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This varied degree will allow you to explore the cultural, social, political, theological and other aspects of medieval history while gaining valuable skills for further research. Read more

This varied degree will allow you to explore the cultural, social, political, theological and other aspects of medieval history while gaining valuable skills for further research.

Core modules will allow you to gain an understanding of medieval Latin and palaeography so you can work with primary sources. You’ll also study research methods and bibliography to sharpen your research skills – all of which will allow you to make the most of the fantastic archives, library resources and collections both within the University and in the region.

You’ll also choose from a range of optional modules offered by our School of History and Institute for Medieval Studies, allowing you to gain specialist knowledge in the areas that interest you while cutting across disciplines and using different critical approaches. You could study a broad range of topics, reflecting the diverse research interests across the University which is home to the International Medieval Congress.

The Institute for Medieval Studies (IMS) has access to excellent resources, both in the University and beyond. The world-class Brotherton Library contains extensive facsimiles and microfilms of primary materials as well as a wide range of online resources. Its Special Collections also contain a wide range of manuscript, archive and early printed material, including the Melsteth Icelandic Collection, archives of the Yorkshire Archaeological Society, the old library of Ripon Cathedral, and the manuscripts and incunabula of the Brotherton Collection.

Leeds is also home to the Royal Armouries and its extensive medieval collections, while the West Yorkshire Archives are dotted around the region and the British Library has a Document Supply Centre in nearby Boston Spa.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

Core modules throughout the degree will allow you to develop important research skills, equipping you to work with primary sources. You’ll gain a working knowledge of medieval Latin, look at research methods in historical study and learn to read and transcribe medieval manuscripts by studying palaeography.

Then you’ll build on this foundation with your choice of optional modules. You’ll choose at least one module offered by the School of History, but you could also choose from the range of interdisciplinary modules offered by IMS. You’ll also specialise further when you complete your dissertation, allowing you to conduct independent research on a specific topic of your choice to showcase the skills you’ve acquired.

If you choose to study this programme part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Details of compulsory modules can be found in the table below; for details of optional modules please see the online module catalogue.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation (Medieval History) 30 credits
  • Introduction to Medieval Latin 30 credits
  • Intermediate Medieval Latin 30 credits
  • Research Methods and Bibliography 15 credits
  • Palaeography: Reading Medieval Manuscripts 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Making History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Bede's Northumbria 30 credits
  • Christian Society and the Crusades, 1185-1230 30 credits
  • Gender, Sex, and Love: Byzantium and the West, 900-1200 30 credits
  • Lifecycles: Birth, Death and Illness in the Middle Ages 30 credits
  • Warfare in the Age of the Crusades (1095-1204) 30 credits
  • How to be a Saint in the Middle Ages: Saints' Cults and their impact on culture and society (500-1500) 30 credits
  • Religious Communities and the Individual Experience of Religion, 1200-1500 30 credits
  • The Medieval Tournament: Combat and Spectacle in Western Europe, 1100-1600 30 credits
  • The Holy Land under the Franks: The Kingdom of Jerusalem and its Enemies, 1099-1187 30 credits
  • Medieval Bodies 30 credits
  • Preaching History: Understanding Sermons as Literature and Historical Source 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Medieval History MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Medieval History MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

IMS tutors are experts in their fields, and their cutting-edge research will inform your teaching. To help you make the most of their expertise, all IMS modules are taught in small groups.

You may study skills in seminar groups of 12 or more students, but languages and other interdisciplinary options are usually taught in tutorials of up to eight students. You’ll also have one-to-one meetings with your supervisor during your dissertation.

Assessment

Depending on the modules you choose, you’ll be assessed by a range of methods to develop skills that are useful across the field of medieval studies. These will include transcriptions, bibliographies, essays, reports, translations and occasionally exams.

Career opportunities

This degree is excellent preparation for further study in related fields. It will also equip you with advanced research, communication and analytical skills that are valuable to employers in a wide range of careers such as in museums and business.

We offer a range of paid opportunities for you to gain experience that can really help with your career plans. You’ll be able to provide a mock tutorial for first-year undergraduates during their induction week, or become an academic mentor for final-year students as they complete their dissertations to gain experience of teaching, one-to-one communication and people management.

We also run several paid one-year internships throughout the year on projects such as the International Medieval Bibliography, IMS website and the International Medieval Congress to gain practical experience.

Read more about Employment in IMS.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This challenging programme will allow you to expand your repertoire and hone your skills as a performer, while giving you the confidence to apply critical approaches to the study of music and its performance. Read more

This challenging programme will allow you to expand your repertoire and hone your skills as a performer, while giving you the confidence to apply critical approaches to the study of music and its performance.

You’ll work with our experienced and talented specialist teachers to develop your repertoire. You’ll learn to interpret music sensitively, injecting your own personality without neglecting the historical style of each work. Not only will you perform regularly throughout the year, but you’ll work towards your own recitals and work on your own solo or ensemble project.

To put your performance into context, you’ll also have a choice of optional modules offered across the School of Music. You could study composition, musicology, aesthetics, psychology of music and more to explore how performance can shape and be shaped by other forms of musical research and practice.

We have a variety of excellent facilities to support your learning, including rehearsal, performance and practice spaces, a lab for studying the psychology of music and studios for sound recording, software development and computer music composition. We also have good working relationships with a range of prestigious arts organisations: we host BBC Radio 3 concerts, Leeds Lieder and the Leeds International Pianoforte Competition, as well as enjoying a close partnership with Opera North and many others in a city with a thriving music and cultural scene.

You could also choose to study for a Postgraduate Diploma qualification over 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time.

Course content

Core modules that run throughout the year will allow you to develop your performance skills in different contexts. Supported by instrumental or vocal lessons with a specialist teacher, you’ll take part in regular performance classes to develop your repertoire.

As well as focusing on a single concerto, song-cycle or extended work of 20-30 minutes, you’ll prepare for a final recital of 40-50 minutes that you’ll perform near the end of the programme. In addition, you’ll prepare for a solo or ensemble project and reflect on the process of preparing and then giving a performance.

You’ll also have the chance to expand your studies. The core Professional Studies module will build your understanding of research methods in music to equip you with a broader range of skills. Then you’ll choose from the optional modules offered across the School of Music, allowing you to explore musicology, composition, psychology of music, aesthetics and more.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

If you opt for the PGDip qualification, you’ll take fewer modules overall.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Professional Studies 30 credits
  • Concerto/Song-Cycle/Extended Work 30 credits
  • Instrumental or Vocal Recital 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Short Dissertation 30 credits
  • Composition Studies 30 credits
  • Instrumental or Vocal Recital 30 credits
  • Applied Performance Studies 30 credits
  • Editing and Archival Studies 30 credits
  • Issues in Critical Musicology 30 credits
  • Aesthetic Theory 30 credits
  • Electronic & Computer Music Practice 30 credits
  • Electronic & Computer Music Contexts 30 credits
  • Case Studies in the Applied Psychology of Music 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Performance MMus Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Performance MMus Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll take instrumental and vocal lessons with our specialist teachers. However, lessons can be organised with teachers from the surrounding area such as Opera North and the Royal Northern College of Music by individual arrangement.

Read about our instrumental and vocal teachers on our opportunities page.

