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Masters Degrees (Raw Materials)

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What is the Master of Food Technology all about?.  The Interuniversity Programme in Food Technology (IUPFOOD) focuses on . Read more

What is the Master of Food Technology all about?

 The Interuniversity Programme in Food Technology (IUPFOOD) focuses on two technological dimensions of prime and crucial importance in food processing and preservation:

  • the transformation (processing) of raw materials into products suited for human consumption
  • the role of postharvest and food preservation unit operations in delivering safe and nutritious foods to the end consumer.

These two concerns are directly translated in the focus points of the IUPFOOD programme.

The InterUniversity Programme in Food Technology (IUPFOOD) is jointly organised by KU Leuven and Ghent University (UGent). The programme builds on KU Leuven’s and UGent’s combined expertise in research and education in the field of food technology.

Structure

The Master of Science in Food Technology (120 ECTS) consists of four major segments:

  • In-depth education segment (60 ECTS)
  • Specialisation segment (18 ECTS)
  • Elective courses segment (12 ECTS)
  • Master’s thesis segment (30 ECTS) 

 In the first year of the Master's programme, students will spend the first semester in Ghent and the second semester in Leuven. The second stage courses of the majors 'Postharvest and Food Preservation Engineering' and 'Food Science and Technology' are taught respectively at KU Leuven and UGent; at both universities, optional courses and thesis research topics are offered.

Objectives

1. Has profound and detailed scientific knowledge and understanding of the (bio)chemical processes in biological raw materials during postharvest storage and their transformation into food products.

2. Has profound and detailed scientific knowledge and understanding of engineering principles of unit operations and their use in the transformation of raw materials into food products as a basis for qualitative and quantitative design, evaluation and optimization of food process and preservation unit operations.

3. Has profound and detailed scientific knowledge and understanding of ecology, physiology, detection, use and combat microorganisms in food systems.

4. Has profound and detailed scientific knowledge and understanding of (bio)-chemical, physical and microbiological methods for analysis of raw materials and foods including the skills to identify and use such methods in the context of research, process and product design and optimization and food control.

5. Has profound and detailed scientific knowledge in different fields of product technology such as vegetable products, dairy products, meat products, fish products, cereal derived products and fermented products including aspects of product development in relation to consumer behavior.

6. Can critically evaluate the functionality and safety of foods in the context of human health including the relation with raw materials and their processing into foods based on analytical data and scientific literature data.

7. Masters the skills and has acquired the problem solving capacity to analyze problems of food quality and safety along the food chain and to elaborate interdisciplinary and integrated qualitative and quantitative approaches and solutions (including implementation) appreciating the complexity of food systems and the processes used while taking into account technical limitations and socio-economic aspects such as feasibility, risks, and sustainability.

8. Has acquired a broad perspective to problems of food security, related to postharvest and food processing, in low income developing countries.

9. Can investigate and understand interaction with other relevant science domains and integrate them within the context of more advanced ideas and practical applications and problem solving.

10. Can demonstrate critical consideration of and reflection on known and new theories, models or interpretation within the broad field of food technology.

11. Can identify and apply appropriate research methods and techniques to design, plan and execute targeted experiments or simulations independently and critically evaluate and interpret the collected data.

12. Can develop and execute independently original scientific research and/or apply innovative ideas within research environments to create new and/or improved insights and/or solutions for complex (multi)disciplinary research questions respecting the results of other researchers.

13. Can convincingly and professionally communicate personal research, thoughts, ideas, and opinions of proposals, both written and oral, to different actors and stakeholders from peers to a general public.

14. Has acquired project management skills to act independently and in a multidisciplinary team as team member or team leader in international and intercultural settings.

Career perspectives

IUPFOOD's objective is to offer a programme that takes the specific needs and approaches of developing countries into account. The IUPFOOD programme prepares graduates for various tasks, including teaching and research. IUPFOOD alumni are mainly active in the following sectors:

  • academic institutions (as teaching and/or research staff)
  • research institutes (as research staff)
  • nongovernmental organisations (in different capacities)
  • governmental institutes (e.g. in research programmes, quality surveillance programmes or national nutritional programmes)
  • private industry (in particular jobs related to quality control)


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The MSc in Advanced Process Integration and Design started in the Department of Chemical Engineering (UMIST) over twenty years ago. Read more

The MSc in Advanced Process Integration and Design started in the Department of Chemical Engineering (UMIST) over twenty years ago. The programme was a result of emerging research from the Centre for Process Integration, initially focused on energy efficiency, but expanded to include efficient use of raw materials and emissions reduction. Much of the content of the course stems from research related to energy production, including oil and gas processing.

The MSc in Advanced Process Integration and Design aims to enable students with a prior qualification in chemical engineering to acquire a deep and systematic conceptual understanding of the principles of process design and integration in relation to the petroleum, gas and chemicals sectors of the process industries.

Overview of course structure and content

In the first trimester, all students take course units on energy systems, utility systems and computer aided process design. Energy Systems develops systematic methods for designing heat recovery systems, while Utility Systems focuses on provision of heat and power in the process industries. Computer Aided Process Design develops skills for modelling and optimisation of chemical processes.

In the second trimester, the students choose three elective units from a range covering reaction systems, distillation systems, distributed and renewable energy systems, biorefining, and oil and gas processing. These units focus on design, optimisation and integration of process technologies and their associated heat and power supply systems.

In two research-related units, students develop their research skills and prepare a proposal for their research project. These units develop students skills in critical assessment of research literature, group work, written and oral communication, time management and research planning.

Students then carry out the research project during the third trimester. In these projects, students apply their knowledge and skills in process design and integration to investigate a wide range of process technologies and design methodologies. Recent projects have addressed modelling, assessment and optimisation of petroleum refinery hydrotreating processes, crude oil distillation systems, power plants, waste heat recovery systems, refrigeration cycles with mixed refrigerants, heat recovery steam generators, biorefining and biocatalytic processes and waste-to-energy technologies.

