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Have you been writing creatively for a while and feel the need for some professional support? Do you wish to be read by like-minded people? Do you sense that you can write but struggle with the mechanics of form and structure? Do you harbour a desire to see how far your writing can get you? Do you dream of being a published author?. Read more
Have you been writing creatively for a while and feel the need for some professional support? Do you wish to be read by like-minded people? Do you sense that you can write but struggle with the mechanics of form and structure? Do you harbour a desire to see how far your writing can get you? Do you dream of being a published author?

For 13 years, our MA Creative Writing has been enabling students to achieve some, if not all, of these goals. In 2016 alone, 11 of our graduates published novels with major publishing houses (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/news/creative-writing-alumni-success).

The course is taught through small, dynamic seminars and one-to-one tuition. We offer modules in fiction writing and options in playwriting, poetry, screenwriting and creative non-fiction.

All teaching is done by regularly published and produced award-winning writers, who will help you strengthen and professionalise your identity as a writer. Students have opportunities to interact with publishers and agents to broaden their understanding of the market and will be eligible to submit work for publication in the annual Birkbeck Creative Writing journal, The Mechanics' Institute Review and MIROnline.

To find out more, read our programme handbook (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/current-students/postgraduate/).

You will taught by successful, published authors and practitioners, including:

- Julia Bell
- David Eldridge
- Richard Hamblyn
- Russell Celyn Jones
- Toby Litt
- Luke Williams
- Benjamin Wood
- Jonathan Kemp.

Visit the website http://www.bbk.ac.uk/study/2016/postgraduate/programmes/TMACWRIT_C/

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/news/ref-results/), which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), English Language and Literature at Birkbeck achieved 100% for a research environment conducive to producing research of the highest quality, while 91% of eligible staff submitted research, of which 75% was recognised as world-leading or internationally excellent.

Read about Birkbeck research that enriches our experience and understanding of our shared history, culture and art (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/arts/research).

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

- Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.

- Aims to develop the craft of fiction at a professional level and includes practical courses on publishing, producing and editing creative work.

- In addition to working with the established writers who teach the degree, you will have contact with industry professionals, such as publishers and literary agents, who offer a series of platform discussions in the summer term.

- In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), English Language and Literature at Birkbeck achieved 100% for a research environment conducive to producing research of the highest quality, while 91% of eligible staff submitted research, of which 75% was recognised as world-leading or internationally excellent.

- Our Department of English and Humanities (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english) is a lively centre of world-class research and teaching.

- We offer a range of world-class research resources (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/study-here/world-class-research-resources).

- Our annual creative writing magazine, The Mechanics' Institute Review, is edited by Birkbeck MA Creative Writing students and features writing from the course as a showcase for the degree, with wide distribution beyond Birkbeck to literary agents, publishers, etc.

- Read an account of how our students created the most recent issue of The Mechanics' Institute Review (http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/george/2014/10/07/editing-the-mechanics-institute-review-11/).

- MIROnline is an interactive website, edited by PhD students and volunteers, with all the latest news and writing from this programme and beyond.

- Find out more about our range of world-class research resources (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-research).

- Watch videos of our postgraduate students discussing their experience of studying at Birkbeck (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/get-ahead-stay-ahead/student-experience-videos).

Teaching and assessment

- Teaching
Teaching is seminar-based. Each session is generally 2 hours, and there are further regular one-to-one tutorials throughout the year.

- Assessment
4 short creative pieces with critical essays (50%). A dissertation (15,000 words) in one of the following genres: a novella, novel or collection of short stories, with a preface of 3000 words (50%).

Careers and employability

Birkbeck Creative Writing graduates include:

Sally Hinchcliffe
Niki Aguirre
Heidi James
Matthew Loukes
Iphgenia Baal
Nii Parkes
Emma Henderson
Liz Fremantle
Anna Hope
Karin Salvalaggio
Olya Knezevic
Phoebe Blatton
Melissa De Villiers
Nik Korpon
Louise Lee
Tray Butler
Helen Pike
David Savill
Laura Allsop
Sarah Alexander
Nadim Safdar
A. J. Grainger
Julia Gray
Nicole Burstein
Jules Grant
Amy Bird
Stefanie Seddon
Fiona Melrose.

Graduates go in to careers in editing, teaching, and writing professionally. Possible professions include creative writer, magazine or newspaper journalist, or editorial assistant. This degree can also be useful in becoming an academic librarian, English as a second language (ESOL) teacher, or information officer.

Find out more about these professions (http://www.prospects.ac.uk/options_with_your_subject.htm).

Find out more about the destinations of graduates in this subject (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/prospective/careers-and-employability/department-of-english-and-humanities).

We offer a comprehensive Careers and Employability Service to help you advance your career, while our in-house, professional recruitment consultancy, Birkbeck Talent, works with London’s top employers to help you gain work experience that fits in with your evening studies.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bbk.ac.uk/prospective/postgraduate/apply

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The Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma in Latin provide a self-contained period of structured but challenging study for anyone who wishes to pursue their interest in Latin language and literature. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma in Latin provide a self-contained period of structured but challenging study for anyone who wishes to pursue their interest in Latin language and literature.

Course Overview

These programmes offer students the opportunity to focus exclusively on the acquisition and/or development of Latin and can be started at beginners, intermediate or advanced level depending on their linguistic ability.

The PGDip is a postgraduate degree comprised of 120 credits (six taught modules) of postgraduate study. The PGCert is a postgraduate degree comprised of 60 credits (three taught modules) of postgraduate study.

Modules

Our language system covers two main levels: Intensive and Advanced.

There are two Intensive modules for Latin. Intensive I always runs in the first semester (September to January) and starts from complete beginners level, hence is the natural starting point for anyone who has no or very little knowledge of the language. Intensive II is the continuation of Intensive I and always runs in the second semester (February to May). Upon successful completion of both Intensive modules, a student is ready to go on to Advanced level and work directly with unadapted Latin texts. The Intensive modules are designed to provide you with high level knowledge of grammar and syntax, and a good vocabulary. Each Intensive module is worth 30 credits, and you need to commit at least 23 hours per week (throughout the semester, so over 15 weeks, including examinations) to your language learning.

Advanced-level modules are in three separate levels: Advanced, Further Advanced and Higher Advanced. As you progress through the advanced-level modules, you will read a greater quantity of ancient texts, and be asked to complete more challenging work in terms of the literary and linguistic investigation of the text. Every year there are two texts/authors chosen for Latin: one text is prose, the other is verse. The texts and authors change every year, and students have the opportunity to read both canonical and non-canonical authors. Over the last few years, we have read Petronius, Columella, Ovid, Claudian and Statius.

