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Masters Degrees (Race)

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How we live with difference is the key issue of our time. Issues relating to race and ethnicity, whether immigration, Islamophobia, #blacklivesmatter, or media diversity, are at the forefront of public debate. Read more

How we live with difference is the key issue of our time. Issues relating to race and ethnicity, whether immigration, Islamophobia, #blacklivesmatter, or media diversity, are at the forefront of public debate. The MA in Race, Media and Social Justice will equip you with critical and theoretical tools to unpack and deepen your understanding of contemporary debates on race, ethnicity and racism.

Goldsmiths is a centre of pioneering critical race scholarship and you will be taught by leading figures in the field. This interdisciplinary degree will introduce you to a range of different theoretical and philosophical approaches to race and ethnicity, including postcolonial and critical race theories, poststructuralist approaches, and theories of intersectionality.

The focus on the cultural industries which underpins the degree enables you to apply these theories to understand why representations of race and ethnicity take the shape that they do in news, film and social media. A series of industry talks from BAME practitioners working in the industry is designed to expand your practical as well as academic insight into issues of diversity in the media and other sectors.

This MA is taught across two departments - Media and Communications and Sociology – that are recognised as world-leading in their respective disciplines. As a postgraduate student you will join the active intellectual community at Goldsmiths, while learning the skills that you will be able to apply to a range of careers, from media, to policy, to charity/NGOs and other forms of social enterprise.

Modules & structure

Core modules

You will study these core modules:

Option modules

You also take 60 credits of option modules from within the Departments of Media and Communications and Sociology, or relevant modules from other departments at Goldsmiths such as Theatre and PerformancePolitics and International RelationsEnglish and Comparative LiteratureCentre for Cultural Studies and Anthropology.

Examples of modules that may be of particular interest to students on this course include:

Assessment

Assessment consists of coursework, extended essays, reports, presentations, practice based projects or essays/logs, group projects, reflective essays, and seen and unseen written examinations.

Skills

This degree will equip you with the ability to recognise and negotiate sensitive ethical issues in research and representation. You will also hone your ability to listen and speak to diverse audiences.

As a graduate from this degree you will develop excellent critical thinking and teamwork skills. The practical and research elements of the course will also equip you with the skills to design and implement projects. These transferable skills are highly valued by employers across many sectors.

Careers

The knowledge and skills you will graduate with from this degree will mean you are well-equipped to enter a diverse range of roles, particularly in relation to issues of equality, diversity and social justice. This could include governmental and public administration roles, NGO and charity work, policy work, and business and communications. Moreover, the emphasis on media will suit graduates interested in careers in creative and cultural industries.



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This unique interdisciplinary degree will allow you to study race and strategies of resistance from a variety of historical and theoretical approaches. Read more

This unique interdisciplinary degree will allow you to study race and strategies of resistance from a variety of historical and theoretical approaches.

A broad transnational framework allows you to combine African, U.S., Caribbean, British and Southeast Asian history under the guidance of leading researchers in English, History, Gender Studies, Spanish, and Latin American studies. You’ll be trained in historical research methods and use varied materials such as novels, films, speeches, newspapers and organisational records to explore issues of race and resistance across very different periods and cultures.

Supported by the Institute for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies, you could study the slave trade, Mexican-American identity, race and feminism in the US, political violence in India or apartheid, among many others. It’s a fascinating and vital opportunity to gain an understanding of the roles that race and resistance have played in shaping the modern world – and how this complex relationship is evolving.

More Information

We have a wide range of resources to help you explore the topics that interest you. Among our library resources are microfilm collections of American, Indian and South African newspapers as well as journals relating to US civil rights. British and US government papers are also on microfilm, and an extensive set of British documents on end of empire and foreign affairs.

The Church Missionary Society Archives, the Black Power Movement archive and the Curzon papers are all available, and we have access to extensive online resources to access original material for your independent research.

With the chance to participate in our active research groups – such as Identity, Power and Protest; Women, Gender and Sexuality; and Health, Medicine and Society – and benefit from an impressive range of expertise among our tutors, you’ll find that the University of Leeds is a fantastic place to gain the knowledge and skills you need.

This degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

The first semester will lay the foundations of your studies, introducing you to historical research methods and approaches to the study of race and resistance. You’ll explore issues such as diasporas and migration, the legacy of non-violence and sexuality and race.

In Semester Two, you’ll build on this knowledge with your choice from a wide range of optional modules across different subject areas, on issues such as the Black Atlantic, postcolonial literature, British settler colonies in Africa and more.

Throughout the programme, you’ll develop your knowledge across a variety of areas as well as key skills in research and critical analysis. You’ll showcase these when you complete your dissertation, which will be independently researched on a topic of your choice and submitted by the end of the programme in September.

You’ll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the ‘Making History: Archive Collaborations’ optional module

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Research Methodology in History 30 credits
  • Approaches to Race 30 credits
  • MA Race and Resistance: Dissertation 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Caribbean and Black British Writing 30 credits
  • Something Rotten: Transatlantic Capitalism and the Literature of Waste 1945-Present 30 credits
  • Race, Empire, Romanticism 30 credits
  • Turks, Moors, and Jews: Staging the Exotic in the Renaissance 30 credits
  • Global Genders30 creditsMaking History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Women, Gender and Sexuality: Archives and Approaches 30 credits
  • Black Internationalism 30 credits
  • India since 1947: Community, Caste and Political Violence 30 credits
  • Sexuality and Disease in African History 30 credits
  • Contesting Patriarchy: Debating Gender Justice in Colonial and Post-Colonial India.30 credits
  • Latin America and the Caribbean from Rebellion to Revolution, 1765-184530 credits
  • Insurgency and Counterinsurgency 30 credits
  • Anti-Apartheid: Cultures of the Struggle 30 credits
  • Race and Second Wave Feminism in the US 30 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Race and Resistance MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Race and Resistance MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Independent study is an important part of this degree, allowing you to develop your own ideas and improve your skills in research and analysis. You’ll then come together with tutors and other students for weekly seminars where you’ll discuss issues and themes in each of your modules.

