• Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of York Featured Masters Courses
London Metropolitan University Featured Masters Courses
University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
Southampton Solent University Featured Masters Courses
Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
"reading"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Reading)

  • "reading" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 2,244
Order by 
The Reading Recovery and Literacy Leadership MA, led by the reading recovery leadership team at UCL Institute of Education (IOE) combines practical and theoretical elements. Read more
The Reading Recovery and Literacy Leadership MA, led by the reading recovery leadership team at UCL Institute of Education (IOE) combines practical and theoretical elements. Students attend the programme in London - which may involve an overnight stay - but the majority of time will be spent locally teaching in a school and studying at home.

Degree information

The programme trains teacher leaders in reading recovery. You will be equipped with the current research in early literacy, the theories of Marie Clay underpinning reading recovery, the skills required to manage an implementation in a local education authority or education system, and the ability to lead high quality professional development for practising teachers.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of three core modules (150 credits), and a report (30 credits). Students can exit after the first year with a Postgraduate Diploma. There are no optional modules for this programme.

Core modules
-Literacy Development
-Research Methods in Literacy
-The Theory and Practice of Reading Recovery

Dissertation/report
All students submit a report of up to 10,000 words on an aspect of their professional role.

Teaching and learning
The programme involves working with children in reading recovery, fieldwork sessions, online discussion sessions undertaken locally and full-day and evening sessions taught face-to-face.

Fieldwork
Teaching of children in reading recovery can take place in the student's own locality. Students bring children to be taught at least twice during the full-time training year. The cost of a child travelling to London is covered in the course fees. The cost of travel to a school in the student's locality is not covered by course fees.

Placement
Placements to observe professional development for teachers is arranged by the course team. Teacher leaders in training and their providers are responsible for arranging a suitable local school placement. Guidance will be offered so that this placement meets course requirements.

Careers

The programme trains teacher leaders for reading recovery in the UK and across Europe. In addition, on graduation students are recognized as accredited reading recovery teacher leaders.

Employability
Students learn to highly skilled reading recovery techniques, become adept facilitators of teachers’ professional development, and proficient administrators of a complex and detailed intervention in an education system.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This demanding and challenging programme was first established in 1991 when Marie Clay, who developed reading recovery, was a visiting professor at the IOE.

Participants will develop or enhance their understanding of how the lowest achieving children can be assisted to overcome their learning difficulties.

There are opportunities for participants to network with their future colleagues across Europe when they attend the annual professional development meeting that is organized for all reading recovery teacher leaders in the UK and Ireland.

Read less
The University of Reading, School of Law is pleased to offer a Double Masters Programme with leading universities around the world. Read more

Overview

The University of Reading, School of Law is pleased to offer a Double Masters Programme with leading universities around the world.

This will enable students to undertake postgraduate study at 2 institutions in the form of a Double Masters Programme, completing 2 Masters programmes in 2 years.

Students will be able to choose from a range of programmes broadening their knowledge and understanding of issues in law across different countries and legal systems.

The other great benefit of this programme is being able to complete the second Masters programme in 1 year, where normally it would take 2 years.

Students from our partner universities who are joining our Commercial Law Masters programmes may be eligible for a discount on the University of Reading tuition fees. Please contact us for details.

We also offer scholarships to students from our partnership schools. The scholarships will be awarded on a competitive basis and only to candidates with a very strong academic record. For an application form, please contact Gemma on . Applications for a scholarship must be received by 31 May. Early applications are advised.

You can find a list of partnership agreements for this Double Masters Programme with the universities here - http://www.reading.ac.uk/law/pg-taught/law-pgt-double-masters-programmes.aspx

Information for incoming students

1) Admissions process (including deadlines)
Students should apply for Postgraduate study at the University of Reading through our online application service: http://www.reading.ac.uk/pgapply. They can apply for a maximum of three courses per application form.

Application Checklist:
Students must complete all sections of the application form including all of the following:

• Full transcript of all previous degree programmes (it is normal that some students will not have finished their degree and so do not have complete transcripts when they apply)

• A copy of their degree certificate (if they have already graduated)

• English Language certificate, (usually IELTS or TOEFL) if available at the time of application

• Two references

With regards to additional attachments for the online application, students should submit any extra documents to the international office directly (). When sending the information the student should provide their name, application ID number and details of what the attachments contain.

For guidance on writing a personal statement to support their application, please refer students to this online article: http://blogs.reading.ac.uk/seecc/2011/10/i-want-to-complete-an-application-form/

There is no specific deadline to apply. Most courses and applications will be considered until the course is full. However, to allow time for us to process your application we recommend that students apply by August 2013 for 2013 admission. Please bear in mind that Admissions can take 6-8 weeks in order to make a decision on an application. All relevant sections of the application have to be finished before you are able to submit, however supporting documentation can be sent later to the address above.

2) Contact information in the University for partner students
Once students have applied they should contact the Law School for information on their decision at

3) Payment information and any discounts/scholarships for partner students
With regards to tuition fees and cost of accommodation we will send details of these to the students when they receive their decision letter.
For information, the fees for 2014/15 for the LLM International Commercial Law are £15,225 for international students. Students can check the School funding page to see whether they are eligible for a scholarship (e.g. http://www.reading.ac.uk/law/pg-taught/law-pgt-feesandfunding.aspx). If applying for scholarships, on the online application students should state that at the moment they have no funding (in the first section). In the second section they can list any funding they are thinking of applying for. At this stage there is no need to be any more specific than that. If there are external scholarships that a student has heard of and is planning on applying for they can also list those here, but this is not essential at this stage. If the student is successful in gaining a scholarship, they should inform the university subsequently. Any scholarship directly from the university, automatically goes towards the payment of fees for the course.
Tuition Fees 2013-14 (PDF 2.13 MB) - http://www.reading.ac.uk/web/FILES/law/Tuition_Fees_2013-14.pdf
CAS numbers will be issued in June and July.

