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Masters Degrees (Rare Books)

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The University of London’s postgraduate degree in the History of the Book was inaugurated in 1995 and each year attracts a range of students from many countries. Read more
The University of London’s postgraduate degree in the History of the Book was inaugurated in 1995 and each year attracts a range of students from many countries. The University’s location in the centre of London, with its unrivalled resources for all aspects of book history within easy reach, together with the expertise that exists in its many colleges and institutes, makes it an ideal place in which to carry out research of an interdisciplinary nature. The history of the book has developed rapidly over the last 40 years as its power to clarify problems in many other disciplines has become evident. Scholars have come to see the study of the book as an aid to understanding literary and other texts and, more recently, as a way of understanding broader social, cultural, and intellectual processes in history.

The programme aims to:

Give students a broad understanding of book history from c. 3000 BCE to 2000 CE

Introduce students to the range of disciplines that make up the subject, including historical bibliography, palaeography, codicology, history of printing, bibliometrics, history of publishing, history of reading, and library history

Provide frequent opportunities to handle archaeological and historical objects relating to the subject

Give students the ability and confidence to deal with primary sources for book history (both manuscript and printed)

In addition, the MRes will:

Provide selected students with a foundation of three appropriately specialised taught courses (60 points in all), which will equip them to undertake a more extensive programme of master’s level research than that offered by the MA

Provide the opportunity for able students to write an extended dissertation (30,000 words) on a subject that requires treatment at a much greater length and depth than the usual MA topic

Offer students a degree programme that satisfies the needs of those who wish to undertake more extensive research or go on to do an MPhil or PhD

Structure

The MA consists of a series of six taught courses (including two core courses) plus a dissertation of 15,000 words.

The MRes consists of a series of three taught courses and a 30,000 word dissertation.

Students may also choose courses from the London Rare Books School programme under the guidance of the Course Director and Course Tutor.

London Book Trade Internship

Students have the option to substitute one of the modules with an internship at a London bookselling firm. The internships offer a key opportunity for students to experience life in a bookselling firm, to undertake projects for the company (everything from stocktaking to cataloguing to running a book stall at a fair), and to make connections in the book trade. In the past, students have been placed in Maggs Bros., Jarndyce Booksellers, Robert Frew Ltd., and Ash Rare Books.

Teaching and Supervision

Teachers are recognised experts drawn from the Institute, the British Library, the Victoria and Albert Museum, Lambeth Palace Library, and other institutions, at which some of the teaching takes place.

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Do you want to define your own path in literary and cultural studies? Take the opportunity to further your understanding of Modernity or eighteenth-century studies, or pursue your own interests and passions, with our MA English and Culture. Read more
Do you want to define your own path in literary and cultural studies? Take the opportunity to further your understanding of Modernity or eighteenth-century studies, or pursue your own interests and passions, with our MA English and Culture. On this diverse and challenging degree you’ll gain advanced research skills, which you’ll apply throughout your studies and beyond. Learn more about an existing area of interest, or discover something new on our highly adaptable and varied MA.

Key features

-Develop your research interests in the eighteenth century or Modernity studies, or carve your own path with a general MA spanning different periods.
-Define your own programme with modules which rotate yearly, giving you a fresh choice each year.
-Benefit from small tutorial groups across all modules, providing you with invaluable face-to-face contact with your tutors.
-Choose from modules closely integrated with staff research interests, whilst being able to pursue your own ideas.
-Hone your skills with a compulsory initial module which shows you how to carry out postgraduate research.
-Benefit from adaptable study routes, allowing you to find a means of studying which fits around your other commitments.
-Access resources at any time with the University library, open 24 hours, 365 days a year, offering a vast range of electronic and print materials, including a rare books collection.
-Engage closely with unique local resources such as the nationally designated eighteenth-century Cottonian Collection, or the University’s own rare books collection stocked with 19th century and 20th century periodicals.
-Build on your experience - some of our students have been involved in curating exhibitions and organising conferences.
-Make the most of a rich cultural environment with Plymouth University’s Peninsula Arts programme and the University’s links with local arts organisations, like the Theatre Royal.

Course details

In your first term you’ll take our compulsory research methods module. In addition, you’ll take a further three modules from those listed below – the combination depends on the award you wish to achieve at the end of the MA. The spring term and summer period will see you take the dissertation module in a subject of your choice, involving one-on-one supervision and support. This will be a chance to work independently on a project which interests and excites you. On a part-time route, you can complete the programme over either two or three years. After completing research methods in the first term, you’ll usually study one module per term for two years (although other arrangements are possible). This works out at three contact hours per week, plus independent reading and study of around 20 hours per week. You’ll then do your dissertation in the spring and summer of the second year, finishing the MA in two years, or defer the dissertation to the following year and complete in three years.

Core modules
-MAEL708 Poetry and the Modern Self
-MALT712 Fictions of femininity in eighteenth-century England
-MAEL700 Research Methods and Debates in Literary and Cultural Studies
-ENMA706 The Legacy of War: Fiction of the 1920's and 1930's

Optional modules
-MALT760 MA English and Culture Dissertation (Art, Architecture and Literature in the Eighteenth Century)
-MAEL740 MA English and Culture Dissertation
-ENMA720 MA English and Culture Dissertation (Literature and Modernity, 1860 - 1960)

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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Study literature and culture through an exciting variety of thematically conceived modules on the MA English Literature. Drawing on staff expertise, the programme covers a broad range of periods from the early modern period to the present. Read more
Study literature and culture through an exciting variety of thematically conceived modules on the MA English Literature. Drawing on staff expertise, the programme covers a broad range of periods from the early modern period to the present. On this diverse and challenging degree you’ll gain advanced research skills, which you’ll apply throughout your studies and beyond. Learn more about an existing area of interest, or discover something new on our highly adaptable and varied MA.

