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Masters Degrees (Radical)

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Never has there been a more important time for a new approach to economics. There is an urgent need for a radical rethink of our economic system. Read more
Never has there been a more important time for a new approach to economics.

There is an urgent need for a radical rethink of our economic system. We need new thinking and new models that recognise the challenges we face now, rather than blindly following the path that has led us into the converging crises we now face.

These models will enable us to both mitigate the impacts and adapt to these inter-locking crises – including climate change, biodiversity loss, the peaking in fossil fuel energy supplies, financial instability, food security, poverty and so on.

They will be built on an understanding of the complementarity of ecological protection and human flourishing.

For 20 years, pioneering thinkers and practitioners have been developing alternative economic ideas, models and experiments that were once considered radical and marginal.

As we turn to face a new economic dawn, these theories and practices are now moving centre stage.

"I teach at Schumacher College because of its strong link with ecological sustainability and an approach which is based on collaborative co-creation. People are not told what to do, together they co-create their ideas. It’s a fundamentally different model of education that we can learn from and apply to the economy as well as other areas of our life."
Professor Eve Mitleton-Kelly, London School of Economics

"In making the transition to a world in which we can all thrive within planetary boundaries, it is paradigm shift or bust, and nobody does paradigm shift better than Schumacher College. Its learning environment and the content of its courses make visions of a better world tangible. And, the Economics for Transition MA shows how right now we can take the first steps to get there."
Andrew Simms, Fellow of New Economics Foundation

"Schumacher College is one of the few places I know where economic questions are being asked as openly as they need to be. When I run seminars there, I learn as much as I teach."
Kate Raworth, Visiting Research Associate at Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute

Why Schumacher College?

Since 1991, Schumacher College has been pioneering radical new thinking in economics, attracting leading teachers, practitioners and activists from across the globe. We have inspired and supported thousands of organisations and individuals from many different countries in their quest to achieve a more sustainable and equitable world.

In 2011, in response to the deepening economic and related crises, we launched our first postgraduate programme in Economics for Transition in association with the New Economics Foundation, the Transition Network and the Business School at Plymouth University.

Now in its fourth year, this partnership offers you an unparalleled opportunity to learn about the cream of radical economic thinking, activism and entrepreneurship globally.

Hosted by highly respected radical economists, completed by an unrivalled visiting faculty of teachers and practitioners from across the world, you have a unique chance to join those at the forefront of new economic thinking.

Our teachers include:

Jonathan Dawson – Schumacher College
Tim Crabtree – Schumacher College
Stephan Harding – Schumacher College
Julie Richardson – Schumacher College
Anna Coote and Tony Greenham (link is external) – New Economics Foundation
Rob Hopkins, Jay Tompt & Sophy Banks (link is external) – Transition Network
David Bollier – co-founder of the Commons Strategies Group
Gustavo Esteva – founder of the Universidad de la Tierra
Fiona Ward – REconomy Project
Pat Conaty – NEF Fellow
Tim ‘Mac’ Macartney – Founder and CEO of Embercombe
Robin Murray – Industrial and environmental economist.
Kate Raworth – Senior Visiting Research Associate at Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute
Dr. Martin Shaw – Author, mythologist, storyteller and award winning wilderness Rites-of-Passage guide

Who is this course for?

We are delighted to receive your application whether you are coming directly from an undergraduate degree, taking time-out to study mid-career or wanting an opportunity to retrain in a subject area that is of huge importance to our global economic future and wellbeing.

We are looking for enthusiastic agents of change who are ready to co-create a new economy in practice. We are looking for those prepared to take a risk and stand on the cutting-edge of new thinking in this area.

Schumacher College welcomes students from all over the world in its diverse mix of cultural experience and age group that allows for rich peer to peer learning.

What you will learn?

The key sustainability issues facing the world today
How ecological, economic and social crises are systemically linked to the malfunctioning of today’s globalised economy
A critique of the dominant neoclassical, industrial growth model from different perspectives
A theoretical and experiential understanding of an ecological world-view
How to apply ecology and complexity science to the economy and social systems
The co-creation of a new approach to economics drawn from alternative schools of thought
The co-creation of future scenarios and pathways towards low-carbon, high wellbeing and resilient economies
Participation in current debates on the economics of transition
New economics tools, methods and policies and their application to real-world case studies
Self-evaluation to improve professional practice

You will also carry out an independent research project related to the economics of transition

Where you will go?

Are you ready to join a new generation of business leaders, entrepreneurs, policy-makers, researchers, consultants and activists?

Graduates from this programme will have the skills and knowledge to work for sustainable change in the public and private sectors as well as in civil society, or to set up their own projects or organisations that will contribute to the transition to a new economy.

Hear from some of our past and present students and find out how this programme has changed their lives and careers by reading our the Economics for Transition student profiles.

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This MA addresses the historical, political, theoretical and ethical issues of applied theatre and develops your ability to contextualise, critique and create. Read more

This MA addresses the historical, political, theoretical and ethical issues of applied theatre and develops your ability to contextualise, critique and create.

Our aim is to prepare students to be collaborative, responsive, imaginative, politically engaged and culturally aware artist practitioners. The course is aimed at newly-emerging practitioners with a background in theatre, education, activism or social change, as well as at more established practitioners who want to reflect, refresh and develop their skills. We actively encourage the sharing of skills and expertise among our multi-national group of students. We prioritise applicants with some experience in the arts, education, activism or social care, and it is rare that we take applicants directly from their first degree.

Together we explore the ways in which theatre and performance is created by diverse groups of people in a variety of community, social and educational settings: in schools or on the streets, in children’s homes and elderly care, in conflict zones, conferences, crèches and youth clubs, pupil referral units and prisons, women’s refuges and refugee centres, hospitals and hostels – anywhere groups of people meet and interact.

What is applied theatre?

Applied theatre is an umbrella term for a range of exciting worldwide performance forms concerned with personal and social change.

The term embracestheatre of the oppressed, community theatre, theatre-in-education, drama in education, theatre for development, prison theatre, intercultural arts, intergenerational arts, theatre in museums, archives and heritage sites, story-telling, reminiscence theatre, conflict resolution. The work often moves across art forms. This is not a definitive list, as it is a field that is dynamic and changing.

The MA considers case studies from the UK and from across the globe. Central to this investigation are: questions of identity; representation; discrimination; health; equality; human rights; opportunity; access; social inclusion/exclusion; participation; ethics; evaluation and documentation; aesthetics and the role of the artist.

