• Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
London Metropolitan University Featured Masters Courses
Cass Business School Featured Masters Courses
University of Strathclyde Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
"radiation" AND "detectio…×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Radiation Detection)

  • "radiation" AND "detection" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 19
Order by 
Established in 1972, Surrey's MSc in Radiation and Environmental Protection is one of the UK’s longest running programmes in the field of nuclear science and its applications. Read more
Established in 1972, Surrey's MSc in Radiation and Environmental Protection is one of the UK’s longest running programmes in the field of nuclear science and its applications.

The programme is taught by a combination of world-leading nuclear physics academics and leading experts from the UK’s radiological protection and nuclear industries.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Our programme will give you a thorough grounding in the radiation and environmental protection aspects of nuclear physics.

This includes in-depth knowledge of radiation protection and showing you how the technical and organisational procedures of the discipline may be applied to the broader concept of environmental protection.

The substantial practical element of this programme enables you to relate taught material to real-world applications. Formal lectures are complemented with work in specialist radiation laboratories that were recently refurbished as part of a £1m upgrade to our facilities.

Here you will work with a wide range of radioactive sources and radiation detectors. There is also an extended project in the spring and an eleven-week MSc dissertation project in the summer.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Radiation Physics
-Radiation Measurement
-Nuclear Power & Non-ionising Radiation
-Introduction to Biology and Radiation Biology
-Radiation Protection
-Environmental Physics and Environmental Protection
-Extended Group Project
-Radiation Laboratory Skills
-Research Project and Dissertation

RESEARCH-LED TEACHING

The programme material is taught by a combination of academics from the Department of Physics at Surrey and specialists provided by industrial partners. The Surrey academics are part of the Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics which houses the largest academic nuclear physics research group in the UK.

In addition to the formal lectures for taught modules, the programme provides a wide range of experimental hands-on training. This includes a nine-week radiation physics laboratory which takes place in the specialist radiation laboratories within the Department of Physics at the University of Surrey.

These were recently refurbished as part of a £1 million upgrade to the departmental teaching infrastructure. Within the Department, we also have a common room and a departmental library, which contains copies of earlier MSc dissertations.

As well as the laboratory training, you will also undertake a research project at the beginning of the Spring semester as a precursor to the eleven-week research dissertation project which makes up the final part of the MSc.

There are many opportunities for both the spring research project and summer dissertation project to be taken in an external industrial environment.

CAREERS

The programme has produced over 500 UK and overseas graduates, many of whom have gone on to well-paid positions in companies in the nuclear and radiation sectors. In the UK we need to decommission old reactors and build new ones to provide a low-carbon source of energy.

This, together with, for example, the importance of radioisotopes in fields such as medicine, means that the career prospects of our graduates are excellent.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The programme integrates the acquisition of core scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills with a focus on professional career development within medical physics and radiation detection, and related industries.

The principle educational aims and outcomes of learning are to provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applied to medical physics, radiation detection instrumentation, radiation and environmental practice in an industrial or medical context.

This is achieved by the development of the participants’ understanding of the underlying science and technology and by the participants gaining an understanding of the legal basis, practical implementation and organisational basis of medical physics and radiation measurement.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

Knowledge and understanding
-A systematic understanding of Radiation and Environmental Protection in an academic and professional context together with a critical awareness of current problems and / or new insights
-A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research project in Radiation and / or Environmental Protection
-Originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of radiation-based, experimental research projects
-An ability to evaluate and objectively interpret experimental data pertaining to radiation detection
-Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application to Radiation and Environmental Protection in a professional context

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation and to analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions from them. Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of uncertainty analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions and/or with published data. -Graduates should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
-The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline of radiation protection
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non- specialist audiences

Professional practical skills
-The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
-The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources
-Responsibility for personal and professional development. Ability to use external mentors for personal / professional purposes

Key / transferable skills
-Identify and resolve problems arising from lectures and experimental work
-Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self-study
-Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research such as journals, books and the internet
-Take responsibility for personal and professional development

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
At the University of Surrey, our MSc in Nuclear Science and Applications is a new and innovative programme, taught by a combination of world-leading nuclear physics academics and leading experts from the UK’s nuclear industries. Read more
At the University of Surrey, our MSc in Nuclear Science and Applications is a new and innovative programme, taught by a combination of world-leading nuclear physics academics and leading experts from the UK’s nuclear industries.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Drawing upon our existing expertise and supported by our MSc in Radiation and Environmental Protection, one of UK’s longest running programmes in its field, our programme will give you a thorough grounding in nuclear science and its applications. This new programmes differs from our existing MSc in Radiation and Environmental Protection as both the group project and the summer dissertation project will be on nuclear science and application topics.

The substantial practical element of this programme enables you to relate taught material to real-world applications. Formal lectures are complemented with work in specialist radiation laboratories that were recently refurbished as part of a £1m upgrade to our facilities.

Here you will work with a wide range of radioactive sources and radiation detectors. There is also an extended project in the spring and an eleven-week MSc dissertation project in the summer and students will have the opportunity to complete their dissertation on a topic specialising in nuclear research.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. Part-time students study over two academic years, within which the workload is evenly distributed. The course consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that modules may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Radiation Physics
-Radiation Measurement
-Introduction to Biology and Radiation Biology
-Radiation Laboratory Skills
-Extended Group Project
-Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety
-Nuclear Metrology
-Environment and Legislation
-Research Project and Dissertation

CAREERS

Completion of this programme will result in strong job opportunities in the nuclear industry, a growing international industry.

The programme will also naturally lead into further study, such as completion of a PhD.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The programme integrates the acquisition of core scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills with a focus on professional career development within medical physics and radiation detection, and related industries.

The principle educational aims and outcomes of learning are to provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applied to medical physics, radiation detection instrumentation, radiation and environmental practice in an industrial or medical context.

This is achieved by the development of the participants’ understanding of the underlying science and technology and by the participants gaining an understanding of the legal basis, practical implementation and organisational basis of medical physics and radiation measurement.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

Knowledge and understanding
-A systematic understanding of Nuclear Science and Applications in an academic and professional context together with a critical awareness of current problems and / or new insights
-A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research project in Nuclear Science and / or its application
-Originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of radiation-based, experimental research projects
-An ability to evaluate and objectively interpret experimental data pertaining to radiation detection
-Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application to nuclear science and applications in a professional context

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation and to analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions from them. Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of uncertainty analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions and/or with published data. -Graduates should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
-The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline of nuclear science
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non- specialist audiences

Professional practical skills
-The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
-The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources
-Responsibility for personal and professional development. Ability to use external mentors for personal / professional purposes

Key / transferable skills
-Identify and resolve problems arising from lectures and experimental work
-Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self-study
-Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research such as journals, books and the internet
-Take responsibility for personal and professional development

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Medical Radiation Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Medical Radiation Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The Medical Radiation Physics course builds on the highly successful research partnerships between the College of Medicine and Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University (ABMU) Health Board, including the Institute of Life Science and Centre for NanoHealth initiatives, and ongoing work in Monte Carlo-based radiotherapy modelling and dosimeter development, body composition, tissue characterisation and novel modes of the detection of disease with state-of-the-art CT and MRI facilities.