This course is also available to study part-time.

Key features

-Develop your research interests in literature and culture across the ‘long Modern’ period.
-Define your own programme with modules which rotate yearly, offering a fresh choice each year.
-Choose from modules closely integrated with staff research interests, while being able to pursue your own ideas.
-Benefit from small tutorial groups across all modules, providing you with invaluable face-to-face contact with your tutors.
-Hone your skills with a compulsory initial module which shows you how to carry out postgraduate research.
-Benefit from adaptable study routes, allowing you to find a means of studying which fits around your other commitments.
-Access resources at any time with the University library, open 24 hours, 365 days a year, offering a vast range of electronic and print materials, including a rare books collection.
-Engage closely with unique local resources such as the nationally designated eighteenth-century Cottonian Collection, or the University’s own rare books collection stocked with 19th century and 20th century periodicals.
-Build on your experience - some of our students have been involved in curating exhibitions and organising conferences.
-Make the most of a rich cultural environment with Plymouth University’s Peninsula Arts programme and the University’s links with local arts organisations, like the Theatre Royal.
-Tailor your time at university to meet your needs by fitting your study around work and personal commitments. Our part-time route allows you to study over two years, giving you the flexibility to study at a pace which suits you.

Course details

In your first semester, you’ll take our compulsory research methods module, plus one other elective module from the list below. In your second semester, you’ll take two elective modules. The summer period will see you take the dissertation module in a subject of your choice, involving one-to-one supervision and support. This will be a chance to work independently on a project which interests and excites you. On a part-time route, you can complete the programme over two years. After completing research methods in the first term, you’ll usually study one module per term for two years (although other arrangements are possible). You’ll then do your dissertation in the spring and summer of the second year, finishing the MA in two years, or defer the dissertation to the following year and complete in three years.

Core modules
-MAEL700 Research Methods and Debates in Literary and Cultural Studies
-MAEL701 MA English Literature Dissertation

Optional modules
-MAEL708 Poetry and the Modern Self
-MAEL706 The Utopian Novel and Modernity
-MAEL707 Ocean Modernity: Literatures of the sea, 1850- the present
-MAEL710 Independent Research Project

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Early Modern English Literature taught with the British Library; a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts. Read more
Early Modern English Literature taught with the British Library; a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts. Ideal foundation for doctoral work and careers in the arts, education, curatorship and broadcasting.

Key Benefits

- A strong tradition of Shakespeare and early modern literary studies at King's

- Unique access to unparalleled collections at the British Library and to the expertise of world-class curators, who will teach the core module and supervise some dissertations

- Close links with the London Shakespeare Seminar, the London Renaissance Seminar, and with the Institute of English Studies

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/early-modern-english-literature-text-and-transmission-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

This MA programme focuses on the transmission of key early modern literary texts makes it unlike any other programme of its kind. Transmission is understood both as the circulation of literary texts in manuscript and print and their reception. Students will therefore learn to read early modern handwriting, to transcribe neglected literary manuscripts and rare printed texts and to edit them for the modern reader.

By focusing on transmission, this MA programme will also make students aware of the impact of the materiality of the text and of the material conditions of its (re)production on its interpretation. The specific process whereby a literary text reaches its readers or its audience is always central to its interpretation.

The core module taught at the British Library is specifically designed to teach students how to search collections of early modern manuscripts and rare books held in major research libraries worldwide and how to identify the agents involved in their production, transmission and preservation in libraries and private collections.

- Course purpose -

Early Modern English Literature taught with the British Library; a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts. Ideal foundation for doctoral work and careers in the arts, education, curatorship and broadcasting.

- Course format and assessment -

Core and optional modules assessed by coursework, plus a dissertation.

Career propsects:

We expect some students will pursue PhD level study in the area, leading to a teaching or academic career. Other students will be ideally placed for jobs in the arts, creative and cultural industries, curatorship and broadcasting.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Do you want to explore a literary topic you’re passionate about, with the potential to advance into MPhil or PhD study and an academic career? Join a vibrant, growing research community and acquire the skills necessary to carry out your own extended project. Read more
Do you want to explore a literary topic you’re passionate about, with the potential to advance into MPhil or PhD study and an academic career? Join a vibrant, growing research community and acquire the skills necessary to carry out your own extended project. You’ll have expert guidance and individual supervision from staff specialising in a range of critical fields, from the 17th century to the present day.

Key features

-Pursue your own specific research interests in English, culminating in an extended dissertation, with the guidance of an individual supervisor.
-Join a thriving research community which fosters the sharing of knowledge and academic enquiry through research seminars, academic conferences, and visiting writers and critics.
-Acquire a sophisticated range of subject specific and interdisciplinary research skills through tutorials, seminars and workshops.
-Enjoy full access to the University’s library and electronic resources, including the Rare Books Room which includes materials on literature, history, architecture and the visual arts.
-Benefit from adaptable study routes, allowing you to find a means of studying that fits around your other commitments.
-Draw on staff expertise in a wealth of diverse areas, from the history of the book and reading to film and drama.
-Broaden your knowledge by undertaking interdisciplinary work across traditional subject boundaries, for example in visual culture, psychology and psychoanalysis, representations of childhood and gender studies.
-Progress from your undergraduate studies on a route that prepares you to become a researcher or do a PhD.