Assessment

All of the modules on this programme are assessed by coursework. This can take a range of forms, including essays, discursive writing, bibliographies, reviews and presentations among others. Optional modules are usually assessed by two 3,000-word essays.

Career opportunities

This MA will give you a deeper understanding of how conceptions of race have shaped and been shaped by the world we live in, as well as the ways in which individuals and communities have employed different strategies of resistance. Crucially, it will equip you with sound intercultural awareness and allow you to look at situations from different points of view, as well as advanced skills in research, analysis, interpretation and written and oral communication.

Graduates have found success in a wide range of careers where they have been able to use their knowledge. These have included teaching and education, research and policy work for NGOs, think tanks and the charity sector. Many others have pursued PhD level study in related fields.

We offer different forms of support to help you reach your career goals. You’ll have the chance to attend our career groups, meeting students with similar plans, or you could become a paid academic mentor to an undergraduate completing their final-year dissertation. You could also apply for one of the internships we offer each year.



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The Race Car Aerodynamics masters degree is recognised as a world-leading course for those wanting to enter Formula One as aerodynamicists and CFD engineers. Read more

The Race Car Aerodynamics masters degree is recognised as a world-leading course for those wanting to enter Formula One as aerodynamicists and CFD engineers. The theme emphasises the fundamentals of aerodynamics as a subject by focusing on analysis, computation and measurement of turbulent flows associated with high performance race cars. It will suit graduates or similarly qualified individuals from engineering, scientific and mathematical backgrounds, with some experience of fluid dynamics who are aiming for advanced specialisation in aerodynamics.

Introducing your degree

This postgraduate masters course emphasises the fundamentals of aerodynamics as a subject by focusing on analysis, computation and measurement of turbulent flows associated with high performance race cars. It will suit graduates or similarly qualified individuals from engineering, scientific and mathematical backgrounds, with some experience of fluid dynamics who are aiming for advanced specialisation in aerodynamics.

Overview

Design is a central theme on this course. You will take part in individual and group practical work to detail your insight of race car design and learn to evaluate and apply experimental aerodynamic concepts. You will also learn advanced computational fluid dynamics and numerical procedures to counteract problems in the design process.

The year is divided into two semesters. Each semester, you will have the option to further your understanding by selecting from a range of modules, from Systems Reliability to Automotive Propulsion.

The final four months will hone in on research. You will have access to our world-class facilities, including the RJ Mitchell wind tunnel as used by F1 teams, America's Cup yacht teams and Olympic athletes. As part of the learning process, you will engage in experimental and practical study and complete a critical research project.

View the specification document for this course



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This course examines the techniques used by states to manage population movement and conflict, their social and cultural impact and the responses they elicit. Read more
This course examines the techniques used by states to manage population movement and conflict, their social and cultural impact and the responses they elicit. It is unique in the way it applies race-critical, cultural and postcolonial theories to racialization, population movement, conflict and peace-making. It is designed for people who work or wish to work in any of these fields, and/or who are thinking of PhD research. There is a focus on Ireland, Europe (including the Balkans), the US and the Middle East.

The course has three components:

i) Three core modules: race-critical theory, research methods, and colonialism, conflict and liberal intervention.

ii) Optional modules covering topics such as ethnic cleansing and forced migration; ethnicity and social policy; human rights and international issues; gender, race and conflict; migration and the European labour market; migration and education; representation and resistance; social movements and international solidarity. (Topics can vary from year to year).

iii) A 20,000 word dissertation researched and written under the supervision of a member of staff with relevant expertise.

(There are also optional field-trips.)

Admission Requirements

Candidates should have a good primary degree (an upper second or equivalent, GPA of at least 3.2) in one of the social sciences or a degree that has included social science as a component.

In exceptional cases, candidates without a first degree may be accepted directly into the programme if they can demonstrate that they possess the equivalent of a good first degree, have work experience in the fields of population movement, conflict, and/or publications that demonstrate analytical skills. Applicants seeking admission in this category may, where practicable, be called for interview .

In all cases the quality of the candidates statement of interest and of their academic references are important.

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This multidisciplinary Master's programme explores debates on 'race' and racism, multiculture and postcoloniality. Read more
This multidisciplinary Master's programme explores debates on 'race' and racism, multiculture and postcoloniality. It explores connections between histories of empire and contemporary social formations and inequalities in the UK, and considers how local debates on 'race' and racism are shaped by the global geopolitics of the twenty-first century.

The programme explores debates on empire and the formation of modern Britain and contemporary transnational political communities, social identities and urban cultures. The MA aims to draw connections between interlocking colonial histories across the globe and our ordinary, local, everyday life here in contemporary Britain.

The programme focuses on subjects such as histories of colonisation, systems of slavery, the concept of 'race' and the invention of 'the West'; colonial cultures, class, nationalisms, 'respectability' and the invention of 'whiteness'; histories of criminalisation and imprisonment; human rights; 'the war on terror'; diaspora, place and belonging; psychoanalysis and 'race', 'hybridity', 'mixedness', 'whiteness', 'race' and 'beauty' and 'race', gender, sexuality and desire. It offers the opportunity to study a wide range of different subjects in this broad multidisciplinary area.

The MA is convened by academics who have interests in racialisation, postcoloniality, urban multiculture and psychoanalysis. You can also choose from a range of option modules convened by other academics in other departments across the College.

