity.

Recent examples include working as an energy efficiency officer for a local government, an environmental officer in multi-national chemical company, a sustainability advisor for a national television / radio station, an environmental consultant for an engineering consultancy, and a programme officer with a sustainability charity.

Other graduates use the research skills they developed to go on and do PhDs.

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Durham's MA in Social and Economic History at Durham provides training in research methods for historical topics in any aspect of social and economic history. Read more
Durham's MA in Social and Economic History at Durham provides training in research methods for historical topics in any aspect of social and economic history. The MA provides quantitative and qualitative research methods appropriate to a wide range of historical approaches. Accredited by the ESRC, this MA is part of our four year funding scheme offered by the North-East Doctoral Training Centre. Students can apply for 1+3 funding for this MA followed by a PhD in any aspect of social and economic history with expert supervision available within the Department – and with our partner institution in the NEDTC at Newcastle University. This includes African history, and aspects of governance, as well as traditional social and economic topics. For further information on funding see further below.

The MA programme is shared with the School of Applied Social Science and will help you to build an awareness of the contemporary boundaries of social and economic history and to master advanced understanding of the concepts and methods with which it may be interrogated. It seeks to equip you with a diverse portfolio of research techniques and approaches to enable you to undertake extended independent research in your dissertation, and to make your own contribution to the field. The skills provided by this MA are also transferrable to a wide range of careers.

Durham has a long tradition of economic and social history, on which this MA draws. The breadth of possible subjects for study mirrors the comprehensive and global nature of the department staff: from medieval Europe to modern-day Africa, and from north-east England to the global economy. Durham's History Department is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham Cathedral and Durham Castle. Students of social and economic history at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library - especially the Sudan Archive - and Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant: the landscape of industrial revolution and of post-industrial response, of globalisation and regional identity.

Course Structure

The MA in Social and Economic History is a one-year full-time programme (or two-years part-time). All students are allocated a supervisor at the beginning of the first term, and s/he guides each student through the year.

Students take 30 credits of core modules from History: Archives and Sources (15 credits), and Critical Practice (15 credits); and 30 credits of core modules from the School of Applied Social Sciences: Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits) AND EITHER Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits) OR Fieldwork and Interpretation (15 credits). They write a 60-credit dissertation (15,000 words) supervised by a member of academic staff in the History Department. They also choose a 30-credit optional module in History; AND 30 credits of optional modules from Social Sciences: EITHER Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits) and Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits) OR Applied Stastics (30 credits).

The programme is structured as follows:
Michaelmas Term (October-December)
-Archives and Sources (15 credits)
-Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)
-*Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits; OPTIONAL)
* Fieldwork and Interpretation (15 credits; OPTIONAL)
* Applied Statistics (30 credits; OPTIONAL; runs across Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms)

Epiphany Term (January-March)
-Critical Practice (15 credits)
-Option module (30 credits)
Option modules allow students the opportunity to learn about a particular topic or issue in medieval history in depth, and to consider different historical approaches to this topic over a full term's study. In previous years, options included: Power and Society in the Late Middle Ages; The Wealth of Nations; Race in Modern America; 'Tribe' and Nation in Africa since 1800; Tradition, Change and Political Culture in Modern Britain; Gender, Nationalism and Modernity in East Asia; History, Knowledge and Visual Culture (a full list of MA option modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/). Option modules are taught in weekly two-hour seminars for a full term's study.
-*Qualitative Research Methods (15 credits; OPTIONAL)
-*Quantitative Research Methods (15 credits; OPTIONAL)

Easter Term (April-June), and the summer vacation (until early September)
-Dissertation (60 credits)

The formal requirements and structure of the programme can be found at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9202&title=Social+and+Economic+History+%28Research+Methods%29&code=V1KB07&type=MA&year=2016#coursecontent a full list of optional modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/

The MA can be taken part-time, over two years: please contact the Department if you are interested in exploring this option further.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered primarily through small group seminar teaching with some larger classes, and lecture-style sessions. Termly division of contact hours between terms depends on student choice. Archives and Sources has 8 contact hours, split between lectures, classes and seminars. Skills modules are taught through seminars or classes and are usually more contact-hour-intensive. Optional modules are taught in seminars and provide a total of 16 contact hours. Critical Practice involves lectures, a drama workshop, and oral presentation to a group (at a 'mini-conference'). Dissertation supervision involves 8 hours of directed supervision, individually with a dedicated supervisor. Social science modules are taught through lectures, seminars, workshops, and practical classes.

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If you are a non-law graduate looking to enter the legal profession, the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) provides your starting point for graduate legal study. Read more
If you are a non-law graduate looking to enter the legal profession, the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) provides your starting point for graduate legal study. It takes you through the academic stage required to become a barrister or solicitor, before you then go on to either the Legal Practice Course (LPC) or Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC).

The GDL at UWE Bristol is highly regarded by both branches of the profession, and many solicitors and barristers choose this route into law, building on the knowledge they have obtained in another academic field to establish a successful legal career.

Key benefits

The GDL satisfies the requirements of Bar Standards Board (BSB) and the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA,) showing that you have successfully completed the academic stage of your legal training.