Course details

MRes English is available full time (one year). If you wish to study part time, the ResM pathway includes the same taught modules and also leads to a written thesis. Unlike the MRes however, you can submit your thesis after 24-36 months. You’ll study two taught modules providing you with the expertise to excel in your 22,500 to 25,000 word thesis. In term one you’ll take research methods and debates, gaining both discipline-specific skills and an understanding of current debates in English. Assessment will revolve around contextual study or literature review, communication skills and subject-specific frameworks. Research in the arts and humanities is cross-disciplinary and taught via six all-day workshops in terms one and two. It’s assessed by a research portfolio and presentation. Finally, the thesis is taught by intensive one-to-one supervision. Students may devise a topic of their choice, but are encouraged to choose an area of staff expertise to gain maximum support and guidance.

Core modules
-MARE700 Research in the Arts and Humanities
-MAEL700 Research Methods and Debates in Literary and Cultural Studies
-MARE701 Masters Thesis in the Humanities and/or Performing Arts

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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This is a distinctive programme, built around the unique position of Edinburgh College of Art (ECA) in the University and the city of Edinburgh. Read more

Research profile

This is a distinctive programme, built around the unique position of Edinburgh College of Art (ECA) in the University and the city of Edinburgh.

It combines advanced research in and on collections (ranging from visual art, film and musical instruments through to medical artefacts and rare books) with practices, including archival work and temporary exhibition organisation. At its core are high-quality peer-group research placements delivered in partnership with national cultural institutions and a regular colloquium course debating key issues in the field.

The programme is aimed at students wishing to develop research-level knowledge in the field of museum, gallery and collections studies broadly conceived, and to gain practical experience of professional working as part of a peer group in a large public institution, delivering a live project.

You will gain critical, analytical, interpretative and other research skills that are transferable to further academic research, to museum collections and curatorial settings, and to other professions.

The study and interpretation of diverse museum and gallery collections involves theoretical, historical and practical approaches to artefacts from world cultures past and present.

Drawing on disciplines such as anthropology, art history, archival studies, conservation, history of music, history of science, and sociology, this exciting field is about working at the interface of academic research and the curatorial profession.

The Edinburgh approach, based around strong partnerships with national cultural institutions in the city, fosters the next generation of researchers and museum and gallery professionals. It affords unique opportunities for live project delivery in national institutions, master classes with leading experts, and a rigorous framework for intellectual development and innovation.

Training and support

The core course will include introductory training relating to the principles and practices of collections management as well as institutional practices including interpretation, access and audience engagement. Two intensive one-day workshops will offer practical training in archival practice and object handling, along with further learning opportunities relating to the transportation, insurance, and installation of objects in exhibitions. More advanced professional training in relevant practices will be given by partner organisations during placement projects. In addition, the programme will enable you to use a range of IT skills in the delivery of presentations: oral, written and visual.

The 60 credit dissertation component will be supervised by a member of staff in ECA, with secondary supervisory support from ECA, the University or from a member of staff in one of the external partner organisations. Your project/dissertation will be supported by regular supervisory meetings and feedback on drafts of chapters.

Facilities

Situated in the heart of Edinburgh's Old Town, Edinburgh College of Art has a wide range of studios and workshop spaces, libraries and collections, places to socialise, perform and show work; all within walking distance of world-class museums, music venues and galleries.

Our facilities range from the historic, to contemporary, specialist spaces for making work at all scales, in and across all media. In this directory, you’ll find details of our own facilities, and selected places in the city to be inspired, research, collaborate or gain work experience.

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In collaboration with New York University (NYU), the Palmer School of Library and Information Science at Long Island University (LIU) offers a unique 52-credit dual master's degree program that prepares you as a subject specialist/scholar-librarian in academic and research institutions or as an information specialist in a specialized library or information center. Read more
In collaboration with New York University (NYU), the Palmer School of Library and Information Science at Long Island University (LIU) offers a unique 52-credit dual master's degree program that prepares you as a subject specialist/scholar-librarian in academic and research institutions or as an information specialist in a specialized library or information center. The program grants an ALA-accredited Master of Science in Library and Information Science from LIU's Palmer School and a Master of Arts or Science (in any of approximately 54 programs) from NYU's Graduate School of Arts and Sciences or from three programs within NYU's Steinhardt School: Costume Studies, Food Studies or Media, Culture, and Communication.

Program Highlights

-Students take approximately 13 fewer credits than would be required if they pursued each master's separately.
-Students are able to take Palmer School courses at any of our sites. All NYU courses are taught at NYU’s Washington Square Manhattan campus.
-Students select from among numerous NYU GSAS programs or NYU Steinhardt School’s approved programs (see above) and enroll simultaneously at the LIU Palmer School.
-Specially designed mentorship program with NYU Libraries' library subject specialists offers professional guidance and experience throughout the duration of the program.