4) Airport pick up
We will arrange airport pick up for students. Please let us know when you are booking your flights and we will send further information on this.

5) Housing application process/deadline
Below is a link to information on how to apply for University accommodation. Specific information on how to apply is given on page 8. Accommodation is guaranteed for new students as long as applications are received before the deadline. Further information on the types of accommodation is available online at: http://www.reading.ac.uk/accommodation

Read less
OVERVIEW. This course runs once a year from January. Reading is a vital part of childhood that has important implications for the development of cognitive processes. Read more
OVERVIEW

This course runs once a year from January.

Reading is a vital part of childhood that has important implications for the development of cognitive processes. This course is suitable for anyone who is interested in improving their understanding of how children learn to read, and why some individuals struggle with written language tasks.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

Only 60 credits – preferable to undertaking a full masters for individuals who are in full time employment,
study can be spread over three years to keep workload manageable,
contains useful, practical skills as well as theoretical aspects,
understand the processes involved in learning to read,
get to grips with techniques for teaching reading,
open up a world of possibilities for people learning to read.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

The course comprises three modules that review theories of reading development, written language difficulties and the assessment of reading and spelling skills.

The course is particularly suitable for teachers or teaching assistants - both primary and secondary levels, psychology graduates interested in educational psychology or child development, or lecturers at FE or HE level who want to understand how to support students who experience dyslexia.

Read less
The Reading for Life MSc, the first of its kind in the country, is concerned with the wider and deeper ways in which serious creative literature ‘finds’ people, emotionally and imaginatively, by offering living models and visions of human troubles and human possibilities. Read more
The Reading for Life MSc, the first of its kind in the country, is concerned with the wider and deeper ways in which serious creative literature ‘finds’ people, emotionally and imaginatively, by offering living models and visions of human troubles and human possibilities.

The programme uses books of all kinds – novels, poetry, drama, essays in philosophy and theology – and books from all periods – from Shakespeare to the present to help you to develop the ability, the confidence and enthusiasm to use all literature as a form of personal time-travel and meditation. You will also learn how, in turn, you may re-create this process for others, through the formation of equivalent reading-groups based on the innovative and successful shared read aloud project run in various locations across the country (schools, hostels for homeless people, community libraries, day centres for the elderly, rehabilitation and drop-in centres, prisons) by the award-winning charity, The Reader.

The programme is run part-time over two years at our Liverpool campus and is available to be studied on a CPD basis at our London campus.

Read less
The Master of Education in Advanced Studies in Teaching and Learning (M.Ed.) with a concentration in Early and Middle Childhood Literacy Reading is offered through the Regents Online Campus Collaborative (ROCC) , and is delivered following the standard protocol established for the delivery of ROCC courses and programs. Read more
The Master of Education in Advanced Studies in Teaching and Learning (M.Ed.) with a concentration in Early and Middle Childhood Literacy Reading is offered through the Regents Online Campus Collaborative (ROCC) , and is delivered following the standard protocol established for the delivery of ROCC courses and programs. The mission of this program is to provide advanced professional preparation in the area of reading and language arts for practicing teachers.

Read less
The MA Education is designed to enhance your professional practice and help you make improvements which will make a positive difference either within the classroom or your particular work environment. Read more
The MA Education is designed to enhance your professional practice and help you make improvements which will make a positive difference either within the classroom or your particular work environment.

Highly flexible, it caters for educators with a diverse range of experience, development needs, and study requirements. It is suitable for teachers, those in leadership or policy-making roles, and other practitioners working in education or related settings.

Language and Literacy

The ability to read and write well is fundamental to a learner’s prospects and ultimate career ambitions. This specialism will help you better understand the requirements of your students and to develop strategies to improve their language and literacy skills and assessment outcomes.

The syllabus may include:

* Context and issues - research in reading and writing; learning to read and write; the role of phonics in decoding text; the role of comprehension; international reading standards; writing in the language curriculum; developing as a writer

* Children’s literature - the place of picture books in reading development; the history of literature written for children; classic children’s literature; fiction for the primary school; teen fiction; non-fiction texts; contemporary authors; reading for pleasure

* Comprehension - comprehension strategies; analysing students’ comprehension levels; developing comprehension skills

* Reluctant readers - reading and motivation; understanding readers’ perspectives; gender differences in attitudes to reading; and supporting reluctant readers

* The writing process - theories of writing; students’ composing processes; the writing process in the curriculum; re-thinking classroom processes

* Creative writing - defining creative writing; professional writers’ perspectives; the creative writing workshop; developing students’ critical responses to writing; assessment

* The grammar-writing relationship - the historical grammar debate; prescriptive and descriptive grammar; functionally-oriented grammar; teaching grammar to support writing development

* Writing conversations - the importance of talk in the teaching of writing; generation, formulation, revision; managing effective classroom talk about writing; supporting meta-linguistic conversations.