Key Features of the MSc in Medical Radiation Physics

On the Medical Radiation Physics MSc, you will gain the necessary knowledge and understanding of fundamental aspects of the use of radiation in medicine, in order that you are conversant in medical terms, human physiology and radiation mechanisms.

A direct link to clinical practice is provided through hands-on instruction with equipment used routinely in the hospital setting, which will prepare you for research in a rapidly changing field, including tuition in computer-based modelling, research methodology and the ethical dimensions associated with medical research.

The Medical Radiation Physics programme is accredited by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM).

The Medical Radiation Physics programme is modular in structure. Students must obtain a total of 180 credits to qualify for the degree. This is made up of 120 credits in the taught element (Part One) and a project (Part Two) that is worth 60 credits and culminates in a written dissertation. Students must successfully complete Part One before being allowed to progress to Part Two.

Part-time Delivery mode

The part-time scheme is a version of the full-time equivalent MSc in Medical Radiation Physics scheme, and as such it means lectures are spread right across each week and you may have lectures across every day. Due to this timetabling format, the College advises that the scheme is likely to suit individuals who are looking to combine this with other commitments (typically family/caring) and who are looking for a less than full-time study option.

Those candidates seeking to combine the part-time option with full-time work are unlikely to find the timetable suitable, unless their job is extremely flexible and local to the Bay Campus.

Timetables for the Medical Radiation Physics programme are typically available one week prior to each semester.

Modules

Modules on the Medical Radiation Physics course can vary each year but you could expect to study:

• Introduction to the Practice of Medical Physicists and Clinical Engineers

• Nanoscale Simulation

• Physics of the Body

• Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Radiology

• Research Methods

• Radiation Protection

• Radiation Physics

• Radiotherapy Physics

• Medical Imaging

• Advanced Radiotherapy

• MSc Research Project

Accreditation

The Medical Radiation Physics course has been accredited by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM). IPEM is the professional body that works with physical science, engineering and clinical professionals in academia, healthcare services and industry in the UK and supports clinical scientists and technologists in their practice through the provision and assessment of education and training.

Links with industry

The close proximity of Swansea University to two of the largest NHS Trusts in the UK outside of London, as well Velindre NHS Trust (a strongly academic cancer treatment centre), offers the opportunity for collaborative research through student placements.

The academic staff of this discipline have always had a good relationship with industrial organisations, which are the destination of our medical engineering graduates. The industrial input ranges from site visits to seminars delivered by clinical contacts.

Careers

The Medical Radiation Physics course will prepare you for research and clinical practise in a rapidly changing field, including tuition in computer modelling, human engineering and the medico-legal issues they imply. It will enable you to develop the potential to become leaders, defining and influencing medical practise.

For a medical physicist career path, the role includes opportunities for laboratory work, basic and applied research, management and teaching, offering a uniquely diverse career. In addition there is satisfaction in contributing directly to patient treatment and care.

Read less
The aim of the MSc programme in Nuclear Engineering is to prepare engineers with the skills necessary to design, build and operate power generation plants, radioactive waste treatment plants, systems using radiation for industrial and medical applications, etc. Read more

Mission and goals

The aim of the MSc programme in Nuclear Engineering is to prepare engineers with the skills necessary to design, build and operate power generation plants, radioactive waste treatment plants, systems using radiation for industrial and medical applications, etc. The educational programme, therefore, gives emphasis to topics referring to energy applications, i.e. fission and fusion plants, nuclear fuel, materials and safety. Topics applied also in non-energy applications are accounted for, as in medical and industrial applications of radiation, material physics, plasma physics and nanotechnologies with a strong link to the nuclear field.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/nuclear-engineering/

Career opportunities

The graduates in Nuclear Engineering, thanks to the MSc multidisciplinary training, can easily be employed in the nuclear sector (e.g. industries operating in nuclear power plants design, construction and operation, in nuclear decommissioning and nuclear waste processing and disposal, in design and construction of radiation sources, in centers for nuclear fusion and high-energy physics), as well as in other areas such as the energy industry, the medical sector, the health, safety and environment sector (e.g. engineering companies, hospitals, consultancy and risk analysis firms) and also research centers and universities.

Presentation

See http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/uploads/media/Nuclear_Engineering.pdf
In this Course emphasis is given to energetic applications, e.g. those referring to fission and fusion plants, the nuclear fuel, materials and safety. Also nonenergetic applications are accounted for, i.e. medical and industrial applications of radiation; radiation detection and measurements; nuclear electronics for radiation detection; radiochemistry; radiation protection and material physics, plasma physics and nanotechnologies with a strong link to their impact in the nuclear field. Graduates in Nuclear Engineering can find employment not only in the nuclear sector (industries operating in electro-nuclear power generation, nuclear plant dismantling, nuclear waste processing and disposal, design and construction of radiation sources, institutes and centers for nuclear fusion and high-energy physics), but also in other areas operating in the field of hightechnology, engineering companies, companies for industrial, medical and engineering advice, hospitals, companies for risk analysis, etc.

Subjects

1st year subjects
Fission reactor physics, nuclear measurements and instrumentation, nuclear plants, nuclear and industrial electronics, reliability safety and risk analysis, solid state physics.

2nd year subjects (subjects differentiated by three specializations)
- Nuclear plants
Nuclear technology and design, Applied Radiation Chemistry, Reliability, Safety and Risk Analysis A+B, Nuclear Material Physics. Fission Reactor Physics II + Radioactive Contaminants Transport, Statistical Physics.

- Nuclear Technology
Medical applications of radiation, Applied Radiation Chemistry, Nuclear technology and design, Reliability, Safety and Risk Analysis A+B, Nuclear material physics, Fission Reactor Physics II + Radioactive Contaminants Transport.

- Physics for Nuclear Systems
Subjects: Nuclear technology and design, Nuclear Material Physics, Medical applications of radiation, Applied Radiation Chemistry, Nuclear material physics, Fission Reactor Physics II + Radioactive Contaminants Transport.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/nuclear-engineering/

For contact information see here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/nuclear-engineering/

Find out how to apply here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/how-to-apply/

Read less
The MSc Physics Euromasters offers you the flexibility to tailor your studies according to your interests, building on the research strengths of our friendly Department, and the supportive environment that we provide for our students. Read more
The MSc Physics Euromasters offers you the flexibility to tailor your studies according to your interests, building on the research strengths of our friendly Department, and the supportive environment that we provide for our students.