Key Features

The PG Diploma and Certificate in Latin are mainly of interest to those who want to learn Latin to advanced level and beyond. One can start on either of the two programmes from complete beginners’ level, intermediate or advanced, based on their existing qualifications and knowledge. For those who have been studying Latin privately, we offer a test to place them in the correct level of language learning. PhD candidates, or those planning to embark on a PhD, can use these degrees to increase their competency in Latin. For those interested in teaching Latin at any level, the degrees can provide an internationally recognised qualification. The degrees in Latin are available only as part-time options.

Specifically for language learners who study at a distance, the School provides the support of dedicated distance language tutors for all its language modules. The distance language tutors provide assistance and support to language learners, as well as interim feedback on assessment. The distance learning tutors work alongside the module lecturers in providing material for language study to distance learners. All language modules include an examination; examination arrangements are communicated to distance learners by the TSD Registry, and distance learners can ask for the support of the School in making arrangements for examinations.

Assessment

Our language degrees in Latin involve a wide range of assessment methods. In addition to traditional essays and exams, you will be assessed through commentaries and in-class tests. This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

Career Opportunities

The programme provides a strong foundation for postgraduate work, by laying particular stress on the languages. The course also provides a professional qualification for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

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The Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma in Ancient Greek provide a self-contained period of structured but challenging study for anyone who wishes to pursue their interest in Ancient Greek language and literature. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma in Ancient Greek provide a self-contained period of structured but challenging study for anyone who wishes to pursue their interest in Ancient Greek language and literature.

Course Overview

These programmes offer students the opportunity to focus exclusively on the acquisition and/or development of ancient Greek and can be started at beginners, intermediate or advanced level depending on their linguistic ability.

The PGDip is a postgraduate degree comprised of 120 credits (six taught modules) of postgraduate study. The PGCert is a postgraduate degree comprised of 60 credits (three taught modules) of postgraduate study.

Modules

Our language system covers two main levels: Intensive and Advanced.

There are two Intensive modules for ancient Greek. Intensive I always runs in the first semester (September to January) and starts from complete beginners level, hence is the natural starting point for anyone who has no or very little knowledge of the language. Intensive II is the continuation of Intensive I and always runs in the second semester (February to May). Upon successful completion of both Intensive modules, a student is ready to go on to Advanced level and work directly with unadapted ancient Greek texts. The Intensive modules are designed to provide you with high level knowledge of grammar and syntax, and a good vocabulary. Each Intensive module is worth 30 credits, and you need to commit at least 23 hours per week (throughout the semester, so over 15 weeks, including examinations) to your language learning.

Advanced-level modules are in three separate levels: Advanced, Further Advanced and Higher Advanced. As you progress through the advanced-level modules, you will read a greater quantity of ancient Greek texts, and be asked to complete more challenging work in terms of the literary and linguistic investigation of the text. Every year there are two texts/authors chosen for Greek: one text is prose, the other is verse. The texts and authors change every year, and students have the opportunity to read both canonical and non-canonical authors. Over the last few years, we have read the Homeric Hymns, Plato, Diodorus, Sophocles and Euripides.

Key Features

The PG Diploma and Certificate in Greek are mainly of interest to those who want to learn ancient Greek to advanced level and beyond. One can start on either of the two programmes from complete beginners’ level, intermediate or advanced, based on their existing qualifications and knowledge. For those who have been studying Greek privately, we offer a test to place them in the correct level of language learning. PhD candidates, or those planning to embark on a PhD, can use these degrees to increase their competency in Greek. For those interested in teaching Greek at any level, the degrees can provide an internationally recognised qualification. The degrees in Greek are available only as part-time options.

Specifically for language learners who study at a distance, the School provides the support of dedicated distance language tutors for all its language modules. The distance language tutors provide assistance and support to language learners, as well as interim feedback on assessment. The distance learning tutors work alongside the module lecturers in providing material for language study to distance learners. All language modules include an examination; examination arrangements are communicated to distance learners by the TSD Registry, and distance learners can ask for the support of the School in making arrangements for examinations.

Assessment

Our language degrees in Greek involve a wide range of assessment methods. In addition to traditional essays and exams, you will be assessed through commentaries and in-class tests. This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

Career Opportunities

The programme provides a strong foundation for postgraduate work, by laying particular stress on the Greek language. The course also provides a professional qualification for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

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OVERVIEW. This course runs once a year from January. Reading is a vital part of childhood that has important implications for the development of cognitive processes. Read more
OVERVIEW

This course runs once a year from January.

Reading is a vital part of childhood that has important implications for the development of cognitive processes. This course is suitable for anyone who is interested in improving their understanding of how children learn to read, and why some individuals struggle with written language tasks.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

Only 60 credits – preferable to undertaking a full masters for individuals who are in full time employment,
study can be spread over three years to keep workload manageable,
contains useful, practical skills as well as theoretical aspects,
understand the processes involved in learning to read,
get to grips with techniques for teaching reading,
open up a world of possibilities for people learning to read.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

The course comprises three modules that review theories of reading development, written language difficulties and the assessment of reading and spelling skills.

The course is particularly suitable for teachers or teaching assistants - both primary and secondary levels, psychology graduates interested in educational psychology or child development, or lecturers at FE or HE level who want to understand how to support students who experience dyslexia.

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The MA Filmmaking course is very practical. It includes two years of training in Directing, Cinematography, Editing , Sound , Production Design, Screenwriting and Production. Read more
The MA Filmmaking course is very practical. It includes two years of training in Directing, Cinematography, Editing , Sound , Production Design, Screenwriting and Production. Please click here to view the full course curriculum - http://lfs.org.uk/full-time-study/ma-filmmaking/curriculum. There are 5 exercise films and a graduation work in the MA Filmmaking programme, shot on film and digital. One film is prepared, shot, delivered and screened in every 12 weeks of your work. Students normally work on quite a few more depending on their time and specialty.

Students are taught by working UK filmmakers. Exercise films are made on built sets, shot on professional level film and digital cameras, recorded on Nagra V, edited on Avid Composer and given a professional dub in Soho.