Placement and partnerships

The course is structured so that practice and theory constantly respond to one another, through practical classes and seminars. All students undertake a placement in a recognised host organisation where you'll work with experienced practitioners, and learn from the inside how participatory arts organisations function.

We have active partnerships with many companies, and the majority of the tutors, including the convenor, are active artists, with a variety of arts practices in performance, community and social settings.

Modules & structure

Practical workshops

In the autumn term we look at the roots of Applied Theatre in Education, in Social and Political Change, and in Community. Classes include work with Geese Theatre on their use of mask in Prisons, Drama and Theatre in Education techniques with Gail Babb of Talawa Theatre, intergenerational arts practices with Convenor Sue Mayo, and the use of Drama to explore Domestic Violence, with Tender. Throughout this term students are also engaged in skills-sharing sessions in order to pool their knowledge and expertise. 

In the Spring Term Tutor Raj Bhari, from Talk for Change, leads a module on creative approaches to Community Cohesion, Conflict Resolution, and the artist as activist. We have a short festival of art forms, with classes in song, puppetry and dance- and a residency shared with students of the MA in performance making, working across modules with artists of distinction from within the Goldsmith’s staff and beyond.

Throughout the practical sessions we work with students to develop their facilitation, devising,- project planning and management skills with attention to issues such as group dynamics; power and leadership; inclusion; accessibility; equality; conflict; intercultural practice; safe space and the ethics of touch.

In the summer term students design and lead a weekend of workshops for a public audience.

Histories, Theories and Contexts seminars

This contextual strand enables us consider the thinking behind our embodied knowledge. Through a series of seminars, we consider: the development of applied methods from political theatre; radical and celebratory arts; drama and theatre-in-education; community theatre; prison theatre; therapeutic creative practices and the legacy of Augusto Boal. We study the growing body of writing on applied theatre and its practitioners, and theatre theory. We consider local and international case studies; we read, discuss, watch videos and experience live performances.

Complementary Contextual lectures

Students also choose a lecture based Option module from one of the other exciting MA programmes. Previous modules have included, African Theatre, Performance Praxis, Radical Performance, and The Reflecxtive Practitioner. Our students can also take a specialist applied module led by Danny Braverman, on Disability Theatre, examining the scope and radical nature of disability theatre.

Placement

The Convenor, Sue Mayo, supports students to locate and develop a placement in a recognised host organisation. On the placement students further the skills they have practiced on the programme, whilst dealing with the challenges of a professional context. Placement hosts include London Bubble, Magic Me, Resonate. Greenwich & Lewisham Young People's Theatre, Talawa Theatre, Pan-arts, Crisis, Ovalhouse, Green Shoes Arts, The Young Vic, MIND, CEN8, Lewisham Youth Theatre and Spare Tyre.

Professional development

As part of our commitment to student’s employability, we offer up to five workshops covering various areas directly relevant to workplaces where drama may be applied; for example: planning and managing projects, child protection and working with vulnerable adults, ethics, evaluation, setting up a theatre company or working as an independent artist.

Assessment

The MA Applied Theatre has five points of assessment:

  • a 6,000-word essay based on material covered in Term 1
  • a 6,000-word reflective portfolio on the placement
  • a 12,000-word research project/dissertation

These assessments count towards 80% of the final mark.

The remaining 20% is derived from assessment of the two shared complementary/contextual modules, which include Disability Theatre, Performance Praxis, African Theatre, Musical Theatre and Cultural Theory.



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The MA in Literary Studies at Aberystwyth offers you a stimulating engagement with English literature in all its depth and diversity, with the opportunity to develop particular expertise in one of a number of specialist areas. Read more

About the course

The MA in Literary Studies at Aberystwyth offers you a stimulating engagement with English literature in all its depth and diversity, with the opportunity to develop particular expertise in one of a number of specialist areas. By studying the latest developments in critical theory and research methodology you will cultivate the necessary skills to undertake your 15,000 word MA Dissertation, an extensive piece of critical research in your chosen field. You will also develop a host of transferable skills which you may deploy in a range of other academic or employment contexts.

As a student on the MA in Literary Studies at Aberystwyth, you will benefit from the University’s superb library and information technology resources and have access to the unrivaled collections of the National Library of Wales, one of the five elite research libraries in the UK.

This degree will suit you:

- If you are fascinated by particular developments in English Literature and want to deepen your knowledge
- If you want to enhance your understanding of particular topics or periods in literary history
- If you wish to cultivate your existing skills as a reader and writer
- If you want to develop your research and analytical skills for future work in academia

Course content and structure

The MA in Literary Studies provides a number of modules on fascinating topics and periods of literary history, including Medieval Lives, Romanticism's Radical Cultures, Victorian Popular Fiction, Postmodern Genres and many more. An important part of the course is the writing of a 15,000-word Dissertation on a specialist topic chosen by you in consultation with a specialist supervisor. We will take great care in assigning you a supervisor whose interests match your own as closely as possible.

A significant part of the course is devoted to research skills, including: exploiting library resources; using electronic journals and databases; building a critical bibliography; researching and writing a proposal; and honing your oral presentation skills. You will also be taught to interrogate the different kinds of 'textuality', or aspects of the literary text, which need to be taken into account in the study of literature at postgraduate level and beyond.

Modules:

Postwar American Fiction
Women, Fiction and Female Community, 1660-1792
Postmodern Genres
Romantic Radical Cultures
Sensational Sales: Victorian Popular Literature 1848-1894
Understanding Creativity
Writing Ireland, Writing Wales

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of: a research proposal, including a critical bibliography; examined oral presentations; and essays of 3,000- 5,000 words. In the third semester, each student will complete a MA Dissertation of 15,000 words on a specialist topic chosen by the student.

Employability

Every MA course at Aberystwyth University is specifically designed to enhance your employability. In addition to developing your writing and research skills, this course will help you to master key skills that are required in a wide variety of workplaces. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation so that you can tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence. Your MA in Literary Studies will place you in the jobs marketplace as a professional writer with highly desirable skills suitable for a career in the arts, literature, journalism and many others.