We collaborate with a variety of partners across the academic, public and industry communities, including the National Physical Laboratory.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

You will select modules from a wide range of fundamental and applied physics topics. The application-focused modules are co-taught by practitioners in public service and industry to ensure that students gain real-world insight.

A module in research skills will prepare you to apply your new knowledge and skills in an eleven-week research project undertaken during the summer.

Your chosen research projects can open the door to many careers, not just further research. They will give you tangible experience of working independently and communicating your work effectively and efficiently in written form: key requirements in many professions.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Introduction to Biology and Radiation Biology
-Radiation Physics
-Radiation Measurement
-Detection Instrumentation
-Radiation Laboratory Skills
-Experimental and Professional Skills for Medical Physics
-Research Skills
-Non-linear Physics
-Topics in Theoretical Physics
-Imaging and Remote Sensing
-Diagnostic Applications of Ionising Radiation Physics
-Radiation Protection
-Extended Group Project
-Therapy Physics
-Non-ionising Radiation Imaging
-Nuclear Power and Non-ionising Radiation
-Environmental Physics and Environmental Protection
-Astrophysical Dynamics
-Quantum Magnetism and Superconductivity
-Advances in Nanophotonics
-Research Project and Dissertation
-Special Relativity
-Modern Analytical Techniques
-Nuclear Astrophysics
-Light and Matter
-Advanced Quantum Physics
-Cosmology and Galaxy Formation
-Semiconductor Physics and Technology

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The primary aim of the programme is to provide a high quality postgraduate level qualification in physics.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will:
-Be able to demonstrate an advanced understanding of theories and ideas in a sub- discipline of Physics
-Have insight into current topics and problems of that sub-discipline in a professional and/or academic context
-Be able to apply their knowledge and practical understanding of scientific methodology in their chosen research topic (e.g. experimental techniques, simulation tools, developing theoretical models etc.)
-Analyse, evaluate and interpret data produced and/or summarised in the literature in their chosen area of speciality
-Be able to carry out a scientific investigation under the guidance and advice of their supervisor
-Acquire, analyse, interpret and draw conclusions from their findings with the appropriate numerical methods and due consideration to uncertainties; they will also be able to critically evaluate the significance of their conclusions, strengths and weaknesses of their study in the context of up-to- date literature relevant to their research topic and present their work in written form to the scientific audience of their speciality in a professional and concise manner

Throughout the programme, students will develop the ability to manage their own learning in terms of time management as well as identifying and accessing the resources required for their academic study. The different learning outcomes of the potential awards may be summarised as follows:

Subject knowledge and skills
-A systematic understanding of their chosen area of specialisation in an academic and professional context together with a critical awareness of current problems and / or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by the state of the art
-A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research project
-Originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of radiation-based, experimental research projects
-An ability to evaluate and objectively interpret experimental data in their chosen topic of specialisation
-Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application in a professional context

Core academic skills
-The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation and to analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions from them
-The ability to evaluate the level of uncertainty in results, understand the significance of uncertainty analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions and/or with published data, along with the ability to evaluate the significance of results in this context
-The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in their chosen discipline of specialisation
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Personal and key skills
-The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
-The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources
-Responsibility for personal and professional development
-The ability to use external mentors for personal / professional purposes

Knowledge and understanding
-Knowledge of physics, technology and processes in the subject of the course and the ability to apply these in the context of the course
-Ability to research problems involving innovative practical or theoretical work
-Ability to formulate ideas and response to problems, refine or expand knowledge in response to specific ideas or problems and communicate these ideas and responses
-Ability to evaluate/argue alternative solutions and strategies independently and assess/report on own/others work with justification

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-The ability to plan and execute, under supervision, an experiment or theoretical investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions
-Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare their theoretical (experimental) results with expected experimental (theoretical) outcomes, or with published data
-They should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Professional practical skills
-Technical mastery of the scientific and technical information presented and the ability to interpret this in the professional context
-Ability to plan projects and research methods in the subject of the course
-Understand and be able to promote the scientific and legal basis of the field through peer and public communication
-Aware of public concern and ethical issues in radiation and environmental protection
-Able to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, mentors and others

Key / transferable skills
-Identify, assess and resolve problems arising from material in lectures and during experimental/research activities
-Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self –study
-Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research; such as journals, books and the internet
-Take responsibility for personal and professional development
-Be self-reliant
-Responsibility for personal and professional development

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
The MSc Physics offers you the flexibility to tailor your studies according to your interests, building on the research strengths of our friendly Department, and the supportive environment that we provide for our students. Read more
The MSc Physics offers you the flexibility to tailor your studies according to your interests, building on the research strengths of our friendly Department, and the supportive environment that we provide for our students.

We collaborate with a variety of partners across the academic, public and industry communities, including the National Physical Laboratory.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

You will select modules from a wide range of fundamental and applied physics topics. The application-focused modules are co-taught by practitioners in public service and industry to ensure that students gain real-world insight.

A module in research skills will prepare you to apply your new knowledge and skills in an eleven-week research project undertaken during the summer.

Your chosen research projects can open the door to many careers, not just further research. They will give you tangible experience of working independently and communicating your work effectively and efficiently in written form: key requirements in many professions.

Why not discover more about the subject in our video?

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Introduction to Biology and Radiation Biology
-Radiation Physics
-Radiation Measurement
-Detection Instrumentation
-Radiation Laboratory Skills
-Experimental and Professional Skills for Medical Physics
-Research Skills
-Non-linear Physics
-Topics in Theoretical Physics
-Imaging and Remote Sensing
-Diagnostic Applications of Ionising Radiation Physics
-Radiation Protection
-Extended Group Project
-Therapy Physics
-Non-ionising Radiation Imaging
-Nuclear Power and Non-ionising Radiation
-Environmental Physics and Environmental Protection
-Astrophysical Dynamics
-Quantum Magnetism and Superconductivity
-Advances in Nanophotonics
-Research Project and Dissertation
-Special Relativity
-Modern Analytical Techniques
-Nuclear Astrophysics
-Light and Matter
-Advanced Quantum Physics
-Cosmology and Galaxy Formation
-Semiconductor Physics and Technology

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The primary aim of the programme is to provide a high quality postgraduate level qualification in physics.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will:
-Be able to demonstrate an advanced understanding of theories and ideas in a sub- discipline of Physics
-Have insight into current topics and problems of that sub-discipline in a professional and/or academic context
-Be able to apply their knowledge and practical understanding of scientific methodology in their chosen research topic (e.g. experimental techniques, simulation tools, developing theoretical models etc.)
-Analyse, evaluate and interpret data produced and/or summarised in the literature in their chosen area of speciality
-Be able to carry out a scientific investigation under the guidance and advice of their supervisor
-Acquire, analyse, interpret and draw conclusions from their findings with the appropriate numerical methods and due consideration to uncertainties; they will also be able to critically evaluate the significance of their conclusions, strengths and weaknesses of their study in the context of up-to- date literature relevant to their research topic and present their work in written form to the scientific audience of their speciality in a professional and concise manner
-Throughout the programme, students will develop the ability to manage their own learning in terms of time management as well as identifying and accessing the resources required for their academic study