About the Program

Academic librarians traditionally need two master’s degrees—a subject master’s and the MSLIS. Our dual degree with NYU offers this opportunity. Students apply to LIU’s Palmer School and NYU’s Graduate School of Arts and Science or NYU’s Steinhardt School of Media, Culture, and Communication. Once admitted to both universities, students apply to be a part of this unique program that offers a mentorship under the direction of a subject specialist librarian here at NYU’s Bobst Library. The entire program is offered at Palmer’s NYU site in Bobst Library. Students take a total of 13 fewer credits in the dual degree program than if they took each master’s separately.

Career Opportunities

The Palmer School of Library and Information Science prepares you for a wide range of professional careers in public and private library systems and information technology settings. Our master’s degree programs, advanced certificates and doctoral degree are highly respected among libraries, organizations and businesses nation-wide.

The faculty of the Palmer School consists of distinguished professors with outstanding credentials and track records of scholarship, research and instruction at top universities across the nation and around the world. They are ready to help you complete your degree and make your own contributions to the fields of library science and information studies.

Graduates will be prepared to pursue positions in a number of areas or to apply their enhanced knowledge to their current positions.

Our alumni hold positions as:
-Academic Librarian
-Archivist/Children’s Librarian
-Chief Information Officer
-Corporate Information Manager
-Database Manager
-Digital Collections Manager Knowledge Organization Director
-Law Librarian
-Information Specialist
-Information Technology Director
-Public Librarian
-Public Library Director
-Medical Librarian
-Rare Books Preservationist
-Records Manager
-Reference Librarian
-School Media Specialist

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Long Island University offers the Master of Science in Library and Information Science – accredited by the American Library Association– at the Palmer School at LIU Post in Brookville, New York and at New York University’s Bobst Library in Manhattan. Read more
Long Island University offers the Master of Science in Library and Information Science – accredited by the American Library Association– at the Palmer School at LIU Post in Brookville, New York and at New York University’s Bobst Library in Manhattan. In addition, the Palmer School partners with NYU to provide a unique Dual Degree program for scholar-librarians, leading to a Master's degree from NYU Steinhardt or NYU College of Arts and Science and a Master of Science in Library and Information Science from LIU. Students can also take master's level courses at LIU Brentwood in Brentwood, N.Y. or Long Island.

Areas of Study

-Academic & Special Librarianship
-Digital Libraries
-Health Sciences
-Rare Books & Special Collections
-School Library Media Specialist
-Technical Service
-Youth Librarianship (Children's & Young Adult Services)

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An understanding of the past is key to understanding the present and the future, and the study of history is publicly important as well as personally enriching. Read more
An understanding of the past is key to understanding the present and the future, and the study of history is publicly important as well as personally enriching. This Masters of Research in History course offers a unique opportunity to combine the local and the global in historical research given the range and diversity of staff specialisms across three distinct strands – ‘Modern Britain and Ireland’, ‘European, American, African and Asian History’, and ‘Memory, Heritage and Place’. It builds upon a very successful and well-established undergraduate programme with a broad range of historical places and subjects from which you can choose to specialise, and provides guided taught support collectively and individually. Broaden and refine your research skills with an enhanced dissertation project with the opportunity to pursue a heritage or public history output, enabling you to become a specialist historical practitioner.

INDUSTRY LINKS

UCLan’s History department has a strong and productive relationship with schools, museums, libraries and archives across the region and students have developed placements with many of these in the past. History at UCLan works particularly closely with the People’s History Museum and the Labour Party Archive located there as well as with the Co-operative College and archive, Lancashire Archives based in Preston close to the main campus and the Harris Museum and Art Gallery, Lancashire Fusiliers Museum and many other friends and partners across the north-west and further afield.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Students will have full access to the resources of UCLan’s library including our Special Collections which contains the Joseph Livesey Collection, a cornerstone of the British temperance movement of the nineteenth century and other important archival material such as the Wainwright Collection of rare books on Irish Home Rule and Ulster Unionism.

The History staff at UCLan are all published historians who work in modern British, Irish, European, American, African and Asian history, mostly with a modern or contemporary focus. In addition to this, several members of the History team have experience and specialist knowledge of various aspects of heritage studies and public history, including memorials and memorialisation, oral history, business heritage and material culture.

FURTHER INFORMATION

Students will be given the opportunity to organise and run their own ‘mini-conference’ as part of the course and are expected to attend the monthly research seminars from visiting academics besides opportunities afforded for placements through History’s numerous links with educational and heritage institutions throughout the region. Visits will also be offered to both local archives and museums.

Graduates can expect to enhance and improve their current skills set providing a base or an advancement for careers in education, museums, archives, heritage groups or organisations as well as a variety of other professions which value the specialised research, organisational and intellectual capabilities provided by a taught postgraduate course such as this.

The History MRes provides opportunities for outstanding and committed students to progress to an MPhil/PhD in History, perhaps with their MRes dissertation becoming the foundation for future research trajectories.

One of the highlights of this course is the option of a public history type output from the dissertation research and the opportunity to make a real world impact. Students can therefore take the route of a single written dissertation of 24,000 words or a 12,000 word written dissertation and a companion exhibition, schools pack, podcast or website.

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The University of British Columbia offers a Master of Arts in Children’s Literature (MACL) program, jointly offered by the Departments of English and Language and Literacy Education, the Creative Writing Program, and the School of Library, Archival & Information Studies. Read more
The University of British Columbia offers a Master of Arts in Children’s Literature (MACL) program, jointly offered by the Departments of English and Language and Literacy Education, the Creative Writing Program, and the School of Library, Archival & Information Studies. The Program Chair and administrative support of the MACL program are housed at the School of Library, Archival & Information Studies.