Key Skills and Competencies Study Skills

You will learn how to identify and interrogate the most relevant materials and literature in your field. You will be taught to master a range of research methodologies and, importantly, you will learn to justify your preferred methodological approach to your subject. You will learn how to deploy your research and analysis in critical discussion and build sophisticated academic arguments. You will learn to quickly assemble, assimilate, interpret and present a broad range of information regarding your specialism, a set of skills keenly sought by many employers from the civil service and journalism to media and commerce.

Self-Motivation and Discipline

Studying at MA level requires high levels of discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of Departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your MA degree. This process will strengthen your skills in planning, executing and analysing work projects in ways that reflect standard practice in the world of employed work.

Transferable Skills

The MA is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of research interests and employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working to specific deadlines.

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Master's specialisation in Philosophical Anthropology (Research). Read more

Master's specialisation in Philosophical Anthropology (Research)

In Philosophical Anthropology you study the philosophical significance of psychoanalytical hermeneutics as developed by Freud and followers (Lacan, Klein, et al.) Research focuses in particular on the phenomenological tradition (Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Deleuze and Butler).

The Centre for Psychoanalysis and Philosophical Anthropology (CPPA) was founded in 1999 as a cooperative venture between two departments of Philosophical Anthropology, at Radboud University and at the Catholic University Leuven (Belgium). The CPPA works closely with several other psychoanalytical and philosophical centres and departments in the Low Countries.

Philosophers usually assume that philosophy is important for psychoanalysis (and psychotherapy in general) in that it can elucidate and analyse the foundations of the latter, but that psychoanalysis can contribute little or nothing to philosophy as a consequence.

Yet, a long-standing tradition at the Radboud University and the Catholic University Leuven emphasizes the role of psychoanalysis and Freudian metapsychology as critical tools for philosophy. According to this school of thought, the Unconscious (language, the Other) generates a radical alienation in the human subject, which is of the utmost importance for philosophical theorizing about human nature.

However, it would be wrong to reduce the philosophical implications of psychoanalysis to this aspect of alienation. The methodology of psychoanalysis as applied to an understanding of human thinking, feeling and behaviour through psychiatric concepts and phenomena appears to be equally important, with the potential for a theory of human nature, in which different pathological variants are understood as intrinsic possibilities of human existence.

Clearly, this approach has far-reaching consequences for our understanding of the relation between normality and pathology. This avenue is currently being pursued at the CPPA in an endeavour to explore philosophical psychopathology and its consequences, both as a contribution to Freudian metapsychology and as a critique of it.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/anthropology

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, nor to one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess essential skills; namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions using clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate; they require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first vocational step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. Graduates tend to fall into three groups. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our approach to this field

The Centre for Psychoanalysis and Philosophical Anthropology (CPPA) was founded in 1999 as a cooperative venture between two departments of Philosophical Anthropology, at Radboud University and at the Catholic University Leuven (Belgium), respectively. The CPPA works closely with several other psychoanalytical and philosophical centres and departments in the Low Countries.

Philosophers usually assume that philosophy is important for psychoanalysis (and psychotherapy in general) in that it can elucidate and analyse the foundations of the latter, but that psychoanalysis can contribute little or nothing to philosophy as a consequence.

Yet, a long-standing tradition at the Radboud University and the Catholic University Leuven emphasises the role of psychoanalysis and Freudian metapsychology as critical tools for philosophy. According to this school of thought, the Unconscious (language, the Other) generates a radical alienation in the human subject, which is of the utmost importance for philosophical theorizing about human nature.

However, it would be wrong to reduce the philosophical implications of psychoanalysis to this aspect of alienation. The methodology of psychoanalysis as applied to an understanding of human thinking, feeling and behaviour through psychiatric concepts and phenomena appears to be equally important, harbouring the possibility of a theory of human nature, in which different pathological variants are understood as intrinsic possibilities of human existence.

Our research in this field

What makes this programme special?

The English-taught Research Master's programme in Philosophy is a two-year course that is meant for students of proven ability who wish to prepare for an academic career in philosophy. We offer the following to provide you with the best possible academic background:

- A combination of internationally acclaimed research and excellent teaching

- Research seminars in the history of philosophy, continental philosophy and analytic philosophy

- A broad range of specialisations in Philosophical Anthropology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of mind, Philosophy of language and Logic, Philosophical Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy and the History of Philosophy

- An emphasis on the training of research skills

- A personal supervisor who guides you throughout the programme

- An excellent preparation for post-graduate life by means of the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis, which is composed of a publishable article and of a PhD research proposal

- A high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad

- An international climate.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/anthropology

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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The main aim of the MA in Social Work is to produce competent, reflective, analytical and research-minded social workers, who are vocationally qualified, with advanced knowledge and skills to bring about innovations through collaborative practice and continuous learning. Read more
The main aim of the MA in Social Work is to produce competent, reflective, analytical and research-minded social workers, who are vocationally qualified, with advanced knowledge and skills to bring about innovations through collaborative practice and continuous learning.

The new programme was developed in consultation with Social Care Service Users and Stakeholders, who are also, actively involved in delivery of the programme. Practising social car professionals ensure teaching is relevant to the cutting edge of today's social work agenda and teaching methods facilitate participative learning.

Why choose this subject?

- Choose this subject if you want to make a difference to people’s lives and feel passionate and committed to social justice.

- Our students say: “The MA in Social Work delivered at Hope gives prospective Social Workers an opportunity to engage with what I have found to be a unique blend of traditional, mainstream and radical ideas on Social Work which is also underpinned by current and critical and cutting edge teaching and research” (David Christie, MA student).

- The student intake each year is limited to 25 students – you will get to know the teaching team well and also have the opportunity to develop excellent peer group support.

- The team has expertise in children and family social work, theorising childhood, racism and anti-racist social work, mental health and mental health user movements, youth justice, radical social work histories, community engagement and international social work.

- The Masters qualification is highly regarded by employers.

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This Masters degree in Political Islam has been specifically designed for those who wish to comprehend the main currents of Islamic thinking during the modern period. Read more
This Masters degree in Political Islam has been specifically designed for those who wish to comprehend the main currents of Islamic thinking during the modern period. This will involve investigating a number of radical Islamic movements as well as alternative understandings of Islam.