Course detail

As the first stage of your legal learning, the GDL takes you through the basics of law in England and Wales and introduces you to legal reasoning, methods and research. As well as this, you will learn how to apply your legal knowledge to the real world, giving you practical insights and skills to take into your vocational training.

The GDL is taught by a dedicated team of solicitors and barristers, who have all practised for many years, and bring their experience to bear on the course with plenty of examples, practical advice and face-to-face support.

You will also have access to an impressive range of facilities in our Professional Law Centre as well as the chance to hear from expert legal speakers and take part in our placement scheme. Our aim is to provide as much realism as possible and to equip you with the skills and knowledge you need to move confidently along the path towards becoming qualified.

Pre-course preparation

• English Legal System - provides you with a basic understanding of the legal system in England and Wales and covers the legal terminology, reasoning and methods that you will practise and develop throughout the course.

Teaching block one (September-January):

• Public Law - introduces you to the constitution of England and Wales and the theoretical principles that underlie it, as well as the judicial review process and how we use the law to protect human rights.
• Obligations I (Contract Law) - takes you through the area of contract law and what is involved in forming and enforcing contracts.
• Obligations II (Law of Tort) - introduces you to tortious liability, in other words how we can enforce obligations to avoid harm being caused to our neighbours.
• Criminal Law - provides an introduction to criminal law, particularly the underlying policy issues and the difference between theory and practice.

Teaching block two (January-June):

• Equity and Trusts - introduces you to equity and trust law, including defining what a trust is and looking at the relevance of trusts today.
• Property Law - explores land as an area of law, the rights and obligations associated with it, and how to transfer land from one party to another.
• European Union Law - provides you with an understanding of what constitutes European Union law, how it works and how we take account of EU law within domestic law in England and Wales.
• Independent Research Project - you will also study a research topic of your choice in depth (out of a range of subjects of current topical interest) and write a 4,000-5,000 word mini dissertation.

Format

Highly experienced and supportive tutors, drawn from legal practice, as well as the academic side of law, will enable you to develop your knowledge quickly.

Each topic will be based on an introductory lecture, followed by a workshop in a large group and then a smaller-group seminar. Both the workshops and seminars are highly interactive, and are designed to give you a deeper understanding of the material covered, and how it can be applied to practical contexts.

You will research and discuss real cases and legislation, based on current developments in law, giving you a valuable insight into situations you are likely to face in your legal career.

Assessment

As is required by the professional regulatory bodies, the main form of assessment for the GDL is through examinations, which are held at the end of each teaching block. Some modules also include a coursework element of 25%.

The Independent Research Project will be assessed through your 4,000-5,000 word mini dissertation, which you will write in response to your allocated research task.

Mock assessments with feedback will be given to help you monitor and improve your performance, and help you deal effectively with all forms of assessment. Two past examination papers will also be available in order to prepare you for examinations.

Careers / Further study

Studying for the GDL is a stepping stone in achieving a successful career as a solicitor or barrister. Many students who complete the GDL go on to study the Legal Practice Course (LPC) or Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) to achieve these career ambitions.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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If you are a non-law graduate looking to enter the legal profession, the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) provides your starting point for graduate legal study. Read more
If you are a non-law graduate looking to enter the legal profession, the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) provides your starting point for graduate legal study. It takes you through the academic stage required to become a barrister or solicitor, before you then go on to either the Legal Practice Course (LPC) or Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC).

Key benefits

The GDL satisfies the requirement of the Bar Standards Board (BSB) and the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA), showing that you have successfully completed the academic stage of your legal training.

Course detail

As the first stage of your legal learning, the GDL takes you through the basics of law in England and Wales and introduces you to legal reasoning, methods and research. As well as this, you will learn how to apply your legal knowledge to the real world, giving you practical insights and skills to take into your vocational training.

The GDL is taught by a dedicated team of solicitors and barristers, who have all practised for many years, and bring their experience to bear on the course with plenty of examples, practical advice and face-to-face support.

You will also have access to an impressive range of facilities in our Professional Law Centre as well as the chance to hear from expert legal speakers and take part in our placement scheme. Our aim is to provide as much realism as possible and to equip you with the skills and knowledge you need to move confidently along the path towards becoming qualified.

Structure

The part-time course is structured into two teaching blocks (each of which is studied over a year) and covers the seven foundations of legal knowledge, as identified by the professional legal bodies. An independent research project then enables you to cover another area of legal study in depth.

Pre-course preparation

English Legal System - provides you with a basic understanding of the legal system in England and Wales and covers the legal terminology, reasoning and methods that you will practise and develop throughout the course.

Year one:

• Public Law - introduces you to the constitution of England and Wales and the theoretical principles that underlie it, as well as the judicial review process and how we use the law to protect human rights.
• Obligations I (Contract Law) - takes you through the area of contract law and what is involved in forming and enforcing contracts.
• Obligations II (Law of Tort) - introduces you to tortious liability, in other words how we can enforce obligations to avoid harm being caused to our neighbours.
• Criminal Law - provides an introduction to criminal law, particularly the underlying policy issues and the difference between theory and practice.