Modules

The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand, please see the website for a current list of modules available http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/education/educationma/modules/

Read less
This Conversion Diploma is designed for those who wish to pursue the study of philosophy at postgraduate level but have studied little or no philosophy in their undergraduate degree. Read more

Conversion Diploma

This Conversion Diploma is designed for those who wish to pursue the study of philosophy at postgraduate level but have studied little or no philosophy in their undergraduate degree. Satisfactory performance on the Diploma leads to entry to the SASP MLitt Programme. Many previous Conversion Diploma students have gone on to further study in philosophy at PhD level – either at St Andrews/Stirling or on another equally prestigious PhD programme.

Though Conversion Diploma students take only undergraduate modules (1000 - 4000 level), they nonetheless remain bona fide members of the large and vibrant postgraduate community at the universities of St Andrews and Stirling. You are invited to all postgraduate events, such as the various postgraduate reading parties, and are strongly encouraged to get fully involved with the many and various seminars, workshops, talks, and reading groups.

To complete the Conversion Diploma, you must take 60 credits in 3000-and/or 4000-level Philosophy modules (to include at least 30 credits of a compulsory 3000-level module) and 60 further credits which may be in 1000- through 4000-level Philosophy modules. (Most 3000-and 4000-level modules are 30 credits, so this usually means you will take four modules – two in each semester).

There is also the option of taking a not-for-credit MLitt module in Basic Logic which runs every Friday in Semester 1. This module is designed for those with little or no knowledge of logic, or for those who wish to brush up on their basic logic skills.

Features

* In the latest Philosophical Gourmet Report produced by Brian Leiter the St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme was ranked the third best Philosophy programme in the UK http://www.philosophicalgourmet.com

* Between 40 – 50 taught postgraduate students are admitted each year, drawn from the UK and around the world.

* Over 35 dedicated full-time Philosophy staff in the SASP programme work in a broad spectrum of disciplines, from logic and metaphysics to moral philosophy and beyond.

* The SASP programme maintains a staff of authoritative researchers, a majority of whom have significant experience of teaching at leading international institutions, and which is large enough to teach a comprehensive and flexible range of graduate courses, and to supervise research projects.

* There is an annual reading party in the Scottish Highlands for all taught and research postgraduates and staff.

* Friendly and congenial atmosphere in which postgraduate students are encouraged to participate actively through, for example, the weekly Graduate Seminar and the Philosophy Club.

Postgraduate community

SASP is taught by the Philosophy departments in the universities of St Andrews and Stirling. The philosophy graduate programmes of St Andrews and Stirling are fully merged for all postgraduate degrees.

St Andrews and Stirling together form Scotland’s premier centre for philosophy and one of the top philosophy schools in the United Kingdom. The philosophical ambience is intense, friendly and co-operative.

The research programme is enhanced by a busy programme of conferences, workshops and visiting speakers from universities in the UK and from abroad. The St Andrews Philosophy Club meets several times each semester, usually on Wednesday afternoons, for papers by visiting speakers.

Every MLitt student is assigned an adviser at the beginning of the year. They provide you with individual guidance on essay planning, essay writing, academic conduct, and where appropriate, advice on how best to apply for a PhD place.

If you wish to brush up on your knowledge of logic, or if you have limited prior experience in this area, the SASP programme runs an additional weekly seminar, Basic Logic, throughout the year.

St Andrews also has a weekly seminar run by and for the research students, meeting Friday evenings, to which everyone is welcome. Arché (Philosophical Research Centre for the Philosophy of Logic, Language, Metaphysics and Epistemology) runs a variety of informal seminars and discussion groups. The programme also supports and encourages a wide range of student-led reading groups on topics relevant to their degree.

The student Philosophy Society (PhilSoc) is the most vibrant and active student-led society in the Faculty of Arts. It boasts a lively programme of stimulating talks and events throughout the year and attracts a regular following from across the University.

There is an annual reading party for postgraduate students and staff. The party provides an opportunity for you to present your work in an informal and relaxed setting. The reading party takes place at a country retreat in beautiful surroundings: a fine opportunity for seeing Scotland, hiking, and sampling Scottish food and drink, with the give and take of philosophy in the evenings.

The SASP programme has the most diverse postgraduate student population in the University. In addition to students from the UK, USA, Canada and across Europe, the programme has in recent years attracted students from areas such as China, Hong Kong, the Middle East and South America. This gives a uniquely international, cosmopolitan and welcoming feel to the philosophical community.

Careers

The SASP MLitt is a much sought after and highly desirable qualification which is greatly valued by leading employers nationally and internationally.

Structure of the MLitt programmes

The structure of our MLitt programmes is the same, regardless of which you choose to do.

Upon successful completion of the taught component of the programme you can progress to the MLitt dissertation which is completed during the summer. The current MLitt population is 40 students, drawn from the UK and around the world, and the annual intake is around 40 – 50 students. Many MLitt students progress to a PhD programme here or elsewhere, including some of the top institutions in the US. A first degree in or including philosophy is the normal pre-requisite. Postgraduates are taught in dedicated postgraduate classes.

Read less
Course Outline. Read more
Course Outline
If you...have a passion for children's books, love reading literature for children, have written or would love to have a go at writing children's literature, have a desire to learn what books children like reading, would love the chance to explore your own ideas about childhood and learn how different societies, histories and critics have defined it, want to learn how publishers produce children's books and produce one yourself, want to be involved in a rapidly growing area of academic study, and need to learn about different careers in writing for children...then this exciting new programme is for you.

You will have the chance to study classic and contemporary children's literature and writing and produce your own, with input from some of the most well known authors and publishers of today.