The course also aims to develop students' skills in implementing engineering models, optimisation and process simulation, in the context of chemical processes, using bespoke and commercially available software.

Industrial relevance of the course

A key feature of the course is the applicability and relevance of the learning to the process industries. The programme is underpinned by research activities in the Centre for Process Integration within the School. This research focuses on energy efficiency, the efficient use of raw materials, the reduction of emissions reduction and operability in the process industries. Much of this research has been supported financially by the Process Integration Research Consortium for over 30 years. Course units are updated regularly to reflect emerging research and design technologies developed at the University of Manchester and also from other research groups worldwide contributing to the field.

The research results have been transferred to industry via research communications, training and software leading to successful industrial application of the new methodologies. The Research Consortium continues to support research in process integration and design in Manchester, identifying industrial needs and challenges requiring further research and investigation and providing valuable feedback on practical application of the methodologies. In addition, the Centre for Process Integration has long history of delivering material in the form of continuing professional development courses, for example in Japan, China, Malaysia, Australia, India, Saudi Arabia, Libya, Europe, the United States, Brazil and Colombia.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is a combination of examinations and submitted coursework.

Examinations take place in the January and May of each year at the University of Manchester. Distance learning students who do not live in mainland UK can take examinations at a local British Council office or University. You would be expected to meet the cost of the supervision of each exam if taken away from Manchester.

The Dissertation Project forms a major part of the MSc course and provides useful practice in carrying out academic research and writing in an area that you are interested in. You learn to apply your knowledge by solving industry-based problems and demonstrate the knowledge you have acquired by solving an original problem. You choose a topic from a wide selection provided by the University's teaching staff and by industry.  Students have the opportunity of working with large engineering or engineering software development companies and The Process Integration Research Consortium (comprising approximately 30 international companies) also provides opportunities for students to discuss project work in a large number of engineering related areas.

Course unit details

A full list of course units is avaialble here

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

The MSc course in Advanced Process Design and Integration typically attracts 40 students; our graduates have found employment with major international oil and petrochemical companies (e.g. Shell, BP, Reliance and Petrobras and Saudi Aramco), chemical and process companies (e.g. Air Products), engineering, consultancy and software companies (e.g. Jacobs and Aspen Tech) and academia.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is accredited by the IChemE (Institution of Chemical Engineers).



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Goal of the pro­gramme. Read more

Goal of the pro­gramme

Do you want to have an impact on what people will eat in the future? Would you like to know what makes food taste good, due to the raw materials and processing technologies? Do you want to know how we could improve the healthiness, safety, ecology and ethics of food and food processing? Are you interested in exploring innovations in food, such as "pulled oats" or using insects as food? If you answered yes, enrol in Food Sciences master’s programme.

The food industry is the 4th most important employer both in Finland and internationally. This industry is constantly looking for experts to solve new problems. With a Master’s degree in Food Sciences you could embark on a career in the food industry; in a food, agricultural or environmental control laboratory; as a teacher, researcher, or self-employed entrepreneur; or as an expert in government ministries or other expert organisations.

As a master in Food Sciences you will be able to help the food industry develop and renew itself, since you will possess know-how on:

  • Raw materials and processes, including their theoretical basics
  • Different food constituents and their impact on food quality
  • Factors that ensure good quality and food safety

You can enrol in the Food Sciences masters' programme if you hold a bachelors' degree in Food Sciences or in Molecular Biosciences. You can also apply to the programme if you have a bachelors' degree in a related area of the natural sciences from a Finnish or foreign university, or if you have a degree from a Finnish university of applied sciences within food sciences or other related areas of the natural sciences.

Your studies in the Food Sciences masters' programme will offer you a broad education covering courses in the composition and processing of food, in the structures and chemical reactions of food proteins, lipids and carbohydrates, and in food legislation and the safety of food additives.

Further information about the studies on the Master's programme website.

Pro­gramme con­tents

Food Sciences on the Viikki campus is a nationally unique programme that covers the whole food production chain from primary production via food processing to consumers. Food Sciences is an internationally appreciated field of education: food research at the University of Helsinki has been highly ranked.

Your masters' studies in food sciences will enable you to make an impact on the the creation of innovative solutions for the whole chain of food production. You will:

  • Study the theory and applications of the broad area of food sciences in lecture courses and in group work 
  • Increase your knowledge of food composition, processing, structure, and legislation
  • Deepen your knowledge of how the reactions of different food components, production processes and packaging affect the structure, sensory quality, healthiness and safety of animal and plant based foods
  • Learn laboratory working skills
  • Acquire employment skills for example by training in the food industry

Se­lec­tion of the study track

You can affect the sort of expertise you would like to gain. You can tailor your Master’s degree by choosing special studies in food chemistry, food technology, and in the science and technology relating to meat, dairy and cereals.

You can also complement your expertise in food sciences with, for example, studies in food development, food safety, food research and analysis, economics, marketing, sustainable food production, microbiology, biotechnology or nutrition.



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Content. The increasing demand for raw materials, their price volatility, the production concentration and the market distortions imposed by some countries, confront Europe and other world regions with a number of challenges along the entire value chain. Read more
Content

The increasing demand for raw materials, their price volatility, the production concentration and the market distortions imposed by some countries, confront Europe and other world regions with a number of challenges along the entire value chain. To tackle this supply risk challenge and to deal with environmental problems arising from too large emissions of waste (such as CO2), technological innovation is required with respect to exploration of new resources and sustainable primary mining, sustainable use of resources in specific products and production processes (e.g. substitution of critical metals in materials), prevention of waste generation, valorisation of secondary (alternative) resources and recovery/recycling of resources from end-of-life products.

