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The Quantum Technologies MSc will take students to the cutting-edge of research in the emerging area of quantum technologies, giving them not only an advanced training in the relevant physics but also the chance to acquire key skills in the engineering and information sciences. Read more
The Quantum Technologies MSc will take students to the cutting-edge of research in the emerging area of quantum technologies, giving them not only an advanced training in the relevant physics but also the chance to acquire key skills in the engineering and information sciences.

Degree information

Students learn the language and techniques of advanced quantum mechanics, quantum information and quantum computation, as well as state-of-the-art implementation with condensed matter and quantum optical systems.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research project with a dissertation/report (60 credits).

Core modules
-Advanced Quantum Theory
-Atom and Photon Physics
-Quantum Communication and Computation
-Research Case Studies for Quantum Technologies
-Transferable Skills in Research Case Studies for Quantum Technologies

Optional modules - students choose three of the following optional modules:
-Advanced Photonic Devices
-Introduction to Cryptography
-Nanoelectronic Devices
-Nanoscale Processing for Advanced Devices
-Optical Transmission and Networks
-Order and Excitations in Condensed Matter
-Physics and Optics of Nano-Structures
-Research Computing with C++
-Research Software Engineering with Python

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project (experimental or theoretical) related to quantum technologies, which culminates in a presentation and a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars, with self-study on two modules devoted to the critical assessment of current research topics and the corresponding research skills. Assessment is through a combination of problem sheets, written examinations, case study reports and presentations, as well as the MSc project dissertation.

Careers

The programme prepares graduates for careers in the emerging quantum technology industries which play an increasingly important role in: secure communication; sensing and metrology; the simulation of other quantum systems; and ultimately in general-purpose quantum computation. Graduates will also be well prepared for research at the highest level in the numerous groups now developing quantum technologies and for work in government laboratories.

Employability
Graduates will possess the skills needed to work in the emerging quantum industries as they develop in response to technological advances.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL offers one of the leading research programmes in quantum technologies anywhere in the world, as well as outstanding taught programmes in the subjects contributing to the field (including physics, computer science, and engineering). It also hosts the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Delivering Quantum Technologies.

The programme provides a rigorous grounding across the disciplines underlying quantum technologies, as well as the chance to work with some of the world's leading groups in research projects. The new Quantum Science and Technology Institute ('UCLQ') provides an umbrella where all those working in the field can meet and share ideas, including regular seminars, networking events and opportunities to interact with commercial and government partners.

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Taught by internationally-recognised experts in the University’s Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), this programme will see you discover the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials, nanotechnology for renewable energy generation and storage. Read more
Taught by internationally-recognised experts in the University’s Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), this programme will see you discover the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials, nanotechnology for renewable energy generation and storage.

You will gain specialised skills through an individual research project within our research groups, using state-of-the-art equipment and facilities.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The programme's broad theme is the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials and nanotechnology.

The programme covers the fundamentals behind nanotechnology and moves on to discuss its implementation using nanomaterials – such as graphene – and the use of advanced tools of nanotechnology which allow us to see at the nanoscale, before discussing future trends and applications for energy generation and storage.

You will gain specialised, practical skills through an individual research project within our research groups, using state-of-the-art equipment and facilities. Completion of the programme will provide you with the skills essential to furthering your career in this rapidly emerging field.

The delivery of media content relies on many layers of sophisticated signal engineering that can process images, video, speech and audio – and signal processing is at the heart of all multimedia systems.

Our Mobile Media Communications programme explains the algorithms and intricacies surrounding transmission and delivery of audio and video content. Particular emphasis is given to networking and data compression, in addition to the foundations of pattern recognition.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and an extended project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-RF and Microwave Fundamentals
-Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
-Molecular Electronics
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Nanofabrication and Characterisation
-Energy Economics and Technology
-Semiconductor Devices and Optoelectronics
-Microwave Engineering
-Nanoelectronics and Devices
-Nanophotonics Principles and Engineering
-Renewable Energy Technology
-Engineering Professional Studies 1
-Engineering Professional Studies 2
-Extended Project

NANOTECHNOLOGY AT SURREY

We are one of the leading institutions developing nanotechnology and the next generation of materials and nanoelectronic devices.

Taught by internationally-recognised experts within the University’s Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), on this programme you will discover the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials and nanotechnology.

You will gain specialised skills through an individual research project within our research groups, using state-of- the-art equipment and facilities.

The ATI is a £10 million investment in advanced research and is the flagship institute of the University of Surrey in the area of nanotechnology and nanomaterials. The ATI brings together under one roof the major research activities of the University from the Department of Electronic Engineering and the Department of Physics in the area of nanotechnology and electronic devices.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate Degree Programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant).