Our 2-year postgraduate multi-discipline MA Filmmaking course requires that you have a 3-4 year degree which does not have to be media related, or a minimum of 3 years relevant work experience. Read more about admissions requirements here - http://lfs.org.uk/full-time-study/ma-filmmaking/admissions. We have students who not only come from various geographical locations but also with varying media knowledge. What they do have in common is their love, passion and genuine interest in film and filmmaking as a craft. We have had lawyers, doctors, engineers, illustrators enrol on our courses so having an unusual background is welcome here.

The London Film School (LFS)

Since 1956 the school has trained thousands of directors, cinematographers, editors and other film professionals now working across the globe. It is the most truly international school anywhere, with at least 60% of its students from outside Great Britain.
We have thousands of high profile alumni, including Michael Mann, Mike Leigh, Duncan Jones, Tak Fujimoto, Franc Roddam, Mark Goldblatt, Bill Douglas, Ho Yim, Anne Hui, Oliver Hermanus and Danny Huston.

LFS is based in Covent Garden two minutes’ walk from Soho, centre of the European entertainment industry. It is one of only three institutions accredited as a Creative Skillset Film Academy, recognised by the UK industry body as a Centre of Excellence.

We teach filmmaking, on stages, and in workshops rather than in classrooms - the building functions as a working studio. LFS is a living creative film community. The school is an independent non-profit establishment run by passionate and experienced filmmakers; full-time faculty and a varied and hugely talented group of visiting lecturers, technicians and artists.
Please get in touch for more information about our MA programmes in Filmmaking, Screenwriting, International Film Business, the Doctoral Programmes, as well as our expanding range of continuing professional development courses.
We have three intakes a year on May, September and January. We are currently operating a rolling process but please do apply as soon as you can for any intake. You can read more about the admissions process and deadlines here - http://lfs.org.uk/full-time-study/ma-filmmaking/admissions

VISIT US

Choosing a film school is a big decision; you may want to visit us or talk to a student or a graduate. We have open afternoons every other Thursday during term time and we can show you around – please click here to sign up for a place - http://lfs.org.uk/full-time-study/book-tour. If you cannot attend any of those days, please do get in touch on to schedule an alternative time; our students are our priorities and as such the working studios are their space.

‘The beauty of a good film school is that it invites you to make mistakes, but never dampens your enthusiasm. At LFS I made plenty, and ignited a passion.’ Duncan Jones, Director of MOON (2009), SOURCE CODE (2011), WARCRAFT (2016), MUTE (2017)

Further Information

The need to follow and understand the intensive course of lectures, and the high pressure of group work make it imperative that all students must have a satisfactory knowledge of the English language. Read the requirements here - http://lfs.org.uk/full-time-study/ma-screenwriting/admissions/admission-requirements

On our website you can view testimonials - http://lfs.org.uk/films-and-filmmakers/testimonials from recent LFS graduates, and we can put you in touch with one from your country. One recent alumni said of his experience: “I always speak very highly of the Screenwriting MA at LFS when prospective students email me. I learnt so much there and have it to thank for a lot, so thanks!” Ben Cleary, MA Screenwriting, 2016 Shorts Film Oscar Nominee for STUTTERER


The MA Filmmaking has three intake dates: January, May and September

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The LFS MA Screenwriting course is an intense one-year programme with the emphasis on developing the writer's original voice through small group and one-to-one mentoring from industry professionals. Read more
The LFS MA Screenwriting course is an intense one-year programme with the emphasis on developing the writer's original voice through small group and one-to-one mentoring from industry professionals.

Our most recent Annual Report for the MA Screenwriting from External Examiner Max Kinnings commented: “...the standards of student performance are at the very top end of the scale of similar programmes in the UK. The MA in Screenwriting at LFS is an impressive programme. The quality of work that is produced is of a very high standard with some truly outstanding screenwriting and critical commentaries being produced. The way that the course is structured over the three terms – or units – is both academically rigorous and also industry facing.” (sic)

The MA Screenwriting course focuses on feature film screenwriting, in an international context and benefits from taking place in a film school where writing is a collaborative process involving actors, directors, musicians, editors and producers. Each student is matched into a mentoring relationship with a working writer and has frequent and detailed meetings with them. You can read more on the MA Screenwriting course curriculum here - http://lfs.org.uk/full-time-study/ma-screenwriting/curriculum

Minimum qualifications for an application to be considered are a three year university degree or equivalent professional experience in a relevant area. You may already have been working in a writing environment, though not necessarily in film. We actively support applicants who have a commitment to screenwriting and want to expand their skills and understanding. We are happy to take the right experience as equivalent to a first degree.

The need to follow and understand the intensive course of lectures, and the high pressure of group work make it imperative that all students must have a satisfactory knowledge of the English language. Read the requirements here - http://lfs.org.uk/full-time-study/ma-screenwriting/admissions/admission-requirements

The London Film School

Since 1956 the school has trained thousands of directors, cinematographers, editors and other film professionals now working across the globe. It is the most truly international school anywhere, with at least 60% of its students from outside Great Britain.
We have thousands of high profile alumni - http://lfs.org.uk/films-filmmakers/associates-london-film-school-alfs, including Michael Mann, Mike Leigh, Duncan Jones, Tak Fujimoto, Franc Roddam, Mark Goldblatt, Bill Douglas, Ho Yim, Anne Hui, Oliver Hermanus and Danny Huston.

LFS is based in Covent Garden two minutes’ walk from Soho, centre of the European entertainment industry. It is one of only three institutions accredited as a Creative Skillset Film Academy, recognised by the UK industry body as a Centre of Excellence.

We teach filmmaking, on stages, and in workshops rather than in classrooms - the building functions as a working studio. LFS is a living creative film community. The school is an independent non-profit establishment run by passionate and experienced filmmakers; full-time faculty and a varied and hugely talented group of visiting lecturers, technicians and artists.

Please get in touch for more information about our MA programmes in Filmmaking, Screenwriting, International Film Business, the Doctoral Programmes, as well as our expanding range of continuing professional development courses.

We have three intakes a year on May, September and January. We are currently operating a rolling process but please do apply as soon as you can for any intake. You can read more about the admissions process and deadlines here.

VISIT US

Choosing a film school is a big decision; you may want to visit us or talk to a student or a graduate. We have open afternoons every other Thursday during term time and we can show you around – please click here to sign up for a place - http://lfs.org.uk/full-time-study/book-tour. If you cannot attend any of those days, please do get in touch on to schedule an alternative time; our students are our priorities and as such the working studios are their space.