Why this programme

◾The University of Glasgow offers a number of course options that may be taken by students, such as the courses provided within the Global Securities programme.
◾The course is taught by experts in Theology and Religious Studies. Assistance is offered by staff who teach outside of the Islamic tradition, which will be of use for those interested, for example, in Islamic-Christian relations or forms of literature within the Islamic tradition.
◾The programme is sufficiently flexible to enable students to concentrate on specific areas of study, or to concentrate on a more general range of issues.
◾Linguistic ability in Arabic, Persian, Turkish (or any other non-European language) is not essential.
◾Students are encouraged to participate in the wider seminar series offered in the subject area in order to gain a comprehensive knowledge of religion and culture in the contemporary world. (There are experts in Chinese religions, Judaism and Christianity with Theology and Religious Studies).
◾Glasgow has a large Muslim community. There are possibilities to engage with this local community.

Programme structure

This MSc in Political Islam investigates a number of “radical” Islamic movements such as Salafism, the Muslim Brotherhood, and the Islamic revival in Iran post-1978. At the same time, alternative understandings of Islam will be examined including the so-called “liberal” version, Islamic feminist thinking and contemporary manifestations of Sufism (the so-called “mystical” side of Islam).

As the course progresses the topics will engage with the historical Islamic tradition, so that students will appreciate the wide variety of “Islams” that have appeared in modern times. An understanding of Islam is imperative in the contemporary period, with issues such as security, identity and immigration appearing on a daily basis in the Western media. Islam is no longer a religion that is confined to the Middle East, but needs to be understood as an integral part of British society and culture. The challenges and issues that Muslims face require urgent investigation, and this course provides the framework for students to engage with the changes that affect everyone in society.

The programme is designed for small groups that will discuss the topics in a seminar environment. There will be formal lectures and the occasional guest speaker. The basis of the programme will be textual, and will involve class/group discussions about the material provided. Core teaching is delivered in two semesters, followed by a dissertation. The project dissertation is an opportunity for students to identify an area of interest and to create a research project that allows in-depth critical exploration of this.

Career prospects

With the current interest in Islam, this degree provides essential knowledge and skills for those involved in teaching, the civil service, government, the police and the military. The degree also provides an excellent entry into a PhD related to Islamic Studies.

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Environmental problems are indisputably a part of the contemporary political landscape. Societies across the globe increasingly confront innumerable and often inter-related environmental challenges ranging from climate change and loss of biodiversity to local conflicts about land-use. Read more

Overview

Environmental problems are indisputably a part of the contemporary political landscape. Societies across the globe increasingly confront innumerable and often inter-related environmental challenges ranging from climate change and loss of biodiversity to local conflicts about land-use. Each of these challenges has political, economic, cultural and ethical dimensions; each provides an opportunity to rethink longstanding debates and opens up new fields of political enquiry.

SPIRE’s Masters in Environmental Politics has run since 1996 and is taught by some of the most prominent figures in the field. The course is designed for people who wish to understand and analyse the wide range of political and policy questions thrown up by increasingly complicated environmental problems. It has attracted students from all over the UK, the EU and the world. The international mix of students and staff adds greatly to the nature of discussion and learning.

Keele University has an unrivalled reputation for its work in Environmental Politics, with internationally recognised experts in various fields of social science environmental research particularly in the fields of sociology, political theory, economics, international relations, environmental ethics and public policy. Our interdisciplinary approach, together with a large and active research community on environmental issues within Keele, contributes to a thriving intellectual culture of which you can expect to be a part as an Environmental Politics student.

The course is taught over a 12 month period (September-September; January-January). It is available as a full-time and/or part-time mode of study. Students completing the course have gone on to a variety of careers in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/environmentalpolitics/

Course Aims

The aim of the MA/MRes in Environmental Politics is to provide you with an intensive period of study in which to learn about environmental politics and policy in a systematic and critical manner. It aims to provide you with a foundation in the theoretical and practical dimensions of this challenging, interdisciplinary field. In addition to your core modules for the MA/MRes, we recommend that you take our Dimensions of Environmental Politics module, which introduces five key fields of political inquiry in relation to the environment. It looks at: green political theory; the political sociology of the environment; the environment and public policy; environment and political economy; and international environmental politics. Your other chosen elective modules and your dissertation project give a broad scope in which to pursue specific environmental topics of your own choosing.

Course Content

Taught masters programmes require satisfactory completion of at least 180 credits, made up of 6 taught module (120 credits) plus a 15,000 word dissertation (60 credits). The MA and MRes programmes differ in that the MA programme contains more subject-specific modules and less research training, while the MRes programme contains more research training, in preparation for a research career or for undertaking a research degree such as a PhD.

MA
• Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Research in Action (15 credits)
• Three (15 credits) optional modules chosen from the list below
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Public Policy (60 credits)

MRes
• Research Design and Process (20 credits)
• Two 15 credits optional modules chosen from the list below
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Quantitative Data Analysis I (20 credits)
• Qualitative Data Analysis (20 credits)
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Public Policy (60 credits)

Options
Optional modules can be drawn from modules such as those listed below, although the precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.

• Approaches to European Integration: History and Practice
• Comparative Public Management reform (recommended)
• Comparative European Politics
• Diplomatic Law
• Diplomatic Practice
• Dimensions of Environmental Politics (recommended)
• Environmental Diplomacy (recommended)
• Environmental Movements: North and South
• Environmental Politics and Policy in India and China (recommended)
• Parties and Democracy
• Right-Wing Radical Parties
• The Changing International Agenda
• The Politics of Global Security
• The Theory of Global Security
• US Environmental Politics and Policy
• US Foreign Policy (recommended)

Teaching & Assessment

Postgraduate teaching and learning generally takes place in a combination of large seminars and smaller discussion groups. Our academics typically lead the sessions, encouraging discussion between all students. Sometimes students will give presentations, either individually or in groups.

There is a strong emphasis on independent learning and students are expected to work on their own to produce their essays and dissertation. Most modules are assessed by a diverse range of coursework (e.g., essays, critiques, reports, presentations), though some modules may also be assessed by seminar contributions and/or written exams. Students take three modules in each semester. The taught modules are completed by May, leaving the summer months for students to write their dissertation.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Sweden, Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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In international politics, the primary day-to-day means of contact between states is through the institution of diplomacy. A rich legal tradition of how this diplomacy is governed has evolved, and the practices of diplomacy by states continue to change and shape the patterns of world politics around us. Read more

Overview

In international politics, the primary day-to-day means of contact between states is through the institution of diplomacy. A rich legal tradition of how this diplomacy is governed has evolved, and the practices of diplomacy by states continue to change and shape the patterns of world politics around us. So one important way to understand international politics is to examine the practices of diplomats and the contexts within which they operate.