To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing and Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

Intended capabilities for MSc graduates:
-Underpinning learning – know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin Nanoscience and nanotechnology for renewable systems
-Engineering problem solving - be able to analyse problems within the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
-Engineering tools - be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Technical expertise - know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within Nanoscience, nanotechnology and nanoelectronics for renewable energy
-Societal and environmental context - be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Employment context - be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Research and development investigations - be able to carry out research-and- development investigations
-Design - where relevant, be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems
-Demonstrate transferable skills such as problem solving, analysis and critical interpretation of data, through the undertaking of the extended 90-credit project
-Know how to take into account constraints such as environmental and sustainability limitations, health and safety and risk assessment
-Have gained comprehensive understanding of design processes
-Understand customer and user needs, including aesthetics, ergonomics and usability.
-Have acquired experience in producing an innovative design
-Appreciate the need to identify and manage cost drivers
-Have become familiar with the design process and the methodology of evaluating outcomes
-Have acquired knowledge and understanding of management and business practices
-Have gained the ability to evaluate risks, including commercial risks
-Understand current engineering practice and some appreciation of likely developments
-Have gained extensive understanding of a wide range of engineering materials/components
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Have become aware of quality issues in the discipline

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering.

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Microsystems Engineering is one of the most dynamic and interdisciplinary engineering fields. The Master of Science program in Microsystems Engineering (MSE) provides the educational basis for your success in this field. Read more
Microsystems Engineering is one of the most dynamic and interdisciplinary engineering fields. The Master of Science program in Microsystems Engineering (MSE) provides the educational basis for your success in this field. The MSE program is designed for highly qualified graduate students holding a Bachelor degree in engineering or science.

In the first year 12 mandatory courses provide the fundamental theoretical framework for a future career in Microsystems. These courses are designed to provide students with a broad knowledge base in the most important aspects of the field:

• MSE technologies and processes
• Microelectronics
• Micro-mechanics
• MSE design laboratory I
• Optical Microsystems
• Sensors
• Probability and statistics
• Assembly and packaging technology
• Dynamics of MEMS
• Micro-actuators
• Biomedical Microsystems
• Micro-fluidics
• MSE design laboratory II
• Signal processing

As part of the mandatory courses, the Microsystems design laboratory is a two-semester course in which small teams of students undertake a comprehensive, hands-on design project in Microsystems engineering. Requiring students to address all aspects of the generation of a microsystem, from conceptualization, through project planning to fabrication and testing, this course provides an essential glimpse into the workings of engineering projects.

In the second year, MSE students can specialise in two of the following seven concentration areas (elective courses), allowing each student to realize individual interests and to obtain an in-depth look at two sub-disciplines of this very broad, interdisciplinary field:

• Circuits and systems
• Design and simulation
• Life sciences: Biomedical engineering
• Life sciences: Lab-on-a-chip
• Materials
• Process engineering
• Sensors and actuators

Below are some examples of subjects offered in the concentration areas. These subjects do not only include theoretical lectures, but also hands-on courses such as labs, projects and seminars.

Circuits and Systems
• Analog CMOS Circuit Design
• Mixed-Signal CMOS Circuit Design
• VLSI – System Design
• RF- und Microwave Devices and Circuits
• Micro-acoustics
• Radio sensor systems
• Optoelectronic devices
• Reliability Engineering
• Lasers
• Micro-optics
• Advanced topics in Macro-, Micro- and Nano-optics


Design and Simulation
• Topology optimization
• Compact Modelling of large Scale Systems
• Lattice Gas Methods
• Particle Simulation Methods
• VLSI – System Design
• Hardware Development using the finite element method
• Computer-Aided Design

Life Sciences: Biomedical Engineering
• Signal processing and analysis of brain signals
• Neurophysiology I: Measurement and Analysis of Neuronal Activity
• Neurophysiology II: Electrophysiology in Living Brain
• DNA Analytics
• Basics of Electrostimulation
• Implant Manufacturing Techologies
• Biomedical Instrumentation I
• Biomedical Instrumentation II

Life Sciences: Lab-on-a-chip
• DNA Analytics
• Biochip Technologies
• Bio fuel cell
• Micro-fluidics 2: Platforms for Lab-on-a-Chip Applications

Materials
• Microstructured polymer components
• Test structures and methods for integrated circuits and microsystems
• Quantum mechanics for Micro- and Macrosystems Engineering
• Microsystems Analytics
• From Microsystems to the nano world
• Techniques for surface modification
• Nanomaterials
• Nanotechnology
• Semiconductor Technology and Devices

MEMS Processing
• Advanced silicon technologies
• Piezoelectric and dielectric transducers
• Nanotechnology

Sensors and Actuators
• Nonlinear optic materials
• CMOS Microsystems
• Quantum mechanics for Micro- and Macrosystems Engineering
• BioMEMS
• Bionic Sensors
• Micro-actuators
• Energy harvesting
• Electronic signal processing for sensors and actuators


Essential for the successful completion of the Master’s degree is submission of a Master’s thesis, which is based on a project performed during the third and fourth semesters of the program. Each student works as a member of one of the 18 research groups of the department, with full access to laboratory and cleanroom infrastructure.