‘The beauty of a good film school is that it invites you to make mistakes, but never dampens your enthusiasm. At LFS I made plenty, and ignited a passion.’ Duncan Jones, Director of MOON (2009), SOURCE CODE (2011), WARCRAFT (2016)

Further Information

On our website you can view testimonials from recent LFS graduates (http://lfs.org.uk/films-and-filmmakers/testimonials), and we can put you in touch with one from your country. One recent alumni said of his experience: “I always speak very highly of the Screenwriting MA at LFS when prospective students email me. I learnt so much there and have it to thank for a lot, so thanks!” Ben Cleary, MA Screenwriting, 2016 Shorts Film Oscar Nominee for STUTTERER

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Students who wish to conduct doctoral-level research in Nepal, or in preparation for professional employment in e.g. a government agency or international NGO. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

Students who wish to conduct doctoral-level research in Nepal, or in preparation for professional employment in e.g. a government agency or international NGO.

This is the only Masters-level programme offered anywhere in the world that provides students who intend to proceed to conduct anthropological research (broadly defined) in Nepal with the necessary skills (disciplinary, linguistic, methodological).

What will this programme give the student an opportunity to achieve?

- The ability to read, write, speak and understand Nepali to a level suitable for field research in Nepal
- A grounding in the scholarly literature on Nepali history, society and culture
- Expertise in anthropological theory and practice that will provide a basis for research in a Nepali context

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-research-methods-nepali/

Structure

- Year 1
Students take a 1.0 unit Nepali language course (either Nepali Language 1 or Nepali Language 2); 1.0 unit Culture and Conflict in the Himalaya; 1.0 unit Theoretical Approaches in Social Anthropology (or other anthropology options, chosen in consultation with programme convenor, for students with equivalent anthropology training); 0.5 unit Media Production Skills; and 0.5 units of anthropology options.

- Summer break between years 1 and 2
Two weeks of intensive Nepali language tuition at SOAS after the June exams, followed by two months in Kathmandu, attached to the Nepā School of Social Sciences and Humanities and the Bishwo Bhasa Campus of Tribhuvan University. At the end of the summer students will be required to submit a 5000-word preliminary fieldwork report and research proposal, accompanied by a 500-word abstract written in Nepali.

- Year 2
Students take the following courses: 1.5 unit Nepali for researchers; 1.0 unit Anthropological Research Methods (0.5 units Ethnographic Research Methods in term 1 and 0.5 units in Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research in term 2). They also attend the compulsory weekly MPhil Research Training Seminar in anthropology and write a 15,000 word MA Dissertation.

Language courses will be assessed though a mixture of written papers and oral examinations.

Non-language courses will be assessed on the basis of coursework essays and written papers.

Programme Specification (msword; 668kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-research-methods-nepali/file68458.rtf

Teaching & Learning

What methods will be used to achieve the learning outcomes?

Knowledge:
1. How to assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts and digital sources, solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations, locate materials, use research sources (particularly research library catalogues) and other relevant traditional sources.

2. The Research Methods course focuses on teaching the various research methods associated with anthropological fieldwork including: participant observation, historical research, qualitative interviewing, quantitative data collection, Rapid Participatory Assessment, how to design questionnaires and, especially, on how to formulate a research question and design a project and consider the ethical issues involved. The Statistics courseworks on how to compile statistics, and how to critically assess statistics.

3. The Research Training course, which is assessed by the Masters dissertation, works on students’ writing skills with an emphasis on thinking of the history of the discipline, writing to schedule, writing to requested word count, how to formulate a research question based on the material gathered, as well as how to do a presentation, how to comment on presentations and how to apply for funding. Term three looks at the strategies for working on the Masters’ dissertation and how to be upgraded at the start of the MPhil year.

4. A good grounding in the sociocultural and political history of and contemporary sociocultural and political issues in Nepal, and familiarity with the scholarly literature on these topics.

5. Proficiency in spoken and written Nepali sufficient for the purposes of anthropological field research: ability to conduct conversations and interviews, and read and synthesise information from Nepali written sources.

Intellectual (thinking) skills

1. Students should become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence, and to understand through practice what documents can and cannot tell us.

2. Students should question interpretations, however authoritative, and reassess evidence for themselves. They should be able to design a research project, set a timetable, understand the principles of fieldwork, and consider questions of ethics.

3. Students should learn to read each others’ work for both its strengths and weaknesses, develop their skills as public speakers, learn how to compose short abstracts of their project (for funding), be able to think critically and yet be open to being critiqued themselves.

Subject-based practical skills

The programme aims to help students with the following practical skills:

1. Communicate effectively in writing, in both English and (at a less advanced level) Nepali
2. Retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources in both English and Nepali.
3. Present seminar papers.
4. Listen to and discuss ideas introduced during seminars.
5. Practice research techniques in a variety of specialized research libraries and institutes.
6. Be prepared to do fieldwork for an anthropology PhD.

Transferable skills

The programme will encourage students to:

1. Write good essays and dissertations.
2. Structure and communicate ideas effectively both orally and in writing.
3. Understand unconventional ideas.
4. Present (non–assessed) material orally.
5. Function as a student and researcher in a radically different environment.
6. Be able to apply for funding to do a PhD.
7. Be prepared to enter an Anthropology PhD programme and to be upgraded from MPhil to PhD in the shortest possible time.

Destinations

Students who study MA Anthropological Research Methods and Nepali develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma in Greek and Latin provide a self-contained period of structured but challenging study for anyone who wishes to pursue their interest in both the Greek and Latin language. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma in Greek and Latin provide a self-contained period of structured but challenging study for anyone who wishes to pursue their interest in both the Greek and Latin language.

Course Overview

These programmes offer students the opportunity to focus on the acquisition and/or development of both Greek and Latin and can be started at beginners, intermediate or advanced level depending on their linguistic ability.

The PGDip is a postgraduate degree comprised of 120 credits (six taught modules) of postgraduate study. Students are normally expected to complete the programme over a period no longer than two years, taking 80 credits in the first year of the programme and 40 credits in the second year.

The PGCert is a postgraduate degree comprised of 60 credits (three taught modules) of postgraduate study.

Modules

Our language system covers two main levels: Intensive and Advanced.

