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The MSc in Advanced Process Integration and Design started in the Department of Chemical Engineering (UMIST) over twenty years ago. Read more
The MSc in Advanced Process Integration and Design started in the Department of Chemical Engineering (UMIST) over twenty years ago. The programme was a result of emerging research from the Centre for Process Integration, initially focused on energy efficiency, but expanded to include efficient use of raw materials and emissions reduction. Much of the content of the course stems from research related to energy production, including oil and gas processing.

The MSc in Advanced Process Integration and Design aims to enable students with a prior qualification in chemical engineering to acquire a deep and systematic conceptual understanding of the principles of process design and integration in relation to the petroleum, gas and chemicals sectors of the process industries.

Overview of course structure and content
In the first trimester, all students take course units on energy systems, utility systems and computer aided process design. Energy Systems develops systematic methods for designing heat recovery systems, while Utility Systems focuses on provision of heat and power in the process industries. Computer Aided Process Design develops skills for modelling and optimisation of chemical processes.

In the second trimester, the students choose three elective units from a range covering reaction systems, distillation systems, distributed and renewable energy systems, biorefining, and oil and gas processing. These units focus on design, optimisation and integration of process technologies and their associated heat and power supply systems.

In two research-related units, students develop their research skills and prepare a proposal for their research project. These units develop students skills in critical assessment of research literature, group work, written and oral communication, time management and research planning.

Students then carry out the research project during the third trimester. In these projects, students apply their knowledge and skills in process design and integration to investigate a wide range of process technologies and design methodologies. Recent projects have addressed modelling, assessment and optimisation of petroleum refinery hydrotreating processes, crude oil distillation systems, power plants, waste heat recovery systems, refrigeration cycles with mixed refrigerants, heat recovery steam generators, biorefining and biocatalytic processes and waste-to-energy technologies.

The course also aims to develop students' skills in implementing engineering models, optimisation and process simulation, in the context of chemical processes, using bespoke and commercially available software.

Industrial relevance of the course
A key feature of the course is the applicability and relevance of the learning to the process industries. The programme is underpinned by research activities in the Centre for Process Integration within the School. This research focuses on energy efficiency, the efficient use of raw materials, the reduction of emissions reduction and operability in the process industries. Much of this research has been supported financially by the Process Integration Research Consortium for over 30 years. Course units are updated regularly to reflect emerging research and design technologies developed at the University of Manchester and also from other research groups worldwide contributing to the field.

The research results have been transferred to industry via research communications, training and software leading to successful industrial application of the new methodologies. The Research Consortium continues to support research in process integration and design in Manchester, identifying industrial needs and challenges requiring further research and investigation and providing valuable feedback on practical application of the methodologies. In addition, the Centre for Process Integration has long history of delivering material in the form of continuing professional development courses, for example in Japan, China, Malaysia, Australia, India, Saudi Arabia, Libya, Europe, the United States, Brazil and Colombia.

Career opportunities

The MSc course in Advanced Process Design and Integration typically attracts 40 students; our graduates have found employment with major international oil and petrochemical companies (e.g. Shell, BP, Reliance and Petrobras and Saudi Aramco), chemical and process companies (e.g. Air Products), engineering, consultancy and software companies (e.g. Jacobs and Aspen Tech) and academia.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is accredited by the IChemE (Institution of Chemical Engineers).

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Do you want to have an impact on what people will eat in the future? Would you like to know what makes food taste good, due to the raw materials and processing… Read more
Do you want to have an impact on what people will eat in the future? Would you like to know what makes food taste good, due to the raw materials and processing technologies? Do you want to know how we could improve the healthiness, safety, ecology and ethics of food and food processing? Are you interested in exploring innovations in food, such as "pulled oats" or using insects as food? If you answered yes, enrol in Food Sciences master’s programme.

The food industry is the 4th most important employer both in Finland and internationally. This industry is constantly looking for experts to solve new problems. With a Master’s degree in Food Sciences you could embark on a career in the food industry; in a food, agricultural or environmental control laboratory; as a teacher, researcher, or self-employed entrepreneur; or as an expert in government ministries or other expert organisations.

As a master in Food Sciences you will be able to help the food industry develop and renew itself, since you will possess know-how on:
-Raw materials and processes, including their theoretical basics.
-Different food constituents and their impact on food quality.
-Factors that ensure good quality and food safety.

You can enrol in the Food Sciences masters' programme if you hold a bachelors' degree in Food Sciences or in Molecular Biosciences. You can also apply to the programme if you have a bachelors' degree in a related area of the natural sciences from a Finnish or foreign university, or if you have a degree from a Finnish university of applied sciences within food sciences or other related areas of the natural sciences.

Your studies in the Food Sciences masters' programme will offer you a broad education covering courses in the composition and processing of food, in the structures and chemical reactions of food proteins, lipids and carbohydrates, and in food legislation and the safety of food additives.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Content

Food Sciences on the Viikki campus is a nationally unique programme that covers the whole food production chain from primary production via food processing to consumers. Food Sciences is an internationally appreciated field of education: food research at the University of Helsinki has been highly ranked.

Your masters' studies in food sciences will enable you to make an impact on the the creation of innovative solutions for the whole chain of food production. You will:
-Study the theory and applications of the broad area of food sciences in lecture courses and in group work.
-Increase your knowledge of food composition, processing, structure, and legislation.
-Deepen your knowledge of how the reactions of different food components, production processes and packaging affect the structure, sensory quality, healthiness and safety of animal and plant based foods.
-Learn laboratory working skills.
-Acquire employment skills for example by training in the food industry.

Selection of the Major

You can affect the sort of expertise you would like to gain. You can tailor your Master’s degree by choosing special studies in food chemistry, food technology, and in the science and technology relating to meat, dairy and cereals.

You can also complement your expertise in food sciences with, for example, studies in food development, food safety, food research and analysis, economics, marketing, sustainable food production, microbiology, biotechnology or nutrition.