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The Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering offers a master of science in metallurgical engineering. Visit the website http://mte.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/. Read more
The Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering offers a master of science in metallurgical engineering.

Visit the website http://mte.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

The program options include coursework only or by a combination of coursework and approved thesis work. Most on-campus students supported on assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis on a research topic.

Plan I is the standard master’s degree plan. However, in exceptional cases, a student who has the approval of his or her supervisory committee may follow Plan II. A student who believes there are valid reasons for using Plan II must submit a written request detailing these reasons to the department head no later than midterm of the first semester in residence.

All graduate students, during the first part and the last part of their programs, will be required to satisfactorily complete MTE 595/MTE 596. This hour of required credit is in addition to the other degree requirements.

Course Descriptions

MTE 519 Principles of Casting and Solidification Processing. Three hours.
Overview of the principles of solidification processing, the evolution of solidification microstructure, segregation, and defects, and the use of analytical and computational tools for the design, understanding, and use of solidification processes.

MTE 520 Simulation of Casting Processes Three hours.
This course will cover the rationale and approach of numerical simulation techniques, casting simulation and casting process design, and specifically the prediction of solidification, mold filling, microstructure, shrinkage, microporosity, distortion and hot tearing. Students will learn casting simulation through lectures and hands-on laboratory/tutorial sessions.

MTE 539 Metallurgy of Welding. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 380 or permission of the instructor.
Thermal, chemical, and mechanical aspects of welding using the fusion welding process. The metallurgical aspects of welding, including microstructure and properties of the weld, are also covered. Various topics on recent trends in welding research.

MTE 542 Magnetic Recording Media. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 271.
Basic ferromagnetism, preparation and properties of magnetic recording materials, magnetic particles, thin magnetic films, soft and hard film media, multilayered magnetoresistive media, and magneto-optical disk media.

MTE 546 Macroscopic Transport in Materials Processing. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 353 or permission of the instructor.
Elements of laminar and turbulent flow; heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation; and mass transfer in laminar and in turbulent flow; mathematical modeling of transport phenomena in metallurgical systems including melting and refining processes, solidification processes, packed bed systems, and fluidized bed systems.

MTE 547 Intro to Comp Mat. Science Three hours.
This course introduces computational techniques for simulating materials. It covers principles of quantum and statistical mechanics, modeling strategies and formulation of various aspects of materials structure, and solution techniques with particular reference to Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamic methods.

MTE 549 Powder Metallurgy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 380 or permission of the instructor.
Describing the various types of powder processing and how these affect properties of the components made. Current issues in the subject area from high-production to nanomaterials will be discussed.

MTE 550 Plasma Processing of Thin Films: Basics and Applications. Three hours.
Prerequisite: By permission of instructor.
Fundamental physics and materials science of plasma processes for thin film deposition and etch are covered. Topics include evaporation, sputtering (special emphasis), ion beam deposition, chemical vapor deposition, and reactive ion etching. Applications to semiconductor devices, displays, and data storage are discussed.

MTE 556 Advanced Mechanical Behavior of Materials I: Strengthening Methods in Solids. Three hours. Same as AEM 556.
Prerequisite: MTE 455 or permission of the instructor.
Topics include elementary elasticity, plasticity, and dislocation theory; strengthening by dislocation substructure, and solid solution strengthening; precipitation and dispersion strengthening; fiber reinforcement; martensitic strengthening; grain-size strengthening; order hardening; dual phase microstructures, etc.

MTE 562 Metallurgical Thermodynamics. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 362 or permission of instructor.
Laws of thermodynamics, equilibria, chemical potentials and equilibria in heterogeneous systems, activity functions, chemical reactions, phase diagrams, and electrochemical equilibria; thermodynamic models and computations; and application to metallurgical processes.

MTE 574 Phase Transformation in Solids. Three hours.
Prerequisites: MTE 373 and or permission of the instructor.
Topics include applied thermodynamics, nucleation theory, diffusional growth, and precipitation.

MTE 579 Advanced Physical Metallurgy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Graduate-level treatments of the fundamentals of symmetry, crystallography, crystal structures, defects in crystals (including dislocation theory), and atomic diffusion.

MTE 583 Advanced Structure of Metals. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
The use of X-ray analysis for the study of single crystals and deformation texture of polycrystalline materials.

MTE 585 Materials at Elevated Temperatures. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Influence of temperatures on behavior and properties of materials.