You’ll also attend seminars and tutorials. However, independent study is crucial, allowing you to hone your skills and explore your own creative approaches to performance.

Assessment

Your performance will largely be assessed through your recitals, and you’ll also submit programme notes for each recital you complete. Other modules may also assess you on project work, bibliographical exercises, essays and presentations. Optional modules may use specialist tasks such as compositions or critical editions.

Career opportunities

This programme will allow you to develop as a performer, improve your musical knowledge and gain critical, research and communication skills.

Graduates have pursued a range of careers in orchestral playing, solo performance, instrumental teaching, and arts administration. Several have also pursued further study at conservatoires in the UK and abroad, or research degrees at Leeds and other institutions.

We also offer additional support as you develop your career plans: the School of Music boasts a unique Alumni Mentoring Network, where students can be supported by past students as they start to plan their next steps.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This cutting-edge course provides you with an in-depth, critical understanding of contemporary and historical debates in human resource management (HRM). Read more

This cutting-edge course provides you with an in-depth, critical understanding of contemporary and historical debates in human resource management (HRM). It is designed for those who may want to pursue a career in HRM and includes essential skills for your professional development. It is also relevant to anyone concerned broadly with the management of people in organisations.

With an international focus, the course draws on the leading research of our teaching team and our Centre for Employment Relations, Innovation and Change.

You’ll gain essential knowledge to become a HR professional, covering advanced HRM concepts and topics including employment law, employment relations, gender and equality, training and development, and global perspectives on employment relations. There is a strong emphasis on applying this knowledge in practical business environments, with opportunities to work with HR practitioners and companies on case studies, live projects and challenges.

Accreditation

Our MA Human Resource Management is fully accredited by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD), the only HR institution in the world to recognise HR professionals through chartered membership.

Exemptions

This course will allow you to satisfy the entry requirements for associate membership and chartered membership (if you have relevant work experience) of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) if you take certain modules and complete an additional chapter in your dissertation.

Course content

Across the two taught semesters you’ll study core modules introducing you to the principles and concepts of HRM in different contexts. You’ll think about the economic labour market, social and cultural contexts of HRM and different patterns of people management.

At the same time, you’ll build an understanding of research methodologies to prepare you for your dissertation – an independent research project on a topic of your choice that you’ll submit by the end of the year.

Beyond this, you’ll choose optional modules that allow you to focus on your interests and career intentions. You could gain specialist knowledge in topics such as employment relations, training and development, employment law, occupational psychology, diversity management and many others.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

The course also provides the opportunity to become an associate or chartered member of the CIPD.

CIPD Pathway

You can choose to enhance your studies by taking an additional professional pathway, which enables you to gain CIPD membership alongside your degree. You’ll take specific elements as part of your studies, and also have the opportunity to attend our HRM in Practice skills development sessions.

Part of your regular timetable, these practical sessions are taught by professionals with first-hand experience of HRM in the workplace. You’ll gain insight into the challenges you’ll face as a practitioner, whilst learning the behaviours and skills needed to manage them. There’s also the opportunity to practise your skills in a supportive environment, working in small teams with support from an external HR practitioner.

If you choose to take this pathway, your optional modules must include Employment Relations and EITHER Training and Development OR Gender and Equality at Work in Comparative Perspectives. The third option is your choice. You will also write an additional dissertation chapter about the practical implementation of your findings.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

You’ll study two compulsory modules and complete your dissertation.

  • Human Resource Management Research Methods and Practice 15 credits
  • Human Resource Management 30 credits
  • Human Resource Management Dissertation 45 credits

Optional modules

You can choose three optional modules.

  • Occupational Psychology 30 credits
  • Training and Development 30 credits
  • Employment Law 30 credits
  • Employment Relations 30 credits
  • Global Perspectives on HRM and Employment Relations 30 credits
  • International Employment Policy and Labour Mobility 30 credits
  • Gender and Equality at Work in Comparative Perspective 30 credits
  • Diversity Management 30 credits
  • People Analytics: Strategy and Practice 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Human Resource Management MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Human Resource Management MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Our tutors are experts in their fields. Many are involved in high-profile national and global projects and their work is well-known among policy makers in the UK and overseas.

We use a range of teaching methods so you can benefit from their expertise such as group learning, lectures, seminars and tutorial among others. Independent study is also crucial, allowing you to develop your skills and prepare for taught sessions.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed by various methods that allow you to build a broad base of skills, including reflective logs, exams, written assignments and essays, group and individual presentations and reports.

Career opportunities

This course provides you with the academic knowledge and professional skills needed for a senior-level career in global Human Resource Management. You will develop strong analytical and problem-solving skills, and become a reflective HR professional. The course also offers opportunities if you want to progress to further research studies.

Recent graduates are now working for a range of organisations, including blue-chip multinationals such as Canon, Honeywell, Rolls-Royce and BAE Systems.

As part of the course you will have the opportunity to work closely with businesses through a range of live projects and challenges. Read more about opportunities to work with employers.

Careers support

Our dedicated Professional Development Tutor provides bespoke academic and careers support, helping you develop the skills to successfully progress through your course as well as the employability skills you need for your career.

You can expect guidance on career choices, identifying and applying for jobs, coaching on interpersonal skills and contact with professionals working in HR.

Read more about our careers and professional development support



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Have you been writing creatively for a while and feel the need for some professional support? Do you wish to be read by like-minded people? Do you sense that you can write but struggle with the mechanics of form and structure? Do you harbour a desire to see how far your writing can get you? Do you dream of being a published author?. Read more
Have you been writing creatively for a while and feel the need for some professional support? Do you wish to be read by like-minded people? Do you sense that you can write but struggle with the mechanics of form and structure? Do you harbour a desire to see how far your writing can get you? Do you dream of being a published author?

For 13 years, our MA Creative Writing has been enabling students to achieve some, if not all, of these goals. In 2016 alone, 11 of our graduates published novels with major publishing houses (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/news/creative-writing-alumni-success).

The course is taught through small, dynamic seminars and one-to-one tuition. We offer modules in fiction writing and options in playwriting, poetry, screenwriting and creative non-fiction.

All teaching is done by regularly published and produced award-winning writers, who will help you strengthen and professionalise your identity as a writer. Students have opportunities to interact with publishers and agents to broaden their understanding of the market and will be eligible to submit work for publication in the annual Birkbeck Creative Writing journal, The Mechanics' Institute Review and MIROnline.

To find out more, read our programme handbook (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/current-students/postgraduate/).

You will taught by successful, published authors and practitioners, including:

- Julia Bell
- David Eldridge
- Richard Hamblyn
- Russell Celyn Jones
- Toby Litt
- Luke Williams
- Benjamin Wood
- Jonathan Kemp.

Visit the website http://www.bbk.ac.uk/study/2016/postgraduate/programmes/TMACWRIT_C/

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/news/ref-results/), which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), English Language and Literature at Birkbeck achieved 100% for a research environment conducive to producing research of the highest quality, while 91% of eligible staff submitted research, of which 75% was recognised as world-leading or internationally excellent.

Read about Birkbeck research that enriches our experience and understanding of our shared history, culture and art (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/arts/research).

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

- Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.

- Aims to develop the craft of fiction at a professional level and includes practical courses on publishing, producing and editing creative work.