The International Master of Science in Sustainable and Innovative Natural Resource Management (SINReM) aims at educating a new range of professionals with a holistic overview on resource management and up-to-date processing technologies, who are familiar with sustainability concepts and possess an innovative mind-set to boost the economic importance of this sector.

Students will be acquainted with the different (technological) options for optimizing flows of natural resources in the different parts of the chain, ranging from resource exploration over sustainable materials use and use of resources in production processes to recovery/recycling of resources from end-of-life products. The focus is on developing ground-breaking technologies, engineering and re-inventing the value chain to make it more sustainable. Students will get a broad view on the entire value chain in its different aspects.

Networking and exchange of knowledge and experience between different nationalities, between academic and non-academic partners and between scholars and students will be promoted.

SINReM is offered by a consortium consisting of 3 Institutes of Higher Education:

Universiteit Gent / Ghent University (UGent, Gent, Belgium);
Uppsala University (UU, Uppsala, Sweden);
TU Bergakademie Freiberg (TUFreiberg, Freiberg, Germany).

The SINReM programme is (co)financed by the European Institute of Innovation and Technology within the EIT Raw Materials programme and aims at achieving an EIT label. EIT-labelled educational programmes foster students to become more creative, innovative and entrepreneurs.

Career Perspectives

Graduates are qualified for a professional career in the private (supporting companies in making processes, products and services more sustainable), research (applied research at universities, research institutes or companies) or public sector (consulting in local, regional and (inter)national administrations, defining and implementing sustainable development policies).
Graduates have an entrepreneurial mindset, a multidisciplinary view and creative innovative problem-based technology development skills

Structure

This 2-year programme contains 120 ECTS credit units and leads to the joint diploma of International Master of Science in Sustainable and Innovative Natural Resource Management.

In order to expose all students to different institutional settings, student mobility within Europe is an integral part of the programme.

General Entrance Module - Semester I 30 ECTS - Ghent University
Advanced Module - Semester II 30 ECTS - Uppsala University
Field trip - Summer School - University of Freiburg
Advanced Module II - Semester III 60 ECTS - choose a one of the following majors containing (elective) courses in combination with master dissertation research:
geo-resource exploration (Uppsala)
sustainable processes (Freiberg)
sustainable materials and resource recovery (Ghent)

All students will be moving as a cohort to Gent, Freiberg and Uppsala in the first year, which approach has significant networking and social cohesion advantages.

During this first year, students are introduced to the value chain, management of natural resources, the circular economy, its economic, policy and legal aspects, inventory techniques, the clean technology concept and life cycle assessment tools to assess sustainability of products, services and processes. Moreover, students are exposed to a basic training in the different technological tools that can be used to intervene in different parts of the value chain (geo-resource exploration, sustainable (chemical) extraction processes, sustainable materials and resource recovery technology).

In the second year students have the option to further specialize by selecting a major and conducting thesis research. They interact with the professional sector through cooperation in thesis research, internships, lectures and seminars.

Admission Requirements

To be admitted, candidates must have at least a bachelor degree (minimum 180 ECTS credits) in engineering or science (physics, chemistry, biology, mathematics, earth science, materials science) including 15 ECTS in mathematics and/or physics and 10 ECTS pure or applied chemistry or an equivalent level from a recognised university or Engineering College.

In terms of language requirements the following is currently applied in or acceptable by the partner institutes. Changes to these requirements are however admissible (upon approval by the MB).

Nationals of Australia, Botswana, Canada, Eritrea, Gambia, Ghana, Guyana, India, Ireland, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Namibia, New Zealand, Nigeria, Philippines, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Trinidad and Tobago, Uganda, UK, USA, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, need to send proof of at least one year - 60 ECTS (finished successfully) - of comprehensive English-based instruction at a HEI do not need to present a language certificate but a mode of instruction.

Candidates from any other nationality need to present test results of one of the following tests (validity of 5 years; TOEFL/IELTS predictive tests and TOEIC will not be accepted):

TOEFL IBT 86
TOEFL PBT 570
ACADEMIC IELTS 6,5 overall score with a min. of 6 for writing

Candidates apply online through a standard online application form. All candidates fulfilling the above-mentioned minimum admission requirements receive and an official letter of admission signed by the legal representative of Ghent University (the Rector), in name of the consortium. Any applicant will need to be granted academic admission by Ghent University, advised by the SINReM Management Board, before starting the program. To this aim, candidates have to prove through their application file that they meet the admission requirements.

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Food Technology at Ghent. -Inter-university programme - Joint degree offered by the two leading universities in Flanders. -High-level research-based education to solve food security problems in developing countries. Read more
Food Technology at Ghent:
-Inter-university programme - Joint degree offered by the two leading universities in Flanders.
-High-level research-based education to solve food security problems in developing countries.
-Farm to fork multi-disciplinary approach.

Food should not only be produced, it should also be delivered to the ultimate consumer in an acceptable form if it is to fulfil its nutritional destiny. To bring foods to the consumer in an acceptable form, on the one hand processing technologies are used to convert edible raw materials into foods with decreased inherent stability; on the other hand preservation technologies are required to increase the stability and shelf life of foods.

Based on these considerations two technological dimensions are the key objectives: the transformation (processing) of raw materials into products suited for human consumption and the role of postharvest and food preservation unit operations in delivering safe and nutritious foods to the end consumer.

Structure

Semester 1 (Sept-Jan)
-Preceded by introduction courses.
-Food Science and Food Engineering at UGent.
Semester 2 (Febr-June)
-Food Science and Food Engineering at KULeuven.
Semester 3 (Sept-Jan) and Semester 4 (Febr-June)
-Major in Food Science and Technology (UGent).
OR
-Major in Postharvest and Food Preservation and Engineering (KULeuven).
-Tailor-made sub programme including elective courses.
-Master dissertation at the university of the major.