MTE 587 Corrosion Science and Engineering. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 271 and CH 102 or permission of the instructor.
Fundamental causes of corrosion problems and failures. Emphasis is placed on tools and knowledge necessary for predicting corrosion, measuring corrosion rates, and combining this with prevention and materials selection.

MTE 591:592 Special Problems (Area). One to three hours.
Advanced work of an investigative nature. Credit awarded is based on the work accomplished.

MTE 595:596 Seminar. One hour.
Discussion of current advances and research in metallurgical engineering; presented by graduate students and the staff.

MTE 598 Research Not Related to Thesis. One to six hours.

MTE 599 Master's Thesis Research. One to twelve hours. Pass/fail.

MTE 622 Solidification Processes and Microstructures Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 519
This course will cover the fundamentals of microstructure formation and microstructure control during the solidification of alloys and composites.

MTE 643 Magnetic Recording. Three hours.
Prerequisite: ECE 341 or MTE 271.
Static magnetic fields; inductive head fields; playback process in recording; recording process; recording noise; and MR heads.

MTE 644 Optical Data Storage. Three hours.
Prerequisite: ECE 341 or MTE 271.
Characteristics of optical disk systems; read-only (CD-ROM) systems; write-once (WORM) disks; erasable disks; M-O recording materials; optical heads; laser diodes; focus and tracking servos; and signal channels.

MTE 655 Electron Microscopy of Materials. One to four hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 481 or permission of the instructor.
Topics include basic principles of operation of the transmission electron microscope, principles of electron diffraction, image interpretation, and various analytical electron-microscopy techniques as they apply to crystalline materials.

MTE 670 Scanning Electron Microscopy. Three hours
Theory, construction, and operation of the scanning electron microscope. Both imaging and x-ray spectroscopy are covered. Emphasis is placed on application and uses in metallurgical engineering and materials-related fields.

MTE 680 Advanced Phase Diagrams. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 362 or permission of the instructor.
Advanced phase studies of binary, ternary, and more complex systems; experimental methods of construction and interpretation.

MTE 684 Fundamentals of Solid State Engineering. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Modern physics, physics with calculus, or by permission of the instructor.
Fundamentals of solid state physics and quantum mechanics are covered to explain the physical principles underlying the design and operation of semiconductor devices. The second part covers applications to semiconductor microdevices and nanodevices such as diodes, transistors, lasers, and photodetectors incorporating quantum structures.

MTE 691:692 Special Problems (Area). One to six hours.
Credit awarded is based on the amount of work undertaken.

MTE 693 Selected Topics (Area). One to six hours.
Topics of current research in thermodynamics of melts, phase equilibra, computer modeling of solidification, electrodynamics of molten metals, corrosion phenomena, microstructural evolution, and specialized alloy systems, nanomaterials, fuel cells, and composite materials.

MTE 694 Special Project. One to six hours.
Proposing, planning, executing, and presenting the results of an individual project.

MTE 695:696 Seminar. One hour.
Presentations on dissertation-related research or on items of current interest in materials and metallurgical engineering.

MTE 698 Research Not Related to Dissertation. One to six hours.

MTE 699 Doctoral Dissertation Research. Three to twelve hours. Pass/Fail.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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This programme for graduates in electronic engineering or similar subjects will prepare you to become a senior manager or entrepreneur in global companies, where understanding technology and managing innovation in business are key to success. Read more
This programme for graduates in electronic engineering or similar subjects will prepare you to become a senior manager or entrepreneur in global companies, where understanding technology and managing innovation in business are key to success.

Jointly delivered by the School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering and Leeds University Business School, the course allows you to tailor the programme of studies to your needs, selecting optional modules from three engineering themes and four business themes. A set of core modules provides the foundation of your knowledge and skills.

You’ll be taught by leading experts in technology and in business management, with practical lab classes and project work allowing you to gain hands-on experience investigating and applying topics from your lectures and tutorials to real-life engineering and business situations.

This joint programme offers a unique opportunity to enhance both your technical and managerial skills.

The School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering is an exciting and stimulating environment where you’ll learn from leading researchers in areas pertinent to emerging and developing technologies. These technologies include future wireless and optical communications systems, renewable energy systems, ultrasound and bioelectronics systems, as well as nano, terahertz, and quantum technologies.

Leeds University Business School is also a leading international business school, globally, in the top 1%. It has world ranked programmes and internationally recognised teaching. You'll leave as a graduate of one of the top ten universities targeted by key employers such as Google, HSBC, Rolls-Royce and the Civil Services.