This innovative, interdisciplinary postgraduate programme will be of interest to those who want to develop careers in social research, education, law, journalism, youth and community work, urban planning, housing, politics, the arts and cultural industries, health and social care, and numerous other areas. It will also be of interest to those who wish to pursue an academic career in sociology, cultural studies, postcolonial studies, urban studies, psychosocial studies, or in the social sciences or humanities more generally and to those who simply wish to develop an advanced understanding of 'race' and racism, multiculture and postcoloniality.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

The programme introduces you to different historical and political debates and theoretical perspectives in the broad multidisciplinary area of 'race' and racism, multiculture and postcoloniality.
You will participate in a vibrant, stimulating and diverse intellectual environment. There is a Race Forum and several other research institutes at Birkbeck that focus on relevant subject areas.
The programme is flexibly designed for students from all backgrounds to pursue their own particular research and professional interests.
The MA draws from sociology, cultural studies, history, urban studies, literary studies, psychosocial studies, philosophy and politics.
The Department of Psychosocial Studies has a formal link with the University of São Paulo, Brazil. This link enables students on this programme to undertake an optional module at the University of São Paulo as part of their programme of study at Birkbeck.
You will join a flourishing and diverse postgraduate student community and a growing research culture. Birkbeck Library has an extensive teaching collection of books, journals and learning resources in sociology, cultural studies, postcolonial studies, psychosocial studies and related disciplines. You will also be able to use the rich research resources nearby including Senate House Library, the British Library of Political and Economic Science (the LSE Library), the SOAS Library and the British Library.
There are also research institutes which focus on relevant subject areas such as the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities, Birkbeck Law School Centre for Law and the Humanities and the Centre for Media, Culture and Creative Practice and reading groups such as the Postcolonial Studies Reading Group.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Sociology at Birkbeck was ranked 13th in the UK.

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The MA in Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice is a vibrant, interdisciplinary graduate program that attracts excellent students from around the world. Read more
The MA in Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice is a vibrant, interdisciplinary graduate program that attracts excellent students from around the world. Our students pursue their interests in areas as diverse as blue collar alliances with neoconservative movements, and post-communist Eastern European women’s narratives of trauma. Many of our faculty are cross-appointed giving the program strong connections in areas such as sociology, English, environment and development, community and regional planning, anthropology, and classical and religious studies.

Each year we receive approximately 35 applications and admit 4-6 students. Most will complete the program in 18-24 months, with thesis students taking a little longer than those writing an extended essay.

Students in the GRSJ MA program will complete 30 credits of course work in total, including their choice of a thesis (9 credits) or extended essay (3 credits). Incoming students will be assigned a pro tem advisor to guide them in planning their program of study.

The Social Justice @ UBC Networks provide opportunities for graduate students to interact with other students and faculty on shared themes of interest. Being interdisciplinary networks, there is also participation from across UBC departments and units, providing key avenues to extend networks across the campus community. To date, the thematic networks have held workshops and colloquia, sponsored guest artists and lectures, and published materials. We see the networks as invaluable training opportunities for our graduate students to engage and interact around targeted focal themes and to work with key academics and activists.

All successful applicants to the program will be considered for partial scholarship funding. A separate application is not required. Incoming students may also apply for Graduate Academic Assistantships.

Students are provided with shared office space and desks, and access to a photocopier with printing and high-speed scanning capability. Laptops may be signed out for day use, and lockers are available on request. The GRSJ main office has a kitchen and lounge space shared by students, faculty and staff, and a meeting room which may be booked by students.

The GRSJ Graduate Student Association pursues activist, social justice and equity issues, and hosts social events throughout the year.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice
- Subject: Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Options
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts

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The Gender Without Borders MA is an interdisciplinary masters, taught across three core subjects, English, philosophy and sociology, while also allowing you to take options in other disciplines, according to your interests. Read more
The Gender Without Borders MA is an interdisciplinary masters, taught across three core subjects, English, philosophy and sociology, while also allowing you to take options in other disciplines, according to your interests. It explores gender as it intersects with race, class, sexuality, ethnicity, religion and disability. The course is taught in a seminar style that is student led by a team of experts that combines international reputations with dynamic, research-led teaching.

This course considers gender across disciplinary borders in a self-consciously transdisciplinary way, interrogating assumptions of both the humanities and social sciences. Its focus is not exclusively on women, but it conceives of gender in a fluid way, across the borders of the traditional divide between genders, by taking transgender seriously. It also incorporates transnational perspectives, reflecting upon the invisible whiteness that is normatively stipulated by discourses that present themselves as neutral with regard to race, while in fact privileging Eurocentric and post-colonial biases.

Two fully funded scholarships are available on a competitive basis.

What will you study?

The course is designed to allow you to reflect critically upon a range of intersecting differences, race, gender, class, sexuality, and disability in such a way as to resist the scripts of white, heteronormative, ableist privilege that tend to invisibly structure discourse unless a concerted effort is made not to allow default social scripts to circulate unchallenged.

The central and organising question of the two core modules is how different sites of privilege, discrimination and marginalisation intersect with one another, and whether and how the discourse of intersectionality adequately theorises the way in which divergent aspects of identity relate to one another. You will engage with texts and debates in a rigorous, critical and transdisciplinary manner, interrogating the relation between theory and practice in creative ways. You will develop the skills necessary to be able to conduct sustained, independent and original research. You will also have the opportunity to pursue you own disciplinary interests by pursuing optional modules in a range of disciplines.

Assessment

Coursework and dissertation.