Programme Structure

You will need 120 credits (ECTS) for the Master’s degree. Together with your faculty adviser, you will make a personal study plan consisting of:
-60 credits of advanced studies in food sciences including a Master’s thesis.
-Studies of your choice in special areas of food sciences.
-Complementary studies of your choice.
-Studies of your free choice.

You can also include career planning, an internship and studies abroad in your Master’s degree.

Career Prospects

With a Master’s degree in Food Sciences, you can find work as a product quality manager in the food industry; as an inspector in a food, agricultural or environmental control laboratory; as a teacher or researcher at a university; as self-employed entrepreneur; or as an expert in a government ministry or other expert organisation.

Internationalization

As a student in Food Sciences you have excellent opportunities for an international student exchange or internship. You can also perform part of your degree studies at a university abroad. Due to the instruction in English, the many international students on the Viikki campus, and the many international personnel in the research groups, you will be part of an international community in your daily student life.

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Content. The increasing demand for raw materials, their price volatility, the production concentration and the market distortions imposed by some countries, confront Europe and other world regions with a number of challenges along the entire value chain. Read more
Content

The increasing demand for raw materials, their price volatility, the production concentration and the market distortions imposed by some countries, confront Europe and other world regions with a number of challenges along the entire value chain. To tackle this supply risk challenge and to deal with environmental problems arising from too large emissions of waste (such as CO2), technological innovation is required with respect to exploration of new resources and sustainable primary mining, sustainable use of resources in specific products and production processes (e.g. substitution of critical metals in materials), prevention of waste generation, valorisation of secondary (alternative) resources and recovery/recycling of resources from end-of-life products.

The International Master of Science in Sustainable and Innovative Natural Resource Management (SINReM) aims at educating a new range of professionals with a holistic overview on resource management and up-to-date processing technologies, who are familiar with sustainability concepts and possess an innovative mind-set to boost the economic importance of this sector.

Students will be acquainted with the different (technological) options for optimizing flows of natural resources in the different parts of the chain, ranging from resource exploration over sustainable materials use and use of resources in production processes to recovery/recycling of resources from end-of-life products. The focus is on developing ground-breaking technologies, engineering and re-inventing the value chain to make it more sustainable. Students will get a broad view on the entire value chain in its different aspects.

Networking and exchange of knowledge and experience between different nationalities, between academic and non-academic partners and between scholars and students will be promoted.

SINReM is offered by a consortium consisting of 3 Institutes of Higher Education:

Universiteit Gent / Ghent University (UGent, Gent, Belgium);
Uppsala University (UU, Uppsala, Sweden);
TU Bergakademie Freiberg (TUFreiberg, Freiberg, Germany).

The SINReM programme is (co)financed by the European Institute of Innovation and Technology within the EIT Raw Materials programme and aims at achieving an EIT label. EIT-labelled educational programmes foster students to become more creative, innovative and entrepreneurs.

Career Perspectives

Graduates are qualified for a professional career in the private (supporting companies in making processes, products and services more sustainable), research (applied research at universities, research institutes or companies) or public sector (consulting in local, regional and (inter)national administrations, defining and implementing sustainable development policies).
Graduates have an entrepreneurial mindset, a multidisciplinary view and creative innovative problem-based technology development skills

Structure

This 2-year programme contains 120 ECTS credit units and leads to the joint diploma of International Master of Science in Sustainable and Innovative Natural Resource Management.

In order to expose all students to different institutional settings, student mobility within Europe is an integral part of the programme.

General Entrance Module - Semester I 30 ECTS - Ghent University
Advanced Module - Semester II 30 ECTS - Uppsala University
Field trip - Summer School - University of Freiburg
Advanced Module II - Semester III 60 ECTS - choose a one of the following majors containing (elective) courses in combination with master dissertation research:
geo-resource exploration (Uppsala)
sustainable processes (Freiberg)
sustainable materials and resource recovery (Ghent)

All students will be moving as a cohort to Gent, Freiberg and Uppsala in the first year, which approach has significant networking and social cohesion advantages.

During this first year, students are introduced to the value chain, management of natural resources, the circular economy, its economic, policy and legal aspects, inventory techniques, the clean technology concept and life cycle assessment tools to assess sustainability of products, services and processes. Moreover, students are exposed to a basic training in the different technological tools that can be used to intervene in different parts of the value chain (geo-resource exploration, sustainable (chemical) extraction processes, sustainable materials and resource recovery technology).

In the second year students have the option to further specialize by selecting a major and conducting thesis research. They interact with the professional sector through cooperation in thesis research, internships, lectures and seminars.

Admission Requirements

To be admitted, candidates must have at least a bachelor degree (minimum 180 ECTS credits) in engineering or science (physics, chemistry, biology, mathematics, earth science, materials science) including 15 ECTS in mathematics and/or physics and 10 ECTS pure or applied chemistry or an equivalent level from a recognised university or Engineering College.

In terms of language requirements the following is currently applied in or acceptable by the partner institutes. Changes to these requirements are however admissible (upon approval by the MB).

Nationals of Australia, Botswana, Canada, Eritrea, Gambia, Ghana, Guyana, India, Ireland, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Namibia, New Zealand, Nigeria, Philippines, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Trinidad and Tobago, Uganda, UK, USA, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, need to send proof of at least one year - 60 ECTS (finished successfully) - of comprehensive English-based instruction at a HEI do not need to present a language certificate but a mode of instruction.

Candidates from any other nationality need to present test results of one of the following tests (validity of 5 years; TOEFL/IELTS predictive tests and TOEIC will not be accepted):

TOEFL IBT 86
TOEFL PBT 570
ACADEMIC IELTS 6,5 overall score with a min. of 6 for writing

Candidates apply online through a standard online application form. All candidates fulfilling the above-mentioned minimum admission requirements receive and an official letter of admission signed by the legal representative of Ghent University (the Rector), in name of the consortium. Any applicant will need to be granted academic admission by Ghent University, advised by the SINReM Management Board, before starting the program. To this aim, candidates have to prove through their application file that they meet the admission requirements.