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Graduate education in Computational Science and Engineering (CMSE) at Koç University is offered through an interdisciplinary program among the Departments of the College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Engineering. Read more
Graduate education in Computational Science and Engineering (CMSE) at Koç University is offered through an interdisciplinary program among the Departments of the College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Engineering. In this program graduate students are trained on modern computational science techniques and their applications to solve scientific and engineering problems. New technological problems and associated research challenges heavily depend on computational modeling and problem solving. Because of the availability of powerful and inexpensive computers model-based computational experimentation is now a standard approach to analysis and design of complex systems where real experiments can be expensive or infeasible. Graduates of the CMSE Program should be capable of formulating solutions to computational problems through the use of multidisciplinary knowledge gained from a combination of classroom and laboratory experiences in basic sciences and engineering. Individuals with B.S. degrees in biology, chemistry, physics, and related engineering disciplines should apply for graduate study in the CMSE Program.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Computational Biology & Bioinformatics
• Computational Chemistry
• Computational Physics
• Molecular Dynamics and Simulation
• Parallel and High Performance Computing
• Computational Fluid Dynamics
• Dynamical and Stochastic Systems
• Quantum Mechanics of Many Body Systems
• Electronic Design Automation
• Numerical Methods
• Simulation of Material Synthesis
• Structural Dynamics
• Biomedical Modeling and Simulation
• Virtual Environments

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Graduate education in Optoelectronic and Photonic Engineering (OEPE) at Koç University is offered through an interdisciplinary program with the objective of giving the students the fundamental physical scientific and applied engineering knowledge required for the design, simulation, realization, and characterization of OEPE materials, devices, systems, and applications. Read more
Graduate education in Optoelectronic and Photonic Engineering (OEPE) at Koç University is offered through an interdisciplinary program with the objective of giving the students the fundamental physical scientific and applied engineering knowledge required for the design, simulation, realization, and characterization of OEPE materials, devices, systems, and applications. The OEPE program has both theoretical and experimental research activities. The graduates of the OEPE program will work at frontiers of technology with a broad spectrum of application areas: from automotive and home lighting to information and communications, from life sciences and health to displays, from remote sensing to nondestructive diagnostics, and from material processing to photovoltaics. Individuals with B.S. degrees in electrical and electronic engineering, optics, optoelectronics, physics, and related science and engineering disciplines should apply for graduate study in the OEPE Program.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• 2D/3D Displays and Imaging Systems
• Advanced Signal Processing
• Femtosecond Lasers
• Metamaterials
• Microwaves
• Nano-optics
• Optical Communication
• Optical MEMS
• Plasma Physics
• Plasmonics
• Quantum Communication
• Quantum Optics
• Remote Sensing
• Silicon Photonics
• Solid State Lasers

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This one-year research degree is a chance for you to develop your skills in one of the most exciting areas of modern science. It’s a unique opportunity to gain hi-tech skills that are central to the latest advances in electronics, IT and computing. Read more
This one-year research degree is a chance for you to develop your skills in one of the most exciting areas of modern science. It’s a unique opportunity to gain hi-tech skills that are central to the latest advances in electronics, IT and computing.

This course brings together our expertise in quantum photonics and nanomaterials. There is a particular focus on the study of novel fundamental phenomena in condensed matter systems as well as applications in quantum information processing, photovoltaics and optoelectronics.

Our staff are at the forefront of technological advances. We work with support from the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, European Research Council and the Horizon 2020 programme, the Royal Society, the Leverhulme Trust and the British Council as well as CONACyT, the National Council of Science and Technology in Mexico.

Our department attracts postgraduate students from around the world.

Core modules

Optical Properties of Solids
Semiconductor Physics and Technology
Advanced Electromagnetism
Solid State Physics
Research Skills in Physics
Research Project in Physics

Examples of optional modules

Magnetic Resonance: Principles and Applications
Physics in an Enterprise Culture
The Physics of Soft Condensed Matter
Statistical Physics
Advanced Quantum Mechanics
Further Quantum Mechanics
Biological Physics

Teaching

Teaching is through lectures, research seminars, small group tutorials and oral presentation.

Your supervisor will help you develop your research skills and support you as you work on your research project.

Assessment

Assessment includes: a project report, literature review, oral presentations, including a viva, formal examinations and short reports and essays.

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Recent theoretical and experimental advances mean that we are now able to exert an extraordinary degree of control over individual quantum systems and to prepare and manipulate groups of interacting quantum systems deterministically. Read more
Recent theoretical and experimental advances mean that we are now able to exert an extraordinary degree of control over individual quantum systems and to prepare and manipulate groups of interacting quantum systems deterministically.

Bringing these techniques to bear upon both fundamental physics and a new swathe of technologies dependent on strange quantum phenomena defines the emerging field of controlled quantum dynamics.