Course structure
Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Advanced Interdisciplinary Critical Skills
-Gender Without Borders Dissertation
-Interrogating Intersectional Differences: Gender, Race, Sexuality, Class

Optional modules
-Diffractive Creativities, Transversal Practices
-Gender and Sexuality
-Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Cinema
-Gender, Race and Class
-Philosophy and Psychoanalysis

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The MSc in Motorsport Engineering course provides a unique preparation for work in the motorsport industry. Read more
The MSc in Motorsport Engineering course provides a unique preparation for work in the motorsport industry. Our location in the heart of UK motorsport valley with close proximity of the majority of Formula 1 teams and their supply chain gives our Department unrivalled access to motorsport companies.This informs and directs development and delivery of the programmes, benefiting from contribution by a range of experts with noteworthy track record in the motorsport industry. It also offers students opportunities to undertake industry-based projects, often in conjunction with our high-standing research based around state-of-the-art automotive test equipment in a purpose-designed engineering building.

Our students also have an opportunity to implement their theoretical knowledge by joining Oxford Brookes Racing, our acclaimed Formula Student team to gain an understanding of racing culture and an environment where winning race cars are built.

Why choose this course?

We are known as a premier institution for Motorsport education - our motorsport legacy is recognised worldwide and many of our graduates progress to work with leading motorsport companies, including all of F1 teams, Formula E and major suppliers to motorsport industry. Our programme has been developed with and delivered in collaboration with the motorsport industry: you will be taught in laboratories that include a four-post test rig, four state-of-the-art engine test cells, analytical and mechanical test equipment and the latest 3D printing technology, in addition to a range of racing cars. Our staff have exceptional expertise in the field of motorsport engineering and include winning F1 race car designers and world-leading sustainable vehicle engineering researchers.

Visiting speakers from business and industry provide professional perspectives, preparing you for an exciting career, for more information see our invited research lectures. You will have the opportunity to join our acclaimed Formula Student team (OBR), mentored by our alumni and visiting lecturers from motorsport industry. They put theory into practice by competing with the best universities from around the world. Find out more about Formula Student at Brookes by visiting the Oxford Brookes Racing website. Regular visits to F1 teams, Formula E teams and major suppliers to the motorsport industry provide students with opportunities to explore technical challenges and the latest technology - to get the flavour of activities at our department see 2015 highlights.

Professional accreditation

Accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and and The Institute of Engineering and Technology as meeting the academic requirements for full Chartered Engineer status.

This course in detail

The Motorsport Engineering MSc is structured around three time periods: Semester 1 runs from September to December, Semester 2 from January to May, and the summer period completes the year until the end of September.

To qualify for a master degree you must pass the compulsory modules, two optional modules and the dissertation.

Compulsory modules:
-Advanced Vehicle Dynamics
-Advanced Vehicle Aerodynamics
-Laptime Simulation and Race Engineering
-Advanced Engineering Management

Optional modules (choose two):
-Vehicle Crash Engineering
-Computation and Modelling
-CAD/CAM
-Advanced Strength of Components
-Advanced Materials Engineering and Joining Technology
-Data Acquisition Systems
-Engineering Reliability and Risk Management

You also take:
The Dissertation is an individual project on a topic from motorsport engineering, offering an opportunity to specialise in a particular area of motorsport. In addition to developing high level of expertise in a particular area of motorsport, including use of industry-standard software and/or experimental work, the module will also provide you with research skills, planning techniques, project management. Whilst a wide range of industry-sponsored projects are available (e.g. Dallara, VUHL, Base Performance, McLaren, AVL), students are also able undertake their own projects in the UK and abroad, to work in close co-operation with a research, industrial or commercial organisation.

Please note: As our courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the choice of modules available may differ from those described above.

Teaching and learning

Teaching methods include lectures, seminars to provide a sound theoretical base, and practical work, designed to demonstrate important aspects of theory or systems operation. Visiting speakers from business and motorsport industry provide valuable insights.

Careers and professional development

The department’s employability record is consistently above 90%, which is significantly above sector average. Graduates enjoy the very best employment opportunities, with hundreds of engineering students having gone onto successful careers in the motorsport industry.

Many of our students go on to work with leading motorsport companies, including directly into F1 teams and their suppliers. Our notable alumni include William Morris, founder of Morris cars (Lord Nuffield) and Adrian Reynard, motorsport driver and entrepreneur whilst honorary graduates include Sir John Surtees, Adrian Newey and Dr Pat Symonds.

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BECOME AN ANALYTICALLY SKILLED ‘AGENT OF CHANGE’. Read more

BECOME AN ANALYTICALLY SKILLED ‘AGENT OF CHANGE’

How do gender, race, class, sexuality and age contribute to the formation of social identities? What role do ensuing power differences between these factors play in our globalised and mediatised world? What measures have been taken, in the past and the present, in order to prevent discrimination and exclusion? And how do academic, cultural, artistic, journalistic, and policy-making institutions respond to these societal challenges?

Emancipation, the recognition of differences, and awareness of intersections of gender with other factors of identity making (class, race, age, sexuality, etc.) are crucial tools in analysing social and cultural relations in today’s postcolonial and post-secular societies. Our Master’s programme in Gender Studies provides you with an interdisciplinary understanding of these tools, as well as advanced analytical skills. You will be trained within an internationally diverse cohort of students and academic staff to become a professionally successful 'agent of change'.

THEORY AND PRACTICE

Your education in gender studies will combine theoretical knowledge with its practical application in all parts of the programme. You will develop research skills through intensive coursework and participate in an internship that combines your subject matter interests with professional experience. Theory and practice come together in your final thesis project, which serves to synthesise your one-year experience in gender studies at Utrecht University.

After completing this one-year programme, you will be able to develop sustainable perspectives for future research and action, and have the motivation and knowledge to implement these perspectives in emancipation policies, diversity management, social and cultural initiatives, and political activism.