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Food Technology at Ghent. -Inter-university programme - Joint degree offered by the two leading universities in Flanders. -High-level research-based education to solve food security problems in developing countries. Read more
Food Technology at Ghent:
-Inter-university programme - Joint degree offered by the two leading universities in Flanders.
-High-level research-based education to solve food security problems in developing countries.
-Farm to fork multi-disciplinary approach.

Food should not only be produced, it should also be delivered to the ultimate consumer in an acceptable form if it is to fulfil its nutritional destiny. To bring foods to the consumer in an acceptable form, on the one hand processing technologies are used to convert edible raw materials into foods with decreased inherent stability; on the other hand preservation technologies are required to increase the stability and shelf life of foods.

Based on these considerations two technological dimensions are the key objectives: the transformation (processing) of raw materials into products suited for human consumption and the role of postharvest and food preservation unit operations in delivering safe and nutritious foods to the end consumer.

Structure

Semester 1 (Sept-Jan)
-Preceded by introduction courses.
-Food Science and Food Engineering at UGent.
Semester 2 (Febr-June)
-Food Science and Food Engineering at KULeuven.
Semester 3 (Sept-Jan) and Semester 4 (Febr-June)
-Major in Food Science and Technology (UGent).
OR
-Major in Postharvest and Food Preservation and Engineering (KULeuven).
-Tailor-made sub programme including elective courses.
-Master dissertation at the university of the major.

Learning outcomes

Our programme will prepare you to become professionals in areas of food technology to equip future personnel with the necessary technical and managerial knowledge, skills and attitudes, which is required to successfully contribute to solving problems related to food security. The programme particularly focuses on countries where food security is a current and future major concern and key challenge.

Other admission requirements

Each application will be evaluated by the Educational Committee for admission. Applicants are fluent in English (written and oral). Candidates from countries where English is not the language of instruction need to have obtained a score of at least 550 on the paper-based TOEFL test (or a score of at least 80 on a internet-based TOEFL test) or at least 6,5 on the IELTS test.

Direct access is given to students who are, based on the specific entrance requirements of those programmes, directly admitted to the Master of Science in Bioscience Engineering: Food Science and Technology (Master of Science in de Bio-ingenieurswetenschappen: Levensmiddelentechnologie) at KU Leuven or to the Master of Science in Bioscience Engineering: Food Science and Nutrition (Master of Science in de Bio-ingenieurswetenschappen: Levensmiddelenwetenschappen en Voeding) at UGent.

Access is given to students who are, based on the specific entrance requirements of those programmes, admitted to the Master of Science in Bioscience Engineering: Food Science and Technology (Master of Science in de Bio-ingenieurswetenschappen: Levensmiddelentechnologie) at KU Leuven or to the Master of Science in Bioscience Engineering: Food Science and Nutrition (Master of Science in de Bio-ingenieurswetenschappen: Levensmiddelenwetenschappen en Voeding) at UGent after successful completion of a preparatory programme (15 to 60 credits) or transitional programme (45 to 90 credits).

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The modern society relies on the work of Chemical Engineers who develop and design the processes that make the useful products for the society by efficient use and management of resources including water and energy while controlling health and safety procedures and protecting the environment. Read more
The modern society relies on the work of Chemical Engineers who develop and design the processes that make the useful products for the society by efficient use and management of resources including water and energy while controlling health and safety procedures and protecting the environment.

Chemical Engineering provides essential tools based on the concept of sustainability and low carbon footprint for changing raw materials into useful products in a safe and cost effective way. Chemical Engineers understand how to alter the chemical, biochemical or physical state of a substance, to create everything from health care products (face creams, shampoo, perfume, drugs) to food (dairy products, cereals, agro-chemicals) and water (desalination for freshwater) to energy (petroleum to nuclear fuels).

Your study at MSc level at Bradford will be a foundation for life aimed at developing a deep understanding of advanced technical principles, analytical tools, and competence in their application together with a wide range of management, personal and professional skills. The course will provide you with essential tools based on the concept of sustainability and low carbon footprint for changing raw materials into useful products in a safe and cost effective way.

Why Bradford?

Flexibility of career path – Choice of three routes:
-Chemical Engineering - advanced chemical engineering and process technology skills for exciting and challenging careers in chemical and process industries
-Petroleum Engineering -matches the needs in different areas of oil and gas production and in medium/small operating and consulting companies
-Polymer Engineering - design and operation of processes to engineer materials with advanced properties leading to careers in diverse manufacturing sectors

Research Strengths - Internationally acclaimed research activities in the following areas:
-Chemical and Petrochemical Engineering
-Polymers
-Energy
-Water
-Pharmaceutical engineering
-Coating and advanced materials engineering

Rankings

Top Five: Chemical Engineering at the University of Bradford is ranked 5th in the UK in the Guardian University League Table 2017/

[[Modules
MSc Chemical & Petroleum Engineering (Chemical Engineering Background)
-Desalination Technology
-Materials & Manufacturing Processes
-Transport Phenomena
-Design Optimisation
-Computational Fluid Dynamics
-Upstream Production & Refinery Operations
-Research Skills
-Food & Pharmaceutical Processes Engineering
-Polymer Engineering
-Risk Management
-Engineering Computational Methods
-MSc Project

MSc Chemical & Petroleum Engineering (non-Chemical Engineering Background)
-Desalination Technology
-Transport Phenomena
-Chemical Engineering Practice
-Material & Manufacturing Processes
-Design Optimisation
-Computational Fluid Dynamics
-Upstream Production & Refinery Operations
-Research Skills
-Food & Pharmaceutical Processes Engineering
-Polymer Engineering
-Risk Management
-Engineering Computational Methods
-MSc Project

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

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The Clean Technology MSc/PGDip aims to train the Environmental Sustainability Managers of the future. Read more
The Clean Technology MSc/PGDip aims to train the Environmental Sustainability Managers of the future. With a focus on industry and commerce, we look at how companies interact with the environment through the raw materials and utilities they use, the products and services they provide, and their impact on the environment and society.

Based in the School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials the course covers a wide field of disciplines and should appeal to any engineer, pure or applied scientist.