Learning outcomes

Our programme will prepare you to become professionals in areas of food technology to equip future personnel with the necessary technical and managerial knowledge, skills and attitudes, which is required to successfully contribute to solving problems related to food security. The programme particularly focuses on countries where food security is a current and future major concern and key challenge.

Other admission requirements

Each application will be evaluated by the Educational Committee for admission. Applicants are fluent in English (written and oral). Candidates from countries where English is not the language of instruction need to have obtained a score of at least 550 on the paper-based TOEFL test (or a score of at least 80 on a internet-based TOEFL test) or at least 6,5 on the IELTS test.

Direct access is given to students who are, based on the specific entrance requirements of those programmes, directly admitted to the Master of Science in Bioscience Engineering: Food Science and Technology (Master of Science in de Bio-ingenieurswetenschappen: Levensmiddelentechnologie) at KU Leuven or to the Master of Science in Bioscience Engineering: Food Science and Nutrition (Master of Science in de Bio-ingenieurswetenschappen: Levensmiddelenwetenschappen en Voeding) at UGent.

Access is given to students who are, based on the specific entrance requirements of those programmes, admitted to the Master of Science in Bioscience Engineering: Food Science and Technology (Master of Science in de Bio-ingenieurswetenschappen: Levensmiddelentechnologie) at KU Leuven or to the Master of Science in Bioscience Engineering: Food Science and Nutrition (Master of Science in de Bio-ingenieurswetenschappen: Levensmiddelenwetenschappen en Voeding) at UGent after successful completion of a preparatory programme (15 to 60 credits) or transitional programme (45 to 90 credits).

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The modern society relies on the work of Chemical Engineers who develop and design the processes that make the useful products for the society by efficient use and management of resources including water and energy while controlling health and safety procedures and protecting the environment. Read more
The modern society relies on the work of Chemical Engineers who develop and design the processes that make the useful products for the society by efficient use and management of resources including water and energy while controlling health and safety procedures and protecting the environment.

Chemical Engineering provides essential tools based on the concept of sustainability and low carbon footprint for changing raw materials into useful products in a safe and cost effective way. Chemical Engineers understand how to alter the chemical, biochemical or physical state of a substance, to create everything from health care products (face creams, shampoo, perfume, drugs) to food (dairy products, cereals, agro-chemicals) and water (desalination for freshwater) to energy (petroleum to nuclear fuels).

Your study at MSc level at Bradford will be a foundation for life aimed at developing a deep understanding of advanced technical principles, analytical tools, and competence in their application together with a wide range of management, personal and professional skills. The course will provide you with essential tools based on the concept of sustainability and low carbon footprint for changing raw materials into useful products in a safe and cost effective way.

Why Bradford?

Flexibility of career path – Choice of three routes:
-Chemical Engineering - advanced chemical engineering and process technology skills for exciting and challenging careers in chemical and process industries
-Petroleum Engineering -matches the needs in different areas of oil and gas production and in medium/small operating and consulting companies
-Polymer Engineering - design and operation of processes to engineer materials with advanced properties leading to careers in diverse manufacturing sectors

Research Strengths - Internationally acclaimed research activities in the following areas:
-Chemical and Petrochemical Engineering
-Polymers
-Energy
-Water
-Pharmaceutical engineering
-Coating and advanced materials engineering

Rankings

Top Five: Chemical Engineering at the University of Bradford is ranked 5th in the UK in the Guardian University League Table 2017/

[[Modules
MSc Chemical & Petroleum Engineering (Chemical Engineering Background)
-Desalination Technology
-Materials & Manufacturing Processes
-Transport Phenomena
-Design Optimisation
-Computational Fluid Dynamics
-Upstream Production & Refinery Operations
-Research Skills
-Food & Pharmaceutical Processes Engineering
-Polymer Engineering
-Risk Management
-Engineering Computational Methods
-MSc Project

MSc Chemical & Petroleum Engineering (non-Chemical Engineering Background)
-Desalination Technology
-Transport Phenomena
-Chemical Engineering Practice
-Material & Manufacturing Processes
-Design Optimisation
-Computational Fluid Dynamics
-Upstream Production & Refinery Operations
-Research Skills
-Food & Pharmaceutical Processes Engineering
-Polymer Engineering
-Risk Management
-Engineering Computational Methods
-MSc Project

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

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The AMIR Master program focuses on the raw material value chain, with particular emphasis on recycling. The two main objectives are. Read more

The AMIR Master program focuses on the raw material value chain, with particular emphasis on recycling. The two main objectives are:

  • Educate students to become highly-skilled European professionals with expertise in various types of materials. This expertise will enable them to develop, at a large and ambitious scale, new methods for material recycling. In addition, the AMIR program includes classes on transferable skills such as innovation, ethics, intellectual property, life cycle assessment, sustainability and advanced research strategies.
  • Develop a deep entrepreneurship mind-set with the help and expertise of associated businesses, incubators and innovation services as well as a large panel of industries.

Program structure

Semesters 1 and 2

The first year of the Master program takes place at the University of Bordeaux in partnership with the research and technology organization, Tecnalia. Students learn about general and technical aspects of the raw material value chain (general chemistry, material science, lifecycle of materials) as well as about the main outcomes of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT): sustainability, intellectual transformation, value judgments (ethical, scientific and sustainability challenges), creativity, innovation, leadership and entrepreneurship. 

Semesters 3 and 4

The third semester (Master 2) is dedicated to a specialization in one of the partner universities. This part of the program offers the possibility to follow selected advanced materials classes for various applications (energy, e-mobility - magnets, transport, environments - catalysis, etc.).

The specializations are:

  • Darmstadt: material design for recycling
  • Liege: metallurgy and metals recycling
  • Madrid: mineral recycling for construction and other sectors 

The program is completed with a three to six months’ internship (Master thesis).

