• University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
SOAS University of London Featured Masters Courses
Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia Featured Masters Courses
University of Hertfordshire Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
Loughborough University Featured Masters Courses
"quantum" AND "computing"…×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Quantum Computing)

  • "quantum" AND "computing" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 29
Order by 
The Department gives MSc students an opportunity to study and perform a research project under the supervision of recognized experts and to acquire specialist knowledge of one or a few topics at the cutting edge of contemporary physics. Read more
The Department gives MSc students an opportunity to study and perform a research project under the supervision of recognized experts and to acquire specialist knowledge of one or a few topics at the cutting edge of contemporary physics.

The project will be devoted to one of several topical areas of modern physics including high-temperature superconductivity, terahertz semiconductor and superconductor electronics, quantum computing and quantum metamaterials, physics of extreme conditions and astrophysics.

Core study areas currently include mathematical methods for interdisciplinary sciences, research methods in physics, superconductivity and nanoscience and a research project.

Optional study areas currently include characterisation techniques in solid state physics, quantum information, advanced characterisation techniques, quantum computing, and physics of complex systems.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/physics/advanced-physics/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Mathematical Methods for Interdisciplinary Sciences
- Research Methods in Physics
- Superconductivity and Nanoscience
- Research Project Part 1
- Research Project Part 2

Optional Modules:
- Characterisation Techniques in Solid State Physics
- Fundamentals of Quantum Information
- Matlab as a Scientific Programming Language
- Advanced Characterisation Techniques
- Quantum Computing
- Physics of Complex systems

Learning and teaching

Knowledge and understanding are acquired through lectures, tutorials, problem classes and guided independent study. Assessment in taught modules is by a combination of examination and coursework. The MSc includes a significant research project completed through guided independent study with a research supervisor.

Careers and further study

The aim of the course is to equip students with key skills they need for employment in industry, public service or academic research.

Why choose physics at Loughborough?

We are a community of approximately 170 undergraduates, 30 postgraduates, 16 full-time academic staff, seven support staff, and several visiting and part-time academic staff.

Our large research student population and wide international links make the Department a great place to work.

- Research
Our research strengths are in the areas of condensed matter and materials, with a good balance between theory and experiment.
The quality of our researchers is recognised internationally and we publish in highly ranked physics journals; one of our former Visiting Professors, Alexei Abrikosov, was awarded the 2003 Nobel Prize in Physics.

- Career Prospects
100% of our graduates were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. They have gone on to work with companies such as BT, Nikon Metrology, Prysmian Group, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS and Smart Manufacturing Technology.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/physics/advanced-physics/

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships or College of Science Postgraduate Scholarships to study High Performance and Scientific Computing at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships or College of Science Postgraduate Scholarships to study High Performance and Scientific Computing at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc in High Performance and Scientific Computing is for you if you are a graduate in a scientific or engineering discipline and want to specialise in applications of High Performance computing in your chosen scientific area. During your studies in High Performance and Scientific Computing you will develop your computational and scientific knowledge and skills in tandem helping emphasise their inter-dependence.

On the course in High Performance and Scientific Computing you will develop a solid knowledge base of high performance computing tools and concepts with a flexibility in terms of techniques and applications. As s student of the MSc High Performance and Scientific Computing you will take core computational modules in addition to specialising in high performance computing applications in a scientific discipline that defines the route you have chosen (Biosciences, Computer Science, Geography or Physics). You will also be encouraged to take at least one module in a related discipline.