- In addition to working with the established writers who teach the degree, you will have contact with industry professionals, such as publishers and literary agents, who offer a series of platform discussions in the summer term.

- In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), English Language and Literature at Birkbeck achieved 100% for a research environment conducive to producing research of the highest quality, while 91% of eligible staff submitted research, of which 75% was recognised as world-leading or internationally excellent.

- Our Department of English and Humanities (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english) is a lively centre of world-class research and teaching.

- We offer a range of world-class research resources (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/study-here/world-class-research-resources).

- Our annual creative writing magazine, The Mechanics' Institute Review, is edited by Birkbeck MA Creative Writing students and features writing from the course as a showcase for the degree, with wide distribution beyond Birkbeck to literary agents, publishers, etc.

- Read an account of how our students created the most recent issue of The Mechanics' Institute Review (http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/george/2014/10/07/editing-the-mechanics-institute-review-11/).

- MIROnline is an interactive website, edited by PhD students and volunteers, with all the latest news and writing from this programme and beyond.

- Find out more about our range of world-class research resources (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-research).

- Watch videos of our postgraduate students discussing their experience of studying at Birkbeck (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/get-ahead-stay-ahead/student-experience-videos).

Teaching and assessment

- Teaching
Teaching is seminar-based. Each session is generally 2 hours, and there are further regular one-to-one tutorials throughout the year.

- Assessment
4 short creative pieces with critical essays (50%). A dissertation (15,000 words) in one of the following genres: a novella, novel or collection of short stories, with a preface of 3000 words (50%).

Careers and employability

Birkbeck Creative Writing graduates include:

Sally Hinchcliffe
Niki Aguirre
Heidi James
Matthew Loukes
Iphgenia Baal
Nii Parkes
Emma Henderson
Liz Fremantle
Anna Hope
Karin Salvalaggio
Olya Knezevic
Phoebe Blatton
Melissa De Villiers
Nik Korpon
Louise Lee
Tray Butler
Helen Pike
David Savill
Laura Allsop
Sarah Alexander
Nadim Safdar
A. J. Grainger
Julia Gray
Nicole Burstein
Jules Grant
Amy Bird
Stefanie Seddon
Fiona Melrose.

Graduates go in to careers in editing, teaching, and writing professionally. Possible professions include creative writer, magazine or newspaper journalist, or editorial assistant. This degree can also be useful in becoming an academic librarian, English as a second language (ESOL) teacher, or information officer.

Find out more about these professions (http://www.prospects.ac.uk/options_with_your_subject.htm).

Find out more about the destinations of graduates in this subject (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/prospective/careers-and-employability/department-of-english-and-humanities).

We offer a comprehensive Careers and Employability Service to help you advance your career, while our in-house, professional recruitment consultancy, Birkbeck Talent, works with London’s top employers to help you gain work experience that fits in with your evening studies.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bbk.ac.uk/prospective/postgraduate/apply

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This professionally-recognised course will provide you with the skills and commercial awareness to apply psychological principles to the challenges faced by organisations. Read more

This professionally-recognised course will provide you with the skills and commercial awareness to apply psychological principles to the challenges faced by organisations.

You’ll build your knowledge of the psychological science base while gaining an appreciation of business management, learning from expert practitioners within organizational psychology.

You’ll examine individual, group and organisational effectiveness by exploring issues such as selection and assessment, and consider the latest topics including managing innovation, change management and designing complex socio-technical systems.

The course has a practical focus and thanks to our connections with firms such as Rolls-Royce, Bentley and Marks and Spencer, you’ll test your professional skills in real business scenarios. During the course you’ll have the opportunity to gain certification in Occupational Test User: Ability and Personality at no additional cost, which is a valuable tool for selection and development.

This masters is an ideal qualification if you want to work as a practitioner organizational psychologist or academic researcher.

Academic excellence

You’ll learn from an influential group of organizational psychologists, introducing you to the latest thinking from our research centres, the Socio-Technical Centre (STC) and the Workplace Behaviour Research Centre. They undertake research at the cutting edge of organizational psychology and behaviour. The centres combine expertise in psychology, management, engineering, environmental science and geography to form a thriving research community.

Students also benefit from our strong corporate connections, as well as links with several leading organizational psychology consulting firms. Recent project partners have included Rolls-Royce, Bentley, Arup, the National Health Service, Network Rail and Marks and Spencer.

Accreditation

The course covers the full range of topics required for professional recognition by the British Psychological Society (BPS), the representative body for psychology and psychologists in the UK. To read more about the benefits of undertaking an accredited programme, please see the BPS website.

Exemptions

Graduation from this course fulfils stage one of the requirements for Chartered Membership of BPS and full membership of the Division of Occupational Psychology. Please see the BPS website for details.

Course content

In each semester you’ll study a range of modules that develop your knowledge of key aspects of organizational psychology.

You’ll be introduced to the individual, team and organisational factors that affect workplace behaviours such as decision-making and teamwork. You’ll explore the selection and training methods use by organisations to recruit, develop and retain talent and the design of complex human-technical systems.

From there you’ll study contemporary business priorities such as organisational development and change, as well as approaches to career development and performance management. A further module will put you in real-life business situations to help you develop your commercial awareness and professional skills.

Throughout the year you’ll develop your understanding of research design and analysis in psychology and social sciences, especially behavioural research. This will develop your skills to prepare you for your dissertation – the independent research project on your choice of topic that you’ll submit by the end of the year. Read about a recent student dissertation project with Bentley.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

You’ll take nine compulsory modules including your dissertation.

  • The Psychology of Effective Organizations 15 credits
  • Personnel Selection and Training 15 credits
  • Systems Thinking and Consulting Practice 15 credits
  • Organizational Development and Change 15 credits
  • Dissertation 60 credits
  • Managing Performance and Developing Careers 15 credits
  • Research Design and Analysis 15 credits
  • Advanced Behavioural Research Design and Analysis 15 credits
  • Commercial and Professional Skills 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Organizational Psychology MSc Full Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a variety of teaching and learning methods to help you make the most of your studies. These will include lectures, seminars, workshops, online learning and tutorials.

Independent study is also vital for this course allowing you to prepare for taught classes and sharpen your own research and critical skills.

Assessment

Assessment methods emphasise not just knowledge, but essential skills development too. You’ll be assessed using a range of techniques including exams, group projects, written assignments and essays, in-course assessment, group and individual presentations and reports.

Career opportunities

As a graduate of this course you will be business savvy, with a broad appreciation of the financial, strategic and operational workings of contemporary organisations. Our graduates are strongly positioned to enter careers in the public or private sectors, equally adept as dedicated consulting organizational psychologists or human resource specialists.

Recent graduates have gone on to pursue successful careers in a range of organisations and consultancies around the world, including Google, Kiddy and Partners, Capp, and Human Factors International. Roles include Consulting Psychologist, Operations Analyst, Trainee Occupational Psychologist, Management Consultant, Recruitment Consultant and Crowd Management Consultant.

Careers support

We help you to achieve your career ambitions by providing professional development support as part of the course. You benefit from our professional development tutor, who will help you to develop the important professional skills that employers value. This means you will develop the academic skills to successfully progress through the course, and also the professional skills you will need to start a successful career.

Read more about our careers and professional development support.