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The MS program in Electrical and Electronics Engineering aims to provide advanced education and a cutting edge research experience in electrical and electronics engineering, or in electrical and computer engineering crossing the boundary of the two disciplines. Read more
The MS program in Electrical and Electronics Engineering aims to provide advanced education and a cutting edge research experience in electrical and electronics engineering, or in electrical and computer engineering crossing the boundary of the two disciplines. The focus of this program is excellence in research. Graduates of the program can join industry or continue to work in academia.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Micro and Nano Systems (MEMS & NEMS)
• Wireless, Acoustic, Nano and Quantum Communication
• Waves, Optics and Photonics
• Electrical, Biological and Nano-Scale Systems
• Signal, Speech, Image and Video Processing
• Multimedia and Networking
• Machine Learning

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The Nanoscale Engineering master is a two-year program corresponding to 120 ECTS credits. Students receive a universal and profound training in physics, materials science and electronics at the nanoscale, but also in nanobiotechnology. Read more
The Nanoscale Engineering master is a two-year program corresponding to 120 ECTS credits. Students receive a universal and profound training in physics, materials science and electronics at the nanoscale, but also in nanobiotechnology.

Elective courses can be followed by the students in their desired area of specialization and/or to broaden their horizons. The entire curriculum is taught in English.

A key educational concept of the program is that each student is immersed in a high-quality research environment for at least half of the time in the curriculum. Throughout the academic year, lab practicals and projects are carried out in research institutions that participate in the program, and thesis projects are undertaken in research laboratories or in nanotechnology companies.

In addition to the scientific and technological aspects, ethical issues and the societal impact of nanotechnology, as well as business considerations, are addressed in specialized seminars and courses.

Structure of the Curriculum

First Year (60 ECTS)

The major part of semester 1 is dedicated to lectures: The students follow 7 courses from the core modules and 2 elective modules. Laboratory practicals and mini-projects ensure a smooth transition into semester 2 with its four-month internship in a research group. This internship is prepared in semester 1 already with a dedicated literature survey. Seminars of speakers from both academia and industry complement the educational program throughout the entire first year.

Second Year (60 ECTS)

Semester 3 is again dedicated to lectures, featuring 5 slots for core modules and 3 for electives, as well as some ancillary courses. The entirety of semester 4 is taken up by the six-month Master thesis project, which can be conducted in a research laboratory or in a company, in France or abroad. As in the first year, seminars of speakers from both academia and industry complement the educational program.

Modules and Courses

Core Modules

These courses impart the fundamental knowledge in the nanotechnology field applied to physics, electronics, optics, materials science and biotechnology. Students are required to follow at least twelve core module courses during the two-year program.

Core modules in the first year There are four obligatory core modules in the first year:

Introduction to Nanoscale Engineering
Micro- and Nanofabrication, part 1
Characterization Tools for Nanostructures
Quantum Engineering

Furthermore, there is a remedial physics course to which students are assigned based on the results of a physics test at the beginning of semester 1:

Basics of Physics

Finally, students have to select a minimum of three courses from the following list for their first year:

Solid State Physics at the Nanoscale
Continuum Mechanics
Physics of Semiconductors, part 1
Physical Chemistry and Molecular Interactions
Biomolecules, Cells, and Biomimetic Systems

Core modules in the second year Students have to choose at least four courses from the following selection for their second year:

Nano-Optics and Biophotonics
Surface-Analysis Techniques
Physics of Semiconductors, part 2
Micro- and Nanofluidics
Micro- and Nanofabrication, part 2
Biosensors and Biochips
Computer Modeling of Nanoscale Systems

Elective Modules

These courses cover a wide range of nanotechnology-related disciplines and thus allow the students to specialize according to their preferences as well as to broaden their expertise. Elective modules in the first year Three courses from the following list have to be chosen for the first year:

Nanomechanics
MEMS and NEMS
Introduction to System Design
Drug-Delivery Systems

Elective modules in the second year Students follow a minimum of three courses from the following selection in the second year:

Multi-Domain System Integration
Solar Cells and Photovoltaics
Nanomagnetism and Spintronics
Nanoelectronics
Tissue and Cell Engineering

Experimental Modules

Students conduct lab practicals that are integrated into the various courses, during which they familiarize themselves hands-on with all standard techniques for fabrication and characterization of nanostructures. They furthermore have the opportunity to work more independently on individual or group projects.

Ancillary Courses and Seminars

This module deals with complementary know-how, relevant both for academia and in an industrial environment. Students follow a course on intellectual-property issues. Ethical aspects and the societal impact of nanotechnology are covered in specialized seminars, which also allow for networking with national and international nanotechnology companies and research laboratories. Communication skills are likewise developed through written and oral presentations of all experimental work that is carried out during the Master program.

Internship

In the second semester, students conduct two-month internships in two of the research laboratories participating in the program. The students choose their projects and come into contact with their host laboratories earlier in the academic year already, by spending some time in these laboratories to carry out an extensive literature survey and to prepare their research projects under the guidance of their supervisors.