There are two Intensive modules for each language. Intensive I always runs in the first semester (September to January) and starts from complete beginners level, hence is the natural starting point for anyone who has no or very little knowledge of the language. Intensive II is the continuation of Intensive I and always runs in the second semester (February to May). Upon successful completion of both Intensive modules, a student is ready to go on to Advanced level and work directly with unadapted ancient texts. The Intensive modules are designed to provide you with high level knowledge of grammar and syntax, and a good vocabulary. Each Intensive module is worth 30 credits, and you need to commit at least 23 hours per week (throughout the semester, so over 15 weeks, including examinations) to your language learning.

Advanced-level modules are in three separate levels: Advanced, Further Advanced and Higher Advanced. As you progress through the advanced-level modules, you will read a greater quantity of ancient texts, and be asked to complete more challenging work in terms of the literary and linguistic investigation of the text. Every year there are two texts/authors chosen for each language: one text is prose, the other is verse. The texts and authors change every year, and students have the opportunity to read both canonical and non-canonical authors. Over the last few years, we have read Petronius, Columella, Ovid, Claudian and Statius in Latin, and the Homeric Hymns, Plato, Diodorus, Sophocles and Euripides in Greek.

Key Features

The PG Diploma and Certificate in Greek and Latin are mainly of interest to those who want to learn or advance their existing knowledge of both Greek and Latin. One can start on either of the two programmes from complete beginners’ level, intermediate or advanced, based on their existing qualifications and knowledge. For those who have been studying Greek or Latin privately, we offer a test to place them in the correct level of language learning. PhD candidates, or those planning to embark on a PhD, can use these degrees to increase their competency in the ancient languages. For those interested in teaching Greek or Latin at any level, the degrees can provide an internationally recognised qualification. The degrees in Greek and Latin are available only as part-time options.

Specifically for language learners who study at a distance, the School provides the support of dedicated distance language tutors for all its language modules. The distance language tutors provide assistance and support to language learners, as well as interim feedback on assessment. The distance learning tutors work alongside the module lecturers in providing material for language study to distance learners. All language modules include an examination; examination arrangements are communicated to distance learners by the TSD Registry, and distance learners can ask for the support of the School in making arrangements for examinations.

Assessment

Our language degrees in Greek and Latin involve a wide range of assessment methods. In addition to traditional essays and exams, you will be assessed through commentaries and in-class tests. This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

Career Opportunities

The programme provides a strong foundation for postgraduate work, by laying particular stress on the languages. The course also provides a professional qualification for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

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Kent’s MA in Modern European Literature enables you to study European writers, genres, figures or movements within their respective socio-historical contexts. Read more
Kent’s MA in Modern European Literature enables you to study European writers, genres, figures or movements within their respective socio-historical contexts.

The literary cultures of Europe have produced some of the world’s richest writings, including the works of Proust, Kafka, Woolf, Joyce, and Dostoevsky, among many others. This MA programme enables you to engage in detail with these and other writers and to study them in their original languages. You should be able to read literary texts in two modern languages in addition to English.

The programme is offered by the Department of Comparative Literature (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/complit/index.html) and benefits from staff expertise in a range of areas, including European modernism, postmodernism, postcolonial literature, literature and medicine, literature and sexuality, literature and psychoanalysis and literature and the visual arts. Our programme also draws on additional expertise in the School of European Culture and Languages (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/index.html), particularly from colleagues in the departments of French, German, Hispanic Studies and Italian.

You begin by studying a choice of four modules across the Autumn and Spring terms, before writing a 12,000-word dissertation over the summer, supervised by an expert in the department.

The MA in Modern European Literature is an ideal programme for anyone with language skills wanting to gain in-depth insight into modern Europe, its culture and literatures, and fosters independent critical thinking as well as an awareness of linguistic and national specificities.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/31/modern-european-literature

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

FR872 - Theories of Art in Modern French Thought (30 credits)
CP813 - Literature and Medicine (30 credits)
FR807 - Postmodern French Detective Fiction (30 credits)
LS810 - History and Memory: Exploring the Independence period throug (30 credits)
CP813 -Literature and Medicine (30 credits)
FR804 - Real Fictions: The Documentation of Modernity (30 credits)
CP808 - Writing the Self: Autobiography in the Modern Period (30 credits)
CP998 - Comparative Literature Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with the knowledge and skills to prepare you for the academic study of European or single-language literature at MPhil/PhD level

- attract outstanding students, irrespective of race, background, gender, or physical disability from within the UK

- enable you to begin to specialise in specific research areas whilst maintaining broad comparative interests

- enable you to hone your ability to read literature and literary theory critically and comparatively in at least two European languages as well as English

- provide you, consistent with point 1 above, with a transition from undergraduate study to independent research

- provide you with a training that will culminate, if followed through to PhD level, in the ability to submit articles to refereed journals across the range of European literature.

Research areas

- Centre for Language and Linguistic Studies (CLLS)

Founded in 2007, the Centre for Language and Linguistic Studies (CLLS) promotes interdisciplinary collaboration in linguistic research and teaching. Membership embraces not just the members of English Language and Linguistics but also other SECL members with an interest in the study of language, as well as researchers in philosophy, computing, psychology and anthropology, reflecting the many and varied routes by which individuals come to a love of language and an interest in the various disciplines and sub-disciplines of linguistics.

- Centre for Modern European Literature

Many of the most significant European writers and literary movements of the modern period have traversed national, linguistic, and disciplinary borders. Co-directed by members of Comparative Literature, French, and German, the Centre for Modern European Literature aims to promote collaborative interdisciplinary research that can do justice to these kinds of border crossing.

Ranging across English, French, German, Italian and Spanish literature, the Centre focuses in particular on the European avant-garde, European modernism and postmodernism, literary theory, the international reception of European writers, and the relations between modern European literature and the other arts, including painting, photography, film, music and architecture. The Centre’s activities include a lecture and seminar series and the regular organisation of conferences. It also works with the editors of the postgraduate journal Skepsi, and runs the MA in Modern European Literature.

Careers

Comparative literature graduates develop key skills, including critical thinking, analysis and problem solving. They go on to successful careers in areas such as the media, academia and many different cultural institutions including libraries, museums and galleries.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This Master's degree offers you an opportunity to engage critically with the study of comparative literature. Read more
This Master's degree offers you an opportunity to engage critically with the study of comparative literature. The primary focus is on English-, French-, German-, Portuguese- and Spanish-speaking cultures, and while we welcome students able to work in these and other languages, you may work exclusively through the medium of English.

Students with a particular interest in French or German culture and/or with high-level French or German language skills are encouraged to apply, as it is possible to take a French or German pathway through the programme.