A key feature of the course is the involvement of industry and the opportunity to carry out a project based at a local company. This experience is a valuable addition to your CV and has resulted in excellent job opportunities. The use of real life case studies involving group work and role play underpins the course.

You will hear about job opportunities from our Careers Service as well as our extensive network of alumni. The course is broad which makes a variety of career options available.

Examples of roles our recent graduates are now working in include:
-Energy Manager
-Environmental Manager
-Waste Manager
-Health and Safety Managers (public and private sector)
-Sustainability Manager (in industry, public sector, health service, councils, police and universities)
-Officers for the Environment Agency (in areas such as waste, permitting, ecology, air quality)

You will also get involved in making our campus more sustainable. We were recently awarded a 'first' by People and Planet.

The Degree Programme Director, Dr Sue Haile, was awarded the Vice Chancellor's Teaching Award in 2012 and currently holds the RAE ExxonMobil Teaching Fellowship in recognition of her achievements in Sustainability education.

Delivery

The MSc course starts in September and consists of seven months of taught modules followed by a project written up as a dissertation.

Semester one modules are taught across the semester with typically two to three hours of lectures per week, case studies and presentations for each module.

Semester two modules are blocked with each module taking place over an intensive one to two week period.

Placements

We have placed students in over 300 companies (and in several countries) for their dissertation projects. These range from multinationals like Nestle, Procter and Gamble and HSBC to small and medium sized enterprises around the North East.

Projects topics are diverse and have covered:
-Life cycle assessment
-Carbon and water foot printing
-Implementation of Environmental Management Systems
-Energy and waste management
-Pollution impacts and mitigation
-Biodiversity
-Corporate Social Responsibility reporting
-Options for renewable energy

Many of these projects inform our teaching and provide case study material for student workshops.

Facilities

The School occupies five floors in Merz Court where we provide a Student Common Room and a separate Student Study Space.

As a Clean Technology student, you have a dedicated room with material to assist with your course including past dissertations, reference books and posters.

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The Paper Science research degrees are part of a dynamic research area within the school. We have close links with industry and much of our research impacts directly on current industry practice. Read more
The Paper Science research degrees are part of a dynamic research area within the school. We have close links with industry and much of our research impacts directly on current industry practice. Our academic team are highly rated within the paper science sector, and are regarded as experts in their field.

The subject

The range of materials classed as paper is diverse, from bathroom tissue to cardboard; but, despite the physical differences, they have the same chemical composition, consisting primarily of natural cellulosic fibres. The difference in the type of paper arises from the choice of raw material and the influence of the manufacturing process.

Our research

Our research covers the influence of factors, such as recycling and process chemistry, on the physical properties of the sheet, and looks at ways to improve them. We also look at improving the efficiency of raw materials and energy in manufacturing processes.

Industry links

We have strong ties with industry, including collaboration with Aylesford Newsprint, Billerud, Abitibi Consolidated, and M-Real. Our research impacts directly on paper manufacturers, and their suppliers and customers, and we are consistently approached by industry to collaborate and give expert advice on research projects.

Research projects

Some of our recent research projects include:
-Analysis of factors affecting the pore size distribution of paper
-Measurement and modelling of paper shrinkage during manufacture

The influence of sheet uniformity and starch on the strength of recycled board

Facilities

To underpin the research and teaching activities, we have established state-of-the-art laboratories, which allow comprehensive characterisation and development of materials. These facilities range from synthetic/textile fibre chemistry to materials processing and materials testing.

To complement our teaching resources, there is a comprehensive range of electrochemical, electronoptical imaging and surface and bulk analytical facilities and techniques.

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This programme brings together the latest developments in materials science and their application into new technology, providing you with specialist knowledge and skills which will enhance your engineering career. Read more
This programme brings together the latest developments in materials science and their application into new technology, providing you with specialist knowledge and skills which will enhance your engineering career.

It focusses on the theory and computational simulation of material structures for application into automotive, aerospace, technology and energy sectors. You will gain a strong understanding of the properties and behaviours of different substances, from raw materials to finished products, identifying their strengths and limitations, enabling you to find solutions to complex contemporary problems.

Our particular research strengths are drawn into the masters programme, in areas including functional materials (those with extra functionality such as electro-magnetic screening, self-sensing and active materials, and materials with negative thermal expansion and Poisson’s ratios), polymers, composites and bio-materials.

The programme will prepare you for an exciting and rewarding career in materials engineering.

Programme Structure

This programme is modular and consists of eight core engineering, modules totalling 165 credits, and one 15-credit option module.

Core modules

The core modules can include; Mechanics of Materials; Software Modelling; Advanced Materials Engineering; Computer Aided Engineering Design; Research Methodology; Sustainable Engineering; New Developments in Materials Engineering and Engineering MSc Project

Optional modules

Some examples of the optional modules are Contemporary Advanced Materials Research and Functional Materials.

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand.

Teaching and assessment

The programme is delivered through a mix of lectures, seminars, tutorials, industrial presentations, case studies, industry visits, computer simulations, project work and a dissertation. It has particular value in developing transferable skills development including management skills, communication skills, computational techniques, data handling and analysis, problem solving, decision making and research methodology. Many of these skills will be addressed within an industrial and commercial context.

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The Principles of Conservation MA offers students an introduction to the context of heritage conservation, of how conservation works, and of the issues and constraints which affect conservation practice. Read more
The Principles of Conservation MA offers students an introduction to the context of heritage conservation, of how conservation works, and of the issues and constraints which affect conservation practice. The programme explores the principles, theory, ethics and practicalities relating to the care and conservation of a wide variety of objects and structures.