Year two

• Equity and Trusts - introduces you to equity and trust law, including defining what a trust is and looking at the relevance of trusts today.
• Property Law - explores land as an area of law, the rights and obligations associated with it, and how to transfer land from one party to another.
• European Union Law - provides you with an understanding of what constitutes European Union law, how it works and how we take account of EU law within domestic law in England and Wales.
• Independent Research Project - you will also study a research topic of your choice in depth (out of a range of subjects of current topical interest) and write a 4,000-5,000 word mini dissertation.

Format

Highly experienced and supportive tutors, drawn from legal practice, as well as the academic side of law, will enable you to develop your knowledge quickly.

Each topic will be based on an introductory large group session and then a smaller group seminar. Both the large group session and seminars are highly interactive, and are designed to give you a deeper understanding of the material covered, and how it can be applied to practical contexts.

You will research and discuss real cases and legislation, based on current developments in law, giving you a valuable insight into situations you are likely to face in your legal career.

Assessment

As is required by the professional regulatory bodies, the main form of assessment for the GDL is through examinations, which are held at the end of each year of the course. Some modules also include a coursework element of 25%.

The Independent Research Project will be assessed through your 4,000-5,000 word mini dissertation, which you will write in response to your allocated research task.

Practice questions with feedback will be given to help you monitor and improve your performance, and help you deal effectively with all forms of assessment. Two past examination papers will also be available in order to prepare you for examinations.

Careers / Further study

Studying for the GDL is a stepping stone in achieving a successful career as a solicitor or barrister. Many students who complete the GDL go on to study the Legal Practice Course (LPC) or Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) to achieve these career ambitions.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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Additional Entry requirements. Criminal Records Check. A satisfactory criminal records check will be required. Other requirements. Read more

Additional Entry requirements:

Criminal Records Check: A satisfactory criminal records check will be required. Other requirements: All students are required to purchase professional indemnity insurance. In order to go on practice placements, a health clearance check and joining the Protection of Vulnerable Groups Scheme will be required. There will be additional costs incurred for the applicant for these processes.

International students or home and EU students who want to work internationally will have to undertake additional CPD studies to meet the competencies required in order to register for the National Board exams. There will be additional costs incurred for the applicant for these processes.

Course Description:

This course will attract people holding a relevant undergraduate honours degree who wish to change career and become an occupational therapist. It is an intensive professional programme of study which will develop theoretical, analytical, practical, evaluative and reasoning skills as well as professional values.

Occupational therapists assess individuals’ disruption and disengagement from their occupations, and facilitate alternative ways for them to re-engage and participate in their occupational roles to improve their quality of life, wellbeing and sense of belonging.

Modules reflect contemporary and prospective occupational therapy practice, concerned with the relationship between the individual’s or a community’s occupations, their health, wellbeing and belonging. The programme is underpinned by person-centred, evidence-informed and occupation-focused occupational therapy practice. The course prepares graduates to work in diverse practice contexts.

Teaching, learning and assessment:

The course philosophy integrates academic and placement study. It centres on adult learning perspectives of learner-responsibility, active participation in learning, collaborative and autonomous learning and learning as a community. Problem-based learning using practice scenarios is a major feature of the learning experience where students work to develop professional reasoning, evidence informed decision making, interpersonal and team working skills. Learning is thus facilitated by a process of acquiring enquiry skills, interpreting information, group discussion, exchanging of perspectives, creation of knowledge, and arriving at a position or judgment.

Teaching methods incorporate self-directed study, practice scenarios, group work, workshops, eLearning modules, digital technology, reflection, lectures and placements. Assessment methods include peer and self-assessment, written assignments, viva voce, conference presentations, projects and placements.

Practice placements form a core element of the course and your personal performance is also assessed. There are four placements in total: Placement 1 – full-time, 6 weeks; Placement 2 – full-time, 6 weeks; Placement 3 – part-time, 14 weeks; Placement 4 – full-time, 8 weeks. There will be additional travel and accommodation costs for every placement.

Teaching hours and attendance:

Each module which you study on campus will require you to attend classes and carry out independent work. The MSc academic modules require you to attend from 9.15am – 6.15pm. You should be aware that services may operate over seven working days. Placements may involve evening and weekend attendance. You will be expected to mirror the working hours of practice educators and be required to purchase professional indemnity insurance.

Links with industry/professional bodies:

Upon successful completion of the course, you can apply for membership of the College of Occupational Therapists and will be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council to work as an occupational therapist.

Modules:

15 credits: Occupational Choices and Narratives in Context/ Research Methods 30 credits: Occupational Therapy Theory, Values and Skills for Practice/ Occupational Therapy Process and Practice/ Advancing Scholarship and Professional Practice Non-credited: Manual Handling 60 credits: Research Project You will also complete undergraduate level professional practice placements 1, 2, 3 & 4 (1000 hours in total) in order to be eligible to register with the Health and Care Professions Council.

Careers:

Occupational therapists are employed in a diverse range of settings including the National Health Service, public health, education, employment services, local authority, prison service, third sector organisations and private practice. Outside the UK, graduates of this course have gone on to work in Hong Kong, Australia, Europe, Canada, the USA and New Zealand.



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