Subject knowledge and skills
-A systematic understanding of their chosen area of specialisation in an academic and professional context together with a critical awareness of current problems and / or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by the state of the art
-A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research project
Originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of radiation-based, experimental research projects
-An ability to evaluate and objectively interpret experimental data in their chosen topic of specialisation
-Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application in a professional context

Core academic skills
-The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation and to analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions from them
-The ability to evaluate the level of uncertainty in results, understand the significance of uncertainty analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions and/or with published data, along with the ability to evaluate the significance of results in this context
-The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in their chosen discipline of specialisation
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Personal and key skills
-The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
-The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources
-Responsibility for personal and professional development
-The ability to use external mentors for personal / professional purposes
-Knowledge and understanding
-Knowledge of physics, technology and processes in the subject of the course and the ability to apply these in the context of the course
-Ability to research problems involving innovative practical or theoretical work
-Ability to formulate ideas and response to problems, refine or expand knowledge in response to specific ideas or problems and communicate these ideas and responses
-Ability to evaluate/argue alternative solutions and strategies independently and assess/report on own/others work with justification

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-The ability to plan and execute, under supervision, an experiment or theoretical investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions
-Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare their theoretical (experimental) results with expected experimental (theoretical) outcomes, or with published data
-They should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Professional practical skills
-Technical mastery of the scientific and technical information presented and the ability to interpret this in the professional context
-Ability to plan projects and research methods in the subject of the course
-Understand and be able to promote the scientific and legal basis of the field through peer and public communication
-Aware of public concern and ethical issues in radiation and environmental protection
-Able to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, mentors and others

Key / transferable skills
-Identify, assess and resolve problems arising from material in lectures and during experimental/research activities
-Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self –study
-Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research; such as journals, books and the internet
-Take responsibility for personal and professional development
-Be self-reliant
-Responsibility for personal and professional development

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Through a mix of lectures, laboratories, clinical demonstrations and hospital visits, our MSc in Medical Imaging will develop you as a professional, enhancing your ability to take on new challenges with confidence. Read more
Through a mix of lectures, laboratories, clinical demonstrations and hospital visits, our MSc in Medical Imaging will develop you as a professional, enhancing your ability to take on new challenges with confidence. This programme is run together with the Department of Physics.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Medical imaging is a rapidly-growing discipline within the healthcare sector, involving clinicians, physicists, computer scientists and those in IT industries.

This programme delivers the expertise you'll need to forge a career in medical imaging, including radiation physics, image processing, biology, computer vision, pattern recognition, artificial intelligence and machine learning.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over 12 months and part-time over 48 months. It consists of eight taught modules and an extended project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Image Processing and Vision
-Professional Skills for Clinical Science and Engineering
-Radiation Biology
-Radiation Physics
-AI and AI Programming
-Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
-Diagnostic Apps of Ionising Radiation
-Non-Ionising Radiation Imaging
-Engineering Professional Studies 1
-Engineering Professional Studies 2
-Extended Project

FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPORT

To support your learning, we hold regular MSc group meetings where any aspect of the programme, technical or non-technical, can be discussed in an informal atmosphere. This allows you to raise any problems that you would like to have addressed and encourages peer-based learning and general group discussion.

We provide computing support with any specialised software required during the programme, for example, Matlab.

The Department’s student common room is also covered by the university’s open-access wireless network, which makes it a very popular location for individual and group work using laptops and mobile devices. There is also a Faculty quiet room for individual study.

We pride ourselves on the many opportunities that we provide to visit collaborating hospitals. These enable you to see first-hand demonstrations of medical imaging facilities and to benefit from lectures by professional practitioners.

To support material presented during the programme, you will also undertake a selection of ultrasound and radiation detection experiments, hosted by our sister MSc programme in Medical Physics.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate Degree Programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant).

To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing & Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Information retrieval. Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental content
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey. Read more
Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The syllabus for the MSc in Medical Physics is designed to provide the knowledge, skills and experience required for a modern graduate medical physicist, placing more emphasis than many other courses on topics beyond ionising radiation (X-rays and radiotherapy).

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over two academic years. It consists of ten taught modules and a dissertation project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Radiation Physics
-Radiation Measurement
-Experimental and Professional Skills for Medical Physics
-Introduction to Biology and Radiation Biology
-Therapy Physics
-Diagnostic Applications of Ionising Radiation Physics
-Non-ionising Radiation Imaging
-Extended Group Project
-Research Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The primary aim of the programme is to provide a high quality postgraduate level qualification in Physics that is fully compatible with the spirit and the letter of the Bologna Accord.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
-Concepts and theories: Students will be able to demonstrate a systematic understanding of the concepts, theories and ideas of a specialized field in physics in Radiation Physics through the taught elements of one of the component MSc programmes MSc in Medical Physics.
-Instrumentation and materials: Students will understand the operation, function and performance of the key radiation detection devices and technologies or principles of the physics relevant to applied radiation physics, in particular medical applications.
-Methods and best practices: Students will become fully acquainted with the scientific methods and best practices of physics and exposed to a specialized field described in the handbook documents of the validated MSc in Medical Physics.

During their 60-credit Research Project students will gain further practical, analytical or programming abilities through working on a more extended investigation. This may be an experiment- or modelling-based project, for which the student will be encouraged to propose and set in place original approaches.

The dissertation required at the end of the Research Project has the objective of encouraging students to write clearly and express their understanding of the work, thereby developing the required skills of scientific writing.

Knowledge and understanding
-Knowledge of physics, technology and processes in the subject of the course and the ability to apply these in the context of the course
-Ability to research problems involving innovative practical or theoretical work
-Ability to formulate ideas and response to problems, refine or expand knowledge in response to specific ideas or problems and communicate these ideas and responses
-Ability to evaluate/argue alternative solutions and strategies independently and assess/report on own/others work with justification

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-The ability to plan and execute, under supervision, an experiment or theoretical investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions
-Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare their theoretical (experimental) results with expected experimental (theoretical) outcomes, or with published data
-They should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Professional practical skills
-Technical mastery of the scientific and technical information presented and the ability to interpret this in the professional context.
-Ability to plan projects and research methods in the subject of the course.
-Understand and be able to promote the scientific and legal basis of the field through peer and public communication.
-Aware of public concern and ethical issues in radiation and environmental protection.
-Able to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, mentors and others.