Degree information

Students gain an in-depth understanding of approaches to collections care, preventive conservation, risk assessment, conservation strategies, ethics, management and professionalism, and develop critically aware perspectives on professional practice and research processes.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules - students are required to take the following:
-Issues in Conservation: Context of Conservation
-Issues in Conservation: Understanding Objects
-Conservation in Practice: Preventive Conservation
-Skills for Conservation Management

Optional modules - students choose to follow further optional modules up to the value of 30 credits from the following list of related options (the degree coordinator may seek to guide the option choices made by those intending to carry on for the MSc in Conservation for Archaeology and Museums):
-Approaches to Artefact Studies
-Archaeology and Ethnicity
-Archaeolmetallurgy 1: Mining and Extractive Technology
-Archaeometallurgy 2: Metallic Artefacts
-Archaeological Ceramics Analysis
-Archaeological Glass and Glazes
-Interpreting Pottery
-Materials structure and deterioration of craft materials

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, small-group tutorials, workshops and practical projects. Some modules include visits to conservation workshops and museums, including the British Museum, National Trust and the Museum of London. Assessment is through coursework, essays, poster, portfolio, project reports and the dissertation.

Careers

The Institute of Archaeology has a long history of training in conservation, and many of its graduates are now employed in key posts around the world. Many students go on to take the Conservation for Archaeology and Museums MSc. Others pursue careers in preventive conservation and collections management in local and national museums, art galleries and heritage organisations (mainly in Europe, North America and Asia). Some students have also used this degree as a platform to become a PhD candidate at both UCL and elsewhere.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Conservator/Preparator, The Natural History Museum
-Assistant Curator, Tower of London
-MLitt Art, Style and Design, Christie's Education
-Historic Property Steward, English Heritage

Employability
Knowledge and skills acquired during the programme include the understanding of the roles conservators play in the care and study of cultural heritage, and the ethical issues involved. This is complemented by a basic understanding of raw materials, manufacturing technologies, assessment of condition and the ways in which different values and meanings are assigned to cultural objects. The student will be able to perform visual examination techniques as well as assessments and monitoring of museum collections. They will also be proficient in various types of documentation, analysis of numerical data, report writing, and presentation of conservation issues through posters, social media, talks and essays.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study. Its conservation programmes have an international reputation.

Students benefit from the institute's lively international involvement in archaeology and heritage, from its well-equipped facilities, and access to UCL's extensive science, art and archaeology collections.

The institute's conservation laboratories provide a modern and pleasant learning environment, while the Wolfson Archaeological Science Laboratories provide excellent facilities for the examination and analysis of a wide variety of archaeological materials.

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Wageningen University is one of the leading centres in Food Science and Technology in Europe and the world. The history of the Food Technology programme at Wageningen University goes back more than 50 years; it is considered to be one of the best and most innovative programmes in its field in Europe. Read more

MSc Food Technology

Wageningen University is one of the leading centres in Food Science and Technology in Europe and the world. The history of the Food Technology programme at Wageningen University goes back more than 50 years; it is considered to be one of the best and most innovative programmes in its field in Europe. The programme focuses on aspects of production, composition and design of food products.

Programme summary

The Food Technology programme at Wageningen University has been in place for more than 50 years and is considered one of the best and most innovative programmes in its field in Europe. Wageningen University offers high-level courses and research in all areas of food science; ranging from advanced technical fields, such as Process Engineering or Chemistry, to fields with a more economic or sociological focus, such as Marketing and Gastronomy.

The Wageningen Food Science faculty is larger than that of any other European university. It includes professors and lecturers from a wide range of departments: Food Chemistry, Food Physics, Food Microbiology, Food Quality and Design, and Food Process Engineering. Food Technology covers nearly all aspects of food science and technology. As a result of being a very broad field, students are required to choose one of the specialisations offered.

Specialisations

Within the programme Food Technology you can choose your own specialisation that meets your personal interests.

Ingredient Functionality
This specialisation focuses on the composition of food, especially, on the role of various components, ingredients or structures in the quality and functionality of the final product. It deals with sensory, nutritive and textural aspects of foods in relation to their components. You major in Food Chemistry or Food Physics.

Product Design
While many new products are launched, not all succeed. This specialisation deals with the design and development of new or improved products. The focus is on the processes used in Food Technology, the design of new products from a consumer perspective and on modelling new product concepts/processes and predictive quality control. You major in Food Process Engineering or Food Quality and Design.

Food Innovation and Management
This specialisation combines courses in Food Technology with courses in Management Studies. It is intended for students who wish to work on product development in small businesses or who plan to start their own business. You will do a thesis in Management Studies and an internship in one of the Food Technology groups.

Food Biotechnology and Biorefining
This specialisation focuses on using micro-organisms or enzymes in food production. During this specialisation, you will learn about processes that can be used for biorefinery or agricultural raw materials. The focus is on biotechnological food production. You major in Food Microbiology, Food Chemistry, Food Process Engineering.

Dairy Science and Technology
This specialisation focuses on the dairy production chain. Its core programme consists of dairy-related courses and several additional courses, such as Food Components and Health, Advanced Fermentation Science and Predicting Food Quality. During the second year, you complete a dairy-related thesis research project and internship.

Sustainable Food Process Engineering
This specialisation focuses on the development of processes that are more efficient in their use of resources. Thesis can be carried out under the supervision of one of the following groups: Food Process Engineering; Operations Research and Logistics; Biobased Chemistry and Technology; or Food Quality and Design.

European Masters Degree in Food Studies
This international specialisation is developed in cooperation with the universities of Cork (Ireland), Lund (Sweden) and Agro-Paris Tech (Paris, France) as well as with ten large industrial partners. For more information see: http://www.eurmscfood.nl.

Gastronomy
This specialisation focuses on the molecular science behind products and dishes used in small scale settings. Scientific insights are used to develop improved food preparation techniques. The cultural aspects of food will also receive attention. You major in Food Chemistry, Food Physics or Rural Sociology.

Sensory Science
This specialisation combines Food Technology with Nutrition and Health. You will work with products and humans in different contexts and study how sensory systems function, how this relates to products and how to analyse these aspects.

Your future career

Graduates find jobs with relative ease, especially in the Netherlands and Western Europe. Recent graduates found positions in the private sector (from small- and medium-sized companies to large multinationals), at Wageningen University or other universities as PhD students, and at research institutes domestically and abroad. Graduates also work in the field of process technology at innovation centres, innovative food companies or government agencies. Most achieve management positions.