AFTER GRADUATION

After graduation, you will have advanced knowledge of and insight into the field of women’s and gender studies. You will be an expert on factors of identity making such as gender, class, race, age, and sexuality. You will also have the academic skills to:

  • Explore social and cultural relations in today’s globalised societies, in an interdisciplinary manner.
  • Develop and implement sustainable perspectives in emancipation policies, diversity management, cultural initiatives, and political activism.
  • Critically investigate power differences and processes of inclusion/exclusion, discrimination, and emancipation.
  • Reflect on how academic, cultural, artistic, journalistic, and policy-making institutions respond to societal challenges.
  • Consider postcolonial and postsecular contexts in your work.

In addition, you will be able to reflect on your course work and further develop your professional practices during your internship. You will then employ these practices in a theory based academic thesis.

The insights from gender studies and emancipation research are useful to a growing number of organisations and companies seeking to develop and/or critically reflect upon policies to effectively intervene on behalf of specific target groups and market segments. Read more about possible career prospects.



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The Social Justice and Education MA will help students to identify, examine and understand key sociological and philosophical perspectives on social justice, including issues of race, class, gender and sexuality, and education. Read more

The Social Justice and Education MA will help students to identify, examine and understand key sociological and philosophical perspectives on social justice, including issues of race, class, gender and sexuality, and education. Participants will explore the personal and political dimensions of social justice concerns and develop their professional, practical and research skills in this area.

About this degree

This programme provides students with the opportunity to address, in a unique way, the complex links between social justice and education, focusing on key current policy and political debates about the role of education. They will also be able to develop, extend and reflect on their own professional interests, concerns and practice and how to address pressing issues of social justice in their everyday profesional and personal lives. Through their engagmeent with cutting-edge research in this area they will learn tools for fighting for social justice and transformation in the educational areas relevant for them.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits), or a report (30 credits) and a third optional module (30 credits).

Core modules

  • Sociology of Education
  • Understanding Education Research

Optional modules

  • Rights and Education
  • Gender, Sexuality and Education
  • Sociology of 'Race' and Education
  • Understanding Educational Policy
  • Theoretical Foundations of Educational Ideas
  • Minorities, Migrants and Refugees in National Education Systems

Students can also choose from a wide range of Master's-level optional modules across the IOE offering.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 20,000 words or a report of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of face-to-face evening sessions and interactive online learning using a variety of teaching and learning styles. Sometimes a conventional lecture-based approach is taken, with the aim of providing an overview of the field. Lectures are usually followed by open discussion or group work. At other times a seminar format is adopted involving, for example, group discussion of set reading, a video or an introductory presentation. Assessment is through coursework essay assignments, plus submission of a report or dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Social Justice and Education MA

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are leaders, managers, teachers and practitioners in the compulsory education sector across international contexts. Many are working as professionals in NGO organisations specialising in social justice across many countries such as Chille, Japan, Canada and the UK. Graduates can also be found working as civil servants and government officials. In addition, many find places in the higher education sector including across a range of professional roles, as researchers, and as university lecturers worldwide.

Employability

Students develop the capacity to:

  • reflect critically on debates concerning education and social justice across diverse contexts
  • understand the ways in which knowledge forms, and is formed by, education politics, policy, practice and research 
  • consider the implications of theory, research and analyses about social justice in education and how it can impact their own future practice and professional development
  • use oral and written communication skills in order to make arguments, examine evidence and creatively advance social justice and education
  • understand processes entailed in social science and philosophical research and conduct their own unique research in the area of social justice and education.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Department of Education, Practice and Society at UCL Institute of Education (IOE) is home to an interdisciplinary grouping bringing together high-quality teaching and research in the sociology, philosophy and history of education, international development, post-compulsory and vocational education and higher education.

The Social Justice and Education MA is taught by world-leading sociologists and philosophers within the department who have expertise in theory, research methods, policy analysis and impacting social change. They are experts in issues such as equality and human rights, gender, 'race', sexuality, youth, disability and social class. Those teaching are active researchers and will introduce the latest research and developments in their fields.

This programme explores sociological and philosophical perspectives on social justice and equalities and also explores processes of social transformation and change. Key issues debated include understanding and responding to social and educational disparities in international contexts. The programme equips students with essential theoretical and methodological research skills for critically engaging with social justice issues including understanding power relations from various perspectives. The MA attracts a diversity of both home and international students thus providing excellent educational and professional networking opportunities. 

Students gain invaluable opportunities to study with leading scholars and a cohort of internationally diverse students across the IOE MA cluster in sociology, social justice and policy studies in education.



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This interdisciplinary Master’s programme provides an opportunity for you to deconstruct the American experience at an advanced level. Read more
This interdisciplinary Master’s programme provides an opportunity for you to deconstruct the American experience at an advanced level.

It interrogates, challenges and moves beyond the Exceptionalist rhetoric and nation-states ideology of traditional American Studies to consider the USA, and its neighbours, in an insightful, challenging and relevant way.

You develop specialist knowledge and research skills in a range of disciplines by navigating complex historical, cultural, geo-political and environmental issues. A sophisticated awareness of the reach (and the limitations) of US hegemony, as well as issues of cultural collision, media penetration, region and identity, give our graduates an intellectual grounding well-suited to many careers, in addition to a solid foundation for graduate work at MPhil or PhD level.

About the Centre for American Studies

American Studies at Kent dates back to 1973 and, over the last few decades, has developed a strong research culture; this matches the commitment of the University to interdisciplinary study as well as the mandate of American Studies to explore the American experience in ground-breaking ways.

Our team of scholars maintains close links with a number of North and South American research institutions and archives, and the University’s Templeman Library houses impressive collections on slavery, Native American culture, and photography/visual materials.