The Careers Centre also provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Combine your knowledge and skills in music with managerial training with this distinctive and diverse degree. Read more

Combine your knowledge and skills in music with managerial training with this distinctive and diverse degree.

Taught by the School of Music and Leeds University Business School, this programme will allow you to specialise in an aspect of music that suits your interests and talents while gaining an insight into the principles and strategies of management across the creative industries. You’ll also study modules designed specifically for this programme which bring music and management together, giving you the chance to connect with professionals in the music industry.

You could specialise in music management and promotion, performance, composition, music psychology, electronic and computer music or source studies while exploring strategic management, marketing and entrepreneurship. Whether you’re looking to launch a management career in the music industry or you want to enhance your skills and promotion prospects, you’ll learn from experts in both subjects to gain the diversity of skills to succeed.

We have a variety of excellent facilities to support your learning, including rehearsal, performance and practice spaces, a lab for studying the psychology of music and studios for sound recording, software development and computer music composition. We also have good working relationships with a range of prestigious arts organisations: we host BBC Radio 3 concerts, Leeds Lieder and the Leeds International Pianoforte Competition, as well as enjoying a close partnership with Opera North and many others in a city with a thriving music and cultural scene.

Leeds University Business School is internationally recognised for the quality of its teaching and research. It’s among just 1% of institutions offering business degrees to be triple-accredited by the world’s best-known accreditation bodies.

Read more about Leeds University Business School

Course content

The focus of the degree will be a major project: working with a tutor, most of our students devise a music and management project to combine and reflect upon music management theory and practice. This could include, for example, organising an event, acting as a consultant during a work placement you organise, or managing a musical group. Alternatively, you can complete a dissertation on a topic of your choice.

A core module throughout the year will introduce you to research methods in music, equipping you with the skills to support the rest of your studies. You’ll also choose from optional modules to specialise in one of computer music, aesthetics, musicology, editing, psychology of music, performance, composition, artistic management or live music promotion.

In both semesters you’ll study core modules run by Leeds University Business School. These will introduce you to strategic management, marketing for managers and how businesses in the creative industries are actually run and managed, applying concepts and theories to understand the business models of media companies, as well as the impact of digital technologies and the rise of exciting new markets.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Creative Industries Management 15 credits
  • Professional Studies 30 credits
  • Music and Management Project 60 credits
  • Live Music Management and Promotion 30 credits

Optional modules

You will choose 15 credits from Entrepreneurship and Enterprise Creation, and Intellectual Property Management, and complete your enrolment by choosing one module from the list below.

  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Short Dissertation 30 credits
  • Instrumental or Vocal Recital 30 credits
  • Applied Performance Studies 30 credits
  • Audience Engagement and Impact 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Music and Management MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Music and Management MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Because this programme is so diverse, you’ll come across a range of teaching and learning methods. These will include lectures, seminars and tutorials as well as group learning. You’ll also take instrumental or vocal lessons in some modules, depending on your choices. Independent study is also vital to this programme, allowing you to build a variety of skills and express your creativity

Assessment

You’ll also be assessed using a range of methods, including presentations, bibliographic exercises, essays and group project work. LUBS modules may include written exams. Specialised music modules will also use relevant methods of assessment, such as compositions, recitals, critical editions and commentaries on musical sources.

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with in-depth knowledge of economic and management issues, both within and beyond the music industry. It will also equip you with transferable skills in research, analysis, interpretation, communication, cultural and commercial awareness that are valuable to a wide range of employers.

All of this will put you in a great position to succeed in the music industry, as well as other related areas of arts and creative industries management .

We also offer additional support as you develop your career plans: the School of Music boasts a unique Alumni Mentoring Network, where students can be supported by past students as they start to plan their next steps.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.




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Public relations is a growing presence in daily life. It’s behind much of the news and websites we read, the social media we follow and brands we choose to buy. Read more

Public relations is a growing presence in daily life. It’s behind much of the news and websites we read, the social media we follow and brands we choose to buy. It shapes how we see the world around us. This programme examines the social, political, cultural and economic functions and consequences of PR.

Core modules explore theoretical perspectives applied to PR within communication and cultural studies, and introduce you to its role as a cultural intermediary. You’ll learn to deconstruct the strategies and tactics of PR campaigns and understand how they affect both the organisations that use them and their social and cultural contexts.

You can also tailor this programme to suit you: you’ll choose from optional modules to gain specialist knowledge of topics such as new media, political communication, photography or communication and development. This isn’t a practical training course – instead it offers an insight into the way PR changes how we live, work and relate to each other.

Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course content

This course provides an in-depth understanding of promotional media and the role of promotion in social, cultural and economic life.

The promotional industries and professions – advertising, branding, marketing and public relations – play a fundamental role in media and society.

This course develops your ability to engage critically with promotional media by analysing various promotional forms and practices, and evaluating impacts and implications for individuals, organisations and societies. You will be introduced to key theoretical perspectives and scholarly debates regarding promotional culture, consumerism and the media, and will explore local, national and global contexts.

You will also have the opportunity to choose optional modules from across the School. 

You will study research methods and undertake an independent research project, working under the guidance of an individual supervisor.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Public Relations Theory 30 credits
  • Public Relations, Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Dissertation and Research Methods 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Technology, Media and Critical Literacy 30 credits
  • Communication and International Affairs 30 credits
  • Feminism, Identity and Media 30 credits
  • Media, Culture and Globalisation 30 credits
  • International Film Industries 30 credits
  • The Media and Democratisation: Global Perspectives 30 credits
  • Innovations in Political Communication 30 credits
  • Politics and the Media 30 credits
  • Communication and Public Opinion 30 credits
  • Multimedia Journalism 30 credits
  • Communication and Development 30 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Radio Technologies, Industries and Cultures 30 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Urban Narratives 30 credits
  • Cultures of Contemporary Photography 30 credits
  • Cinematics and Photography 30 credits
  • Integrated Communication 30 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Managing Business Across Cultures 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • Critical Debates in Culture and Place 30 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction?30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Public Relations and Society MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Public Relations and Society MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

MA modules will use a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, group learning and project work, seminars, tutorials and workshops. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, as an opportunity to deepen your knowledge of the subjects introduced in lectures and seminars, and to develop your skills in analysis and research. You should anticipate spending at least 20 hours per week on independent study associated with your modules.

Assessment

Assessment methods may vary depending on the modules you choose. They’re likely to include essays, case analyses, group projects and reports. Optional modules may even use literature reviews, campaign reports or even video and photography projects.

Career opportunities

This is not a practical training course, but it gives you a real insight into the construction, influence and impact of PR in a range of contexts.

You’ll also acquire or refine high-level skills in areas such as research, analysis, interpretation and oral and written communication, as well as having good cultural, political and critical awareness.

You’ll be well prepared for a career in PR or public affairs in a wide range of sectors, working in-house for large or small organisations or in an agency context. There are also opportunities for PR professionals in specialist sectors such as finance or the non-profit sector.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This interdisciplinary degree will equip you with a broad understanding of historical and cultural aspects of the medieval world, as well as the skills to conduct high-level research. Read more

This interdisciplinary degree will equip you with a broad understanding of historical and cultural aspects of the medieval world, as well as the skills to conduct high-level research.