Strengths of this Master program

  • AMIR graduates are international entrepreneurs and innovators, able to work anywhere in Europe and beyond.
  • High-level education and research environment.
  • Practical insights with advanced research labs.
  • High-quality internships.
  • Mandatory international and intersectoral mobility.
  • Supported by the European Institute of Innovation & Technology (EIT) and the International Master program of the Bordeaux “Initiative of Excellence” (IdEx).

After this Master program?

The AMIR program benefits from a strong academic, research and industrial network.

After graduation, students are fully prepared to integrate the working environment as professionals in the recycling sector (process optimization, materials design, plant administration, project management, etc.) whether it be in the industrial field or governmental organizations. Possible sectors include: information and communication technologies, building construction, energy, machinery tools, mobility.

Graduates also obtain the necessary skills and knowledge to set up their own company or work in sales and marketing.

Finally, further doctoral studies are another possibility and students may apply for Ph.D. programs in Europe, including those offered in the framework of the European Multifunctional Materials Institute (EMMI : http://www.emmi-materials.eu).



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The only programme of its kind in the world, GCU's MSc Climate Justice explores one of the most pressing issues of our times. climate justice, where climate change, human rights and policy development intersect. Read more

The only programme of its kind in the world, GCU's MSc Climate Justice explores one of the most pressing issues of our times: climate justice, where climate change, human rights and policy development intersect.

Each year, the effects of climate change become more pronounced. People all over the world are already being displaced due to rising sea levels, crop-destroying droughts and disasters like floods and forest fires. Over the next decade, these climate consequences will only intensify. How we chose to move forward may be one of the most important ethical questions of the 21st century.

Your MSc Climate Justice programme will prepare you to think strategically and contribute to the growing field of climate justice. You might help craft public policy at a local or global level, work with a non-profit or intergovernmental agency, assist a developmental organisation or pursue academic research in the field.

Taking a practical, multi-disciplinary approach, the curriculum offers a solid foundation in the complex issues of climate justice.

  • Explore topics in resources and sustainability
  • Learn about carbon management and renewable energy technologies
  • Study how water access affects public health
  • Investigate gender issues and their implications for human rights
  • Master the basics of project management and environmental management

GCU's Centre for Climate Justice is taking the lead, collaborating to drive research and policy in the field. At GCU, the University for the Common Good, you'll join a community dedicated to achieving meaningful social change. You'll find friends, classmates, colleagues and professors who share your values in the fight for human rights.

As we come to this crossroads, we believe in working together to transform our society and strengthen our communities - for the common good.

What you will study

The MSc Climate Justice explores the principles that underpin climate justice; human rights, development and climate change. The programme is tailored to provide a practical angle to climate justice to allow students to graduate with a Masters which provides them with skills, approaches and methodologies for addressing climate justice in their future work plans. It can be studied full-time for one year or part-time over two years.

Resources and Sustainability

This module provides an overview of our resources (water, air, forests, soil, raw materials, energy, etc) and how to critically analyse how and why these resources are exploited on a global scale. This module will focus on both the natural and social and economic sciences to provide a holistic understanding of sustainable resource use and management.

Climate Change and Carbon Management

Develops a student's understanding and knowledge of global climate change issues and the role of built environment in it, and an ability to conduct practical investigation of carbon management in the context of the built environment.

Climate Justice

Provides an overview of key issues that underpin climate justice (injustice) and the history of the climate justice movement and critique thereof Climate injustice and human rights to life are explored via addressing equity and equality including the implications, complexities and trade-offs between climate change and poverty. Controversial issues are examined by exploring challenging current economic models and theories and analysing failures(Kyoto, CDM and MDGs).

Human Rights, Gender and Development

This module critically examines the variety of ways in which a rights based approach seeks to engage with the impact of climate change. It does so by considering climate change within broader debates surrounding human rights and the structured nature of vulnerability in relation to gender and development.

Environmental Ethics and Climate Change

Critically examines the ethics of climate change. Rather than taking the concept of climate justice as its starting point, however, the focus is on locating the phenomena of climate change within the wider debates and schools of thought that are prevalent in the field of environmental ethics.

Climate Change, Adaptation and Mitigation

Develops a student's understanding and knowledge of global climate change issues and the ways that differing political cultures can impact adaptation and mitigation measures. In addition, sectoral responses to climate change will be explored and country/regional mitigation strategies will be considered, using climate modelling to investigate how decisions regarding adaptation and mitigation emerge.

Water, Justice and Public Health

Develops a student's understanding and knowledge of the important links between water and public health and explores the water/food/energy nexus that prevents developing world countries from making the most of economic development opportunities. It discusses whether developed world solutions are appropriate or even desirable for implementation in the developing world.

Renewable Energy Technologies

The module concentrates on therenewable energy technologies most likely to succeed in the UK and other temperate countries, i.e. solar energy, energy from waste, wind, hydro and biomass. Renewable energy is regarded as an integral part of a sustainable development strategy and is intimately linked to safe water access and agriculture based economic development.

Master's Dissertation/Project

Provides the student with the opportunity to conduct an individual in-depth piece of research, into a topic of their own choosing. This includes elements of time management, achieving deadlines and outputs and different ways of presenting work.

Assessment methods

Students will be assessed via a combination of coursework, oral presentations, on-line discussions, computer based exercises, case study analysis, reports and a final dissertation.

Graduate prospects

Graduates of the MSc Climate Justice will find rewarding careers with development organisations, the UN and related organisations, government agencies and non-profit organisations - as well as within academic and research institutions.



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The Clean Technology MSc/PGDip aims to train the Environmental Sustainability Managers of the future. Read more
The Clean Technology MSc/PGDip aims to train the Environmental Sustainability Managers of the future. With a focus on industry and commerce, we look at how companies interact with the environment through the raw materials and utilities they use, the products and services they provide, and their impact on the environment and society.