Student Harmke Klunder
“It is rich in proteins, unsaturated fats, vitamins and is available in large quantities all over the world. You may conclude, ‘The ideal food ingredient.’ However, would you still think it was ideal if you knew it was made from insects? With three other students, we added insects to a third world food product, thereby winning an international competition from the IFT (Institute of Food Technologists). Malnutrition in Africa could be fought by enriching their daily porridge, sorghumpap, with protein-enhanced termites. As food ingredients technologist, it is possible to look beyond the products found on the shelves of the local supermarkets.”

Related programmes:
MSc Food Quality Management
MSc Food Safety
MSc Biotechnology
MSc Nutrition and Health

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Accredited by the internationally respected Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT), our International Logistics and Supply Chain Management MSc covers complex production flows, production processes, distribution and materials management, channels of supply, procurement strategies and logistics systems management in the UK and international logistics sectors. Read more
Accredited by the internationally respected Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT), our International Logistics and Supply Chain Management MSc covers complex production flows, production processes, distribution and materials management, channels of supply, procurement strategies and logistics systems management in the UK and international logistics sectors.

What's covered in the course?

The term logistics addresses every aspect of operation of product-based and service industry sectors. International logistics can affect operations from the initial design process and sourcing of the raw materials and bought in components to the long-term satisfaction of the customer. Customer satisfaction is achieved by ensuring the supply of the right goods, in the right quantity, of the right quality, at the right price, to the right place, anywhere in the world, at the right time.

With companies facing ever-increasing competition, coupled with the need to reduce waste and improve the overall service offered to customers from initial design to final delivery, the need for highly skilled logistics practitioners and managers has never been more pronounced.

Why choose us?

-The course is taught via distance learning, meaning you can fit your studies around your personal and work commitments
-Our accreditation from the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT) ensures our course is fresh, relevant and replete with key industry insight. Upon graduation, you will receive an additional certificate from CILT
-You will gain new skills and knowledge in emerging technologies, processes and production methods

CILT

This degree course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport.

Course in depth

The programme is designed solely for distance learning, part-time study and utilises teaching and learning strategies and tools developed by the University for the delivery of similar programmes, including the virtual learning environment (VLE) Moodle, and the continuing personal and professional development tools available for an effective VLE.

There is an emphasis on active and participative learning, as well as practical work, problem-based learning and group work, all of which will develop your analytical and decision-making skills. Throughout the programme, you will relate real-life problems to industry and commerce, as well as applying new technologies and techniques to solve present and future problems.

This postgraduate programme is designed to allow maximum flexibility in learning to allow you to decide for yourself how and when it is most convenient to fit your studies around employment commitments.

Modules
-Research Methods and Professional Development 15 credits
-Developing Resource Capability 30 credits
-International Project and Process Management 30 credits
-Global Distribution and Materials Management 30 credits
-International Logistics and Systems Management 15 credits
-Strategic Planning for International Supply Chains 15 credits
-Master’s Project 45 credits

Enhancing employability

We will prepare you for employment by providing you with the skills, experience and industry links you’ll need to thrive upon graduating.

The University also has its Graduate+ scheme, an extracurricular programme which is designed to augment and enhance the subject-based skills you develop through the programme. These additional skills and attributes will further enhance your employment options and prospects once you leave the University.

The programme will help you develop your skills in CV writing, presentations, covering letters and creating winning portfolios.

Wajeeh Ahmed has launched his own logistics and supply chain company – Texture Shipping – in Dubai since completing his Master’s course.

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Around 90% of global trade is carried by sea. It remains the most cost efficient method for transporting raw materials and finished products around the world. Read more
Around 90% of global trade is carried by sea. It remains the most cost efficient method for transporting raw materials and finished products around the world. This requires a complex network of contracts involving ship owners and operators, cargo owners, banks and insurers.

The United Kingdom has a long standing expertise in the law relating to these transactions, and provides dispute resolution services for parties with no connection to the UK.

Moreover, the potential exploitation of marine resources (whether mineral or fish) is fertile source of dispute between States. This course offers a detailed investigation of the theoretical and practical issues that arise within maritime law and can help you to develop the expertise necessary to become a specialist in this major area of commercial law.

The LLM Shipping Law course provides you with a general appreciation of current issues in specific areas of law, both domestic and international. It stimulates a critical approach to evaluation of current and proposed regulation and cultivates independent and original thought.

This programme enables you to undertake in-depth research and demonstrate advanced knowledge in specific areas of law.

Distinctive features:

The LLM Shipping Law course is very flexible and offers a wide range of modules providing you with the ability to customise the course to meet your own professional and/or employment needs or interests.

Structure

The course can be completed in one year with full-time study and in two years by part-time study.

You must select at least two of your four taught modules and complete the dissertation in the area of Shipping Law and you may select up to two modules from those listed in any other LLM course or from a combination of LLM courses.

The course is delivered in two stages. Stage One (the taught component) comprises four 30 credit modules; Stage Two comprises the dissertation.

For a list of modules for the FULL-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/shipping-law-llm

For a list of the modules for the PART-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/shipping-law-llm-part-time

Teaching

Study for an LLM is intensive and challenging and it is important that you take full advantage of the teaching that is provided in order to succeed. Attendance at classes and dissertation supervisions is compulsory and we will expect you to be well prepared.

Our teaching is very flexible and your modules may be delivered through seminars or a combination of lectures and seminars. Other teaching methods include the online use of discussion boards, self-access study packs and formative quizzes and activities.

Modules may be diverse in content to cater for the fact that for some LLM courses there may be a high proportion of international students or students with previous qualifications other than in law. Modules are typically led by experienced staff actively engaged in research relevant to their subject area.

Assessment

The School of Law and Politics makes use of both formative and summative assessment.

Formative assessments do not count towards your degree but are designed to give you the opportunity to practice for your summative assessments and enable you and your tutors to assess your progress in your modules. Formative assessments will normally involve written coursework or a class test or may comprise individual student presentations.

Summative assessments count towards your degree. Your marks in these assessments count towards your formal progression from Stage One (taught modules) to Stage Two (the dissertation), and towards the determination of your final award. Summative assessments in Stage One will vary by module but will typically involve written coursework (5,000 word essays), unseen examinations or pre-release examinations. The dissertation (up to 15,000 words) comprises the Stage Two summative assessment.