Modules of High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc

The modules you study on the High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc depend on the route you choose and routes are as follows:

Biosciences route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming
High Performance Computing in C/C++
Operating Systems and Architectures
Software Testing
Programming in C/C++
Conservation of Aquatic Resources or Environmental Impact Assessment
Ecosystems
Research Project in Environmental Biology
+ 10 credits from optional modules

Computer Science route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming
High Performance Computing in C/C++
Operating Systems and Architectures
Software Testing
Programming in C/C++
Partial Differential Equations
Numerics of ODEs and PDEs
Software Engineering
Data Visualization
MSc Project
+ 30 credits from optional modules

Geography route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming
High Performance Computing in C/C++
Operating Systems and Architectures
Software Testing
Programming in C/C++
Partial Differential Equations
Numerics of ODEs and PDEs
Modelling Earth Systems or Satellite Remote Sensing or Climate Change – Past, Present and Future or Geographical Information Systems
Research Project
+ 10 credits from optional modules

Physics route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming
High Performance Computing in C/C++
Operating Systems and Architectures
Software Testing
Programming in C/C++
Partial Differential Equations
Numerics of ODEs and PDEs
Monte Carlo Methods
Quantum Information Processing
Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena
Physics Project
+ 20 credits from optional modules

Optional Modules (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Software Engineering
Data Visualization
Monte Carlo Methods
Quantum Information Processing
Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena
Modelling Earth Systems
Satellite Remote Sensing
Climate Change – Past, Present and Future
Geographical Information Systems
Conservation of Aquatic Resources
Environmental Impact Assessment
Ecosystems

Facilities

Students of the High Performance and Scientific Computing programme will benefit from the Department that is well-resourced to support research. Swansea physics graduates are more fortunate than most, gaining unique insights into exciting cutting-edge areas of physics due to the specialized research interests of all the teaching staff. This combined with a great staff-student ratio enables individual supervision in advanced final year research projects. Projects range from superconductivity and nano-technology to superstring theory and anti-matter. The success of this programme is apparent in the large proportion of our M.Phys. students who seek to continue with postgraduate programmes in research.

Specialist equipment includes:

a low-energy positron beam with a highfield superconducting magnet for the study of positronium
a number of CW and pulsed laser systems
scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
a Raman microscope
a 72 CPU parallel cluster
access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Supercomputer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

The Physics laboratories and teaching rooms were refurbished during 2012 and were officially opened by Professor Lyn Evans, Project Leader of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. This major refurbishment was made possible through the University’s capital programme, the College of Science, and a generous bequest made to the Physics Department by Dr Gething Morgan Lewis FRSE, an eminent physicist who grew up in Ystalyfera in the Swansea Valley and was educated at Brecon College.

Read less
The Quantum Technologies MSc will take students to the cutting-edge of research in the emerging area of quantum technologies, giving them not only an advanced training in the relevant physics but also the chance to acquire key skills in the engineering and information sciences. Read more
The Quantum Technologies MSc will take students to the cutting-edge of research in the emerging area of quantum technologies, giving them not only an advanced training in the relevant physics but also the chance to acquire key skills in the engineering and information sciences.

Degree information

Students learn the language and techniques of advanced quantum mechanics, quantum information and quantum computation, as well as state-of-the-art implementation with condensed matter and quantum optical systems.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research project with a dissertation/report (60 credits).

Core modules
-Advanced Quantum Theory
-Atom and Photon Physics
-Quantum Communication and Computation
-Research Case Studies for Quantum Technologies
-Transferable Skills in Research Case Studies for Quantum Technologies

Optional modules - students choose three of the following optional modules:
-Advanced Photonic Devices
-Introduction to Cryptography
-Nanoelectronic Devices
-Nanoscale Processing for Advanced Devices
-Optical Transmission and Networks
-Order and Excitations in Condensed Matter
-Physics and Optics of Nano-Structures
-Research Computing with C++
-Research Software Engineering with Python

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project (experimental or theoretical) related to quantum technologies, which culminates in a presentation and a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars, with self-study on two modules devoted to the critical assessment of current research topics and the corresponding research skills. Assessment is through a combination of problem sheets, written examinations, case study reports and presentations, as well as the MSc project dissertation.

Careers

The programme prepares graduates for careers in the emerging quantum technology industries which play an increasingly important role in: secure communication; sensing and metrology; the simulation of other quantum systems; and ultimately in general-purpose quantum computation. Graduates will also be well prepared for research at the highest level in the numerous groups now developing quantum technologies and for work in government laboratories.