Course Content
7 taught modules plus a Dissertation:

Histories of Children's Literature
An introduction to Children's Literature You will investigate Classic British, American and International Children's literatures before choosing an individual topic on any historical selection of Children's literature to research.

Reading Crossover Fiction
You will explore contexts of crossover fiction such as age-banding, genre, education and new ways of marketing fiction in this relatively new field.

Creative Writing for Children Workshop
A chance to develop your own voice and style by producing creative writing for children in any genre, including the fairy-tale, fantasy, social realism, non-fictional prose, drama or poetry with help from established authors.

Scriptwriting for Children
Run by professionals with experience in commissioning work for children's television and in partnership with the BBC (the BBC Children's Division will shortly be moving to Salford), these workshops will show you how to write for children's television and film and how to present your work to the industry.

Reading the Child
This module will seek to understand what we mean by the "child" and "childhood" by exploring the theoretical approaches to the study and practice of writing for children over the last 100 years.

Children's Writing and Publishing
An opportunity to work in a group to produce/publish a new children's book with the help of experts. You will begin by focusing on the age ranges, educational edicts, series fiction, niche markets, "pester power" and digital and online publishing, ebooks and downloads.

Planning Your Career in Writing for Children
You will be given access to career case studies and trends in publishing, writing, teaching, academia and other areas of graduate recruitment which will enable you to produce your own action plan.

Writing for Children Dissertation
You will be able to choose between a traditional literature dissertation, a creative writing dissertation, one that combines literature and creative writing, or a work-related dissertation.

The programme uses a wide range of teaching and learning strategies. As well as interactive lectures all modules have seminar or workshop elements where you will be encouraged to engage in critical reading and writing exercises. Seminar discussion and, in some modules, formal presentations, will enable you to further develop your subject-specific knowledge and understanding, strengthen your communicative skills, and pursue research projects either independently or in teams. Tutorials enable you to discuss issues and ideas with your tutors either individually or in small groups.

Creative Writing Workshops will offer you the opportunity to give and receive peer critique and support. As an individual you will keep learning journals or logs for some modules. You will spend a substantial amount of time on independent research but you will be supported by one-to-one supervision from tutors.

Read less
Kingston University is proud to offer the first Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing in the UK. This course offers talented and aspiring writers the chance to refine their skills under the tutelage of acclaimed professionals while receiving accredited training and experience in teaching in higher education. Read more
Kingston University is proud to offer the first Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing in the UK. This course offers talented and aspiring writers the chance to refine their skills under the tutelage of acclaimed professionals while receiving accredited training and experience in teaching in higher education.

The unique combination of creative and practical skills provided on this course will prepare you simultaneously for a career as a publishing writer and an accredited teacher of creative writing.

Admissions to the MFA will based upon the quality of a writing sample as well as an assessment of your publishing potential.

What will you study?

The first year of the course involves writing workshops; modules examining literary genre and texts; the opportunity to take a module designed to prepare you for the world of publishing; and a 15,000-word dissertation, leading to the award of a masters degree. In the second year you progress to even smaller group writing workshops; modules to improve your skills of reading and textual analysis; and the chance to take a suite of modules culminating in the University's postgraduate teaching certificate. The extensive one-to-one supervision for the dissertation leading to the MFA (no less than the equivalent of 40,000 words) will be provided by one of the course's permanent staff, one of our writers in residence or an editor from a leading UK publishing company. There may also be the opportunity to gain experience assisting with Kingston University Press.

Creative Writing MFA students have the opportunity to undertake the Introduction to Learning and Teaching part 1 (ILT1) which is a non-accredited course run at Kingston University which aims to at support new colleagues and PhD students with teaching and learning.

Assessment

Book-length creative dissertation; critical reading log of approximately 4,500 words. You also take a series of unaccredited modules for which you will produce creative work, reading and teaching logs, critical commentary on selected texts and short essays.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Advanced Critical Reading
-Advanced Writers' Workshop
-MFA Dissertation
-Reading, Genre and Impact
-Special Study: Workshops in Popular Genre Writing
-Structure and Style
-Teaching and Writing Workshop
-Ten Critical Challenges for Creative Writers
-Writers' Workshop

Read less
At present, we offer the opportunity to gain a postgraduate degree by research at MSc, MPhil or DPhil level. Study can be on either a full-time or a part-time basis. Read more

Course outline

At present, we offer the opportunity to gain a postgraduate degree by research at MSc, MPhil or DPhil level. Study can be on either a full-time or a part-time basis. The minimum periods of study for achieving these research degrees are as follows:

- MSc – 1 year full-time or 2 years part-time
- MPhil – 2 years full-time or 4 years part-time
- DPhil – 3 years full-time or 6 years part-time

Specific projects that we would be happy to supervise immediately include:

Developmental Psychology

- Conceptual change
- Children’s mental models of natural phenomena
- Misconceptions of scientific theory and practice (in both children and adults)
- Science learning in schools
- Science teaching in schools
- Methods of investigating children’s knowledge

Music Psychology

- Expertise in sight-singing music:
- Expertise in any domain requires practice and involves the use of specific cognitive strategies. Research on sight-singing has suggested a number of factors involved in pitching sung notes, such as memory, reading intervals, the presence of other musical lines, and an understanding of tonality. This project would extend the existing research by carrying out a number of experiments on expert and less expert singers. (Note: this project could be extended to instrumental sight-reading.)
- Sung text intelligibility:
- A great deal of music is sung, and an important aspect of perceiving sung music is the extent to which the words can be understood. There are no doubt differences between understanding speech and sung words. This project would investigate a number of factors thought to affect the intelligibility of sung text, based on a previous exploratory survey questionnaire study, in a set of controlled experiments.
- Factors affecting music reading
- Effects of background music on various behaviours / cognitive abilities
- Factors affecting the understanding of sung text
- Gender and musical instrument playing as a function of experience