Career Prospects

A law degree doesn’t restrict graduates to careers within the legal profession. Our law graduates enter professions as diverse as finance, sales and marketing, digital communications and recruitment.

We are committed to extending extracurricular opportunities, helping to enhance your CV in a competitive graduate job market. We work in partnership with lawyers, charities and voluntary organisations to give you the opportunity to practise and extend their skills and we run several Pro Bono schemes and provide advice to members of the community on different legal issues.

Upon successfully completing the LLM course you may have the opportunity to continue your legal study through the School’s PhD programme or through the Centre for Professional Legal Studies professional programmes (the Legal Practice Course or Bar Professional Training Course).

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Become a sustainable engineering expert, learning to use energy and resources so that the natural environment meets the needs of future generations. Read more
Become a sustainable engineering expert, learning to use energy and resources so that the natural environment meets the needs of future generations.

You might already be in industry and are looking to develop your engineering skills for career progression, or you could be keen to further your studies before entering the profession.

Our course enables you to understand sustainability in which ever area of engineering you wish to specialise, from simulation, modelling and eco engineering, to sustainable systems design and green computing technologies, to name just a few.

Our aim is simple - to provide you with a learning experience that helps you to achieve the career you want. That's why our course is made up of option modules - it's an opportunity to tailor the course so that it reflects engineering sustainability issues that are most important to you.

Innovation will be at the heart of your studies, developing your ability to find sustainable solutions to engineering problems anywhere in the world, and equipping you with the skills to design and construct sustainable systems.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including computer science.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/sustainableengineering_msc

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

Bursting with creative solutions to sustainable challenges, your engineering skills will be in demand around the world and across many industries.

If you're currently in a junior management or technical role, you will gain the expertise to progress your career to focus more on the processes and management of environmentally sustainable engineering.

- Engineer
- Environmental surveyor and analyst
- Automation consultant
- Project manager

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will have access to a range of impressive facilities, including FlexSim Discrete simulation software, Dimension Rapid Prototyping machine, ARM development boards, concrete beam production testing, structural element testing and hydraulics equipment, to name just a few.

To meet the government objective of cutting greenhouse gas emissions by four fifths by 2050, UK businesses are increasingly looking for professionals who are experts in how energy is used in buildings. The research findings of the Leeds Sustainability Institute at our University will feed into your course and ensure what you learn reflects the latest, cutting-edge developments in sustainable engineering so you can catch the eye of such employers.

In addition to this, you'll benefit from our strong connections with business leaders and sustainability experts, many of whom provide guest talks to our students.

If you're already working in industry you will also benefit from assignments that allow you to focus on your own place of work, enabling you to apply what you learn straight away in your current role.

Modules

Work Based Learning (option module)
Provides a foundation upon which to develop engineering skills and protocols through a work based or work simulated environment.

Final project
Carry out an in-depth research project, presented in a dissertation, into an area of sustainable engineering.

ICT and Environment (option module)
Examine the environmental impact of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) in an industrial / commercial setting.

Project Management (option module)
Develop the ability to initiate, plan, execute, manage and sign off a project.

Simulation and Modelling (option module)
Use discreet event simulation and 3D modelling techniques to construct virtual factories that use automated systems.

Sustainable Systems Design (option module)
Review current trends in building services systems design, focusing upon design approaches, sustainability considerations, electrical systems and lighting design.

Engineering Systems Control (option module)
Study real time control issues using the latest PLC controls and emulation software.

Lean and Agile Engineering (option module)
Analyse how organisations respond to rapidly changing markets, unknown or changing product requirements.

Green Computing Technologies (option module)
Investigate, identify and evaluate technologies to minimise the energy consumption and environmental impacts of computing resources.

Sustainable Buildings (option module)
Enhance your knowledge of building and system performance in resolution of carbon reduction and achieving long-term sustainability.

Eco Engineering (option module)
Explore the environmental issues for the life cycle of a product, from raw materials to the final recycling.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Agriculture plays a critical role in poverty reduction by providing food, raw materials, employment, and ecosystem services. However, its ability to do this is threatened by demands from rising populations, stagnant yields, and increasing pressures on natural resources. Read more
Agriculture plays a critical role in poverty reduction by providing food, raw materials, employment, and ecosystem services. However, its ability to do this is threatened by demands from rising populations, stagnant yields, and increasing pressures on natural resources. Improving sustainable agricultural productivity and secure and equitable access to food has become a major global challenge.

This course provides students with the essential tools required for theoretical and empirical economic analysis, particularly in relation to the renewable natural resources sector. It aims to equip students with the rigorous technical skills that are generic to the field of agricultural economics, while maintaining a focus on applications rather than abstract analysis. Students are able to take modules orientated towards development, production, marketing, policy, and economic transition. The course is designed for those who wish to pursue a career as an agricultural economist or to undertake higher studies within this area.

Visit the website https://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/programmes/agecon/

Structure

For the MSc in Agricultural Economics students will take:

- 4 core modules
- 3 elective modules*
- 2 research modules

* including one free choice from across all programmes (subject to approval on the Programme Convenor)

Core modules:

- either Economic Principles or Economics and Institutions for Development [the chosen module must be taken in the first year]
- Agricultural Policy and Trade
- Food Security and Social Protection
- Political Economy of Public Policy

Elective modules:

- Applied Econometrics
- Climate Change and Development
- Natural Resource Economics
- Project Planning and Management
- Rural Development
- Rural Finance
- Sustainable Land Management
- Understanding Poverty (subject to approval by the Programme Convenor)
- Water Resources Management
- One module selected from another programme, with the approval of the Programme Convenor

Research component:

- Dissertation
- Research Methods

Strengthening quantitative skills:
It is recommended that students whose basic quantitative analysis skills are weak should also take a non-examined module:Quantitative methods (CF04) at or near the start of their studies. Study materials may be obtained from CeDEP’s online learning environment.