Keele's MA/MRes in Diplomatic Studies aims to meet this need. The first of its kind in the UK, it continues to provide a solid, advanced grounding in the legal foundations, and the theory and practice of diplomacy. Many students on the course are from diplomatic backgrounds, and so the course provides a useful link between the worlds of academia and of practical policy-making.

The course is taught over a 12 month period (September-September; January-January). It is available as a full-time and/or part-time mode of study. Students completing the course have gone on to a variety of careers in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/diplomaticstudies/

Course Aims

The course aims to ground students in the central legal, theoretical and practical aspects of diplomacy. It does this within a context of a more general understanding of International Relations. It also prepares students for research – both research that they may do for their dissertation, but also research that they may undertake in their future academic or professional work. The optional modules and the dissertation give students a broad scope in which to pursue topics of their own choosing.

Course Content

Taught masters programmes require satisfactory completion of at least 180 credits, made up of 6 taught module (120 credits) plus a 15,000 word dissertation (60 credits). The MA and MRes programmes differ in that the MA programme contains more subject-specific modules and less research training, while the MRes programme contains more research training, in preparation for a research career or for undertaking a research degree such as a PhD.

MA
• Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Research in Action (15 credits)
• Three (15 credits) optional modules chosen from the list below
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Diplomatic Studies (60 credits)

MRes
• Research Design and Process (20 credits)
• Two 15 credits optional modules chosen from the list below
• Perspectives in Politics and international Relations (30 credits)
• Quantitative Data Analysis I (20 credits)
• Qualitative Data Analysis (20 credits)
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Diplomatic Studies (60 credits)

Options
Optional modules can be drawn from modules such as those listed below, although the precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.

• Approaches to European Integration: History and Practice
• Comparative Public Management Reform (recommended)
• Comparative European Politics
• Diplomatic Law (recommended)
• Diplomatic Practice (recommended)
• Dimensions of Environmental Politics
• Environmental Diplomacy
• Environmental Movements: North and South
• Environmental Politics and Policy in India and China (recommended)
• Parties and Democracy
• Right-Wing Radical Parties
• The Changing International Agenda
• The Politics of Global Security
• The Theory of Global Security
• US Environmental Politics and Policy
• US Foreign Policy

Options available outside SPIRE
It is also possible to take a modern foreign language as a replacement for one of your optional modules. Languages currently available are; French, Russian, German, Spanish and Japanese, at beginners, intermediate or advanced level.

Background reading:
There is no single textbook for this course. Some of the basic texts include: R.P. Barston, Modern Diplomacy, G.R. Berridge, Diplomacy: Theory and Practice, C.M. Constantinou, On the Way to Diplomacy, J. Der Derian, On Diplomacy, K. Hamilton and R. Langhore, The Practice of Diplomacy, H. Nicoslon, The Evolution of Diplomatic Method, E. Satow, Guide to Diplomatic Practice, and A. Watson, Diplomacy: The Dialogue Between States.

Teaching & Assessment

Postgraduate teaching and learning generally takes place in a combination of large seminars and smaller discussion groups. Our academics typically lead the sessions, encouraging discussion between all students. Sometimes students will give presentations, either individually or in groups.

There is a strong emphasis on independent learning and students are expected to work on their own to produce their essays and dissertation. Most modules are assessed by a diverse range of coursework (e.g., essays, critiques, reports, presentations), though some modules may also be assessed by seminar contributions and/or written exams. Students take three modules in each semester. The taught modules are completed by May, leaving the summer months for students to write their dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from purchasing textbooks and other sundry materials, no significant additional costs are compulsory for this course.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Sweden, Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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As a discipline, International Relations is undergoing many transformations. Read more

Overview

As a discipline, International Relations is undergoing many transformations. From a discipline which focused closely on a certain set of interactions between sovereign states, it has expanded greatly to encompass a much wider set of questions about the nature of international or global political structures and processes.

Correspondingly, a whole set of theoretical tools have also emerged to try to explain or interpret this newly expanded field

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/internationalrelations/

Course Aims

The course aims to provide you with an innovative grounding in the central theoretical and practical aspects of both the traditional and the expanded conceptions of International Relations. It also aims to equip you with the conceptual and analytical skills to think critically about the nature of global structures and processes. These skills are fundamental to postgraduate study and invaluable for vocational and personal development and for future professional life.

The course is taught over a 12 month period (September-September; January-January). It is available as a full-time and/or part-time mode of study. Students completing the course have gone on to a variety of careers in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

Course Content

Taught masters programmes require satisfactory completion of at least 180 credits, made up of 6 taught module (120 credits) plus a 15,000 word dissertation (60 credits). The MA and MRes programmes differ in that the MA programme contains more subject-specific modules and less research training, while the MRes programme contains more research training, in preparation for a research career or for undertaking a research degree such as a PhD.

MA
• Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Research in Action (15 credits)
• Three (15 credits) optional modules chosen from the list below
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in International Relations (60 credits)

MRes
• Research Design and Process (20 credits)
• Two 15 credits optional modules chosen from the list below
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Quantitative Data Analysis I (20 credits)
• Qualitative Data Analysis (20 credits)
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in International Relations (60 credits)

Options
Optional modules can be drawn from modules such as those listed below, although the precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.

• Approaches to European Integration: History and Practice (recommended)
• Comparative Public Management reform
• Comparative European Politics
• Diplomatic Law
• Diplomatic Practice
• Dimensions of Environmental Politics
• Environmental Diplomacy
• Environmental Movements: North and South
• Environmental Politics and Policy in India and China
• Parties and Democracy
• Right-Wing Radical Parties
• The Changing International Agenda (recommended)
• The Politics of Global Security
• The Theory of Global Security
• US Environmental Politics and Policy
• US Foreign Policy

Teaching & Assessment

Postgraduate teaching and learning generally takes place in a combination of large seminars and smaller discussion groups. Our academics typically lead the sessions, encouraging discussion between all students. Sometimes students will give presentations, either individually or in groups.