You will have the opportunity to develop your understanding of key critical concepts associated with the comparative study of literature and cultures, such as literary history and the canon, genre, theme, influence, intertextuality and translation across genres and media. You will gain practical experience of working with these concepts in your reading of texts. You will also be given a grounding in twentieth- and twenty-first-century literary theory, exploring its development in a cross-cultural context and investigating how it can change the way we read texts and the cultures that produced them.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
Explore literature from a comparative perspective and in the context of other cultural forms.
Examine the ways in which literary and cultural theories can change how we read cultures and the texts they produce.
Follow a pathway in French and/or German culture and language, if this is your specialist interest.
Courses taught in English by subject specialists from a variety of language areas.
Ideal if you wish to embark on doctoral research, further your career prospects (particularly in arts-related fields), or build on a personal interest.
You will have access to outstanding specialist libraries, including the collection of the Institute of Modern Languages Research at Senate House.
The departments involved in teaching this programme run a series of research events for both their taught and research postgraduates.

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Learn how to manage and develop employees, ensure their well-being and understand the latest changes in employment legislation. Read more
Learn how to manage and develop employees, ensure their well-being and understand the latest changes in employment legislation. The MSc Human Resource Management (HRM) will develop your understanding of the theory and practice of people management in work organisations, addressing the skills required for effective analysis and policy information. Our graduates go on to work at companies such as Barclays, KPMG and Tesco.

This course is suitable for graduates who have studied any subject who wish to secure their first HR job, or those taking a break and wishing to re-train or re-focus their career. Our MSc HRM is a dual award programme accredited by CIPD, giving full exemption against their Level 7 Advanced Diploma in HRM.

If you are studying a CIPD Diploma qualification, you are required to join the CIPD as a student member at the start of your programme. Upon successful completion of your studies, you will automatically become an Associate professional member which will entitle you to use Assoc CIPD after your name. This ensures that your qualification is recognised by CIPD and that you receive access to HR and development resources and student resources to support you in your study and throughout your career. It also means you’ll avoid paying a non-registration fee. Please note that students join CIPD as individual members, so membership fees are payable directly to CIPD.

Special Features

• You will receive an excellent grounding in all aspects of HR, developing your knowledge and practical skills, and focusing particularly on how a strategic approach to HR can add value to organisation
• The Business School has a long-standing reputation for excellence in teaching human resource management to the CIPD standards. Our programme has been designed to provide an ideal foundation for your career in HRM/HRD or related fields
• The Postgraduate Diploma level of this course meets the advanced professional standards set by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD), it is accredited by CIPD and gives full exemption from their level 7 Advanced Diploma in HRM. • • Upon successful completion of your qualification and depending on your relevant HR or development experience, you can then apply to upgrade to chartered membership. You can read more about chartered membership here: http://www.cipd.co.uk/membership/professional/chartered-member.aspx
• You will be taught in the internationally recognised multi-award-winning Business School on All Saints Campus.
• The course provides you with an opportunity to attend the annual CIPD National Conference held in Manchester in November and this is included in the course fee
• A human resources work experience placement is part of the course which provides an opportunity to conduct a live research project leading to your dissertation. Many students choose to research their dissertations in their placement organisation. Our placement team will help and support you in finding your placement, including CV and job/placement application and interview skills preparation. These skills are an excellent foundation to enhance your employability on completion of your studies.
• A management skills/self-development residential is included in this course. This two-day event is included in the course fee and takes place early in term one.
• We also host conferences, workshops and symposiums on a variety of HRM and HRD themes. We ran an ESRC/BAM HR Special Interest Group Symposium on the theme of “HRM and Employee Wellbeing” in May 2014. Click here for more details
Manchester Met Business School hosts the Manchester Industrial Relations Society which runs frequent talks and debates by national recognised experts in the field. See http://www.mirs.org.uk/ for more information
• Our programme is closely linked to the MMU Centre for People and Performance, which conducts independent research in partnership with a wide range of organisations, to explore the challenges of managing, leading and developing people to create sustainable high-performing organisations. Our experts deliver tailor-made solutions to organisational and sector-specific challenges and issues for a range of private and public sector clients and policy-makers. Many of the Centre for People and Performance staff teach on our HRM programmes, you can read more about our Centre and the staff here: http://www.business.mmu.ac.uk/cpp/

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The Aberystwyth University’s MA in Medieval Welsh Literature offers you an exciting opportunity to engage with the Welsh language and literature of the medieval period through historical, social and intellectual approaches. Read more
The Aberystwyth University’s MA in Medieval Welsh Literature offers you an exciting opportunity to engage with the Welsh language and literature of the medieval period through historical, social and intellectual approaches. You will study a rich array of Welsh texts and cultural phenomena by engaging with three core modules – The Four Branches of the Mabinogi, Welsh Language I and Welsh Language II – and two further modules from a fascinating selection.

By studying the central canon of Welsh texts, you will develop a sound knowledge of the language, culture and thought of the middle and medieval periods in Wales. You will read and appreciate the most important of Middle Welsh texts in the original language, and you will discuss the narrative techniques, characterisation, themes and structure of these tremendously important texts. You will also encounter important texts from neighbouring cultures and traditions, such as Anglo-Saxon, Irish and Late Latin, so that you may fully contextualise the central literary artefacts of your study.

In addition to the subject-specific knowledge, this study programme is constructed in such a way to develop you personally, and equip you with a strong compliment of skills that you can draw upon in many postgraduate employment situations.

Upon completion of this degree, you will have mastered the diverse skills needed for evidence-handling, such as locating, gathering, selecting, organising and synthesising large bodies of evidence into a coherent and compelling interpretation. You will also have mastered the highly creative nature of the source texts and their authors, and you will have responded with imagination, insight and creativity. Together, your analytical rigour and creative independence will make you an attractive prospect for employers in a range of fields.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/medieval-welsh-literature-masters/

Overview

This MA offers students who have not necessarily had the chance to study for a first degree in Welsh or Celtic Studies to engage closely with the Welsh language and literature of the medieval period while at the same time learning Modern Welsh in order to be able to read and converse confidently by the end of the year. This is a unique combination which is popular with students of cognate disciplines (Modern Languages, Medieval Studies, Old and Middle English, Classics) who wish to improve their language and interpretative skills to equip them for doctoral work. Other students, sometimes with a background in archaeology or history, are interested in knowing more about the culture and language of Wales in the medieval period with an eye to working in the education, heritage, and tourism sectors.