Cognition and Perception

- Expertise and strategies in cryptic crossword completion:
- Expertise in any domain requires practice and involves the use of specific cognitive strategies. An exploratory survey of expert cryptic crossword solvers has shed light on their solving habits and the role of motivation, but not really tackled the cognitive strategies involved. This project would investigate the cognitive aspects of cryptic crossword solving in experts, including looking at the role of group work when people solve crosswords together. Methods would include controlled experiments on anagram solving, clue recognition and solving, and completing part-answered clues, as well as the use of online verbal protocols during crossword solving.
- Expertise for problem solving
- Time estimation and processing
- Stroop effect in music reading
- Working memory and dual task performance

Educational Psychology

- Dyslexia
- Provision of special needs accommodations throughout education
- Effects and perceived benefits of special needs education post-education

General areas that we would be happy to supervise projects in include:

- Evolutionary psychology, particularly intergenerational conflict
- Psychology of religion
- Questionnaire design
- Object recognition and naming
- Reading for meaning in literary texts
- Discourse, authorship and readership
- Role of shame in counselling, therapy and education

Find out more about our Psychology Department on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/psychology.

Research

The Master of Science (MSc) is available as a research degree. Candidates seeking the degree on the basis of research undertake one year of supervised research on a topic with an area for which the first degree would be the degree of Bachelor of Science (two years if they are studying part-time), at the end of which they submit a thesis embodying the results of their research. This research must demonstrate familiarity with, and an understanding of the subject, its principal sources and authorities. It should display critical discrimination and a sense of proportion in evaluating evidence and the judgements of others. The subject should be dealt with in a competent and scholarly manner. Candidates who are awarded the degree of MSc will have demonstrated their ability to conduct independent research using a range of primary and/or secondary sources and to present this in an organised, coherent and scholarly manner. Candidates for the degree of MSc must already hold a good honours degree or the equivalent. Admission to the degree is normally on a provisional basis while the candidate, with the help of the supervisor, refines the proposal for the research, including developing a work plan and identifying the requirements for support and resources and how these will be met.

The degree of Master of Philosophy (MPhil) is a degree that is awarded on the basis of a thesis embodying the results of supervised research. Despite the name of the degree, it may be awarded in any subject or discipline. Candidates spend a period of two years full-time or four years part-time undertaking supervised research, at the end of which they submit a thesis embodying the results of that research. This thesis must demonstrate familiarity with, and an understanding of the subject, its principal sources and authorities. It should display critical discrimination and a sense of proportion in evaluating evidence and the judgements of others. The subject should be dealt with in a competent and scholarly manner.

The research embodied in the thesis for the degree of Master of Philosophy (MPhil) must advance understanding in the field or area of study concerned.

Candidates seeking the degree of Doctor of Philosophy on the basis of a thesis embodying the results of supervised research must already hold a good honours degree or the equivalent.

Admission to the degree is normally on a provisional basis while the candidate, with the help of the supervisor, refines the proposal for the research, including developing a work plan and identifying the requirements for support and resources and how these will be met.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/sciences/msc/psychology.

Read less
This programme offers you the chance to study a range of theories in depth. It engages with modern literary theory, psychoanalytical theory, political theory and theories of visual and aesthetic experience. Read more
This programme offers you the chance to study a range of theories in depth. It engages with modern literary theory, psychoanalytical theory, political theory and theories of visual and aesthetic experience.

You reflect on these areas of thinking in themselves and as they relate to particular literary texts, to post-enlightenment philosophy and to other relevant areas of culture and experience. It is for those interested in writing, reading, language, art, the self, literature and discovering more about the relations between literature and philosophy.

The MA in Critical Theory offers a choice of two core courses that survey a wide range of modern theoretical approaches, and a range of taught options covering postcolonial theory, theories of art, modern approaches to comparative literature, deconstruction and a chance to work in depth on a single key theoretical text and the writings it refers to.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/216/critical-theory

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You take two modules in the autumn term and two in the spring term; one core module (FR866: Literature and Theory) and three optional modules. You are also expected to attend the Faculty and School Research Methods Programmes.

You then write a theory-based dissertation between the start of the Summer Term and the end of August.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

FR866 - Literature and Theory (30 credits)
FR807 - Postmodern French Detective Fiction (30 credits)
EN889 - Literary Theory (30 credits)
EN897 - Advanced Critical Reading (30 credits)
FR872 - Theories of Art in Modern French Thought (30 credits)
CP808 - Writing the Self: Autobiography in the Modern Period (30 credits)
CP810 - Comparative Literature in Theory and Practice (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
EN857 - Body and Place in the Postcolonial Text (30 credits)
TH831 - Spirituality and Therapy (30 credits)
TH833 - Contemporary Critical Approaches to the Study of Religion (30 credits)
EN876 - Dickens and the Condition of England (30 credits)
EN888 - Extremes of Feeling: Literature and Empire in the Eighteenth Century (30 credits)
EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)
EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN842 - Reading the Contemporary (30 credits)
EN850 - Centres and Edges: Modernist and PostcolonialQuest Literature (30 credits)
MT864 - Reading the Medieval Town: Canterbury, an International City (30 credits)