There is a strong emphasis on independent learning and students are expected to work on their own to produce their essays and dissertation. Most modules are assessed by a diverse range of coursework (e.g., essays, critiques, reports, presentations), though some modules may also be assessed by seminar contributions and/or written exams. Students take three modules in each semester. The taught modules are completed by May, leaving the summer months for students to write their dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from purchasing textbooks and other sundry materials, no significant additional costs are compulsory for this course.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Security matters. Because it matters, its study demands the development of complex analytical skills supported by cutting edge research as well as innovative and creative teaching techniques. Read more

Overview

Security matters. Because it matters, its study demands the development of complex analytical skills supported by cutting edge research as well as innovative and creative teaching techniques.

This novel exciting course reflects the latest trends in security studies and is designed to provide students with the elements to become world-class global security analysts. The course is intended for UK, EU, and overseas students and offers direct applications for policy-makers, risk professionals, and students seeking to pursue an academic path.

The course is taught over a 12 month period (September-September; January-January). It is available as a full-time and/or part-time mode of study. Students completing the course have gone on to a variety of careers in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/globalsecurity/

Course Aims

This novel exciting programme reflects the latest trends in security studies, cutting-edge security research developed at Keele, and innovative and creative teaching methods. The course is intended for UK, EU, and overseas students eager to develop their analytical skills on the breathtaking world of global security. The uniqueness of the programme lies on its creative approach to teaching and research designed to inspire critical thinking for the analysis of a complex world. Teaching is complemented by academic-trips intended to provide students with an opportunity to experience in situ security analysis. The overall objective of the programme is to help students to unleash their curiosity on learning and researching security.

This course aims to provide you with an up-to-date, advanced and critical introduction to the theory and politics of global security. In doing so it also seeks to promote and nurture the development of the complex analytical and conceptual skills that the study of this discipline requires. These skills are fundamental to postgraduate study and invaluable for vocational and personal development and for future professional life.

Course Content

Taught masters programmes require satisfactory completion of at least 180 credits, made up of 6 taught module (120 credits) plus a 15,000 word dissertation (60 credits). The MA and MRes programmes differ in that the MA programme contains more subject-specific modules and less research training, while the MRes programme contains more research training, in preparation for a research career or for undertaking a research degree such as a PhD.

MA
• Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Research in Action (15 credits)
• Three (15 credits) optional modules chosen from the list below
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Global Security (60 credits)

MRes
• Research Design and Process (20 credits)
• Two 15 credits optional modules chosen from the list below
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Quantitative Data Analysis I (20 credits)
• Qualitative Data Analysis (20 credits)
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Global Security (60 credits)

Options
Optional modules can be drawn from modules such as those listed below, although the precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.

• Approaches to European Integration: History and Practice
• Comparative Public Management
• Comparative European Politics
• Diplomatic Law
• Diplomatic Practice
• Dimensions of Environmental Politics
• Environmental Diplomacy
• Environmental Movements: North and South
• Parties and Democracy
• Right-Wing Radical Parties
• The Changing International Agenda
• The European Union and the Global Commons
• The Politics of Global Security (recommended)
• The Theory of Global Security (recommended)
• US Environmental Politics and Policy
• US Foreign Policy

Options available outside SPIRE
It is also possible to take a modern foreign language as a replacement for one of your optional modules. Languages currently available are; French, Russian, German, Spanish and Japanese, at beginners, intermediate or advanced level.

Teaching & Assessment

Postgraduate teaching and learning generally takes place in a combination of large seminars and smaller discussion groups. Our academics typically lead the sessions, encouraging discussion between all students. Sometimes students will give presentations, either individually or in groups.

There is a strong emphasis on independent learning and students are expected to work on their own to produce their essays and dissertation. Most modules are assessed by a diverse range of coursework (e.g., essays, critiques, reports, presentations), though some modules may also be assessed by seminar contributions and/or written exams. Students take three modules in each semester. The taught modules are completed by May, leaving the summer months for students to write their dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from purchasing textbooks and other sundry materials, no significant additional costs are compulsory for this course.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Sweden, Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The nature and role of the state and its institutions and the relationship between the state, these institutions and society are undergoing fundamental transformations. Read more

Overview

The nature and role of the state and its institutions and the relationship between the state, these institutions and society are undergoing fundamental transformations. Arguably, nowhere are these developments more evident than in contemporary Europe.

On the one hand, European integration has undoubtedly challenged the role and powers of the nation state. While nation states remain in control of many aspects of domestic politics and policy, more and more policies are being shaped by decisions made at the European Union level. While these trends raise all sorts of questions about issues of sovereignty, democratic accountability, representation and efficiency, they also open up new opportunities for the nation states to cooperate more closely, and for the EU itself to develop further as a regional and global actor.

On the other hand, developments within nation states have challenged the ways political decisions are made and how citizens are linked with this decision-making. Traditional communities have become less cohesive, political loyalties have waned, and trust in democratic institutions has declined. At the same time, however, we have also witnessed the rise of new values, identities and actors. Together, these developments are putting pressure on longstanding patterns and processes of representation, political intermediation and decision-making and are challenging the traditional way of conducting politics.

This course is unique in the UK in that it examines developments within Europe through an interdisciplinary lens, combining political science and international relations perspectives with historical and cultural ones. This broad outlook is made possible by the range of expertise of the teaching staff at Keele and by SPIRE’s research strengths.

The course is taught over a 12 month period (September-September; January-January). It is available as a full-time and/or part-time mode of study. Students completing the course have gone on to a variety of careers in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/europeanpoliticsandculture/

Course Aims

The aims of this Masters course are to provide students with the conceptual and analytical skills and the factual knowledge to think critically about and develop an understanding of the political and cultural dynamics of contemporary Europe, viewed in a global, regional and national context.

In addition, the course aims to assist students in developing a range of cognitive and social skills relevant to their intellectual, vocational and personal development. In pursuing these aims, the course seeks to prepare students for a variety of professional careers, including those in governmental and non-governmental organizations, the European institutions, the media and business, or for research beyond the Masters level.

Course Content

Taught masters programmes require satisfactory completion of at least 180 credits, made up of 6 taught module (120 credits) plus a 15,000 word dissertation (60 credits). The MA and MRes programmes differ in that the MA programme contains more subject-specific modules and less research training, while the MRes programme contains more research training, in preparation for a research career or for undertaking a research degree such as a PhD.

MA
• Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Research in Action (15 credits)
• Three (15 credits) optional modules chosen from the list below
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in European Politics and Culture (60 credits)

MRes
• Research Design and process (20 credits)
• Two 15 credits optional modules chosen from the list below
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Quantitative Data Analysis I (20 credits)
• Qualitative Data Analysis (20 credits)
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in European Politics and Culture (60 credits)

Options
Optional modules can be drawn from modules such as those listed below, although the precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.