MACL Overview

The MACL program provides specialized education for graduate students in the study of children’s and young adult literature and media using a multi-disciplinary approach. It provides each student with the opportunity to study the creative writing and publishing of this literature, to examine models of sharing its rich heritage with the young, and also to facilitate the literary, social, historic, and psychological analyses of children’s literature as literature. This multi-disciplinary approach exposes students to many schools of literary criticism, educational theory, and professional and creative practice. It acquaints students with the broad literary canon of children’s literature across a spectrum of languages and cultures, and with a variety of critical perspectives and professional application. Across various disciplines, departments, and faculties, a broad range of courses provide disciplined, academic study of children’s and young adult literature and media.

The MACL Program is the only one of its kind in the world offered from such a broad, multidisciplinary perspective and the only Master’s program in children’s literature in Canada. The program is unique in that the two faculties and the four academic units jointly provide faculty, courses, thesis supervision and committee support to give the graduate academic study of children’s literature a perspective on the full life cycle of the literature – the creation of the literature (through Creative Writing), its critical analysis (through English) and pedagogical approaches to the literature in interaction with children in schools, homes and libraries (Language and Literacy Education; School of Library, Archival & Information Studies).

Faculty in these departments are authors of both acclaimed children’s books and scholarly guides to the literature. They serve on national and international children’s book juries, lead national research studies, and have received awards for scholarship, service, and teaching.

The University Library's collections in historical and contemporary children’s books and the critical study of children’s literature are considered among the strongest such collections in an academic library in Canada, including some 4,000 early and rare children’s books and some 50,000 modern children’s books. As well, the Library maintains a large collection of research materials on children’s literature, including histories, criticisms, bibliographies, catalogues, and biographies.

Students in the MACL Program have come from China, England, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Mexico, the United States, and from across Canada. The program provides specialized study of children’s books to those who are, or who intend to be, involved in teaching, school and public library services, writing, editing/publishing, theatre/film, storytelling, or affiliated fields.

The Master of Arts in Children’s Literature Program extends beyond its four departments and two faculties in a strong outreach to the community across and outside the University. Members of all departments involved in the program sit on the Steering Committee of the Vancouver Children’s Literature Roundtable which plans a series of annual events and conferences to bring award-winning authors, illustrators, editors and publishers such as Philip Pullman, Gregory Maguire, Shaun Tan, Katherine Paterson, and Lois Lowry to speak with students and Vancouver’s dynamic children’s literature community.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: Children's Literature
- Subject: Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts
- School: School of Library, Archival and Information Studies

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The MA in History provides a coherent but flexible course of graduate study, combining research training with intensive modules on specific historical themes and the opportunity to conduct advanced research on a dissertation topic of your choice. Read more
The MA in History provides a coherent but flexible course of graduate study, combining research training with intensive modules on specific historical themes and the opportunity to conduct advanced research on a dissertation topic of your choice.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/history/

Why choose this course?

- You will benefit from being taught by a team of research-active historians – internationally renowned scholars who publish in their areas of expertise.

- The History field at Oxford Brookes is recognised as a centre of academic excellence in both teaching and research.

- We include all aspects of our research interests in the History MA course, teaching modules and supervising dissertations that reflect our specialist subjects.

- The course provides an excellent preparation for students intending to go on to PhD research and will also be of interest to graduates wishing to pursue advanced study in History.

We welcome further enquiries – please contact the MA Subject Co-ordinator, Dr Viviane Quirke, or the History Programme Administrator, Ms Poppy Hoole ().

Teaching and learning

The MA course is taught through small-group seminars, discussion groups, workshops and individual tutorials as well as historiographical and bibliographical presentations.

Classes are held in the evenings (except where indicated), and the sessions run from 6.30pm to 9.00pm.

Part-time students attend the University one evening per week and should be able to devote an additional 12-15 hours per week to private study.

Full-time students attend classes on two evenings per week and spend 30 hours per week in private study. Assessment is entirely by written work. There are no examinations.

Shorter courses in History are also available: the postgraduate diploma and the postgraduate certificate. It is possible to transfer between these and the MA course.

Specialist facilities

Students have access to the world-famous Bodleian Library, a copyright library which houses all books published in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

In addition to the Bodleian and its unparalleled collection of books and rare historical manuscripts, there are affiliated libraries such as Rhodes House, home to the Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies, and the Vere Harmsworth Library of the Rothermere American Institute, where students will find one of the finest collections of publications on the Political, Economic and Social History of the United States from colonial times to the present.

Oxford is a lively centre for events, exhibitions, seminars and open lectures in various specialist areas of history, which staff and students at Brookes regularly attend.

The city is also an easy bus or train ride to London for convenient access to an even wider resource of historical materials. These include various seminars and lecture series offered by the University of London and the Institute of Historical Research. In addition, The National Archives at Kew, The British Library and other specialised libraries will be of particular interest to students.

Oxford is also within easy reach of other archival collections in Birmingham, Cambridge, Reading and Bristol.

Careers

Students who have completed the MA in History have developed a variety of careers. A significant number have gone on to undertake PhD study and secondary school history teaching. Others have taken up careers in archive management; law; accountancy; local government; the civil service and at GCHQ - all jobs which require excellent research and analysis skills.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research areas and clusters

Our thriving research and postgraduate culture will provide you with the ideal environment in which to undertake a research degree on a broad range of topics from the 16th century to the present day, and to engage in interdisciplinary research.