Assessment

The course is assessed by coursework for each module and by the dissertation which accounts for a third of the final grade.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- extend and deepen through coursework and research your understanding of modern literary and critical theory

- study the reading-practices, analytic tools and vocabularies of modern critical thought

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- introduce you to the research methods that facilitate advanced theoretical study of literature

- provide a basis in knowledge and skills if you intend to teach critical theory, especially in higher education

- develop your understanding and critical awareness of the expressive and analytical resources of language

- offer scope for the study of critical theory within an interdisciplinary context, notably that provided by philosophy

- develop your ability to argue a point of view with clarity and cogency, both orally and in written form

- examine this writing in the wider context of literature, culture and philosophy

- provide teaching which is informed by current research and scholarship and which requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- develop your research skills to the point where you are ready to undertake a research degree, should you so wish.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less
The Graduate Diploma in Philosophy is a one-year conversion course (two years part-time), designed for those who already have a degree and wish to pursue an interest in philosophy. Read more
The Graduate Diploma in Philosophy is a one-year conversion course (two years part-time), designed for those who already have a degree and wish to pursue an interest in philosophy. No formal training in philosophy is required. The programme provides an ideal learning environment if you are interested in progressing to an MA in Philosophy, or simply want the opportunity to learn about philosophy.

Course structure

The Diploma has two main components:
-Four undergraduate modules. At least two of these must be at Level 3 and no more than one should be at Level 1.
-A dissertation of 12,000 words (double module).

You can choose from a wide range of modules, which in the past have included:
Level 1
-Ethics and Values
-Knowledge and Reality
-Introduction to Logic
-Reading Philosophy
-History and Theory of Medicine
-Introduction to the History and Philosophy of Science
Level 2
-Philosophy of Mind
-Philosophy of Religion
-Political Philosophy
-Language, Logic and Reality
-Moral Theory
-Theory, Literature and Society
-Biomedical Ethics Past and Present
-Science and Religion
-Modern Philosophy I
-Philosophy of Science
-Philosophy of Economics: Theory, Methods and Values
-Ancient Philosophies West and East
Level 3
-Modern Philosophy II
-Aesthetics
-Applied Ethics
-Issues in Contemporary Ethics
-Twentieth Century European Philosophy
-Language and Mind
-History of the Body
-Philosophical Issues in Contemporary Science
-Metaphysics
-History and Philosophy of Psychiatry
-Gender, Film and Society
-20th Century European Philosophy
-History and Philosophy of Psychiatry
-Ethics in Business Practice
-Formal and Philosophical Logic

Learning and Teaching

Students in the Graduate Diploma programme receive an average of eight timetabled contact hours per week over the course of the programme. The contact hours come in the form of lectures, tutorials and seminars, depending on the four modules chosen by the student. In addition, students are offered six hours of one-to-one dissertation supervision with an expert in their chosen research area.

Philosophical development involves not only familiarizing oneself with a body of knowledge but also acquiring skills in critical reasoning and argumentation. Thus, in addition to introducing students to key works in philosophy, the programme offers many opportunities for dialogical interaction. Lecture sessions include time for questions, tutorials consist mainly of structured, critical dialogue in a supportive environment, and seminars provide opportunities for extended discussion. Dissertation supervision meetings give guidance on suitable reading, critical discussion of relevant sources, detailed advice on how to write a 12,000 word piece of research, and intensive critical engagement with the student’s philosophical position and argument.

Timetabled contact is only a part of the learning process; its aim is to provide students with the knowledge and skills required to navigate the relevant literature themselves and to pursue independent learning. Lectures and accompanying documents contextualise material and introduce students to topics, positions and debates. At least four hours of additional study per week are recommended for each lecture or seminar, which includes reading and the completion of assignments. Having completed the reading, students engage in discussion in seminars or return to lecture topics in small group tutorials. These help students to refine their understanding of material and to develop the reasoning skills needed to formulate, present, defend and criticise philosophical positions.

Graduate Diploma students also can benefit from a range of other activities in the department, including the department’s postgraduate philosophy society (EIDOS), weekly research seminars and reading groups, and occasional conferences, workshops and Royal Institute of Philosophy lectures. The programme director remains in contact with students throughout the year and is always available to discuss any issues that might arise, whether personal or academic.

Read less
These courses provide a broad understanding of infectious diseases through the core modules in public health, biostatistics and epidemiology, and the biology and control of infectious diseases which are taken by all students, together with the subsequent opportunities for specialised study in areas of the student’s own choice. Read more
These courses provide a broad understanding of infectious diseases through the core modules in public health, biostatistics and epidemiology, and the biology and control of infectious diseases which are taken by all students, together with the subsequent opportunities for specialised study in areas of the student’s own choice. Most of the students are in-service health professionals working for example as doctors or laboratory staff, who take the courses in order to acquire new knowledge in infectious diseases, or to update their current expertise.

The Infectious Diseases courses draw upon the School’s long tradition in the study of clinical and epidemiological aspects of infectious and tropical diseases. Providing a broad understanding of infectious diseases, together with developing strategies for their control and treatment, the courses will be of particular relevance to in-service health professionals, such as doctors or laboratory staff who either wish to acquire new knowledge in infectious diseases or update their current expertise.