Based in the School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials the course covers a wide field of disciplines and should appeal to any engineer, pure or applied scientist.

A key feature of the course is the involvement of industry and the opportunity to carry out a project based at a local company. This experience is a valuable addition to your CV and has resulted in excellent job opportunities. The use of real life case studies involving group work and role play underpins the course.

You will hear about job opportunities from our Careers Service as well as our extensive network of alumni. The course is broad which makes a variety of career options available.

Examples of roles our recent graduates are now working in include:
-Energy Manager
-Environmental Manager
-Waste Manager
-Health and Safety Managers (public and private sector)
-Sustainability Manager (in industry, public sector, health service, councils, police and universities)
-Officers for the Environment Agency (in areas such as waste, permitting, ecology, air quality)

You will also get involved in making our campus more sustainable. We were recently awarded a 'first' by People and Planet.

The Degree Programme Director, Dr Sue Haile, was awarded the Vice Chancellor's Teaching Award in 2012 and currently holds the RAE ExxonMobil Teaching Fellowship in recognition of her achievements in Sustainability education.

Delivery

The MSc course starts in September and consists of seven months of taught modules followed by a project written up as a dissertation.

Semester one modules are taught across the semester with typically two to three hours of lectures per week, case studies and presentations for each module.

Semester two modules are blocked with each module taking place over an intensive one to two week period.

Placements

We have placed students in over 300 companies (and in several countries) for their dissertation projects. These range from multinationals like Nestle, Procter and Gamble and HSBC to small and medium sized enterprises around the North East.

Projects topics are diverse and have covered:
-Life cycle assessment
-Carbon and water foot printing
-Implementation of Environmental Management Systems
-Energy and waste management
-Pollution impacts and mitigation
-Biodiversity
-Corporate Social Responsibility reporting
-Options for renewable energy

Many of these projects inform our teaching and provide case study material for student workshops.

Facilities

The School occupies five floors in Merz Court where we provide a Student Common Room and a separate Student Study Space.

As a Clean Technology student, you have a dedicated room with material to assist with your course including past dissertations, reference books and posters.

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The Paper Science research degrees are part of a dynamic research area within the school. We have close links with industry and much of our research impacts directly on current industry practice. Read more
The Paper Science research degrees are part of a dynamic research area within the school. We have close links with industry and much of our research impacts directly on current industry practice. Our academic team are highly rated within the paper science sector, and are regarded as experts in their field.

The subject

The range of materials classed as paper is diverse, from bathroom tissue to cardboard; but, despite the physical differences, they have the same chemical composition, consisting primarily of natural cellulosic fibres. The difference in the type of paper arises from the choice of raw material and the influence of the manufacturing process.

Our research

Our research covers the influence of factors, such as recycling and process chemistry, on the physical properties of the sheet, and looks at ways to improve them. We also look at improving the efficiency of raw materials and energy in manufacturing processes.

Industry links

We have strong ties with industry, including collaboration with Aylesford Newsprint, Billerud, Abitibi Consolidated, and M-Real. Our research impacts directly on paper manufacturers, and their suppliers and customers, and we are consistently approached by industry to collaborate and give expert advice on research projects.

Research projects

Some of our recent research projects include:
-Analysis of factors affecting the pore size distribution of paper
-Measurement and modelling of paper shrinkage during manufacture

The influence of sheet uniformity and starch on the strength of recycled board

Facilities

To underpin the research and teaching activities, we have established state-of-the-art laboratories, which allow comprehensive characterisation and development of materials. These facilities range from synthetic/textile fibre chemistry to materials processing and materials testing.

To complement our teaching resources, there is a comprehensive range of electrochemical, electronoptical imaging and surface and bulk analytical facilities and techniques.

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A UNIQUE, INTERDISCIPLINARY POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMME DESIGNED TO RESPOND TO THE DIVERSE NEEDS OF THE TECHNOLOGICALLY ADVANCED AND CREATIVELY DYNAMIC FASHION AND TEXTILE INDUSTRIES. Read more

A UNIQUE, INTERDISCIPLINARY POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMME DESIGNED TO RESPOND TO THE DIVERSE NEEDS OF THE TECHNOLOGICALLY ADVANCED AND CREATIVELY DYNAMIC FASHION AND TEXTILE INDUSTRIES.

Heriot-Watt University's School of Textiles and Design is enagaged in leading-edge international research and our unrivalled facilities, combined with traditional and cutting edge expertise in technology and management, make our graduates highly sought after in these rapidly evolving sectors. Staff knowledge and expertise span the full spectrum from design to manufacture, context to management, technology to creativity and practice to theory.

The School has developed an enhanced postgraduate programme designed to respond to the needs of the global fashion and textile industries, utilising our unique combination of traditional and contemporary expertise in science, technology and creativity. The benefits of our location within Scotland's manufacturing centre of high-end cashmere and textile production and design, are extended and maintained through international links in fashion and textiles. Studying within a school that reflects such high-quality collaborations, research and teaching, positions our graduates highly within these rapidly evolving sectors.

Our taught postgraduate programme aims to develop advanced knowledge and practice through the exploration of concepts and contemporary topics in design, fashion and textiles. The programme content challenges traditional and contemporary uses of fashion and textiles, as well as creating the opportunity, through well-resourced workshops, to promote new approaches and processes in fashion and textiles. The design of the programme also encourages inter-disciplinary projects reflecting the School's strategy of creative collaborations between subject areas to foster design innovation.

The MSc in Fashion and Textiles Management attracts applicants from business as well as fashion and textile backgrounds and results in projects that test and develop theory in the form of an academic paper.