Research skills are developed in preparation for your dissertation and provide a potential pathway to PhD study. You will have the opportunity to work alongside scholars of international standing as well as receiving comprehensive training in research methods.

Principal research areas in which our teaching staff specialise include:
- History of medicine
- History of fascism
- Social history
- History of crime, deviance and the law
- History of religion from the Reformation onwards.

As well as meeting to discuss and analyse central texts in the field, each group undertakes a number of activities including organising work-in-progress seminars, and offering support and feedback for external grant applications.

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Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship. Read more
Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship.

The MA History (History of Medicine) is a distinctive strand within our MA History. The strands offers you the unique chance to focus specifically on the social, scientific and cultural history of medicine, as well as the relationship between medicine and the humanities (history, philosophy, sociology, literature and art) through a course of research training. It also gives you the flexibility to pursue taught modules in other aspects of history if you wish.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/history-of-medicine/

Why choose this course?

- You will benefit from being taught by a team of nationally and internationally recognised scholars. We are all active researchers and we include all aspects of our own research on the course, teaching specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervising dissertations in our specialist subjects.

- The knowledge and expertise you gain is grounded in the latest scholarship within the field.

- You will have the opportunity to conduct advanced research on a dissertation subject of your choice.

- The course provides an excellent preparation for students intending to continue with PhD research. It will also be of interest to health care professionals and to graduates in history or the social sciences seeking further personal development.

- All classes are held in the evening. There are no exams - assessment is by written work only.

We welcome further enquiries – please contact the MA Subject Co-ordinator, Dr Viviane Quirke, or the History Programme Administrator, Poppy Hoole, email:

Teaching and learning

The MA course is taught through small-group seminars, workshops and individual tutorials. Assessment is entirely by written work. There are no examinations.

Specialist facilities

Oxford Brookes is home to the Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH). The Centre was established in early 2015. It marks an exciting expansion and diversification of the work previously conducted through the Centre for Health, Medicine and Society which over the past 15 years has been the beneficiary of substantial support from both Oxford Brookes University and the Wellcome Trust. The CMH is building on this track record of outstanding research and grant successes, innovative teaching, career development and public outreach. Engaging with the expanding field of medical humanities, the CMH brings historians of medicine together with scholars from History, History of Art, Philosophy, Social and Life Sciences as well as Anthropology and Religion. It thus aims to foster genuine interdisciplinary collaboration amongst staff and students through a range of new research and teaching initiatives, which reflect the new concerns with the relationship between medicine and the humanities in the twentieth first century.

Students have access to Oxford Brookes University’s special Welfare collection, as well as numerous local medical archive resources. They also have access to the world famous Bodleian Library, a copyright library, which houses all books published in the United Kingdom and Ireland. In addition to the Bodleian and its unparalleled collection of books and rare historical manuscripts, there are affiliated libraries such as Rhodes House, home to the Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies, and the Vere Harmsworth Library of the Rothermere American Institute, where students will find one of the finest collections of publications on the Political, Economic and Social History of the United States from colonial times to the present.

Oxford is a lively centre for events, exhibitions, seminars and open lectures in various specialist areas of history, which staff and students at Brookes regularly attend.

It is also an easy bus or train ride to London for convenient access to a wider resource of historical materials. These include various seminars and lecture series offered by the University of London and the Institute of Historical Research. In addition, The National Archives at Kew, The British Library and other specialised libraries will be of particular interest to students.

Oxford is also within easy reach of other archival collections in Birmingham, Cambridge, Reading and Bristol.

Careers

Students who have completed an MA have developed a variety of careers. A significant number have gone on to undertake PhD study and secondary school history teaching. Others have taken up careers in archive management; law; accountancy; local government and the civil service as well as GCHQ - all jobs which require excellent research and analysis skills.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The department boasts a wealth of research expertise and is home to two important research centres:

- Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH)
The centre seeks to promote the study of medical humanities. , It is one of the leading research groups of its kind in the UK and has research links with a wide network of associates, both national and international. The centre also provides associate status opportunities to researchers from outside the University who wish to advance their studies and gain experience in the field.

- Centre for the History of Welfare
The centre provides a base for collaboration between all those with an interest in the history of welfare both within Oxford Brookes and across the wider academic and professional communities. It acts as a focus for research in this field. It aims to support and disseminate research which makes connections between historical research and current welfare policy, and thereby fosters links between historians of welfare and policy makers.

Research areas and clusters

Our thriving research and postgraduate culture will provide you with the ideal environment in which to undertake a research degree on a broad range of topics from 16th century to the present day, and to engage in interdisciplinary research. Research skills are developed in preparation for your dissertation and provide a potential pathway to PhD study.

You will have the opportunity to work alongside scholars of international standing as well as receiving comprehensive training in research methods. Principal research areas in which our teaching staff specialise include:
- History of fascism
- History of race
- Social history
- History of crime, deviance and the law
- History of religion from the Reformation onwards

As well as meeting to discuss and analyse central texts in the field, each group undertakes a number of activities. This includes organising work-in-progress seminars, and offering support and feedback for external grant applications.