Master Thesis Project

The final six-month period of the program is devoted to the master project, which can be carried out either in an academic research laboratory or in an industrial environment. Students have the option to conduct their thesis project anywhere in France or abroad.

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The School of Chemistry is one of the largest in the UK and an internationally recognised centre of teaching and research. Currently there are over 250 postgraduate and postdoctoral researchers, from many different countries, working with more than 60 academic staff on a wide range of research themes. Read more
The School of Chemistry is one of the largest in the UK and an internationally recognised centre of teaching and research. Currently there are over 250 postgraduate and postdoctoral researchers, from many different countries, working with more than 60 academic staff on a wide range of research themes. Extensive collaborations with science-based industries and leading international academic centres ensure that research in Bristol remains at the frontier of science.

The School of Chemistry is housed in spacious, modern laboratories, which are well equipped with state-of-the-art facilities. There is a comprehensive graduate programme to ensure you have the opportunity to build a wide range of skills, both in chemistry and other transferable skills.

The School of Chemistry hosts or participates in a number of Centres for Doctoral Training (CDTs) and Doctoral Training Partnerships (DTPs). Training opportunities in these national flagship centres are available in the following disciplines:
-Chemical synthesis
-Functional nanomaterials
-Catalysis
-Theory and modelling in chemical sciences
-Science and technology of diamond
-Synthetic biology
-Advanced composites
-Earth and environmental sciences
-Quantum engineering
-Future autonomous and robotic systems
-Bioscience
-Condensed matter physics

Research groups

The School of Chemistry maintains a traditional managerial structure with three sections, namely Inorganic and Materials, Organic and Biological, and Physical and Theoretical. However, the school’s research profile is defined according to nine themes, each with a critical mass of researchers. Further information on the school's research profile can be found at Explore Bristol Research (http://research-information.bristol.ac.uk/).

-Atmospheric and Global Change Chemistry
-Biological and Archaeological Chemistry
-Catalysis
-Computational and Theoretical Chemistry
-Materials for Energy
-Soft Matter, Colloids and Materials
-Spectroscopy and Dynamics
-Supramolecular and Mechanistic Chemistry
-Synthesis

Researchers in the School of Chemistry are engaged in a number of collaborative centres and research institutes, with broader engagement from researchers across the Faculty of Science, the University and beyond.

Careers

Many of our PhD graduates are successful in securing postdoctoral positions at universities in the UK and abroad. A PhD in chemistry is valued in many employment sectors worldwide, including pharmaceutical sciences, polymers, coatings, agrochemicals, instrumentation manufacturers and management consultancy. Your skills will be in high demand from the chemical and allied industries, as well as the public sector.

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The Department gives MSc students an opportunity to study and perform a research project under the supervision of recognized experts and to acquire specialist knowledge of one or a few topics at the cutting edge of contemporary physics. Read more
The Department gives MSc students an opportunity to study and perform a research project under the supervision of recognized experts and to acquire specialist knowledge of one or a few topics at the cutting edge of contemporary physics.

The project will be devoted to one of several topical areas of modern physics including high-temperature superconductivity, terahertz semiconductor and superconductor electronics, quantum computing and quantum metamaterials, physics of extreme conditions and astrophysics.

Core study areas currently include mathematical methods for interdisciplinary sciences, research methods in physics, superconductivity and nanoscience and a research project.

Optional study areas currently include characterisation techniques in solid state physics, quantum information, advanced characterisation techniques, quantum computing, and physics of complex systems.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/physics/advanced-physics/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Mathematical Methods for Interdisciplinary Sciences
- Research Methods in Physics
- Superconductivity and Nanoscience
- Research Project Part 1
- Research Project Part 2

Optional Modules:
- Characterisation Techniques in Solid State Physics
- Fundamentals of Quantum Information
- Matlab as a Scientific Programming Language
- Advanced Characterisation Techniques
- Quantum Computing
- Physics of Complex systems

Learning and teaching

Knowledge and understanding are acquired through lectures, tutorials, problem classes and guided independent study. Assessment in taught modules is by a combination of examination and coursework. The MSc includes a significant research project completed through guided independent study with a research supervisor.

Careers and further study

The aim of the course is to equip students with key skills they need for employment in industry, public service or academic research.

Why choose physics at Loughborough?

We are a community of approximately 170 undergraduates, 30 postgraduates, 16 full-time academic staff, seven support staff, and several visiting and part-time academic staff.

Our large research student population and wide international links make the Department a great place to work.

- Research
Our research strengths are in the areas of condensed matter and materials, with a good balance between theory and experiment.
The quality of our researchers is recognised internationally and we publish in highly ranked physics journals; one of our former Visiting Professors, Alexei Abrikosov, was awarded the 2003 Nobel Prize in Physics.