Key / transferable skills
-Identify, assess and resolve problems arising from material in lectures and during experimental/research activities
-Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self –study
-Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research; such as journals, books and the internet
-Take responsibility for personal and professional development
-Be self-reliant
-Responsibility for personal and professional development

Subject knowledge and skills
-A systematic understanding of Medical Physics in an academic and professional context, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by, the state of the art
-A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to research projects in Medical Physics
-Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application to Medical Physics in a professional context

Core academic skills
-The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions (students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions or with published data; they should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context)
-The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Personal and key skills
-The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
-The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
The Masters in Physics. Nuclear Technology provides an understanding of the application of nuclear processes and technology to energy generation, medical physics and environmental monitoring, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist. Read more
The Masters in Physics: Nuclear Technology provides an understanding of the application of nuclear processes and technology to energy generation, medical physics and environmental monitoring, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist.

Why this programme

-The University of Glasgow’s School of Physics and Astronomy is ranked 2nd in Scotland (Complete University Guide 2016).
-You will gain theoretical, experimental and computational skills necessary to analyse and solve advanced physics problems relevant to the theme of Nuclear Technology, providing an excellent foundation for a career of scientific leadership.
-With a 93% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2014, the School of Physics and Astronomy combines both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.
-You will benefit from direct contact with our group of international experts who will teach you cutting-edge physics and supervise your projects.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc Physics: Nuclear Technology include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

Core courses include
-Advanced data analysis
-Detection and analysis of ionising radiation
-Environmental radioactivity
-Imaging and detectors
-Nuclear power reactors
-Research skills
-Extended project

Optional courses include
-Advanced electromagnetic theory
-Advanced nuclear physics
-Computational physics laboratory
-Dynamics, electrodynamics and relativity
-Energy and environment
-Medical imaging
-Nuclear and particle physics
-Numerical methods
-Plasma theory and diagnostics (alternate years starting 2015-16)
-Relativistic quantum fields
-Statistical mechanics

The programme in Physics: Nuclear technology lasts 1 year and contains a minimum of 180 credits. You will undertake a minimum of 120 credits in Semesters 1 and 2 and be assessed on these courses either via continuous assessment, or unseen examination in the May/June examination diet, or a combination thereof. The remaining 60 credits will take the form of an extended MSc project, carried out on a specific aspect of theoretical, computational or experimental physics which has current or potential application in the areas of nuclear technology, nuclear energy, radiation detection or environmental monitoring. You will conduct this project while embedded within a particular research group – under the direct supervision of a member of academic staff.

Your curriculum will be flexible and tailored to your prior experience and expertise, particular research interests and specific nature of the extended research project topic provisionally identified at the beginning of the MSc programme. Generally, however, courses taken in Semester 1 will focus on building core theoretical and experimental/computational skills relevant to the global challenge theme, while courses taken in Semester 2 will build key research skills (in preparation for the extended project).

Industry links and employability

-The School of Physics and Astronomy is highly active in research and knowledge transfer projects with industry. Our Masters students have regular opportunities to engage with our industrial collaborators through informal visits, guest lectures and workshops.
-You will also benefit from our membership of the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance. The alliance brings together internationally leading physics research across Scotland to form the largest physics grouping in the UK.
-Our staff and students come from all around the world providing a truly global experience. The School of Physics and Astronomy is committed to providing an equitable environment for study and work, in line with the principles of Project Juno of the Institute of Physics. This was recognised in 2011 by the award of Juno Champion status. We also have a strong programme of talks and seminars given by experts from the UK and abroad, which will give you the chance of broadening your knowledge in many other areas of physics and astronomy.
-This programme is accredited by the Institute of Physics. Accredited MSc programmes automatically meet the master's level education requirement for Chartered Physicist (CPhys) status. To fully meet the educational requirements for CPhys, graduates must also possess an IOP accredited undergraduate degree or equivalent.

Career prospects

Career opportunities in academic research, based in universities, research institutes, observatories and laboratory facilities; industrial research in a wide range of fields including energy and the environmental sector, IT and semiconductors, optics and lasers, materials science, telecommunications, engineering; banking and commerce; higher education.

Read less
Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey. Read more
Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The syllabus for the MSc in Medical Physics is designed to provide the knowledge, skills and experience required for a modern graduate medical physicist, placing more emphasis than many other courses on topics beyond ionising radiation (X-rays and radiotherapy).

Examples of other topics include magnetic resonance imaging and the use of lasers in medicine.

You will learn the theoretical foundations underpinning modern imaging and treatment modalities, and will gain a set of experimental skills essential in a modern medical physicist’s job.

These skills are gained through experimental sessions in the physics department and practical experiences at collaborating hospitals using state-of-the-art clinical facilities.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over two academic years. It consists of ten taught modules and a dissertation project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Radiation Physics
-Radiation Measurement C
-Experimental and Professional Skills for Medical Physics
-Introduction to Biology and Radiation Biology
-Therapy Physics
-Diagnostic Applications of Ionising Radiation Physics
-Non-ionising Radiation Imaging
-Extended Group Project
-Research Skills (Euromasters)
-Outreach and Public Engagement
-Euromaster Dissertation Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The primary aim of the programme is to provide a high quality postgraduate level qualification in Physics that is fully compatible with the spirit and the letter of the Bologna Accord.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
-Concepts and theories: Students will be able to demonstrate a systematic understanding of the concepts, theories and ideas of a specialized field in physics in Radiation Physics through the taught elements of one of the component MSc programmes MSc in Medical Physics.
-Instrumentation and materials: Students will understand the operation, function and performance of the key radiation detection devices and technologies or principles of the physics relevant to applied radiation physics, in particular medical applications.
-Methods and best practices: Students will become fully acquainted with the scientific methods and best practices of physics and exposed to a specialized field described in the handbook documents of the validated MSc in Medical Physics.

In the second year of the programme the outcomes are linked closely to a unique 8-month research project (two months preparation and research skills development, 5 months research, and 1 month reporting), students will apply their acquired research skills to an individual research project in a Research Group.

During the first two months of year two of the programme students will further extend their self-confidence in their practical, analytical and programming abilities; their ability to communicate; realise that they can take on responsibility for a task in the Research Group and see it through.

An important element is the assignment of responsibility for a substantial research project which is aimed to be of a standard suitable for publication in an appropriate professional journal.

It is expected that the student will approach the project in the manner of a new Research Student, e.g. be prepared to work beyond the normal working day on the project, input ideas, demonstrate initiative and seek out relevant information.

Thereby the students will acquire proficiency in research skills, including (but not limited to) careful planning, time scheduling, communication with colleagues and at workshops, keeping a detailed notebook, designing and testing equipment, taking and testing data and analysis.

The dissertation required at the end of the Research Project has the objective of encouraging students to write clearly and express their understanding of the work, thereby developing the required skills of scientific writing.