Core modules will develop your ability to read Medieval Latin and decipher palaeography, giving you the skills to transcribe, translate and analyse primary sources. You could even learn another medieval language such as medieval French or Old Norse. You’ll also focus on areas that interest you when you choose from optional modules on interdisciplinary themes across literature, history, art history, cultural studies and theology and religious studies, and study specialist modules offered by Schools across the University.

The Institute for Medieval Studies sits at the heart of the University, with impressive research resources and a wide range of expertise among its teaching staff. You’ll gain the skills and knowledge to explore the medieval period in the home of the International Medieval Congress.

The Institute for Medieval Studies (IMS) has access to excellent resources, both in the University and beyond. The world-class Brotherton Library contains extensive facsimiles and microfilms of primary materials as well as a wide range of online resources.

Its Special Collections also contain a wide range of manuscript, archive and early printed material, including the Melsteth Icelandic Collection, archives of the Yorkshire Archaeological Society, the old library of Ripon Cathedral, and the manuscripts and incunabula of the Brotherton Collection.

Leeds is also home to the Royal Armouries and its extensive medieval collections, while the West Yorkshire Archives are dotted around the region and the British Library has a Document Supply Centre in nearby Boston Spa.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

Core modules throughout the degree will allow you to develop important research skills, equipping you to work with primary sources. You'll gain a working knowledge of medieval Latin and could even choose to learn another medieval language. You'll also develop your understanding of research methods and bibliography and explore palaeography.

Then you'll build on this foundation with your choice of interdisciplinary optional modules, to explore areas that interest you, and even choose from some modules offered by other Schools on historical, literary or art historical topics. You'll also demonstrate the skills you've acquired in your dissertation, where you'll undertake independent research on a topic of your choice and submit your work by the end of the programme.

If you choose to study this programme part-time, you'll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Introduction to Medieval Latin 30 credits
  • Intermediate Medieval Latin 30 credits
  • Research Methods and Bibliography 15 credits
  • Palaeography: Reading Medieval Manuscripts 15 credits
  • Medieval Studies Dissertation 30 credits

Optional modules

  • The Margins of Medieval Art 30 credits
  • Encountering Things: Art and Entanglement in Anglo-Saxon England 30 credits
  • The Origins of Postcolonial England 30 credits
  • Culture and Identity in the Later Fourteenth Century 30 credits
  • Old and New Beliefs in Medieval Scandinavia: From Pagan to Christian 30 credits
  • Arthurian Legend: Medieval to Modern 30 credits
  • Making History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Bede's Northumbria 30 credits
  • Gender, Sex, and Love: Byzantium and the West, 900-1200 20 credits
  • Lifecycles: Birth, Death and Illness in the Middle Ages 30 credits
  • Medieval German Language 30 credits
  • Old and Middle French 30 credits
  • Advanced Medieval Latin 30 credits
  • Medieval English 30 credits
  • Old Norse 30 credits
  • Vikings, Saxons and Heroic Culture 30 credits
  • Warfare in the Age of the Crusades (1095-1204) 30 credits
  • How to be a Saint in the Middle Ages: Saints' Cults and their impact on culture and society (500-1500) 30 credits
  • Religious Communities and the Individual Experience of Religion, 1200-1500 30 credits
  • The Medieval Tournament: Combat and Spectacle in Western Europe, 1100-1600 30 credits
  • The Holy Land under the Franks: The Kingdom of Jerusalem and its Enemies, 1099-1187 30 credits
  • Medieval Bodies 30 credits
  • Preaching History: Understanding Sermons as Literature and Historical Source 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Medieval Studies MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Medieval Studies MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

IMS tutors are experts in their fields, and their cutting-edge research will inform your teaching. To help you make the most of their expertise, all IMS modules are taught in small groups.

You may study skills modules in seminar groups of 12 or more students, but languages and other interdisciplinary options are usually taught in tutorials of up to eight students. You’ll also have one-to-one meetings with your supervisor during your dissertation.

Assessment

Depending on the modules you choose, you’ll be assessed by a range of methods to develop skills that are useful across the field of medieval studies. These will include transcriptions, bibliographies, essays, reports, translations and occasionally exams.

Career opportunities

This degree is excellent preparation for further study in related fields. It will also equip you with advanced research, communication and analytical skills that are valuable to employers in a wide range of careers such as in museums and business.

We offer a range of paid opportunities for you to gain experience that can really help with your career plans. You’ll be able to provide a mock tutorial for first-year undergraduates during their induction week, or become an academic mentor for final-year students as they complete their dissertations to gain experience of teaching, one-to-one communication and people management.

We also run several paid one-year internships throughout the year on projects such as the International Medieval Bibliography, IMS website and the International Medieval Congress to gain practical experience.

Read more about Employment in IMS



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This challenging and exciting programme will introduce you to key methods and approaches in translation studies, specialising in the processes and practices of audiovisual translation. Read more

This challenging and exciting programme will introduce you to key methods and approaches in translation studies, specialising in the processes and practices of audiovisual translation.

You’ll work between English and one or two languages, including Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. You’ll also have the chance to study modules informed by research taking place at our Centre for Translation Studies on topics such as computer-assisted translation, machine translation, interpreting and genre analysis.

Leading researchers work alongside contracted practitioners to equip you with a range of practical skills, as well as a solid understanding of the principles that underpin audiovisual translation. It’s an opportunity to gain the knowledge and skills to launch an exciting career in a growing industry.

Specialist facilities

We have excellent facilities and resources to support your studies. Our Electronic Resources and Information Centre (ERIC) supports all of our translation programmes, complete with 59 high-spec PCs and a wide range of specialist software for translation and subtitling.

The Centre for Translation Studies is also constantly compiling and updating very large corpora of texts in digital form so you can analyse source texts and produce more idiomatic translations. If you want to try your hand at interpreting, you will have the option to do so in our state-of-the-art conference suites.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months, or as a Postgraduate Diploma qualification.

Course content

You’ll focus on computer-assisted audiovisual translation throughout this programme using a wide range of professional software tools. In addition to the processes and practices of professional audiovisual translation, core modules will introduce you to essential concepts in translation studies

In addition you’ll choose optional modules specialising in translation from one or two languages, while you can also choose from modules informed by the research of our experts in key areas such as computer-assisted translation, machine translation or genre analysis. You’ll also complete a summer project by the end of the programme in September, which could take the form of extended translations, a dissertation or subtitling project.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules each year.

Course structure

Year 1 Compulsory modules

  • Methods and Approaches in Translation Studies 30 credits
  • Audiovisual Translation: Processes, Strategies and Industry-Driven Practice 30 credits
  • Monolingual Subtitling 15 credits 

For more information on typical modules, read Audiovisual Translation Studies MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Audiovisual Translation Studies MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use different teaching methods to help you develop a range of practical skills as well as a sound theoretical knowledge base. These include lectures and seminars, as well as practical classes where you’ll make the most of our facilities. In addition, the Centre for Translation Studies runs a regular programme of Research and Professionalisation Talks from visiting speakers, many of whom are actually practicing translators, interpreters, subtitlers or project managers.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a wide range of methods. Translation tests are an important element, as are essays and individual and team projects. You’ll also be assessed on your individual summer project, which can be either two long translation pieces or one short research project.