Teaching & Learning

1. Academic level

All CeDEP programmes are taught to Master’s (Second Cycle) level, which involves building upon existing knowledge and understanding typically associated with the Bachelor’s (First Cycle) level or its equivalent. Study at Master’s level requires:

- originality in developing and/or applying ideas, and extending or enhancing previous learning

- application of knowledge and understanding, including problem solving in new or unfamiliar environments within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts

- integration of knowledge and handling of complexity

- formulating judgements with incomplete or limited information, including reflection on social and ethical responsibilities

- clear and unambiguous communication of conclusions, and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- learning skills to study in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous

Prospective students should note that distance education of this kind demands a high degree of commitment, determination and self-discipline. Whilst CeDEP provides significant support through the tutorial system and by other means, students taking on programmes of this nature should possess a strong measure of self-reliance.

2. Study Expectations

- How long will it take?:
For students in full time employment, the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma, usually take three or four years to complete and the Certificate 2 years.

- When can I study?
You can begin your studies in either February or June. The examinations for all students are in October. The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June.

- How many hours a week?
For the 30 week study period starting in February, you will need to allocate 5–6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15 week session, 10–12 hours per module, per week is recommended.

- How many modules can I take per study year?
We strongly recommend that students should take only one or two modules in their first year, so that they can adjust to studying at a distance, whilst combining this with work and family life.

Students wishing to complete an MSc in two years they will need to enrol/pay for four core modules and both Research Methods and the Dissertation in the first year although the Dissertation is written and submitted in the second year. Please contact your programme convenor by email.

3. Assessment

- How you will be assessed
For each module you will sit a two-hour unseen examination held on a specific date in October, worth 80% of your total module mark. There is also an Examined Assignment (worth 20% of the total module mark) which is submitted during the study year and marked by your tutor.

- Examination arrangements
Examinations are held in students’ countries of residence, using the University of London’s network of approved Overseas Examination Authorities. Fees for taking examinations at all examination centres other than London are the responsibility of the student.

Assignments are submitted to CeDEP electronically via the online learning environment.

- Assessment of the Research Component
The Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541) are not assessed through final written examinations. These two modules constitute the Research Component of an MSc and are assessed entirely by submitted coursework.

4. Research Component

In order to qualify for an MSc, it is mandatory for CeDEP students to pass the Research Component.

The Research Component comprises two of the nine modules necessary for completion of an MSc. These are a Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541). The modules are assessed as follows:

- P506 through two examined assignments submitted during the study year
- P541 through a 10,000 word dissertation

The Research Component is studied over two consecutive years. The Research Methods module (P506) must be studied and successfully passed before the Dissertation module (P541). This is because it provides skills and techniques which will assist with the subsequent development and conduct of your research and preparation of your dissertation. Students are required to enrol and pay for P506 and P541 at the same time.

The dissertation is usually carried out during the final year of registration with CeDEP. Students conduct desk- or field-based research in a relevant topic of their choice. All research topics are subject to approval and each student is assigned a personal supervisor. Background reading and preparation of the proposal take place between the October exams and commencement of the final study year in February.

Scholarships

For further details and information on external scholarships visit the Scholarships section (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/)

Career prospects for graduates

Typically, graduates of this programme will find work as applied economists in the following fields:

- government ministries undertaking work in agricultural policy analysis
- public and private sector companies involved in upstream and downstream agricultural industries
- international and non-governmental organisations concerned with the economic analysis of agricultural sector issues
- applied research and teaching in institutions of research and higher education

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/applying/

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Do you want to develop your technical poultry production practice to postgraduate level?. Harper Adams University has developed a Masters degree in Poultry Production. Read more
Do you want to develop your technical poultry production practice to postgraduate level?

Harper Adams University has developed a Masters degree in Poultry Production.

The course

The poultry meat and egg sectors continue to show a consistent growth across all continents, with greater levels of expansion in developing regions of the world. Poultry meat production exceeded 100 milion tons in 2013 with broiler production accounting for all but 10 per cent of this production. With the anticipated expansion in world human population of 9.3 billion primarily in developing countries the demand four poultry meat is expected to continue into the future with India and China representing particularly large markets. Egg production is also expected to continue its expansion. Poultry is a major consumer of animal feed grain, with 40% of the total being used by poultry. There will be competing demands for this feed, which the poultry sector will need to respond to.

The UK poultry industry is characterised by a small number of large integrated companies a position increasingly mirrored on a global scale. Whilst there is a clear opportunity for growth there are a number of known challenges including feed price volatility in the short to medium term, the increased competition for raw materials in the longer term, poultry health, human health related issues (e.g. Campylobacter), concerns over antibiotic use.

The global poultry sector is particularly well placed to address the needs for increasing quantities of animal derived protein, this programme will provide the platform for students to address these and other emerging issues through focused and tailored assignments allowing students to plot their own pathway of learning.

The programme will serve to offer a portfolio of multidisciplinary topics within a selection of specialised integrative modules to advance students’ understanding of the relevant biosciences underpinning poultry farming. This will be presented within a theme of mono-gastric animal production where there are many similarities of principle and scientific approaches.

In summary the course:

Supports students to develop a level of understanding and knowledge that allows them to work as subject specialists and lead developments within poultry production systems.
Supports students to evaluate the wider consequences of animal production systems, mitigating any detrimental effects on animal welfare, food quality and the natural environment.
Supports students in their development of an advanced understanding of the biological factors that limit animal production and the scientific, technological, economic and social factors that influence animal production systems.

How will it benefit me?

The course will:

Prepare students for a career in Poultry Production.
Offer vocational training in the area of applied Poultry Production.
Prepare students for PhD studies.

Modules are usually delivered as an intensive short course, taught over a one week block, with a maximum of 5 days per 15 credit module providing in the region of 35 hours of contact time.
Teaching may consist of formal lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical exercises, laboratory sessions, study visits or the use of guest speakers.
The PgC, PgD and MSc are offered full-time and part-time to allow those in work to study towards an award at a pace that suits their needs and time available.
The PgC is particularly well suited to those currently working in the sector as a means of initial training or CPD.

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