During the Research Project as a whole it is expected that the students will further develop communication skills through participation in group meetings, preparation of in-house reports, giving oral presentations and show initiative in acquiring any necessary new skills.

The oral presentation at the end of the Research Project is a chance to show their oral presentation skills and ability to think independently.

Knowledge and understanding
-Knowledge of physics, technology and processes in the subject of the course and the ability to apply these in the context of the course
-Ability to research problems involving innovative practical or theoretical work
-Ability to formulate ideas and response to problems, refine or expand knowledge in response to specific ideas or problems and communicate these ideas and responses
-Ability to evaluate/argue alternative solutions and strategies independently and assess/report on own/others work with justification

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-The ability to plan and execute, under supervision, an experiment or theoretical investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions
-Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare their theoretical (experimental) results with expected experimental (theoretical) outcomes, or with published data
-They should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Professional practical skills
-Technical mastery of the scientific and technical information presented and the ability to interpret this in the professional context.
-Ability to plan projects and research methods in the subject of the course.
-Understand and be able to promote the scientific and legal basis of the field through peer and public communication.
-Aware of public concern and ethical issues in radiation and environmental protection.
-Able to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, mentors and others.

Key / transferable skills
-Identify, assess and resolve problems arising from material in lectures and during experimental/research activities
-Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self –study
-Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research; such as journals, books and the internet
-Take responsibility for personal and professional development
-Be self-reliant
-Responsibility for personal and professional development.

Subject knowledge and skills
-A systematic understanding of Medical Physics in an academic and professional context, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by, the state of the art
-A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to research projects in Medical Physics
-Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application to Medical Physics in a professional context

Core academic skills
-The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions (students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions or with published data; they should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context)
-The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Personal and key skills
-The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
-The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Therapeutic radiographers use sophisticated radiography equipment to treat patients suffering from cancer or non-malignant tumours by aiming doses of radiation at tumours. Read more
Therapeutic radiographers use sophisticated radiography equipment to treat patients suffering from cancer or non-malignant tumours by aiming doses of radiation at tumours. With an increasing amount of opportunities available for therapeutic radiographers, prospects for graduates are very bright.

In the treatment of cancer, accuracy is paramount and a variety of highly specialised equipment is available within Radiotherapy Departments to achieve this. Computerised Tomography (CT) simulators employ the latest technology to localise tumours. Technological advances in linear accelerator design ensure that treatment conforms to patients needs with pinpoint accuracy. Treatment units housing radioactive sources also play a useful role in patient management, as do 3D planning systems.

Alongside the technology, the importance of high standards of communication and care of cancer patients cannot be overestimated. Cancer patients are treated by a multidisciplinary team in which the therapeutic radiographer plays a major role in reducing the sense of vulnerability and promoting patients autonomy.

Therapeutic Radiographers work within a multidisciplinary team in Radiation Oncology and play a vital role in the management and treatment of patients with cancer. They are predominantly responsible for treatment for the accurate localisation, planning and delivery of ionising radiation

The PgDip programme compliments the changing healthcare environment with the aim of providing practitioners who are fit for purpose and fit for award and is an accelerated programme over two years, for graduate students who already have a level 6 qualification. Building on graduate skills you will develop an enquiring, reflective, critical and innovative approach to Therapeutic Radiography within the context of the rapid changes occurring in the health service.

The programme aims to develop confident and competent practitioners who practice autonomously, compassionately, skilfully and safely whilst fostering independence in learning and commitment to lifelong learning. The course comprises of five compulsory units instilling a range of academic knowledge from health sciences to profession specific radiotherapy and oncology practice.

The PgDip in Therapeutic Radiography confers eligibility to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a Radiographer.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/therapeutic-radiography-pre-registration-pgdip-msc

Modules

Year 1:
- Radiation science and technology
This module provides the basic physical concepts of the production, detection and interaction of ionising radiations and the importance of safe working practices.

- Applied biological sciences
This module provides an understanding of anatomy and pathophysiology with an introduction to oncology and the concept of holistic care in the management of people with cancer, with reference to evidence based practice.

- Clinical radiotherapy theory and practice 1
This module introduces the professional practice of radiotherapy. It identifies the various radiotherapy modalities employed in the treatment of people with cancer. This module will also complement the knowledge and learning gained within clinical practice by focussing on the acquisition of basic skills required for the safe, accurate planning and treatment of patients with cancer.

Year 2:
- Management of morbidities
This module addresses the principles of radiobiology and cytotoxic chemotherapy, to facilitate appreciation of the limiting effects of normal tissues on treatment. Methods of limiting radiation and cytotoxic morbidity, together with the wider issue of palliative care will also be considered.

- Clinical radiotherapy theory and practice 2
This module provides knowledge and skills relevant to pre-treatment and verification processes employed in the radiotherapy management of patients. You will be required to develop a critical awareness of advances in technology and practice. Clinically based competencies focus on the complex techniques found in Radiotherapy and the problem solving skills required for successful performance in clinical practice.

Employability

- Radiotherapy as a career
On successful completion of the course you'll be eligible to register with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a therapeutic radiographer.

From helping plan and administering treatment, to explaining it to patients and assessing their responses, therapeutic radiographers are involved in every stage of the treatment process.

Therapeutic radiographers need excellent interpersonal skills and emotional resilience as they deal with patients and their families at very difficult and emotional times. Making patients feel comfortable and guiding them through the process can be as important as the technical skills required for this role.

- Career progression
Through the acquisition of a wide range of transferable skills such as psychosocial, organisational, management, technical and scientific skills, individuals are well prepared to work in any situation that best suits their individual expertise and interest.Working as a consultant practitioner is one common career path as well as management, research, clinical work and teaching.

After qualification, clinically experienced therapeutic radiographers may gain additional specialist skills and expertise through the postgraduate, post-registration and continuing professional development frameworks.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Placements

- Time spent on placement
Clinical placements are an essential element of the course. You will spend 50% of your time involved in academic study and 50% in clinical practice within a broad variety of healthcare settings. A clinical practice placement allows you to put theory into practice by working with a range of health professionals in clinical situations to develop the skills, knowledge and experience required to become a competent radiographer. Although sometimes initially challenging, practice learning is one of the most interesting and exciting aspects of learning to be a radiographer.

- Clinical settings
At LSBU you will experience a variety of clinical settings such as NHS Trusts and the independent sector.

Placements for Therapeutic Radiography include:
- Brighton and Sussex University Hospital: Sussex Cancer Centre
- Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust: Kent Oncology Centre
- Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust
- Royal Surrey Hospital
- Queens Hospital, Romford

- Structure of placements
Placements are spread over two years.