• Approaches to European Integration: History and Practice (recommended)
• Comparative European Politics (recommended)
• Comparative Public Management Reform
• Diplomatic Law
• Diplomatic Practice
• Dimensions of Environmental Politics
• Environmental Diplomacy
• Environmental Politics and Policy in India and China
• Environmental Movements: North and South
• Parties and Democracy
• Right-Wing Radical Parties
• The Changing International Agenda
• The Politics of Global Security
• The Theory of Global Security
• US Environmental Politics and Policy
• US Foreign Policy

It is also possible to take a modern foreign language (other than English) as one of the optional modules. Language modules run over both semesters. Languages currently available are:

* French (beginners, intermediate, advanced, post A-level 1 or post A-level 2 level)
* German (beginners, intermediate, advanced or post A-level 1 level)
* Spanish (beginners, intermediate, advanced or post A-level 1 level)
* Japanese (beginners, intermediate or advanced level)
* Russian (beginners or intermediate level)

Teaching & Assessment

Postgraduate teaching and learning generally takes place in a combination of large seminars and smaller discussion groups. Our academics typically lead the sessions, encouraging discussion between all students. Sometimes students will give presentations, either individually or in groups.

There is a strong emphasis on independent learning and students are expected to work on their own to produce their essays and dissertation. Most modules are assessed by a diverse range of coursework (e.g., essays, critiques, reports, presentations), though some modules may also be assessed by seminar contributions and/or written exams. Students take three modules in each semester. The taught modules are completed by May, leaving the summer months for students to write their dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from purchasing textbooks and other sundry materials, no significant additional costs are compulsory for this course.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Sweden, Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The course embraces the truth that true creative spirit is born out of a radical review of the interior design process. Read more

Summary

The course embraces the truth that true creative spirit is born out of a radical review of the interior design process.

Students will be inspired by creative experiences that act as a catalyst for reflection, exploration, debate and the strategic management of the multi-facetted aspects that determine interior design processes.

The existing boundaries of interior design will be explored, pushing the international platform for the profession forward in new and versatile directions

This course is divided into three trimesters to allow students to work towards a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or a Master's qualification.

Modules

PgCert: Design Systems; Design Culture.

PgDip: Appreciative Design Inquiry; Collaborative Practice

Master's: Major Project - Practice.

Assessment

Informal reflection and debate are at the heart of the seminars and group tutorials where peer reviews, active learning exercises and self-appraisal help our students to shape their assignments towards self-determined outcomes. Project work is always professionally presented and will be assessed formally by a team made up of internal and external experts and academics.

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MSc International Development. Environment, Climate Change and Development links environmental understanding grounded in the physical sciences with study of the social and economic bases of planning and managing development. Read more

MSc International Development: Environment, Climate Change and Development links environmental understanding grounded in the physical sciences with study of the social and economic bases of planning and managing development.

Over the past two decades, environmental considerations have become central to development policy and management. As a result, there is a growing need for policymakers, planners and managers to be fully conversant with the environmental dimension of development.

The course is therefore perfect if you're looking to benefit from research-led teaching by world-class academics that examines radical alternatives and critical insights into mainstream environmentalism.

Informal enquiries, prior to application, are welcomed. Please contact Dr Nicholas Jepson, Deputy Programme Director (  ).

Aims

  • Provide an interdisciplinary training to equip you with an understanding of the environmental and climate change dimensions of development trends and interventions.
  • Provide you with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to analyse effectively the relationships between environmental issues, climate change and development processes, and make judgements about policies and their implementation.
  • Provide critical insights into the key strategies, policies and practices currently employed to promote climate change adaptation, mitigation and sustainable development.
  • Develop professionally-oriented skills related to formulating, investigating and implementing different approaches to promoting climate change adaptation, mitigation and sustainable development.
  • Provide a wide range of options for advanced training in areas of specialist expertise relevant to environment, climate change, and development.
  • Develop advanced competencies in transferable areas, including developing reasoned arguments, gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources, undertaking both team-based and independent work to deadlines, and both written and verbal forms of communication.
  • Assist you in developing your specialist area of expertise within the field of environment, climate change, and development, and applying your understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation.

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is covered by the course fee. Recent fieldtrip locations have included Uganda, Ghana, Sri Lanka and India.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. We cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. Planning will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

The taught elements of the programme, carrying 120 credits overall is continuously assessed by a variety of methods (project based reports, essays), involving largely individual submissions, but also elements of group work.

Participants must also complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice approved by the Programme Directors. Students are encouraged to base their dissertations on topics of direct professional concern to themselves.

Facilities

The Arthur Lewis Building provides excellent resources including analytical laboratories, studio facilities, workshops, seminar rooms, an on-site cafe and dedicated computer clusters including GIS facilities.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for employment in a range of development-related fields, including research, policy and practice. A wide range of transferable skills will be developed, including analytical and professional skills. Many of our alumni have gone onto careers in public service, the NGO/charitable and private sectors at national and international levels, as policy officers, managers, consultants or development practitioners - while others have pursued further academic study leading to a PhD and academic careers. Since its foundation, the Global Development Institute has trained over 7000 individuals from 170 different countries.



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The MSc in International Relations, the largest Masters stream offered by the Department of Politics and International Relations, allows you the opportunity to engage critically with broad issues in various regions around the globe. Read more
The MSc in International Relations, the largest Masters stream offered by the Department of Politics and International Relations, allows you the opportunity to engage critically with broad issues in various regions around the globe. The core of the programme introduces key themes and approaches to the study of international politics, and then allows you to bring these to bear on social, economic, and political interactions of key actors in world politics.

You will study a mixture of core units and elective options, including a generous choice of free options, and write a supervised dissertation over the summer. Option courses for the programme do vary from year to year, but normally include courses on US foreign policy, south Asian politics, EU foreign and security policy, media and war, and international law. Teaching is conducted primarily in small group seminars that meet weekly for two hours, supplemented by individual tuition for the dissertation.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Masters degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpgdipinternationalrelations.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The Department of Politics and International Relations is a young, vibrant and rapidly-rising department and was ranked in the Top 10 small politics departments in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE).

- The course is taught by world-class scholars and informed by cutting-edge research.

- The course offers an advanced grounding in international relations while allowing you to specialise in particular issues or regions of interest.