Career opportunities

A postgraduate qualification in Audiovisual Translation Studies equips you with valuable practical skills, underpinned by a solid theoretical foundation. You’ll also develop advanced skills in IT, research, communication and analysis that are very valuable to employers.

Graduates have launched careers in subtitling and translation in locations such as London, Hong Kong, Taipei and Tokyo. They work for organisations such as the BBC, UN, World Bank and World Trade Organization, as well as major translation companies. Many also go on to work as freelancers, making use of the experience and significant networks that they start to build at Leeds.

Careers support

We provide plenty of support to help you reach your career goals. We offer targeted careers advice and professional training throughout the programme, as well as events including workshops arranged with professional national and international organisations.

As a student at Leeds you’ll be able to enter the SDL Certification Program for free and obtain discounts on CAT and subtitling software to help you prepare for your career.

Read more about Careers and Employability



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Programme description. This programme has popular international appeal and is endorsed by many international organisations for its up-to-date understanding and application of the latest animal welfare methods and practices. Read more

Programme description

This programme has popular international appeal and is endorsed by many international organisations for its up-to-date understanding and application of the latest animal welfare methods and practices.

We provide students with an understanding of animal welfare that can be applied in animal research, management, care, production, inspection, assessment and preparation of legislation.

In addition to the core teaching team, we have many guest lecturers travel to Edinburgh each year to teach on the programme, allowing you to benefit from the experience and knowledge of professionals working throughout the animal behaviour and welfare community.

Our students benefit from the expertise of organisations such as:

Programme structure

The programme involves taught courses and your own dissertation.

Throughout the taught courses you will take part in many visits to farms and animal facilities and will study the following courses:

  • Introduction to Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare
  • Biology of Suffering
  • Animal Cognition and Consciousness
  • Scientific Methodology
  • Animal Welfare Applications
  • Read more about the taught courses

You can complete the programme over one, two or three years.

Dissertation

From March until August, you will work on a research project.

Career opportunities

Graduates move on to a variety of jobs such as research technicians, scientific advisors and lecturers. Many will also continue their study and enrol in a PhD.



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If you are an ambitious numerate graduate, or a practitioner in the field, this Masters will equip you with the analytical skills for a rewarding career supporting transport delivery and policy-making at national, regional and local level. Read more

If you are an ambitious numerate graduate, or a practitioner in the field, this Masters will equip you with the analytical skills for a rewarding career supporting transport delivery and policy-making at national, regional and local level.

97% of our graduates find employment in a professional or managerial role, or continue with further studies.*

Study transport economics, as well as econometrics and cost-benefit analysis.

Develop a suite of economic skills that will help promote economic growth within a regulatory framework that minimises any damaging health and environmental impacts, whilst incentivising the best use of resources.

Expand your fluency in:

  • Economic appraisal – to better understand the complex interface between transport and the wider economy
  • Micro-economics – to understand pricing techniques, the importance of economic regulation and the valuation of third party costs and benefits
  • Econometrics – to develop your quantitative models with real world data and test economic theories
  • Independent research – opening the gateway to a career in transport research in either academia or consultancy.

Also experience what it is like to be part of a project team working across disciplinary boundaries within the transport sector. Through this, gain insights into how economics, planning, environmental science, modelling and engineering can work together to design sustainable solutions to global challenges. This industry-inspired approach will enable you to apply your knowledge to real-world issues in the field.

Your colleagues will be among the best and brightest from Latin America to the Far East, from Africa to Europe and the UK. Together, you will learn economic research techniques that will help you develop transport networks that are founded on robust evidence, sustainable and equitable principles, state-of-the-art modelling, accurate data analysis, and an understanding of human psychology.

  • *Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) 2015, http://www.hesa.ac.uk

ITS – the global institute teaching the transport leaders of tomorrow.

We have redesigned our suites of courses following close consultation with Industry and academia.

With a strong focus on industry needs, our degrees will prepare you for employment in your chosen field. They will also address the multi-disciplinary nature of transport – enabling you to make effective decisions for clients, employers and society.

And to experience what it’s really like to work in the transport sector, collaborate with a project team of students from our other degrees through our new Transport Integrated Project module.

Research environment

The Institute for Transport Studies (ITS) was established as the UK’s first multi-disciplinary transport department, and we continue to lead the field with our research.

Our economics research has been successful in bridging the interface between academia and industry. For example, CQC (Cost, Quality, Customer) Efficiency Network initiative which is based at ITS and a joint venture between the National Highways & Transport Network (NHT) and the University of Leeds. The CQC Efficiency Network offers local authorities throughout Britain the ability to quantify the scope for cost savings in the delivery of highway services and to identify better practises.

Other Study Options

This programme is available part time, allowing you to combine study with other commitments. You can work to fund your studies, or gain a new qualification without giving up an existing job. We aim to be flexible in helping you to put together a part-time course structure that meets your academic goals while recognising the constraints on your study time.

Accreditation

This programme fulfils the educational requirements for membership of the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT UK).

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Shaping Future Transport Systems 15 credits
  • Principles of Transport Economics 15 credits
  • Welfare Economics and Cost-Benefit Analysis 15 credits
  • Transport Econometrics 15 credits
  • Economics of Regulation 15 credits
  • Economic Appraisal and Economic Performance 15 credits
  • Transport Dissertation 60 credits
  • Transport Integrated Project 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Transport Economics MSc Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Transport Economics MSc Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Postgraduate study involves a range of teaching methods, supported by independent learning. In addition to the traditional lecture and seminar formats, you’ll experience a blend of workshops, computer exercises, practical sessions, directed reading, reflective journal, student-led discussions, fieldwork and tutorials.

Assessment

Assessment is equally varied and can include coursework essays, case-study reports, group assignments, posters, presentations and exams.

Field trips

Transport at ITS is an applied subject. We offer plenty of opportunities for students to experience transport systems in action, both within the UK and Europe, allowing you to meet and hear directly from transport professionals and see what you’ve learned in practice.

For many of our students, the highlight of their year is the European Field Trip. This week-long trip which takes place after the summer exams and has been a fixture in the ITS calendar since 1987. The itinerary varies from year to year, but has often included Belgium, The Netherlands and Germany.

Stops en-route have included Pedestrian Centres and Docklands Transport in Rotterdam; Cycle and Traffic Calming Facilities in Delft; the Motorway Traffic Control Centre in Amsterdam; the Guided Bus System in Essen; the Wuppertal Monorail; Town Planning features in Duisburg and Dusseldorf; research talks at the University of Hasselt, and visit to the Brussels Metro.

Career opportunities

Links with industry

ITS has close working relationships with a number of organisations and many employers visit ITS each year to interview our students for graduate schemes and other vacancies. ITS also regularly circulates specific job vacancies to students.

Our students are highly sought after and have a good reputation with transport consultants, and may receive a job offer before or shortly after graduation.

The organisations that have advertised and/or recruited directly from ITS include Arup, Mott MacDonald, AECOM, Capita, Transpennine Express, Transport for London, Pell Frischmann, Leigh Fisher, JMP, Amey and Hyder among many others.

Read more about Graduate Employability at the Institute for Transport Studies.



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This course is designed to prepare you for a career in conservation, or for further research at PhD level. If you’re already an established conservation professional, our modules provide additional skills to support you to progress in your employment. Read more

This course is designed to prepare you for a career in conservation, or for further research at PhD level. If you’re already an established conservation professional, our modules provide additional skills to support you to progress in your employment.