- Career Prospects
100% of our graduates were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. They have gone on to work with companies such as BT, Nikon Metrology, Prysmian Group, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS and Smart Manufacturing Technology.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/physics/advanced-physics/

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This programme provides students with a challenging range of advanced topics drawn from optical communications systems and devices, and optics-related signal processing, including associated enabling technologies. Read more
This programme provides students with a challenging range of advanced topics drawn from optical communications systems and devices, and optics-related signal processing, including associated enabling technologies. It provides an excellent opportunity to acquire the skills needed for a career in the most dynamic fields in optical communications.

This programme builds on the internationally-recognised research strengths of the Photonics and High Performance Networks research groups within the Smart Internet Lab. Optical fibre communications form the backbone of all land-based communications and is the only viable means to support today's global information systems. Research at Bristol is contributing to the ever-increasing requirement for bandwidth and flexibility through research into optical switching technology, wavelength conversion, high-speed modulation, data regeneration and novel semiconductor lasers.

There are two taught units related to optical communications: Optical Networks and Data Centre Networks. Optical Networks focuses on Wavelength Division Multiplexed (WDM) networks, Time Division Multiplexed (TDM) networks including SDH/SONET and OTN, optical frequency division multiplexed networks, and optical sub-wavelength switched networks. Data Centre Networks focuses on networks for cloud computing, cloud-based networking, grid computing and e-science.

The group at Bristol is a world leader in the new field of quantum photonics, with key successes in developing photonic crystal fibre light sources, quantum secured optical communications and novel quantum gate technologies.

The programme is accredited by Institute of Engineering and Technology until 2018, one of only a handful of accredited programmes in the UK.

Programme structure

Your programme will cover the following core subjects:

Semester one (50 credits)
-Communication systems
-Digital filters and spectral analysis
-Mobile communications
-Networking protocol principles
-Optoelectronic devices and systems

Semester two (70 credits)
-Advanced optoelectronic devices
-Data centre networking
-Advanced networks
-Engineering research skills
-Optical communications systems and data networks
-Optical networks

Research project (60 credits)
A substantial research project is initiated during the second teaching block and completed during the summer. This may be based at the University or with industrial partners.

Careers

This one-year MSc programme gives you a world-class education in all aspects of current and future optical communication systems, along with associated signal processing technologies. It will prepare you for a diverse range of exciting careers - not only in the communications field, but also in other areas such as management consultancy, project management, finance and government agencies.

Our graduates have gone on to have rewarding careers in some of the leading multinational communications companies, such as Huawei, China Telecom, Toshiba, China Mobile and Intel. Some graduates follow a more research-oriented career path with a number of students going on to study for PhDs at leading universities.

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We offer postgraduate research degrees in Physics at the MPhil and PhD level in all of our major research areas such as Emerging Technology and Materials, Applied Mathematics, and Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Read more

Course Overview

We offer postgraduate research degrees in Physics at the MPhil and PhD level in all of our major research areas such as Emerging Technology and Materials, Applied Mathematics, and Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

We supervise MPhil and PhD students whose interests match the expertise we have in our four main research themes.

Condensed matter and nanoscale physics

We research electronic, optical, structural and magnetic properties of novel solid-state materials, particularly novel semi-conductor structures and nanostructured materials such as nanocrystals and nanowires. Theoretical studies use quantum mechanical approaches and involve massively parallel supercomputing.

Our development of new approaches to quantum modelling is changing the size and complexity of systems that can be modelled. Experimental work takes place at synchrotron facilities in Europe and America and related work takes place with colleagues in the Emerging Technology and Materials (ETM) Group in the School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering.

Biophysics

Our research in biophysics explores the structure and function of cells with the aim of creating artificial life and building machines based on biological parts. Projects include protocell development and the construction of a cyborg robot. An understanding of biological physics is needed that uses techniques including single molecule manipulation, atomic force microscopy and scanning tunnelling microscopy.

Astrophysics

Galaxies and the interstellar medium, the source of the galactic magnetic field and its influence on the structure of the galaxy form the focus of our research in astrophysics. There is also interest in cosmology, particularly the early universe and its origin in the big bang.

Ultrafast optics

Our research focuses on coherent optical control of atomic collisions in ultracold gases by femtosecond laser light for studies of problems in fundamental physics, such as the measurement of time dependence of the fundamental constants of nature. We also research metrological protocols for characterisation of broadband light, specifically those relating to foundational aspects of quantum mechanics and its application.

Training and Skills

As a research student you will receive a tailored package of academic and support elements to ensure you maximise your research and future career. The academic information is in the programme profile and you will be supported by our Postgraduate Researcher Development Programme, doctoral training centres and Research Student Support Team.

For further information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/physics-mphil-phd/#training&skills

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/physics-mphil-phd/#howtoapply

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