These courses are aimed both at recent graduates who wish to pursue an advanced degree, and at people who took their first training some time ago and wish to update their knowledge in this rapidly evolving field or who wish to change career direction.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.londoninternational.ac.uk/sites/default/files/progspec-infectiousdiseases.pdf)
- Distance Learning prospectus (pdf) (http://www.londoninternational.ac.uk/sites/default/files/prospectus/lshtm-prospectus.pdf)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/dmsid.html

English Language Requirements

You will meet the English language requirement if you have passed, within the past three years:

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English when a minimum overall score of B or 190 is achieved;

- (IELTS) International English Language Testing System when an overall score of at least 7.0 is achieved with a minimum of 7.0 in the Written sub-test and a minimum of 5.5 in Listening, Reading and Speaking; or

- Pearson Test of English (Academic) overall score of 68 or above, with a minimum of 68 in Writing and a minimum of 59 in Listening, Reading and Speaking

- (TOEFL) iBT Test of English as a Foreign Language overall score of 100 or above with at least 24 in Writing, 23 in Speaking, 22 in Reading and 21 in Listening

Course objectives

Students will develop:

- a comprehensive understanding of the role of biology of infective agents and hosts on the outcome of infection

- the use of this knowledge, in combination with epidemiological and public health approaches, to develop rational strategies for the control and treatment of infection

Method of assessment

All distance learning modules are assessed by means of a two-hour unseen written examination (with 15 minutes planning/reading time at the start of the examination).

Elective modules (i.e. modules other than the IDM1 modules) are assessed partly by the two-hour unseen written examination (70%) and partly by an assessed assignment (30%), submitted electronically to the School by a set deadline.

Examinations take place once a year in June (please note: it is not possible to hold examinations at other times of year). These are normally held in a student’s country of residence. Details of available examination centres (http://www.londoninternational.ac.uk/community-support-resources/current-students/examinations/examination-centres).

They are arranged mainly through Ministries of Education or the British Council. Students taking distance learning examinations will need to pay a fee to their local examination centre. Please note that if you fail an examination at the first entry you will be allowed one further attempt, if you have failed the module overall.

Study materials

You receive your study materials after you register. Study materials may include Subject guides, Readers, Textbooks, CD-ROMs/additional computer software (e.g. Stata), Past examination papers and Examiners’ reports, and Handbooks. You also have access to the School’s online library resources. We also provide all students with a student registration card.

Flexible study

We know that if you have a full-time job, family or other commitments, and wish to study at a distance, you will have many calls on your time. The course allows you to study independently, at a time and pace that suits you (subject to some course-specific deadlines) using the comprehensive study materials provided, with support available from academic staff.You have between 1-5 years in which to complete the Postgraduate Certificate, and between 2-5 years in which to complete the Postgraduate Diploma or the MSc.

The study year for most modules runs from the beginning of October through to the June exams, while two modules run from the beginning of January through to assignment submission at the end of August. Tutorial support is available throughout this time. Students carrying out projects are assigned personal supervisors to support their project work which is mostly carried out between June and the end of September in their final year.

Blended learning: taking modules in London

After successful completion of a minimum number of core modules, Postgraduate Diploma and MSc students may also be eligible for the 'blended learning option', which allows for the study of up to two modules only (from a restricted list) at the School in London during the Spring or Summer terms in place of distance learning modules. Please note that these options, and the dates when the modules are held at the School, are subject to change - full details will be sent to all distance learning students in July each year.

Support

- a web-based learning environment (including web conferencing, allowing you to engage in academic discussions with tutors and fellow students)

- personalised feedback from teaching staff and advice on assignments

- tutors are allocated to each module and are available to answer queries and promote discussion during the study year, through the online Virtual Learning Environment

- communicate with other distance learning students, either individually or through learning support groups

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/dmsid.html#seventh

Read less
This one-year programme (two years part-time) provides an ideal academic environment for those who would like to study the subject at a higher level in preparation for a PhD or as a basis for future employment. Read more
This one-year programme (two years part-time) provides an ideal academic environment for those who would like to study the subject at a higher level in preparation for a PhD or as a basis for future employment. Significant numbers of former students go on to further study. The programme includes research training and allows you to write a substantial dissertation on a topic you wish to pursue at PhD level. Our staff members have expertise in a very wide range of areas, so there is considerable flexibility over choice of dissertation topic. Modules are taught via group seminars and one-to-one tutorials. There is also a weekly student-led work-in-progress seminar, which all MA students attend.

Course structure

Candidates shall study and be assessed in the following modules:

List A:

Dissertation- 60 credits
Philosophical Research Methods- 30 credits

Candidates shall also study and be assessed in modules to the value of 90 credits from Lists B, C and D. The module titles below are those offered in previous academic years. Not all the modules will necessarily be available every year.

List B:

Ancient Philosophers on Necessity, Fate and Free Will- 30 credits

Forms After Plato- 30 credits

Mind and Action- 30 credits

Philosophical Issues in Science and Medicine- 30 credits

Phenomenology and the Sciences of Mind- 30 credits

Current Issues in Aesthetics and Theory of Art- 30 credits

Current Issues in Metaphysics- 30 credits

Current Issues in Ethics- 30 credits

Philosophy and Religion- 30 credits

Gender Theory and Feminist Philosophy- 30 credits

Science and the Enlightenment- 30 credits

Ethics, Medicine and History- 30 credits

Philosophy of the Social Sciences- 30 credits

Ethics of Cultural Heritage- 30 credits

Environmental Philosophy- 0-30 credits

List C:

Candidates taking modules from List C must take both modules:

BUSINESS ETHICS 1: Ethical Leadership- 15 credits

BUSINESS ETHICS 2: Society and Sustainability- 15 credits

List D:

Candidates taking modules from List D must take both modules:

Moral and Corporate Trust: Trust and Accountability- 15 credits

Moral and Corporate Trust: Trust and Business Ethics- 15 credits

Learning and Teaching

The Taught MA in Philosophy provides the opportunity for in-depth engagement with areas of philosophy in which the Durham department has internationally recognised expertise. In the process, students develop critical abilities and independent research skills that prepare them for further postgraduate study in Philosophy and for a wide range of careers where such skills are highly prized.