The first clinical placement; approximately seven weeks after the start of the course, gives a real taster of the role of the radiotherapy radiographer in the radiotherapy treatment process. It gives you an opportunity to confirm correct choice of career early within the course. Thereafter clinical placements follow the same pattern throughout the course.

Support from a mentor

An identified Link Lecturer and Personal Tutor from the University will be the person you can contact during working day hours whilst on placement with any concerns or questions you are unable to solve otherwise. As there is a close relationship between LSBU and the clinical placement; the Link Lecturer will pay regular scheduled visits to the different sites to meet up with students.

Read less
This one-year full-time taught MSc programme (or up to six years part-time) will equip you for a career in any industry involving radiation and radiation detectors. Read more
This one-year full-time taught MSc programme (or up to six years part-time) will equip you for a career in any industry involving radiation and radiation detectors.

We cover basic radiation principles, the use of detection systems and associated instrumentation applications, and modelling. There’s a strong focus on practicals and laboratory-based techniques.

You’ll be able to carry out a project, often in industry, making you even more employable in sectors such as nuclear power, medicine, environmental protection, oil and mining, and health and safety.

The programme consists of a number of one-week modules which you can select to best meet your needs. These modules are organised into four groups:-

Foundation
Basic
Applied
Project and Dissertation.

For your MSc you must complete your chosen modules and one major project to a value of 180 credits. Diploma (120 credits) and Certificate (60 credits) may also be available if you don’t want to submit a dissertation.

Key Facts

REF 2014
We're 15th in UK for 4* and 3*research (world leading and internationally excellent), and we achieved 100% excellence in a research environment.

Why Department of Physics?

Excellent facilities

We're a major centre for research and recieve around £35m of funding per year from the research councils, the University and other sources.

Exciting, rigorous research environment

Study for a Physics PhD, MPhil, MRes or pursue one of our taught MSc programmes.

Read less
This award is offered within the Postgraduate Scheme in Health Technology, which aims to provide professionals in Medical Imaging, Radiotherapy, Medical Laboratory Science, Health Technology, as well as others interested in health technology, with an opportunity to develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills. Read more

Programme Aims

This award is offered within the Postgraduate Scheme in Health Technology, which aims to provide professionals in Medical Imaging, Radiotherapy, Medical Laboratory Science, Health Technology, as well as others interested in health technology, with an opportunity to develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills.

A. Advancement in Knowledge and Skill
‌•To develop specialists in their respective professional disciplines to enhance their career paths;
‌•To broaden students' exposure to health science and technology to enable them to cope with the ever-changing demands of work; and
‌•To provide a laboratory environment for testing problems encountered at work.

Students develop intellectually, professionally and personally while advancing their knowledge and skills in Medical Laboratory Science. The specific aims of this award are:
‌•To broaden and deepen students' knowledge and expertise in Medical Laboratory Science;
‌•To introduce students to advances in selected areas of diagnostic laboratory techniques;
‌•‌To develop in students an integrative and collaborative team approach to the investigation of common diseases;
‌•To foster an understanding of the management concepts that are relevant to clinical laboratories; and
‌•To develop students' skills in communication, critical analysis and problem solving.

B. Professional Development
‌•To develop students' ability in critical analysis and evaluation in their professional practices;
‌•To cultivate within healthcare professionals the qualities and attributes that are expected of them;
‌•To acquire a higher level of awareness and reflection within the profession and the healthcare industry to improve the quality of healthcare services; and
‌•To develop students' ability to assume a managerial level of practice.

C. Evidence-based Practice
‌•To equip students with the necessary research skills to enable them to perform evidence-based practice in the delivery of healthcare service.

D. Personal Development
‌•To provide channels for practising professionals to continuously develop themselves while at work; and
‌•To allow graduates to develop themselves further after graduation.

Programme Characteristics

Our laboratories are well-equipped to support students in their studies, research and dissertations. Our specialised equipment includes a flow cytometer, cell culture facilities, basic and advanced instruments for molecular biology research (including thermal cyclers, DNA sequencers, real-time PCR systems and an automatic mutation detection system), microplate systems for ELISA work, HPLC, FPLC, tissue processors, automatic cell analysers, a preparative ultracentrifuge and an automated biochemical analyser.

This programme is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (UK), and graduates are eligible to apply for Membership of the Institute.

Programme Structure

The Postgraduate Scheme in Health Technology consists of the following awards:
‌•MSc in Medical Imaging and Radiation Science
‌•MSc in Medical Laboratory Science

A range of subjects that are specific to the Medical Laboratory Science profession, and a variety of subjects of common interest and value to all healthcare professionals, are offered. In general, each subject requires attendance on one evening per week over a 13-week semester.

Award Requirements

Students must complete 1 Compulsory Subject (Research Methods & Biostatistics), 4 Core Specialism Specific Subjects, 2 Elective Subjects (from any subjects within the Scheme) and a research-based Dissertation. They are encouraged to select a dissertation topic that is relevant to their professional and personal interests.

Students who have successfully completed 30 credits, but who have taken fewer than the required 4 Core Specialism Specific Subjects, will be awarded a generic MSc in Health Technology without a specialism award.

Students who have successfully completed 18 credits, but who decide not to continue with their course of MSc study, may request to be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma (PgD) as follows:
‌•PgD in a specialism if 1 Compulsory Subject, 4 Core Subjects and 1 Elective Subject are successfully completed; or
‌•PgD in Health Technology (Generic) if 1 Compulsory Subject and any other 5 Subjects within the Scheme are successfully completed.

Core Areas of Study

The following is a list of the Core Medical Laboratory Science Subjects. Some subjects are offered only in alternate years.

•Integrated Medical Laboratory Science
‌•Advanced Topics in Health Technology
‌•Clinical Applications of Molecular Diagnostics in Healthcare
‌•Clinical Chemistry
‌•Epidemiology
‌•Haematology & Transfusion Science
‌•Histopathology & Cytology
‌•I‌mmunology
‌•Medical Microbiology
‌•Molecular Technology in the Clinical Laboratory
‌•Workshops on Advanced Molecular Diagnostic Technology

Having selected the requisite number of subjects from the Core list, students can choose the remaining Core Subjects or other subjects available in this Scheme as Elective Subjects.

The two awards within the Scheme share a similar programme structure, and students may take subjects across disciplines. For subjects offered within the Scheme by the other discipline of study, please refer to the information on the MSc in Medical Imaging and Radiation Science.

English Language Requirements

If you are not a native speaker of English, and your Bachelor's degree or equivalent qualification is awarded by institutions where the medium of instruction is not English, you are expected to fulfil the University’s minimum English language requirement for admission purpose. Please refer to the "Admission Requirements" http://www51.polyu.edu.hk/eprospectus/tpg/admissions-requirements section for details.

Additional Document Required
Transcript / Certificate

Other Information
Suitable candidates may be invited to attend interviews.