We treat the American experience in a critical and reflective manner, and offer an extremely good base for postgraduate study. While able to supervise a wide range of American topics, the Centre currently operates three specialist research clusters of particular interest to candidates:

- The American West
- The Study of US Environmental Issues
- The Study of Race, Ethnicity and Borders.

Course structure

You take a compulsory 30 credit module ‘Transnational American Studies: Research and Approaches’. This is a year-long module designed to introduce key modes of analysis in transnational and interdisciplinary study as well as consider different methodologies, themes and intellectual debates. Assessment includes an extended essay, seminar presentation and a critical review of an academic research paper.

You also select 90 credits from a range of optional modules, spread across at least two disciplines. Optional modules vary year to year and below is a selection of recent modules on offer:

- American Cold War Propaganda

- Geiger Counter at Ground Zero: Explorations of Nuclear America

- From Wounded Knee to the Little Bighorn Casino: The Vietnam War in American History

- American Narrative in the Age of Postmodernism

- American Modernism

- Boundary Busting and Border Crossing

- Myth, Image, Fashion and Propaganda in the Cuban Revolutionary Era

- History and Memory

- American Foreign Policy

The remaining 60 credits are made up with a Dissertation. Written over the summer term, this 12,000 word extended study allows students to work on their own research project based on primary research. You have the opportunity to present your ideas as part of workshop sessions on researching American Studies in the core course and receive supervision from an academic specialist.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Assessment

Assessment for this course includes an extended essay, seminar presentation and a critical review of an academic research paper.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a thorough grounding in the techniques and approaches necessary for advanced research in American Studies.

- promote interdisciplinarity as a conceptual mode of theory and analysis (encourage you to ‘operate across disciplines, learning how to integrate a variety of approaches in formulating and solving problems, and using diverse materials and information sources.’

- encourage critical reflection and engagement with public debates relating to aspects of American society.

- consolidate the strengths of our long-running undergraduate programmes whilst interrogating, challenging, and moving outside the exceptionalist rhetoric and nation-state ideology of conventional American Studies (develop a ‘synthesising impulse…which can work across, as well as interrogate traditional discipline boundaries in innovative ways’.

- promote a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that provides breadth and depth of intellectual inquiry and debate.

- assist you to develop cognitive and transferable skills relevant to their vocational and personal development.

Research areas

Staff interests broadly fit within the parameters of American literature, American history, American film and American politics, although we actively welcome interdisciplinary projects that investigate several areas of study. Current strengths in American Studies at Kent are: Native American literature and culture; African-American history; slavery and the Atlantic world; the American West; US environmental issues; US visual culture; Disney and recreation; American realist fiction; modern American poetry; US immigration politics; American science fiction; Hollywood; US foreign policy.

The American West
Kent is the only UK institution to operate a research cluster on the American West, with five members of the Centre specialising in trans-Mississippi studies. The research cluster engages in pioneering work on Native American literature, Western films and video games, female frontiering and several other elements of the Western experience.

The Study of US Environmental Issues
US environmental history is a relatively new field of study, but of increasing importance. Our two environmental specialists work on wildlife management, animal studies, nuclear protest and concepts of ecological doomsday.

The Study of Race, Ethnicity and Borders
The Centre has a long history of studying race and ethnicity. Currently, six members of the team cover a range of topics that include African-American political, cultural and social history, Native American literature, Latin American relations and immigration writing and politics.

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Addressing some of the most challenging issues in today’s world, this programme relates ethnicity and migration to global economic and cultural change, and to systems of domination and resistance movements. Read more

Addressing some of the most challenging issues in today’s world, this programme relates ethnicity and migration to global economic and cultural change, and to systems of domination and resistance movements. You learn to analyse the causes of migration, as well as its consequences for emerging formations of race, gender, labour, citizenship, healthcare, welfare and culture.

The master’s programme is interdisciplinary, integrating the humanities and the social sciences, and is animated by a commitment to critical, innovative and useful approaches to issues and problems within the broad field of ethnic and migration studies.

Students will gain a comprehensive grasp of the field of ethnic and migration studies and will be well prepared for positions in local, national and international organisations, administration, business, government, media and the cultural sector, as well as for further postgraduate studies and research.

The programme consists of a mix of mandatory courses and electives that will allow you an individual specialisation, options to study abroad, options for internships, and research tutorials with faculty. Teaching involves formats with a high level of student participation. Teaching forms include lectures, workshops, seminars and individual/group tutorials. 

Areas of focus include historical and sociological perspectives on the ways in which migration shapes society; in-depth knowledge in the field of intersectional migration studies; globalisation and its link to changing conditions for work and migration; the European Union asylum policies;, theories of biopolitics, citizenship and exclusion; and the relation of race, ethnicity and migration to cultural and aesthetic expressions such as narratives, visual arts, theatre and cinema.

The faculty will be joined by international guest professors to make up an interdisciplinary and internationally experienced team, covering all aspects of the programme’s curriculum and beyond. The program thus offers a direct interface with ongoing research.

Example of specific focus areas within the programme:

  • Historical perspectives on ethnicity and migration
  • Intersectional migration studies
  • Changing frameworks for citizenship
  • Migration and globalisation in post-colonial perspectives
  • Race, ethnicity and migration in culture and the arts
  • Migration and asylum policy in the European Union
  • Migration and health.


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This degree is intended for students with a general interest in sociology who wish to update, extend and deepen their knowledge and understand current developments in the field. Read more
This degree is intended for students with a general interest in sociology who wish to update, extend and deepen their knowledge and understand current developments in the field. The programme aims to provide students with opportunities to expand their knowledge of the discipline by engaging with contemporary research and by undertaking historical and comparative study.

Compulsory modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Principles of research design and issues of data collection and analysis are studied.