Students choose three optional ‘topic’ modules from a list of approximately twelve. They are also required to take a ‘philosophical research methods’ module and to complete a double-module dissertation. Topic modules are taught via seven two-hour seminars and two one-to-one tutorials. Seminars incorporate staff-led discussion of topics, student presentations and small group discussions, in the context of a friendly, supportive environment. Seminars serve to (i) familiarise students with topics, positions and debates, (ii) help them to navigate the relevant literature, (iii) refine their oral and written presentation skills and (iv) further develop their ability to independently formulate, criticise and defend philosophical positions. Students are expected to do approximately four hours of reading for each seminar. Having completed the seminar-based part of the module, they decide upon an essay topic, having received guidance from the module leader. At this point, they begin a more focused programme of reading and independent study, and also benefit from two one-to-one supervisions with an expert in the relevant field. These supervisions provide more focused teaching, tailored to a student’s chosen essay topic. Supervisions further enable students to develop and refine their own philosophical positions, convey them clearly and support them with well constructed arguments.

The core modules of the programme are the ‘Philosophical Research Methods’ module and the double-module Dissertation. The former consists of ten seminars of 2 hours duration. Seven of these introduce students to different philosophical methodologies and to contrasting conceptions of what philosophy is. Critical refection upon the nature of philosophy, cultured through seminar discussions and subsequent reading, equips them with the ‘meta-philosophical’ skills required to write a ‘Philosophical Methods’ essay. The other three seminars include training in library use, referencing, writing abstracts, structuring an MA-level essay and other research-related matters. They also include focused advice and discussion concerning dissertation proposals, which students are required to submit as part of this module.

Having completed the three topic modules and the research methods module, students start work on their dissertations. They are offered six one-to-one tutorials of up to an hour each, with a supervisor who will be an expert in their chosen field. There is also a ‘dissertation mini-conference’ in August, where students present work from their dissertation and receive feedback from members of staff and from their peers. The supervisions and the conference both help them to further refine skills acquired during the academic year (such as presenting and defending an argument in a clear, structured fashion) and to complete a substantial piece of high quality independent research. Through the conference, they also engage with the work of other students in ways that are mutually informative.

In addition to this core teaching, students benefit from a range of activities, including an MA Master-class, a student-led ‘work-in-progress group’ and regular meetings of EIDOS, the department’s postgraduate philosophy society. They are welcomed as full participants in the department’s research culture, and are thus strongly encouraged to attend a range of other events, including weekly Research Seminars, and occasional Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures, conferences, workshops and reading groups. The programme director remains in regular contact with the students throughout the year and is always available to discuss any issues that might arise (personal or academic).

Read less
This Literacy Learning and Literacy Difficulties MA will provide students with a deeper understanding of the processes involved in learning to read, write and spell, the sources of difficulties, and approaches to intervention. Read more
This Literacy Learning and Literacy Difficulties MA will provide students with a deeper understanding of the processes involved in learning to read, write and spell, the sources of difficulties, and approaches to intervention.

Degree information

This programme provides students with the opportunity to draw on the strengths of a team with research expertise in literacy and experience in evaluating early literacy interventions. They will also investigate literacy acquisition and problems in depth, covering reading, writing and spelling.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), one optional module (30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules:
-Research Methods in Literacy and Literary Development
-Literacy Development
-Literacy Practice in Writing and Comprehension

Optional modules
-Reading and Spelling Difficulties
-Students choose one or two optional Master's level modules from across the UCL IOE offering.

Dissertation/report
All students submit a 20,000-word dissertation (60 credits).

Teaching and learning
Sessions for all modules are offered face-to-face in the evenings, supplemented by online discussion and reading. Dissertation/report group sessions are also delivered in the evening and are supplemented by one-to-one supervision. All 30 credit modules are assessed via the equivalent of a 4,000-word assignment.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as literacy co-ordinators and special educational needs co-ordinators, while others have jobs as literacy advisers and specialists. Graduates can also be found working as teachers and as independent literacy intervention tutors.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Primary School Acting Deputy Head Teacher, Peterborough City Council
-Primary School Class Teacher (Year 5), Belmore Primary Academy
-Primary School Class Teacher, Sacred Heart Catholic Voluntary Academy
-Special Education Deputy Head Teacher, The Collett School

Employability
Students learn to diagnose a range of literacy difficulties and then to be able to consider appropriate interventions for those struggling with their reading and/or writing. Those graduating from the programme usually enhance their career prospects and can demonstrate a deeper understanding of literacy learning and supporting struggling readers and writers. Graduates usually move into coordinator/literacy management roles.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Department of Learning and Leadership at UCL Institute of Education (IOE) has developed an internationally-recognised reputation for early childhood and pre-school and primary education studies.

The department has a vibrant teaching programme and offers a range of enriching events including research seminars and conferences in the field of early childhood and primary education.

In all its work, the department is strongly committed to working in partnership with government agencies, education authorities, schools, early years and community groups and other departments within the IOE.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X