How to Apply

For latest admission info, please visit [email protected] http://www51.polyu.edu.hk/eprospectus/tpg and eAdmission http://www.polyu.edu.hk/admission

Enquiries

For further information, please contact:
Telephone: (852) 3400 8653
Fax: (852) 2362 4365
E-mail:

For more details of the programme, please visit [email protected] http://www51.polyu.edu.hk/eprospectus/tpg/2016/55005-mmf-mmp website.

Read less
The Masters in Physics. Advanced Materials provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with particular emphasis on their application to global interdisciplinary challenges in the area of advanced materials and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist. Read more
The Masters in Physics: Advanced Materials provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with particular emphasis on their application to global interdisciplinary challenges in the area of advanced materials and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist.

Why this programme

-The School of Physics & Astronomy hosts the Kelvin Nanocharacterisation Centre, which houses state-of-the-art instrumentation for studying materials at the nanoscale or below.
-With a 93% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2014, the School of Physics and Astronomy combines both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.
-The University of Glasgow’s School of Physics and Astronomy is ranked 2nd in Scotland (Complete University Guide 2016).
-You will gain the theoretical, experimental and computational skills necessary to analyse and solve a range of advanced physics problems relevant to the theme of this global challenge, providing an excellent foundation for a career of scientific leadership in academia or industry.
-You will develop transferable skills that will improve your career prospects, such as project management, team-working, advanced data analysis, problem-solving, critical evaluation of scientific literature, advanced laboratory and computing skills, and how to effectively communicate with different audiences.
-You will benefit from direct contact with our group of international experts who will teach you cutting-edge physics and supervise your projects.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Physics: Advanced Materials include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

The programme draws upon a wide range of advanced Masters-level courses. You will have the flexibility to tailor your choice of optional lecture courses and project work to a wide variety of specific research topics and their applications in the area of advanced materials.

Core courses include
-Advanced data analysis
-Nano and atomic scale imaging
-Research skills
-Solid state physics
-Extended project

Optional courses include
-Detection and analysis of ionising radiation
-Detectors and imaging
-Environmental radioactivity
-Nuclear power reactors
-Semiconductor physics
-Statistical mechanics

Industry links and employability

-The School of Physics and Astronomy is highly active in research and knowledge transfer projects with industry. Our Masters students have regular opportunities to engage with our industrial collaborators through informal visits, guest lectures and workshops.
-You will also benefit from our membership of the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance. The alliance brings together internationally leading physics research across Scotland to form the largest physics grouping in the UK.
-Our staff and students come from all around the world providing a truly global experience. The School of Physics and Astronomy is committed to providing an equitable environment for study and work, in line with the principles of Project Juno of the Institute of Physics. This was recognised in 2011 by the award of Juno Champion status. We also have a strong programme of talks and seminars given by experts from the UK and abroad, which will give you the chance of broadening your knowledge in many other areas of physics and astronomy.
-The School of Physics and Astronomy plays a world-leading role in the design and operation of the worldwide network of laser interferometers leading the search for gravitational waves. These interferometers are among the most sensitive scientific instruments ever built.
-This programme is accredited by the Institute of Physics. Accredited MSc programmes automatically meet the master's level education requirement for Chartered Physicist (CPhys) status. To fully meet the educational requirements for CPhys, graduates must also possess an IOP accredited undergraduate degree or equivalent.

Career prospects

Career opportunities in academic research, based in universities, research institutes, observatories and laboratory facilities; industrial research in a wide range of fields including energy and the environmental sector, IT and semiconductors, optics and lasers, materials science, telecommunications, engineering; banking and commerce; higher education.

Read less
The Masters in Physics. Energy & the Environment provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with emphasis on their application to global challenges in sustainable energy, climate change and the environment, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist. Read more
The Masters in Physics: Energy & the Environment provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with emphasis on their application to global challenges in sustainable energy, climate change and the environment, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist.

Why this programme

-The University of Glasgow’s School of Physics and Astronomy is ranked 2nd in Scotland (Complete University Guide 2016).
-The School plays a leading role in the exploitation of data from the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest particle accelerator at CERN.
-With a 93% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2014 the School of Physics and Astronomy combines both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.
-The School of Physics & Astronomy hosts the Kelvin Nanocharacterisation Centre, which houses state-of-the-art instrumentation for studying materials at the nanoscale or below.
-You will gain the theoretical, experimental and computational skills necessary to analyse and solve a range of advanced physics problems relevant to the theme of this global challenge, providing an excellent foundation for a career of scientific leadership in academia or industry.
-You will develop transferable skills that will improve your career prospects, such as project management, team-working, advanced data analysis, problem-solving, critical evaluation of scientific literature, advanced laboratory and computing skills, and how to effectively communicate with different audiences.
-You will benefit from direct contact with our group of international experts who will teach you cutting-edge physics and supervise your projects.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc Physics: Energy and the Environment include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

The programme draws upon a wide range of advanced Masters-level courses. You will have the flexibility to tailor your choice of optional lecture courses and project work to a wide variety of specific research topics and their applications in the areas of energy and the environment.

Core courses include
-Advanced data analysis
-Energy and environment
-Nuclear power reactors
-Research skills
-Extended project

Optional courses include
-Advanced electromagnetic theory
-Detection and analysis of ionising radiation
-Detectors and imaging
-Environmental radioactivity
-Plasma theory and diagnostics (alternate years, starting 2015–16)
-Statistical mechanics

Industry links and employability

-The School of Physics and Astronomy is highly active in research and knowledge transfer projects with industry. Our Masters students have regular opportunities to engage with our industrial collaborators through informal visits, guest lectures and workshops.
-You will also benefit from our membership of the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance. The alliance brings together internationally leading physics research across Scotland to form the largest physics grouping in the UK.
-Our staff and students come from all around the world providing a truly global experience. The School of Physics and Astronomy is committed to providing an equitable environment for study and work, in line with the principles of Project Juno of the Institute of Physics. This was recognised in 2011 by the award of Juno Champion status. We also have a strong programme of talks and seminars given by experts from the UK and abroad, which will give you the chance of broadening your knowledge in many other areas of physics and astronomy.
-The School plays a world-leading role in the exploitation of data from the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest particle accelerator at CERN.
-This programme is accredited by the Institute of Physics. Accredited MSc programmes automatically meet the master's level education requirement for Chartered Physicist (CPhys) status. To fully meet the educational requirements for CPhys, graduates must also possess an IOP accredited undergraduate degree or equivalent.

Career prospects

Career opportunities in academic research, based in universities, research institutes, observatories and laboratory facilities; industrial research in a wide range of fields including energy and the environmental sector, IT and semiconductors, optics and lasers, materials science, telecommunications, engineering; banking and commerce; higher education.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X