• New College of the Humanities Featured Masters Courses
  • St Mary’s University, Twickenham Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
Middlesex University Featured Masters Courses
Ulster University Featured Masters Courses
Barcelona Executive Business School Featured Masters Courses
Queen’s University Belfast Featured Masters Courses
Bath Spa University Featured Masters Courses
"railroad"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Railroad)

  • "railroad" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 2 of 2
Order by 
This course has been designed to meet the industrial demand for the training and education of both existing and future engineers in the advanced concepts of sustainable electrical power and energy generation. Read more
This course has been designed to meet the industrial demand for the training and education of both existing and future engineers in the advanced concepts of sustainable electrical power and energy generation.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for both practicing engineers and those considering a career in engineering.

The course has been designed to provide an in-depth insight into the technical workings, management and economics of the electrical power industry.

Objectives

This programme has been designed to meet the industrial demand for the training and education of both existing and future engineers in the advanced concepts of sustainable electrical power and energy generation. The aims are to produce graduates of a high calibre with the right skills and knowledge who will be capable of leading teams involved in the operation, control, design, regulation and management of power systems and networks of the future.

The programme aims to:
-Provide you with the ability to critically evaluate methodologies, analytical procedures and research methods.
-Provide an advanced education in electrical power engineering.
-Give you the education, knowledge and the skills you need to make sound decisions in a rapidly changing electricity supply industry.
-Provide a sound understanding of the principles and techniques of electrical power engineering.
-Give a broad knowledge of the issues and problems faced by electrical power engineers.
-Give a solid working knowledge of the techniques used to solve these problems.
-Provide a foundation in power systems principles for graduates with an engineering background.
-Demonstrate the practical relevance of these principles to the operation of successful enterprises in the broad field of electrical power engineering.
-Familiarise professional engineers and graduates with the theory and application of new technologies applied to power systems.

Academic facilities

Students in City's Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering benefit from a recent lab equipment upgrade worth £130,000. This includes photovoltaic trainers, three phase synchronous machines, AC motor speed control machines, single and three phase transformers, thryistor controllers, a power systems mainframe and power systems virtual instrumentation.

The equipment is essential in training students to be highly skilled professionals in the energy industry.

The photovoltaic trainer, for instance, is a desk-top instrument which teaches the fundamental principles of photovoltaic energy. The 'photovoltaic effect' is a method of energy generation which converts solar radiation into an electrical current using semiconductors arranged into solar cells.

Teaching and learning

Modules are delivered by academics actively involved in energy related research, as well as visiting lecturers from the power industry who provide a valuable insight into the operation of energy companies.

Industry professionals give several seminars throughout the year. At least two industrial trips are organised per academic year.

Modules

The modules for this course are delivered over two semesters, with weekly lessons scheduled over two days a week. The third semester is spent completing a project that involves writing a dissertation and presenting findings. This course is organised into eight modules provided on a weekly basis.

Course content
-Introduction to Power Systems & Energy Management EPM874 (15 credits)
-Systems Modelling EPM744 (15 credits)
-Renewable Energy Fundamentals and Sustainable Energy Technologies EPM879 (15 credits)
-Transmission and Distribution Systems Management EPM875 (15 credits)
-Power Systems Design and Simulation EPM423 (15 credits)
-Power Electronics EPM501 (15 credits)
-Power Systems Protection and Grid Stability EPM990 (15 credits)
-Economics of the Power Industry EPM101 (15 credits)
-Dissertation EPM949 (60 credits)

Career prospects

Graduates are prepared for careers that encompass a variety of roles in the power industry, from technical aspects to management roles. Previously graduates have found jobs as engineers, managers and analysts in the power sector, with companies such as:
-OFGEM
-National Grid
-UK Power Networks
-EON
-EDF
-Vattenfall
-Caterpillar
-Railroad
-Graduates may also wish to further their research in the energy field by considering a PhD

Read less
Goods are produced for consumers. But how do those goods become finished products and get to where they need to go? Supply chain management masterminds the flow of goods. Read more
Goods are produced for consumers. But how do those goods become finished products and get to where they need to go? Supply chain management masterminds the flow of goods. Raw materials must be stored and catalogued, transformed into usable inventory, and, once finished and given the stamp of approval, must be moved from the point of origin to the point of consumption. The movement of goods is a skillfully designed labyrinth of interlinking networks, channels, and connecting points, with the customer situated at the end of that supply chain. The goal is to satisfy customer demand and optimize the number of organizations in satisfying that demand, while reducing managerial control of daily logistics operations. Less control and more supply-chain partners led to the original concept of supply chain management. The consumer expects dependable and efficient service and assumes the product will arrive in good time and in perfect condition. The manager of the supply chain must ensure that the journey from product inception to customer reception runs without a hitch.

The Master of Science (M.S.) in Management is offered by the Department of Management in the Jennings A. Jones College of Business. This program, with three concentrations, offers students planning, communication, and ethical decision-making skills through experiential learning in which they will find themselves in the trenches of the real-world work environment. Each concentration—Supply Chain Management, Social Innovation and Not-for-Profit Management, and Organizational Leadership—includes a capstone project in which students will partner with an organization in the industry or non-profit sector.

Career

It was once noted that supply chain management deals with a product from cradle to the grave. Supply chain management borrowed from the process known as logistics, which emerged as a procedure in World War II as part of an effort to deliver the right amount of supplies to the troops in the trenches. The supply chain concept, however, focused on the inception of the product, as far back as the design stage, and followed that product all the way through marketing and customer service. The largest Fortune 500 Company, Wal-Mart, owes much of its success to making supply chain management a science. Examples of career opportunities include areas such as:

Corporate upper-level management
Customer relations
Distribution
Government
Healthcare
Logistics
Manufacturing
Procurement
Sourcing
Transportation/trucking/railroad/air/ocean freight/private carrier
Warehousing/inventory

Because this program is relatively new, employer information is still being compiled. Following are examples of employers of Management graduates and Career Fair participants:

American Cellular
Automatic Data Processing
CalsonicKansei North America
Chick-Fil-A Murfreesboro
Consolidated Electrical Distributors, Inc.
Enterprise
Ettain Group
Insight Global, Inc.
Internal Data Resources
Liberty Mutual
Modern Woodmen of America
Nissan North America
Northwestern Mutual Financial Network
PepsiCo Foodservice
Sherwin-Williams
State Farm Insurance
Target Stores
Tennessee Valley Healthcare System (VA)
The Hershey Company
Walter Meier Manufacturing

Read less

  • 1
Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X