Distinct from similar courses offered in the UK, the course concentrates on the biological principles underlying biodiversity, its assessment and management. You’ll learn to identify plants and animals, explore the institutional framework underlying biodiversity and conservation and gain key analytical and practical skills for a range of academic and professional careers. You’ll also gain valuable experience in biodiversity and conservation-related research.

The University of Leeds has twice been recognised by the European Union as a "centre of excellence" for biodiversity and conservation training. We believe biodiversity can only be managed and conserved when it can be measured and interpreted properly.

Course content

This degree offers you a wide range of options, allowing you to personalise your study in preparation for further academic research or professional development in the field.

We’ll equip you with a diverse set of skills needed for ecological careers and further research. The course combines theory-based modules on the principles of ecology and conservation with a wide range of practical skills-based modules. These include survey, management and identification skills, where the emphasis is on spending time in the field, and analytical skills such as statistics and GIS.

The independent research project is one of the most important and potentially fulfilling parts of the degree. Projects cover a wide range of topics and usually include around six to eight weeks of practical work. A number of our students have been based overseas for their project.

If you study part time, the course will last for two years and you’ll study around half of the total number of modules each year.

MSc or MRes – what’s the difference?

MRes students have fewer taught modules, and carry out two major research projects rather than one. The MSc is the broader course, suitable for both conservation careers and PhD study, while most students taking the MRes are planning to go on to do a PhD. The MSc allows students to widen their skills base through the additional taught elements that are available. An increasing number of students treat the MSc as a conversion course, after having taken degrees in non-biological subjects.

Course structure

The course is made up of modules that add up to 180 credits, with a mix of compulsory and optional modules. These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Biodiversity and Conservation Skills I 10 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation Skills II 10 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation MSc and MRes Summer Project 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Community Ecology 15 credits
  • Conservation Genetics 15 credits
  • Advanced Statistics 10 credits
  • Habitat Management 10 credits
  • Introduction to GIS Skills for Ecologists 10 credits
  • Population Dynamics 10 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation Internships 15 credits
  • Practical Conservation with the National Trust 10 credits
  • Masters Mediterranean Ecology Field Course 15 credits
  • Plant Identification 15 credits
  • Insect Identification Skills 15 credits
  • Conservation Skills 5 credits
  • GIS and Environment 15 credits
  • Environmental Economics and Policy 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Biodiversity and Conservation MSc Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Biodiversity and Conservation MSc Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll have access to the very best learning resources and academic support during your studies. We’ve been awarded a Gold rating in the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF, 2017), demonstrating our commitment to delivering consistently outstanding teaching, learning and outcomes for our students.

Your learning will be heavily influenced by the University’s world-class research as well as our strong links with highly qualified professionals from industry, non-governmental organisations and charities.

You’ll experience a wide range of teaching methods including formal lectures, interactive workshops, problem-solving, practical classes and demonstrations.

Through your research project and biodiversity and conservation modules, you’ll receive substantial subject-specific training. Our teaching and assessment methods are designed to develop you into a professional who is able to think independently, solve problems, communicate effectively and demonstrate a high level of practical ability.

Research projects

As an MSc student, you’ll carry out one research project. The range of project topics is large and diverse, covering applied, empirical and theoretical subjects. Projects can be carried out in the UK or overseas: projects have been carried out in over twenty countries so far, and this year alone we have projects in Belize, Thailand, Greece, Bermuda and Morocco.

Practical skills

There are many opportunities to develop valuable practical skills through modules such as Practical Conservation with the National Trust, Insect Identification, Plant Identification, and by overseas field courses within Europe and Africa (see field courses) and research project work. You can also build your analytical skills, with modules in GIS and statistics.

Leeds is one of the best locations geographically to study Biodiversity and Conservation. You’ll be within easy reach of three areas of great natural beauty and dramatic scenery; Yorkshire Dales, North Yorkshire Moors and the Peak District – providing you with a wide range of project and fieldwork opportunities.

Assessment

We use a variety of assessment methods: practical work, data handling and problem solving exercises, group work, computer-based simulation, essays, posters and oral presentations.

Career opportunities

Specialist and transferable skills are key component of our degrees, opening up diverse opportunities for our graduates. A proportion of both MSc and MRes graduates go on to study for a PhD and enter a research career. Many graduates go on to a career in an applied ecology or conservation-related area. Potential employers look for academic qualifications in combination with practical skills and experience, and a relevant MSc course can give you the edge in a highly competitive field.

Please visit the website for more details regarding career opportunities and support.



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This course engages with issues at the very forefront of modern food production. You‘ll explore the origins of biotechnology, the legislation and social issues related to biotechnology in food, the immune system and role of antibodies. Read more

This course engages with issues at the very forefront of modern food production. You‘ll explore the origins of biotechnology, the legislation and social issues related to biotechnology in food, the immune system and role of antibodies.

You’ll have chance to challenge the myths associated with food allergies and the risks, causes and solutions. You’ll learn the science behind every ingredient that goes into a product.

The core sciences of chemistry and biochemistry underpin the course, alongside the processing of food. You’ll also study some elements of microbiology and nutrition. You’ll learn to apply fundamental scientific concepts to understand and manipulate the complex characteristics of foods and to integrate this scientific knowledge with an understanding of food technology.

The course is strongly linked to our research groups, meaning you’ll be taught by staff who are actively engaged in world-class research and cutting-edge professional practice.

Course content

Through this programme you'll develop the ability to critically assess the complex factors that influence the range, quality and acceptability of foods produced in an industrialised society.

You'll apply scientific knowledge from your bachelor degree and extend it to areas outside your first degree discipline. You'll gain a broad knowledge of food science with the necessary related understanding of chemistry, biochemistry, physics, mathematics and biology. You'll also learn to integrate your scientific knowledge with an understanding of food technology and will develop your own interests and skills through specialised options and projects, influenced by current research thinking in the field.

The programme provides an understanding of the methodology of research investigations by experimental project, and helps you develop the personal skills you'll need to communicate effectively in future professional activities.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Microbiological and Chemical Food Safety 20 credits
  • Food Processing 20 credits
  • Research Project 60 credits
  • Food Biotechnology 10 credits
  • Impacts of Food Processing on Nutritional Quality 10 credits
  • GMOs, Antibodies and PCR 10 credits
  • Food and the Allergic Reaction 10 credits
  • Structure and Function of Food Components 20 credits
  • Professional Development for Employment and Research 20 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Food Science (Food Biotechnology) MSc in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Teaching is by lectures, practical classes, tutorials, seminars and supervised research projects. We make extensive use of IT, and a wide range of materials is available to enable you to study at your own pace and in your own time to enhance and extend the material you’ll learn formally.

Assessment

Assessment is by a range of methods, including formal examination, in-class tests, laboratory practical reports, example sheets, problem solving, project work and verbal presentations.

The pass mark for each module is 50%. All marks from all modules (passed and failed) are included in the final classification mark, which must be at least a 50% average to pass.

Career opportunities

Postgraduates from the School go into careers in research, in the food industry, into regulatory and public bodies across the world, backed by the confidence and skills gained from studying at one of the leading schools of food science and nutrition internationally.