Structure:

Students negotiate with their supervisor to concentrate on an appropriate area of study to acquire knowledge and expertise in an area of fashion and textiles that supports their individual project intended outcome. The areas available across the School reflect the breadth of expertise relevant to fashion and textiles.

Semester 1

Design context

Creative and Critical Thinking: Research principles

Management Studies in Design

Fashion and Textile Practice and Expertise

Semester 2

Design Technologies and Textiles Futures

Reflective Practice to plan the agreed course of study

Industrial placement

Fashion and Textile Practice and Expertise

Semester 3

Masters Project: an academic paper or report on a design management theme.

Objectives:

Challenge traditional and contemporary uses of fashion and textiles, as well as creating the opportunity to promote new approaches and processes in fashion and textiles

Provide students with the knowledge, skills and competencies to meet the diverse demands of the fashion and textile industries

Encourage, in inter-disciplinary projects, creative collaborations between subject areas to foster innovation

Develop an inter-disciplinary understanding of key issues relating to the design, management and innovation in fashion and textiles

Develop competent and confident professionals for the global fashion and textiles industries with an in-depth understanding of the creative process and its management in international and local contexts.

Course length

The full-time Fashion Management masters starts in mid September and lasts one year. The course can also be taken part-time over two years.

Objectives

  • Challenge traditional and contemporary uses of fashion and textiles, as well as creating the opportunity to promote new approaches and processes in fashion and textiles
  • Provide students with the knowledge, skills and competencies to meet the diverse demands of the fashion and textile industries
  • Encourage, in inter-disciplinary projects, creative collaborations between subject areas to foster innovation
  • Develop an inter-disciplinary understanding of key issues relating to the design, management and innovation in fashion and textiles
  • Develop competent and confident professionals for the global fashion and textiles industries with an in-depth understanding of the creative process and its management in international and local contexts.

Course content:

Students negotiate with their supervisor to concentrate on an appropriate area of study to acquire knowledge and expertise in an area of fashion and textiles that supports their individual project intended outcome. The areas available across the School reflect the breadth of expertise relevant to fashion and textiles.

Semester 1

  • Fashion Management
  • Design Context
  • Design Project
  • Design Technology and Innovation

Semester 2

  • Brand Management
  • Research Methodologies
  • Business Enterprise

And

  • Raw Materials Testing and Exploration

or

  • Consumer Motivations

Semester 3

  • Research project

Assessment

Students are assessed through a combination of practical and written course work, examinations and the Masters project. Emphasis is placed on rigorous academic standards as well as acquiring and developing a range of transferable industry skills and individual creative development. Assessment exercises can therefore include making effective visual and oral presentations, writing reports and as well as team and group work.

How to Apply:

https://www.hw.ac.uk/study/apply/uk/postgraduate.htm

 



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Overview. The course aims to develop practice-based learning, informed by an in-depth study of design. It tends to attract students from an art and design background, looking to challenge established practice and offer new insights. Read more

Overview

The course aims to develop practice-based learning, informed by an in-depth study of design. It tends to attract students from an art and design background, looking to challenge established practice and offer new insights. Through well-resourced workshops the course also promotes new approaches and processes.

You’ll be able to study an area of fashion and textiles that interests you. You’ll also be encouraged to work on inter-disciplinary projects, reflecting the School's strategy of creative collaborations between subject areas to foster design innovation. And, you’ll be supported by staff with knowledge that covers everything from design and manufacture through to technology and creativity.

The Fashion and Textiles Design degree is taught at our Scottish Borders Campus in Galashiels. To find out more about the final design collections, visit the School pages.

Objectives

  • Challenge traditional and contemporary uses of fashion and textiles, as well as creating the opportunity to promote new approaches and processes in fashion and textiles
  • Provide students with the knowledge, skills and competencies to meet the diverse demands of the fashion and textile industries
  • Encourage, in inter-disciplinary projects, creative collaborations between subject areas to foster innovation
  • Develop an inter-disciplinary understanding of key issues relating to the design, management and innovation in fashion and textiles
  • Develop competent and confident professionals for the global fashion and textiles industries with an in-depth understanding of the creative process and its management in international and local contexts.

Course length

The full-time course starts in mid-September and lasts one year. The course can also be taken part-time over two years, or as a nine month Postgraduate Diploma.

Course content:

Students negotiate with their supervisor to concentrate on an appropriate area of study to acquire knowledge and expertise in an area of fashion and textiles that supports their individual project intended outcome. The areas available across the School reflect the breadth of expertise relevant to fashion and textiles.

Semester 1

  • Fashion and Textiles Practice and Expertise 1
  • Design Context
  • Design project
  • Design Technology and Innovation

Semester 2

  • Fashion and Textiles Practice and Expertise 2
  • Research Methodologies
  • Raw Materials Testing and Exploration

And

  • Business Enterprise

OR

  • Brand Management

Semester 3

  • Research Project

Assessment

Students are assessed through a combination of practical and written course work, examinations and the Masters project. Emphasis is placed on rigorous academic standards as well as acquiring and developing a range of transferable industry skills and individual creative development. Assessment exercises can therefore include making effective visual and oral presentations, writing reports and as well as team and group work.

How to Apply:

https://www.hw.ac.uk/study/apply/uk/postgraduate.htm



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This programme brings together the latest developments in materials science and their application into new technology, providing you with specialist knowledge and skills which will enhance your engineering career. Read more
This programme brings together the latest developments in materials science and their application into new technology, providing you with specialist knowledge and skills which will enhance your engineering career.

It focusses on the theory and computational simulation of material structures for application into automotive, aerospace, technology and energy sectors. You will gain a strong understanding of the properties and behaviours of different substances, from raw materials to finished products, identifying their strengths and limitations, enabling you to find solutions to complex contemporary problems.