A variety of Welsh texts, from 600 to 1600, will be studied in the original language taking account of their manuscript and cultural contexts, and using a variety of critical approaches including comparative work with texts from neighbouring cultures and traditions such as Irish, Late Latin, and some Anglo-Saxon and Middle English. Our main aim, however, is to equip you with a working knowledge of the Medieval Welsh language, and to ensure that you are fully conversant with the full range of current scholarship including that written in the Welsh language. The dissertation will allow you to develop a topic of your choice and to produce a sustained piece of work up to 20,000 words which will demonstrate to future employers your ability to research independently (under the guidance of a specialist) and to exercise your critical faculties and writing skills at a high level.

Welsh is the everyday language of the Department and the usual language of administration, but learners are given every encouragement to start using the language as soon as they can, and to attend a range of cultural and social events. Staff and students meet in our fortnightly lunch-time research seminars, and the Postgraduate Study Room, located in the heart of the Department, next to the Hugh Owen Library, makes for a good deal of informal interaction between taught Masters’ students, research student, staff and undergraduates. Postgraduate employment stands currently at 100%.

Employability

Qualification: MA in Welsh Medieval Literature

This degree will suit you:
- If you wish to study Welsh language and literature at an advanced academic level;
- If you desire a strengthen your critical and scholarly abilities through engagement with Welsh texts;
- If you wish to explore your enthusiasm for this exciting and highly satisfying subject;
- If you aim to foster transferable skills and engage in professional and personal development for entering employment.

- Employability:
Every element of the Aberystwyth Master’s in Welsh Medieval Literature enhances your employability. Alongside the development of your subject-specific knowledge and experience, an especially noteworthy strength of this course is the emphasis on personal development. As an emerging language specialist, your strengthened research and critical faculties will make you a strong candidate for any post where ideas and topics need research, analysis, discussion, expansion and classification.

The very nature of a literature course requires you to develop thoughtful responses to a range of texts, authors and contexts. You will develop confidence in thinking which is both thorough and creative, and demonstrates your initiative, self-motivation, flexibility and independence of mind along the way. The organisational skills you will learn on this course will help you direct your individual flair, bringing a balance of skills that prospective employers will find attractive.

Employers in every industry value such skills, and the pattern of creativity, research, analysis and discussion in this course will stand you in excellent stead for entry into the competitive jobs market.

- Personal, Professional and Project-Management Skills:
The Master’s dissertation requires you to work independently and to pursue your own individual dissertation topic. You will access to the support and expertise of the Welsh department staff, but you are required to cultivate a professional work ethic to deliver this extremely demanding academic dissertation. The project management skills you will gain in preparing this project are entirely transferrable to almost any work context that Master’s graduates apply for.

Studying for this Master’s degree will allow you to sharpen up all your research and analysis disciplines, your professional work ethos and your presentation and communication skills. A host of employers look for accuracy, thoroughness, an eye for detail and the ability to find and prove connections across broad subject matter, and you certainly will have proven yourself, simply by graduating from this prestigious MA course.

Find out how to apply here http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/medieval-welsh-literature-masters/#how-to-apply

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The MA in Journalism is accredited by the Periodical Publishers Association and combines practical and theoretical approaches to journalism as a multimedia skill- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-journalism/. Read more
The MA in Journalism is accredited by the Periodical Publishers Association and combines practical and theoretical approaches to journalism as a multimedia skill- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-journalism/

This MA covers everything from online news writing to digital methods of delivering news and feature content and magazine production. It is taught by highly skilled industry professionals, all with experience at senior national level in newspapers, broadcasting and magazines.

You will work on our own local news website - EastLondonLines - which covers a large area of East and South London and provides unrivalled experience of practical journalism.

Graduates enjoy high levels of success and go on to work in a variety of jobs in newspapers, magazines - both in print and online - and in broadcasting. To find out more about the kind of career you might have with a Goldsmiths MA in Journalism, read about our graduates on our own special alumni site.

But do not just take our word for it. This is what the PPA Accrediting Panel said in 2012: "A course packed full of knowledge, experience and academic stretch and focus is on the right things - producing creative, thinking, enthusiastic and good journalists." And this is what they said after their last visit in 2014: "There is nothing to be improved on. We can't find fault with this course!"

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Terry Kirby.

Modules & Structure

The programme module is divided into a series of modules that cover the key practical skills and theoretical background. There are no optional modules or alternate pathways.

The four practical modules focus on the basic journalistic skills common to different media: news and feature research and writing, interviewing, image, video and data skills print and online production techniques. You will learn how to apply these skills across all platforms.

In the summer term, you work in groups to produce magazines. In the past, these have won the annual Periodical Publishers Association competition for student magazines. This year, one group of our students took the top prize in the successor Magazine Academy Awards for a magazine about independent cinema.

There are four lecture-based theoretical modules in which we give you the background theoretical knowledge to become expert practictioners. These are:

Journalism in Context, which places journalism in the wider political and social context
Media Law and Ethics, which delivers a grounding in legal issues
Asking the Right Questions, helping you develop key research skills
Politics and Power, a module that delivers a basic grounding in how government and public sector operate
Practice modules are largely assessed by portfolios of your work, while theory modules are all assessed by essays or written research work.

Careers

Graduates go on to work in a wide variety of jobs in newspapers, magazines, TV, radio, and online media. You can read some of their profiles on our alumni site.

Skills

You'll develop:

familiarity with a wide range of journalistic techniques and practices
specific practice skills to a high level
awareness of the wider ethical, legal and technological contexts of journalistic practice
awareness of the qualities of your own work and its cultural significance
an understanding of the pleasures of media consumption
Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.

Alumni profiles

Take a look at some of our recent success stories:

Serina Sandhu (graduated 2014) Reporter, Independent on Sunday

Emma Craig (graduated 2012) Sub editor, Daily Mail

Lena de Casparis (graduated 2009) Culture Director, Elle Magazine

Laurance Dodds (graduated 2012) Assistant Comment Editor, Daily Telegraph

Daisy Bowie Sell (graduated 2010) Time Out

Riddi Shah (graduated 2005) The Hindustan Times

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Drawing on Birkbeck's position as a world-leading centre in the field of nineteenth-century studies, this MA offers you the chance to take a genuinely interdisciplinary approach to studying the literature, culture and history of Victorian Britain. Read more
Drawing on Birkbeck's position as a world-leading centre in the field of nineteenth-century studies, this MA offers you the chance to take a genuinely interdisciplinary approach to studying the literature, culture and history of Victorian Britain. You will encounter a compelling range of Victorian texts, contexts, themes and ideas on a degree course that does justice to the energy and variety of the Victorian period.