Our graduates are in big demand and food companies come to Leeds to recruit the best talent. Some of our past graduates hold key positions in the food industry and government agencies.

There are many opportunities open to you within the food industry, from jobs in nutrition and new product development to roles in the supply chain, purchasing, logistics and distribution. You may decide to become a development scientist, working on new foodstuffs and producing food which is safe and nutritious with a consistent flavour, colour and texture. There are roles within this area in industry, but also within government and local authority food inspection departments. Other job roles include industrial buyer, retail buyer, production manager or quality assurance manager.

Read more about typical career paths:

Further study

A Masters in food science will also serve you well in progression to research-led projects. Many of our students go on to undertake PhD research here at the University of Leeds in one of the School’s research groups. Read about postgraduate research in the School of Food Science and Nutrition.

Careers support

The School of Food Science and Nutrition has its own dedicated Employability Enhancement Officer who can offer quality advice and support with regards to careers, CV and cover letter writing, job applications etc. The Employability Enhancement Officer promotes a range of opportunities available to students to ensure they maximise their capabilities through a process of personal development and career planning.

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This programme will teach you how to apply project management, industrial experimental design, sensory and quality design techniques to food product development - from concept to product launch. Read more

This programme will teach you how to apply project management, industrial experimental design, sensory and quality design techniques to food product development - from concept to product launch.

You’ll develop in-depth specialist knowledge of scientific techniques and practical skills in the assessment and control of food quality, food safety, product design and new product development. In addition to industrial monitoring of quality, you will also study industry standard techniques and international standards in quality and safety management, as well as the impact of EU law and legislation on food products.

Course content

Throughout the programme you will develop an understanding of the underpinning scientific techniques in chemistry, biochemistry, physics, mathematics and biology relevant in applications of food science and the food industry.

You’ll examine different aspects of the product development process from product conception through to product launch. Through the process you’ll apply principles of project management, industrial experimental design, quality design techniques and sensory science in developing new food products and production processes that integrate consumer needs and expectations ,while at the same time conforming to food legislation, food quality and safety requirements.

The study of the principles of quality assurance, management and improvement and its application through design, measurement and monitoring will also be examined, covering aspects such as quality auditing, quality control and HACCP, predictive modelling and experimental design.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Microbiological and Chemical Food Safety 20 credits
  • Food Processing 20 credits
  • Structure and Function of Food Components 20 credits
  • Food Analysis 10 credits
  • Food Product Development 80 credits
  • Sensory Science 20 credits
  • Food Quality Assurance and Control 10 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Food Quality and Innovation MSc in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Teaching is by lectures, practical classes, tutorials, seminars and supervised research projects. Extensive use is made of IT and a wide range of materials is available to enable you to study at your own pace and in your own time, to enhance and extend the material taught formally.

Assessment

Assessment is by course work and written exams which take place at the end of the semester in which the module is taught.

Career opportunities

Postgraduates from the School go into careers in research, in the food industry, into regulatory and public bodies across the world, backed by the confidence and skills gained from studying at one of the leading schools of food science and nutrition internationally.

Our graduates are in big demand and food companies come to Leeds to recruit the best talent. Some of our past graduates hold key positions in the food industry and government agencies.

There are many opportunities open to you within the food industry, from jobs in nutrition and new product development to roles in the supply chain, purchasing, logistics and distribution. You may decide to become a development scientist, working on new foodstuffs and producing food which is safe and nutritious with a consistent flavour, colour and texture. There are roles within this area in industry, but also within government and local authority food inspection departments. Other job roles include industrial buyer, retail buyer, production manager or quality assurance manager.

Read more about typical career paths:

Further study

A Masters in food science will also serve you well in progression to research-led projects. Many of our students go on to undertake PhD research here at the University of Leeds in one of the School’s research groups.

Read about postgraduate research in the School of Food Science and Nutrition.

Careers support

The School of Food Science and Nutrition has its own dedicated Employability Enhancement Officer who can offer quality advice and support with regards to careers, CV and cover letter writing, job applications etc. The Employability Enhancement Officer promotes a range of opportunities available to students to ensure they maximise their capabilities through a process of personal development and career planning.

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website



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With the advancement of food technology, food manufacture has allowed for enhanced food quality, improved food safety and increasingly competitive options for consumers. Read more

With the advancement of food technology, food manufacture has allowed for enhanced food quality, improved food safety and increasingly competitive options for consumers. Developments in food production have also given way to consideration of the impact on food safety.

This Masters will provide you with a broad knowledge of food science focusing on chemistry and biochemistry, whilst giving you the necessary background understanding of physics, mathematics, and biology to excel in this field. You’ll develop the ability to apply fundamental scientific concepts to understand and manipulate the complex characteristics of foods. The programme will also allow you to challenge current issues in food production and issues arising from food safety.

Course content

Throughout the programme you’ll analyse and critically appraise complex factors, including sociological and ethical issues that influence the range, quality and acceptability of foods produced in an industrialised society.

Through a combination of practical laboratory classes and lectures underpinning scientific theory and knowledge, you’ll gain the ability to integrate scientific knowledge with an understanding of food technology.

In the final months of your programme you’ll have the opportunity to focus your studies in areas of particular interest to you through your research project, which will be influenced by current research thinking in the field. The research project will also help you develop the personal skills you'll need to communicate effectively in future professional activities such as presentations.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Physical Aspects of Food 10 credits
  • Microbiological and Chemical Food Safety 20 credits
  • Food Processing 20 credits
  • Research Project 60 credits
  • Colloid and Dairy Science 10 credits
  • Structure and Function of Food Components 20 credits
  • Food Analysis 10 credits
  • Professional Development for Employment and Research 20 credits
  • Food Quality Assurance and Control 10 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Food Science MSc in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Teaching is by lectures, practical classes, tutorials, seminars and supervised research projects. Extensive use is made of IT and a wide range of materials is available to enable you to study at your own pace and in your own time, to enhance and extend the material taught formally.

Assessment

Assessment is by course work and written exams which take place at the end of the semester in which the module is taught.

Career opportunities

Postgraduates from the School go into careers in research, in the food industry, into regulatory and public bodies across the world, backed by the confidence and skills gained from studying at one of the leading schools of food science and nutrition internationally.

Our graduates are in big demand and food companies come to Leeds to recruit the best talent. Some of our past graduates hold key positions in the food industry and government agencies.

There are many opportunities open to you within the food industry, from jobs in nutrition and new product development to roles in the supply chain, purchasing, logistics and distribution. You may decide to become a development scientist, working on new foodstuffs and producing food which is safe and nutritious with a consistent flavour, colour and texture. There are roles within this area in industry, but also within government and local authority food inspection departments. Other job roles include industrial buyer, retail buyer, production manager or quality assurance manager.

Read more about typical career paths:

Further study

A Masters in food science will also serve you well in progression to research-led projects. Many of our students go on to undertake PhD research here at the University of Leeds in one of the School’s research groups. Read about postgraduate research in the School of Food Science and Nutrition.

Careers support

The School of Food Science and Nutrition has its own dedicated Employability Enhancement Officer who can offer quality advice and support with regards to careers, CV and cover letter writing, job applications etc. The Employability Enhancement Officer promotes a range of opportunities available to students to ensure they maximise their capabilities through a process of personal development and career planning.

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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