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The Early Modern Studies MA offers an innovative blend of skills training (palaeography and historical bibliography), object-based learning and museum visits. Read more
The Early Modern Studies MA offers an innovative blend of skills training (palaeography and historical bibliography), object-based learning and museum visits. The core modules cover a wide range of disciplines, giving you a broad understanding of the early modern period. You can then tailor your programme to suit your interests, with over forty optional modules, covering the culture, history and society of the early modern.

Degree information

The MA will teach you critical reading skills, the ability to assess and weigh evidence, and construct persuasive arguments. It combines training in book history, bibliography, and paleography with a range of theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of the early modern period.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), between two and four optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Early Modern Exchanges: Methods, Histories, Cultures A
-Early Modern Exchanges: Methods, Histories and Cultures B

Optional modules (indicative list) - up to 60 credits from a list which varies each year. An up-to-date list is available on our website. Below is an indicative list, showing modules that have been offered previously.
-Shakespeare in his Time
-Sex and the Body in Early Modern Europe
-From Renaissance to Republic: The Netherlands: 1555-1609
-Early Modern Science
-The Self and the World: Theoretical Approaches to Travel Writing
-Aztec Archaeology: Codices and Ethnohistory
-Early Modern Books and Their Readers: Historical Bibliography for Researchers
-I.T. for Graduate Research
-Paradoxes of Enlightenment: German Thought from Leibniz to Humboldt
-Political Thought in Renaissance Europe
-The Practice of Toleration in Early Modern Europe
-Trade, Money and Institutions in the Ottoman Mediterranean 1600-1914
-Early Modern Handwriting and Manuscript Culture for Researchers
-Giordano Bruno
-The Public Sphere in Britain, 1476-1800: Print Culture, Censorship and Propaganda
-Men on the Moon: Cosmic Voyages in the Early Modern Period
-Thinking with Women: Gender as an Early Modern Category
-Web 0.1: Early Modern Information Culture, c.1450-c.1750
-The Conquest of Mexico
-Witches in History, Fiction and Scholarship

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 18,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of tutorials, seminars, workshops, presentations, class discussions and library, archive, museum and gallery visits. Assessment is through essays, annotated bibliography and the dissertation.

Careers

Many of our students have been accepted to undertake further study as research students both at UCL and elsewhere, including the Universities of Oxford, Cambridge, York and Swansea. In addition our students have been successful in obtaining funding and prizes including the Bryce-Jebb and Dorris Russell Scholarships and the prestigious John Edward Kerry Prize awarded by the Malone Society. Graduates may also find careers in the heritage or cultural industries.

Employability
This MA will give you a very specific skill set, including manuscript handling and archival research. Depending on the optional modules you select you may also develop language skills and knowledge in information technologies and database use. These skills will make you very employable within the heritage or cultural sectors, as well as library work, the arts, and other roles which require information management.

Why study this degree at UCL?

A bespoke programme of study, unique to your interests; there are over forty optional modules, all taught by leading scholars, in a wide range of subjects including art, history, law, literature, politics and science.

Practical, hands-on modules, with ‘traditional’ skills such as palaeography and textual bibliography taught alongside the latest techniques in databases and XML. The programme includes fieldtrips to museums, archives and galleries.

Privileged access to a wide range of world-class museums, rare-books libraries and archives in central London. Located in Bloomsbury, it is a short walk to the exceptional resources of the British Library and the British Museum.

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Develop a deep understanding of key issues and methods in book history c.1445-1870. Become familiar with the invention, development, spread, and transformation of printing in the period concerned. Read more

MLitt in The Book. History and Techniques of Analysis

• Develop a deep understanding of key issues and methods in book history c.1445-1870.

• Become familiar with the invention, development, spread, and transformation of printing in the period concerned.

• Explore important aspects of book history, such as the economics of the book trade, the social and religious context of printed books, news and censorship, the development of the illustrated book, the relationship between books and the Enlightenment, the industrialisation of print, and the history of libraries and book collecting.

• Acquire the technical skills required for rare book curatorship (teaching involves the Special Collections department): bibliography, paper, format, type, provenance, bindings, fingerprints, technical description, cataloguing, research tools and methods.

• Undertake skills training in palaeography and either Latin or a modern foreign language.

• Study as part of active book history research community with the Universal Short Title Catalogue, Department of Special Collections, Book History Online, the St Andrews Book History Conference series.

Features

* With around 50 staff, we can offer an unusually broad and varied portfolio of research expertise.

* We have a friendly and collegial atmosphere, in which our postgraduates are actively involved. Social events run throughout the year, starting with a Welcome Reception, and including parties organised by the different Departments, Centres and Institutes.

* Our large postgraduate community includes around 90 research postgraduates and a further 50 taught postgraduates.

* We have a strong commitment to providing skills training to enhance the employability of our postgraduates.

* We are committed to the provision of language training throughout the degree; we also offer up to six language bursaries to incoming postgraduates wishing to develop skills essential to their research.

Postgraduate community

The University of St Andrews is one of the world’s Top 40 Arts and Humanities universities (Times Higher Education 2015) and home to a major centre for postgraduate historical study. Building on excellence in individual research, the School has expertise across the Mediaeval, Early Modern and Modern periods, and a wide geographical coverage. Our research interests range from sixth-century Scotland to Iran in the early twenty-first century (and innumerable other places in between). We have particular strengths in Middle Eastern, Transnational, British, Continental European and US History; as well as groupings focused on Reformation Studies, Environmental History, and Intellectual History. As befits Scotland’s oldest university, the School is also a leading centre of Scottish
historical research.
The School of History occupies three sites in the heart of the historic town of St Andrews. All are within a few minutes’ walk of each other, and of the University Library:
• On tree-lined South Street and close to the ruins of the Cathedral, most Mediaevalists and Reformation Studies colleagues are based in a charming seventeenth-century town house and the adjoining mediaeval residence of the Hospitallers.