Applied Social Research: This module delivers specialist training in sociological research. It draws upon generic social science research skills and knowledge and applies them to a joint group project. In the group project, students will select the topic in which they will develop their skills as empirical researchers. It is a ‘hands on’ module and students will engage in hypothesis development, research design, data gathering, data analysis and interpretation of the results.

Optional modules:

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes. The module focuses on four main themes:

Conceptual issues: the meaning of ‘community’ and its use as a concept in social scientific and popular discourse. This will be considered in relation to different theoretical approaches such as social constructionism, realism, and post-structuralism.
Empirical applications: an examination of classic and contemporary examples of community research and relevant case studies dealing with different forms of ‘community’.
Policy issues: relating to contemporary forms of intervention in relation to community development, regeneration, mobilisation, participation, leadership and power. This will be considered in the context of frameworks such as communitarianism, social capital, and the ‘third way’.
Community methodology: examines how ‘community’ has been researched and the tools and methods available for empirical investigation. These include ethnographic studies, large-scale surveys, ‘community profiling’ and auditing, and action research.
Nationalism and Minorities: This module will examine key issues and debates concerning the growing claims by ethnic and national minorities and indigenous peoples for distinct language, territorial and other minority rights and recognition within nation-states and beyond. The relationships between nationalism, citizenship and minority rights will be considered with reference to empirical examples. Debates and policies concerned with the management of cultural and ethnic diversity by the state will also be considered. The approach is interdisciplinary drawing on sociology, political theory, anthropology, law and education, with case study examples provided from Europe, North America, Asia and Oceania. It aims to provide students with a global and comparative understanding of individual cases, of their historical antecedents, and of the key similarities and differences between them.

Sociology of Everyday Life: The module deals with different theories of everyday life, for example those focusing on face-to face communication. Other theories emphasize how social life is “performed” in everyday contexts and its “dramaturgy”. It is discussed how individuals construct meaning out of their social lives. Some approaches reflect on the constraints of society, especially of powerful institutions, and how they affect the “lifeworld”. Empirical studies of everyday life will also be part of the module. From airports to zoos, human behaviour in different settings has been described and placed in theoretical context. The creation of social stigmas, or of social spaces can be studied. Students will be introduced to the use of different methodologies, like observation and listening to individuals telling their story.

Culture, Race and Civilization: The module explores normative and descriptive concepts of culture, the dichotomy of culture and civilization, and the dialectical tension between all of these. Culture appears in a number of different contexts: for example as promise of Enlightenment, or as social reality of the everyday. The relation between “multiculturalism” and ideas of “nation” and “race” will be part of the discussion. What is the role of the idea of “civilization” for racism and racialization? Another aspect to be covered is the relation between wealth and culture. “Cultural critique” and globalization theories provide different answers. Finally, the role of violence in relation to culture, race and civilization will be discussed.

MA Dissertation

The dissertation is undertaken on completion of the taught modules. It is valued at 60 credits (one-third of the MA degree) and will be around 20,000 words in length.

Part-time students in employment may choose a topic related to their profession and an area in which they wish to develop further expertise and specialisation. Under guidance of a dissertation tutor, students will undertake their MA dissertation work independently on a topic of their choice. This may be a piece of empirical research including primary or secondary data analysis or a theoretical dissertation.

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Whether you’re interested in the making of the modern world or witchcraft through the ages, at Essex we give you the freedom to explore the history that excites you. Read more
Whether you’re interested in the making of the modern world or witchcraft through the ages, at Essex we give you the freedom to explore the history that excites you. Our geographic spread, topic diversity and social reach give you an unrivalled opportunity to pursue your historical passions and discover new ones.

Our MA History is rigorous, flexible and wide-ranging, so that you can to choose the modules and thesis topic which best suit your interests.

Alongside four optional modules which enable you to explore the latest in historical research in our specialist areas, you also study a practical module in research techniques, and write a 20,000-word dissertation on a topic of your choice.

Historical research at Essex concentrates on the period from 1500 to the present, and covers a wide geographical area that includes British and European history, as well as Latin America, the USA, China, Russia and Africa.

Our Department of History has developed a strong research and teaching profile, with the majority of our research rated as ‘world leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014). We provide you with opportunities to explore local history, and have strong links with the Essex Record Office, one of the best county record offices in the UK.

Alternatively you can focus your study on a more specific area by following one of the following pathways:

Public History Pathway
Further your understanding of, and expertise in, a variety of public history contexts, ranging from museums and documentary films to conflict resolution and computer games.

This pathway makes the most of our status as an institution at the cutting edge of communicating history to the general public, and will involve classes led by scholars who are currently involved in documentary, heritage, oral history and school curriculum projects.

You will be given the opportunity to create, participate in, and/or critique a current piece of public history as part of your coursework assessment on the Public History Workshop module, and your dissertation will demonstrate an engagement with the methods and/or theories of public history, analyse an example of public history, or be an example of public history.

Cultural and Social History Pathway

Explore the varied ways in which understandings of the relationship between evidence and interpretation, language and the material world, economies and identities, have been challenged and changed by the ‘cultural turn’.

This pathway offers you modules which deal with a range of areas, themes and periods, placing you at the cutting-edge of historical thought on issues such as gender, race, class, consumption, modernity, mentalities and identities.

Local and Regional History Pathway
Local (or micro) history, as well as community and family studies, has played an increasingly important part in the development of historical analysis.

We reflect on these developments, drawing on the rich national and comparative literature in these fields, with a primary focus on the period from 1800 to the 20th century.

You also design and conduct a substantial independent study on a chosen historical topic or in the field of local, community or family history.

Our expert staff

Our staff are among world leaders in their field, and our enthusiasm for our subject is infectious. Our flexible course is combined with a supportive structure which helps you to pursue the modules best-suited to your interests.

We take the time to get to know you as an individual, welcome you into our scholarly community, and value your views.