Two core modules, Progress and Anxiety, 1789-1859 and Modernising Victorians, introduce some of the most significant debates, ideas and events of the long nineteenth century, and offer you the chance to develop new critical approaches to Victorian studies. Weekly seminars take you from the French Revolution to the Boer War and investigate topics such as the discovery of geological time, movements for social and political reform, the aims and limits of realist fiction, the Great Exhibition, Darwinism, aestheticism, the religious imagination and the Gothic revival.

These compulsory courses are supplemented by a wide range of option modules, which allow you to pursue your own interests in the field of Victorian Studies and beyond. Recently offered option modules are listed below.

Students in their final year of study have the chance to take an internship module. Successful interns spend a term working with one of London's Victorian cultural institutions, gaining first-hand experience of working in the cultural sector and using their host institution's archives to develop a unique research project. Previous interns have worked with the Dickens House Museum, the Salvation Army Heritage Centre and Archive, and the Guildhall Art Gallery, and have developed their projects into funded doctoral research topics.

A schedule of visiting speakers and other events, organised by Birkbeck's Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies, ensures that you have the opportunity to engage with leading Victorian studies specialists from around the world, and are welcomed into one of the country's liveliest research communities.

Staff teaching on this MA include:

Professor Hilary Fraser
Professor Laurel Brake
Professor David Feldman
Dr Nicola Bown
Dr Carolyn Burdett (Course Director)
Dr Luisa Calè
Dr Julia Laite
Dr David McAllister
Dr Emily Senior
Dr Heather Tilley
Dr Ana Parejo Vadillo.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
Explore this fascinating period through a multidisciplinary approach, bringing together literature, visual art, history and cultural studies.
Our graduates have an impressive record in competing for Arts and Humanities Research Council awards for research degrees.
Our lively Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies organises a dynamic range of year-round events that showcase the research of Birkbeck's academics, researchers and students, including our annual Dickens Day and our Forum for Nineteenth-Century Studies. The Centre also established, and for many years hosted, the London Nineteenth-Century Studies Seminar.
Read 19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century, our free, open-access online journal that celebrated its tenth anniversary in November 2015 with a special issue on 'The Nineteenth-Century Digital Archive'.
Read more about our Dickens's Our Mutual Friend project, which culminated in November 2015 as part of the tenth-anniversary celebrations of 19.
Birkbeck is at the geographical centre of London's research library complex, a short distance from the British Library, the University of London Library, the Warburg Institute and the Institute of Historical Research.
The University of London Library has an outstanding collection of literary periodicals of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

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Globalisation and an ever-changing economic landscape are introducing new opportunities and practices to effective Human Resource Management (HRM). Read more
Globalisation and an ever-changing economic landscape are introducing new opportunities and practices to effective Human Resource Management (HRM). Our MSc in International Human Resource Management will develop your understanding of real-world HR issues, developing your knowledge and practical skills, with a focus on how a strategic approach to HR can add value to organisations across the globe.

This course is particularly suitable if some, or all, of your career will involve working outside the UK or if you have an interest in global employment issues. Our MSc International HRM is fully accredited by the UK professional body (CIPD) and leads directly to Associate Membership.

The course is taught by an experienced team of lecturers, many of whom have extensive experience as HR professionals, and others who are actively researching and publishing in the field.

The course includes a work placement, and an opportunity to do a live research project leading to your dissertation. It also includes a residential event and a visit to the CIPD’s national conference.

Special Features

• Manchester Met Business School has a long-standing reputation for excellence in teaching Human Resource Management to the CIPD Standards. Our programme has been designed to provide an ideal foundation for your career in HRM/HRD or related fields, including international HRM
• This course meets the advanced professional standards set by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD), it is accredited by CIPD, and gives full exemption from their level 7 Advanced Diploma in HRM. Upon successful completion of your qualification, and depending on your relevant HR or development experience, you can then apply to upgrade to Chartered Membership. You can read more about Chartered Membership here
• The course is taught by an experienced team of lecturers, many of whom have extensive experience as HR professionals, and others who are actively researching and publishing in the field, including internationally
• Staff are active in researching internationally, including comparative employment practices , studies of international management development with recent major projects in China, East-Asia, and Europe
• You will be taught in the internationally recognised multi-award-winning Business School on All Saints Campus.
• The course provides you with an opportunity to attend the annual CIPD National Conference held in Manchester in November and this is included in the course fee
• A human resources work experience placement is part of the course. Many students choose to research their dissertations in their placement organisation. Our placement team will help and support you in finding your placement, including CV and job/placement application and interview skills preparation. These skills are an excellent foundation to enhance your employability on completion of your studies
• A management skills/self-development residential is included in this course. This two-day event is included in the course fee and takes place early in term one. As part of the Developing Skills for Business leadership (DSBL) unit, students are able to gain a CMI Award in Management Coaching and Mentoring, further adding to an excellent profile for employability in the UK/Europe, or internationally
• We have strong links with the CIPD, which is increasingly international. Recent research from the CIPD suggests that over 30% of HR practitioners in the UK have an international dimension to their work, and the international links and partnerships between CIPD and lead bodies in other counties is growing. The CIPD has members located internationally In SE Asia, South America, Latin America, Africa, Middle -East, Europe and beyond
• The Business School holds many accreditations from many professional bodies, including AACSB, AMBA, CMI, CIPD. Research firmly underpins our curriculum but we are also characterised by our strong external focus through the application of research to organisations and policy formation.
• Our programme is closely linked to the Manchester Met Busienss School Centre for People and Performance which conducts independent research in partnership with a wide range of organisations, to explore the challenges of managing, leading and developing people to create sustainable high-performing organisations
• Our experts deliver tailor-made solutions to organisational and sector-specific challenges and issues for a range of private and public sector clients and policy-makers. Many of the Centre for People and Performance staff teach on our HRM programmes, you can read more about our Centre and the staff here
• We host Conferences, Workshops and Symposiums on a variety of HRM and HRD themes.
• Manchester Met Business School hosts the Manchester Industrial Relations Society which runs frequent (monthly) talks and debates by national recognised experts in the field.

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