Our particular research strengths are drawn into the masters programme, in areas including functional materials (those with extra functionality such as electro-magnetic screening, self-sensing and active materials, and materials with negative thermal expansion and Poisson’s ratios), polymers, composites and bio-materials.

The programme will prepare you for an exciting and rewarding career in materials engineering.

Programme Structure

This programme is modular and consists of eight core engineering, modules totalling 165 credits, and one 15-credit option module.

Core modules

The core modules can include; Mechanics of Materials; Software Modelling; Advanced Materials Engineering; Computer Aided Engineering Design; Research Methodology; Sustainable Engineering; New Developments in Materials Engineering and Engineering MSc Project

Optional modules

Some examples of the optional modules are Contemporary Advanced Materials Research and Functional Materials.

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand.

Teaching and assessment

The programme is delivered through a mix of lectures, seminars, tutorials, industrial presentations, case studies, industry visits, computer simulations, project work and a dissertation. It has particular value in developing transferable skills development including management skills, communication skills, computational techniques, data handling and analysis, problem solving, decision making and research methodology. Many of these skills will be addressed within an industrial and commercial context.

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The Principles of Conservation MA offers students an introduction to the context of heritage conservation, of how conservation works, and of the issues and constraints which affect conservation practice. Read more

The Principles of Conservation MA offers students an introduction to the context of heritage conservation, of how conservation works, and of the issues and constraints which affect conservation practice. The programme explores the principles, theory, ethics and practicalities relating to the care and conservation of a wide variety of objects and structures.

About this degree

Students gain an in-depth understanding of approaches to collections care, preventive conservation, risk assessment, conservation strategies, ethics, management and professionalism, and develop critically aware perspectives on professional practice and research processes.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

Students are required to take the following: 

  • Issues in Conservation: Context of Conservation
  • Issues in Conservation: Understanding Objects
  • Conservation in Practice: Preventive Conservation
  • Skills for Conservation Management

Optional modules

Students choose further optional modules up to the value of 30 credits from the following list of related options (the degree co-ordinator may seek to guide the option choices made by those intending to carry on for the MSc in Conservation for Archaeology and Museums.

  • Approaches to Artefact Studies
  • Archaeolmetallurgy
  • Archaeological Ceramics Analysis
  • Archaeological Glass and Glazes
  • Interpreting Pottery
  • Materials structure and deterioration of craft materials

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words (90 credits).

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, small-group tutorials, workshops and practical projects. Some modules include visits to conservation workshops and museums, including the British Museum, National Trust and the Museum of London. Assessment is through coursework, essays, poster, portfolio, project reports and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Principles of Conservation MA

Funding

Institute of Archaeology Master's Awards: a small number of grants up to the value of £1,000 are available for the academic year 2018/19. All UK/EU and Overseas fee-paying students with an offer to start any Master's degree offered by the IoA are eligible to apply. For an application form please email . The deadline for applications is 1 March 2018.

UK students are eligible to apply to the Anna Plowden Trust 

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

The Institute of Archaeology has a long history of training in conservation, and many of its graduates are now employed in key posts around the world. Many students go on to take the Conservation for Archaeology and Museums MSc. Others pursue careers in preventive conservation and collections management in local and national museums, art galleries and heritage organisations (mainly in Europe, North America and Asia). Some students have also used this degree as a platform to become a PhD candidate at both UCL and elsewhere.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Freelance Conservator, National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH)
  • Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Conservation, New York University and studying MA in Principles of Conservation, UCL
  • Collections Intern, George Washington University Museum - The Textile Museum and studying MA in Principles of Conservation, UCL
  • Historic Property Steward, English Heritage
  • Assistant Curator, Tower of London

Employability

Knowledge and skills acquired during the programme include the understanding of the roles conservators play in the care and study of cultural heritage, and the ethical issues involved. This is complemented by a basic understanding of raw materials, manufacturing technologies, assessment of condition and the ways in which different values and meanings are assigned to cultural objects. The student will be able to perform visual examination techniques as well as assessments and monitoring of museum collections. They will also be proficient in various types of documentation, analysis of numerical data, report writing, and presentation of conservation issues through posters, social media, talks and essays.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study. Its conservation programmes have an international reputation.

Students benefit from the institute's lively international involvement in archaeology and heritage, from its well-equipped facilities, and access to UCL's extensive science, art and archaeology collections.

The institute's conservation laboratories provide a modern and pleasant learning environment, while the Wolfson Archaeological Science Laboratories provide excellent facilities for the examination and analysis of a wide variety of archaeological materials.



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Plants form the basis of life as they convert sunlight into an inexhaustible source of food and renewable raw materials. Plants also have a stabilising effect in (agro) ecosystems, a landscape function and ornamental value. Read more

Plants form the basis of life as they convert sunlight into an inexhaustible source of food and renewable raw materials. Plants also have a stabilising effect in (agro) ecosystems, a landscape function and ornamental value. In a nutshell, we cannot do without plants.

Study Programme

The Plant Sciences programme has been designed to help meet the worldwide demand for scientific expertise in the development of plant and crop production and farming systems. It not only covers the technological aspects of crop production, but also deals with important environmental, quality, health and socio-economic aspects. Interdisciplinarity is a hallmark of the programme.

On the programme of Plant Sciences page you can find the general outline of the programme and more detailed information about courses, theses and internships.

Specialisations

Within the master's programme you can choose one of the following Specialisations to meet your personal interests.

Your future career

Graduates in Plant Sciences are university-trained professionals who are able to contribute to the sustainable development of plant production at various integration levels, based on their knowledge of fundamental and applied plant sciences and their interdisciplinary approach. Read more about career perspectives and opportunities after finishing the programme.

Related programmes:

MSc Biosystems Engineering

MSc Biotechnology 

MSc Biology 

MSc Forest and Nature Conservation

MSc Organic Agriculture

MSc Plant Biotechnology



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