• St Katharine’s Lodge is a nineteenth-century former school (attended by Field Marshal Earl Haig) close to St Andrews Castle and the magnificent West Sands beach.

• Middle Eastern History is in the Arts Building, which opened in 2008, with elegant new teaching and work spaces.

Facilities

• The University Library provides extensive collections for use in historical study, including an outstanding Special Collections facility, and continues to make substantial investment in materials, including electronic resources, each year.

• Computer facilities are also readily available within workspaces and University clusters.

• A scheme of competitive scholarships and bursaries is in place to support selected postgraduates financially.

• Language bursaries are available (through a competitive scheme) to enable students new to St Andrews to gain language skills in the summer before starting their postgraduate study.

• All History postgraduates at St Andrews receive financial assistance annually from the School of History specifically to subsidise research expenses.

• Postgraduate students can apply for material support for the organisation of conferences and seminars; this has led in the past to successful events and subsequent publication.

• Social events run throughout the year including the Welcome Reception, a Christmas Party and a Champagne Brunch at graduation. Students may also attend annual Reading Parties and enjoy the opportunity to meet visiting speakers over dinner after research seminars.

Careers

Following a taught postgraduate course in History at the University of St Andrews, students go on to pursue careers in a range of sectors including journalism, publishing, think tanks, government, law, and teaching. Others continue in academia, moving on to a PhD.

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Our department offers a distinctively comparative approach to the study of literature; at Essex you don’t just study English literature, you study world literature in English. Read more
Our department offers a distinctively comparative approach to the study of literature; at Essex you don’t just study English literature, you study world literature in English. You explore literature across time, geography, and genre, combining scholarly research with innovative, practical ways of engaging with texts.

You grapple with the challenges of conducting research into Shakespeare and other early modern literature, acquiring specialist skills in archival research, palaeography, and the study of rare and antiquated books. You study materials on 18th century drama and literature, visiting the UK’s only surviving Regency Theatre to investigate how architecture affected the content of drama, and how drama reflected Georgian society. You have the opportunity to explore the history of genres such as the novel and lyric poetry, and study a truly extensive range of work; your reading takes you from African American literature, through Caribbean literatures, to the literature and performance of New York, Paris, Berlin, Vienna, Moscow and London.

Our department is ranked Top 20 in the UK (Guardian University Guide 2015), and three-quarters of our research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014).

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

At Essex, we have an impressive literary legacy. Our history comprises staff (and students) who have been Nobel Prize winners, Booker Prize winners, and Pulitzer Prize winners.

Our Department is a vibrant conservatoire of scholars and practitioners who are committed to unlocking creative personal responses to literature. This distinctive environment is possible because we are a community of award-winning novelists, poets and playwrights, as well as leading literature specialists.

Our academic staff specialise in a range of areas including modernism, comparative and world literature, Shakespeare, the Renaissance, modernism, travel writing, nature writing, translated literature, cultural geography, Irish and Scottish writing, U.S. and Caribbean literatures, and the history of reading.

Specialist facilities

-Meet fellow readers at the student-run Literature Society or at our department’s Myth Reading Group
-Write for our student magazine Albert or host a Red Radio show
-View classic films at weekly film screenings in our dedicated 120-seat film theatre
-Learn from leading writers and literature specialists at weekly research seminars
-Our on-campus Lakeside Theatre has been established as a major venue for good drama, staging both productions by professional touring companies and a wealth of new work written, produced and directed by our own staff and students
-Improve your playwriting and performance skills at our Lakeside Theatre Workshops
-Our Research Laboratory allows you to collaborate with professionals, improvising and experimenting with new work which is being tried and tested

Your future

A good literature degree opens many doors.

We offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MA by Dissertation in different literatures and various approaches to literature, covering most aspects of early modern and modern writing in English, plus a number of other languages.

Our University is one of only 11 AHRC-accredited Doctoral Training Centres in the UK. This means that we offer funded PhD studentships which also provide a range of research and training opportunities.

A number of our Department of Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies graduates have gone on to undertake successful careers as writers, and others are now established as scholars, university lecturers, teachers, publishers, publishers’ editors, journalists, arts administrators, theatre artistic directors, drama advisers, and translators.

We work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation
-Research Methods in Literary and Cultural Analysis
-Georgian and Romantic Literature and Drama
-Early Modern to Eighteenth Century Literature
-The New Nature Writing (optional)
-Writing the Novel (optional)
-Memory Maps: Practices in Psychogeography (optional)
-Dramatic Structure (optional)
-Literature and Performance in the Modern City (optional)
-Adaptation
-Documentary and the Avant-garde: Film, Video, Digital
-Film and Video Production Workshop
-Advanced Film and Industry: Production and Industry
-US Nationalism and Regionalism (optional)
-African American Literature (optional)
-Sea of Lentils: Modernity, Literature, and Film in the Caribbean (optional)
-Writing Magic (optional)
-"There is a Continent Outside My Window" : United States and Caribbean Literatures in Dialogue (optional)
-Literature and the Environmental Imagination: 19th to 21st Century Poetry and Prose (optional)

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