Specialist facilities

-We have several Special Collections in history, including the Essex Society for Archaeology and History Library, the Harsnett Collection, the Hervey Benham Oral History Sound Archive, the Bensusan Collection, and the Colchester Medical Society Library
-Access the UK Data Archive, a national service provider digital resources for historians, which is particularly strong in 19th and 20th-century economic and social history
-Attend an exciting programme of events
-Access a variety of textbooks and journals in our Albert Sloman Library which houses materials on Latin America, Russia and the US that are of national significance

Your future

We have excellent links with the research community, both in the UK and worldwide, so many of our students have gone on to teach in higher education institutions. Others have found employment in archives, research, managing research funds, other forms of educational provision, the Civil Service, the National Health Service, and management.

Within our Department of History, we offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MA by Dissertation. Themes of particular research interest include:
-Class, race and gender formation
-Nationalism
-Wars and revolutions
-International relations and oil diplomacy
-The history of medicine
-The history of crime
-Popular culture and consumption
-Slave societies
-The history of ideas and print culture
-The history of the Roma and Sinti in Europe
-Historical censuses and surveys

Our University is one of only 11 AHRC-accredited Doctoral Training Centres in the UK. This means that we offer funded PhD studentships which also provide a range of research and training opportunities.

We also work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation
-Research Methods in History
-Race and Class in the United States, South Africa and Britain: Select Topics (optional)
-Illness and Culture in 18th-And 19th-Century Europe (optional)
-The Public History Workshop (optional)
-Gender in Early Modern Europe c.1500- c.1800 (optional)
-Approaches to Cultural and Social History (optional)
-A Global History of Food, c.1400 - c.1750 (optional)
-The Making of Consumer Culture: Britain 1780-1960 (optional)
-Narcotic Culture: A History of Drugs (From the Sixteenth to the Twenty First Century) (optional)
-Decency and Disorder: Institutions in Essex 1700-1900
-The Patterns of Victorian Life: Reconstructing Nineteenth-Century Communities (optional)
-The Uses of Space in Early Modern History (optional)

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This course focuses on the history of Britain, Europe and the wider world between c.1500–1800, highlighting themes of political, cultural… Read more

This course focuses on the history of Britain, Europe and the wider world between c.1500–1800, highlighting themes of political, cultural, religious and social history. The course is taught by experts in the histories of the Reformation and the Enlightenment, gender, the material world of the Renaissance, race and racism, and on Britain, Ireland, France, the Netherlands, Portugal and the Iberian world, offering you the opportunity to choose from a wide range of modules.

Leads to further research or careers in museums, journalism, finance and the cultural sector.

Key benefits

  • One of the best history departments in the world, ranked 5th in the UK for Research Quality (REF 2014) and in the Top 10 departments of History in Europe (QS World University Rankings 2016).
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Kings is ranked in the top 6 in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016).
  • A wide set of optional modules all taught by established experts in the field
  • A rigorous core course that trains students in historical research in archives, manuscripts, print and objects
  • Central London location and staff expertise offers students unrivalled access to world-class museums, collections, archives and libraries as well as easy access to resources in Europe.
  • Vibrant research culture of seminars, workshops and conferences in the department and at the Institute of Historical Research, in which students are encouraged to participate.

Description

Our Early Modern History MA bridges the division between British and European history that exists on many courses, focusing on ways in which cultural, political and social themes stretch across the period c.1500–1800.

The course is taught by experts in the histories of the Reformation and the Enlightenment, gender, the material world of the Renaissance, race and racism, and on Britain, Ireland, France, the Netherlands, Portugal and the Iberian world. Their research connects the political and the social, the cultural and the religious dimensions of the early modern world, and our course will give you interdisciplinary perspectives on early modern history.

You will write a dissertation at the end of your course, but you will begin by testing concepts such as identity, mentality, religion; by challenging models of change including modernization, state-building, the civilising process, reformation, enlightenment and revolution; and by trying out different methodologies such as cultural history, gender, thinking with material objects, global history, using digital data.

Our optional modules offer you different perspectives on religion, society, politics and culture, by examining primary sources of all kinds alongside the most recent historiographical interpretations. We will also develop your practical skills through modules such as advanced historical skills, including palaeography, Latin from beginner to advanced levels, and offer the chance to learn a European language. The flexibility of the course means that you can also take relevant modules from other departments in, for example, early modern English or French literature, the Iberian world and Digital Humanities. You can also attend relevant undergraduate lecture series such as Power, Culture and Belief in Europe 1500–1800 and Early Modern Britain 1500–1750.

You will have access to an excellent range of library resources. Our long-standing expertise in the early modern period means our library has an extensive collection of journals and books in this field. You can also use the British Library, Senate House Library (University of London) and the Institute of Historical Research. We provide access to the most significant online collections of primary printed material, Early English Books Online and the Eighteenth Century Online and to JSTOR and other online resources for secondary material.

Course purpose

The MA Early Modern History course offers a rigorous introduction to the advanced study of early modern history, providing training in the historiographical and technical skills necessary for doctoral study, but is also designed for those who want to deepen their knowledge of the period.

Course format and assessment

Teaching Style

We teach our modules through small seminar groups where we will debate and discuss ideas based on extensive reading.

If you are a full-time student, we will provide you with six to nine hours of teaching each week, and we will expect you to undertake 32 to 34 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide you with two to six hours of teaching each week, and we will expect you to undertake 14 to 18 hours of independent study.

For your dissertation we will provide you with six hours of one-to-one supervision and we will expect you to undertake 574 hours of independent study.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

We will assess your performance through coursework and occasionally exams. The majority of the history modules are assessed by coursework essay; other optional modules may differ.

Regulating body

King’s College is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.

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