- Our international cohort of students will provide you with excellent opportunities to obtain genuinely global perspectives.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Centre for European Politics was officially launched by Lord Mandelson in September 2007, with the mission of producing research in two principal areas: the study of democracy in Europe, and Europe as an actor in world politics. Under the leadership of Co-Directors Dr Alister Miskimmon and Dr James Sloam, it has recently hosted a number of high-profile speakers, including Lord Mandelson, Professor Simon Hix (LSE), Roger Liddle (Policy Network), John Peet (The Economist), Sir Stephen Wall (former European policy advisor to Tony Blair), and David Willetts MP (Shadow Secretary of State for Innovations, Universities and Skills).
Recent funded research projects include: a European Union Committee of the Regions consultancy on EU External Relations and European Neighbourhood Policy; an EU-funded Workshop on the Review of the European Union Budget; and Teaching Democracy.

- The Centre for Global and Transnational Politics is devoted to the multi-disciplinary exploration of global and transnational processes. Led by its Co-Directors Dr Chris Rumford and Professor Sandra Halperin, its central concern is to theorise and conceptualise the substance of, and connections between and among, political processes that operate at all levels or scales: the local, national, international, transnational, and global.

- The Centre recently won £54,000 from NORFACE, a partnership of European Research Councils including the ESRC, for a pan-European research network on globalisation and the transformation of Europe's borders, and £20,000 from the joint AHRC/ESRC Religion and Society programme for a research network on the normative foundations of public policy in a multi-faith society.
Dr Yasmin Khan’s recent book The Great Partition: The Making of India and Pakistan (Yale University Press) won the Royal Historical Society’s Gladstone Book Prize of 2007.

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Dr Ben O'Loughlin and Akil N. Awan, together with colleague Andrew Hoskins at the University of Warwick, were awarded £300,000 from the ESRC for a study of terrorist networks on the internet.
Unit Co-Director Professor Andrew Chadwick is one of the founding members of the US National Science Foundation's International Working Group on Online Consultation and Public Policymaking, a three year project focusing on how political interaction on the internet can contribute to better government policy. It is funded through part of an overall grant of $1m to the State University of New York at Albany, from the NSF Digital Government Programme. Andrew Chadwick’s recent book Internet Politics (Oxford University Press) was awarded one of the American Sociological Association Best Book Prizes in 2007.

- The Contemporary Political Theory Research Group was founded in October 2009, as a result of the development of political theory at postgraduate level and growth in academic staff numbers having created the critical mass it required. The group organizes its activities collectively, focusing on issues around contemporary pluralism, liberalism, democratic theory and radical politics. It brings together staff working in contemporary Continental philosophy, normative political theory, and American pragmatism, and its postgraduate members include two students on the College’s most prestigious studentship, the Reid Award. The group also has ties to the College’s Philosophy Team and the interdepartmental Humanities and Arts Research Centre.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments related to international relations

- sound knowledge of the texts, theories and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes and phenomena
- associated with particular fields of politics and international relations

- aadvanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods within the disciplines of politics and international relations
a solid foundation for progression to either a politics-related career or continued academic study.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different politics and international relations-related areas, including roles as officials in local government, personnel officers and higher education lecturers. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Why study at Roehampton. We are ranked best modern university in London for the quality of our research (Research Excellence Framework 2014). Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • We are ranked best modern university in London for the quality of our research (Research Excellence Framework 2014).
  • Roehampton’s School of Education has a historical association with Froebel College which was founded in 1892. As a result, the programme is supported by the renowned Froebel Archive for Childhood Studies, and has developed an international reputation in the field attracting students at postgraduate level from around the world.
  • Students become part of the early childhood research centre with its internationally highly respected research team.
  • Students graduate with a high level of knowledge and expertise in early childhood and strengthened confidence to contribute to, and advance in their chosen career.

Course summary

Early Childhood Studies at Roehampton is committed to babies and young children as people with agency and unique capacities, and to their overall wellbeing from the prenatal period.

The postgraduate programme draws on Froebel’s understanding of the transformative power of young children’s play on their thinking, and the crucial way that adults can either seek to assist or control young children’s intrinsic creativity. In adults’ interactions with children, however, Froebel recognised the profound influence of the community and social context. 

The syllabus is underpinned by an awareness of the influence of these social, cultural and political contexts on young children’s lives, and of the roots and structures of inequality that arise from these issues. The programme will strengthen your awareness and understanding of these influences and explore how you take account of them in action. In these respects, the programme also draws inspiration from the work of Paulo Freire, the radical and pioneering educator. 

The teaching is informed by active research and scholarship in early years policy and practice, as well as leading research into young children’s well-being, thinking and understanding. There is a deep commitment to working in partnership with families and communities and to the development of students’ professionalism, advocacy and leadership.

The programme is relevant, engaging and of professional and personal value for a variety of roles within the early years sector. For those working directly with young children, engagement with the course content will provide a platform for continuing professional development and career progression, while for those involved in early years policy or research, the course offers an opportunity to engage with up current thinking in a broad range of issues.

Content

Students will first look at babies' and children’s capacity for play, how they think, and how they communicate their ideas and emotions though a variety of ‘languages’ such as talk, mark-making, drawing, construction, movement, music and dance. This is studied from a variety of theoretical perspectives, critically looking at the values and assumptions underpinning these views. 

There is special focus on Froebel’s legacy in early childhood practice and other key pioneers in the child-centred tradition, which embodies advocacy and respect for children and their families. You will gain an understanding of the political nature of this work, learn advocacy skills for the well-being of young children and their families and develop effective leadership and collaboration techniques across disciplines in the field of early childhood. Alongside modules going deeper into young children’s emotions and well-being, students will learn skills for undertaking their own social and educational research. These skills will be put into practice with an extended in-depth research-based project, critically enquiring into an identified social or educational problem.

Modules

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation
  • Play, Thinking and Communication

Required module

  • Undertaking Social and Educational Research

Optional modules

  • Early Childhood Pedagogy and Practice
  • Exploring the Froebelian Legacy in Early Childhood Practice
  • Professionalism, Leadership and Advocacy
  • Emotion and the Roots of Wellbeing

Career options

  • Careers in professional practice and leadership in early childhood, education, health and social welfare.
  • Careers in policy making, implementation and administration of early childhood provision.
  • Careers in research and developing the early years workforce in further and higher education.

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