Employability
Graduates will possess the skills needed to work in the emerging quantum industries as they develop in response to technological advances.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL offers one of the leading research programmes in quantum technologies anywhere in the world, as well as outstanding taught programmes in the subjects contributing to the field (including physics, computer science, and engineering). It also hosts the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Delivering Quantum Technologies.

The programme provides a rigorous grounding across the disciplines underlying quantum technologies, as well as the chance to work with some of the world's leading groups in research projects. The new Quantum Science and Technology Institute ('UCLQ') provides an umbrella where all those working in the field can meet and share ideas, including regular seminars, networking events and opportunities to interact with commercial and government partners.

Read less
This course is ideal both for graduates who would like to undertake original research without committing themselves to a three-year PhD, and for students who want to gain a research-based Master's before embarking on their PhD. Read more
This course is ideal both for graduates who would like to undertake original research without committing themselves to a three-year PhD, and for students who want to gain a research-based Master's before embarking on their PhD.

The major element of this course is a research project which is carried out under supervision. There is also a minor taught element, with classes covering a wide range of generic research-related topics.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/physics/coursefinder/mscphysicsbyresearch.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The Department of Physics is known internationally for its top-class research. Our staff carry out research at the cutting edge of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Experimental Quantum Computing, Quantum Matter at Low Temperatures, Theoretical Physics, and
Biophysics, as well as other areas.

- We offer exceptional teaching quality and are consistently near the top of the league tables.

- Our Masters courses are taught in collaboration with other University of London Colleges, providing a wide range of options.

Department research and industry highlights

The Physics Department at Royal Holloway is one of the major centres for physics research within the University of London and has research expertise in the following areas:
- Particle physics experiments at Large Hadron Collider
- Neutron and synchrotron x-ray scattering at ISIS and Diamond
- London Low Temperature Laboratory
- Centre for Nanophysics and Nanotechnology

Recent projects that the Department has worked on include:
- The ATLAS project at the LHC
- Thermoelectrics for conversion of waste heat into electrical power
- Quantum criticality in helium films
- Studies of nanostructures for quantum computing

Course content and structure

This courses consists of the major research element and a minor taught element:

- Major Project:
An original research project in one of the research areas of the Department, carried out under supervision. Makes up 75% of total mark.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- developed research skills using a mix of experimental, theoretical and computational techniques

- developed communication skills through the writing of the project report and the presentation of an oral report at the viva

- transferable skills suitable for both continued research or the workplace.

Assessment

This course is assessed by the completion of a major research project (75% of the final mark) as well as other coursework assignments (25% of the final mark).

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different areas, including careers in industry, information technology and finance. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued studies in physics; around 50% of the graduates of this course progress onto PhD study at Royal Holloway.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

Read less
This one-year research degree is a chance for you to develop your skills in one of the most exciting areas of modern science. It’s a unique opportunity to gain hi-tech skills that are central to the latest advances in electronics, IT and computing. Read more
This one-year research degree is a chance for you to develop your skills in one of the most exciting areas of modern science. It’s a unique opportunity to gain hi-tech skills that are central to the latest advances in electronics, IT and computing.

This course brings together our expertise in quantum photonics and nanomaterials. There is a particular focus on the study of novel fundamental phenomena in condensed matter systems as well as applications in quantum information processing, photovoltaics and optoelectronics.

Our staff are at the forefront of technological advances. We work with support from the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, European Research Council and the Horizon 2020 programme, the Royal Society, the Leverhulme Trust and the British Council as well as CONACyT, the National Council of Science and Technology in Mexico.

Our department attracts postgraduate students from around the world.

Core modules

Optical Properties of Solids
Semiconductor Physics and Technology
Advanced Electromagnetism
Solid State Physics
Research Skills in Physics
Research Project in Physics

Examples of optional modules

Magnetic Resonance: Principles and Applications
Physics in an Enterprise Culture
The Physics of Soft Condensed Matter
Statistical Physics
Advanced Quantum Mechanics
Further Quantum Mechanics
Biological Physics

Teaching

Teaching is through lectures, research seminars, small group tutorials and oral presentation.

Your supervisor will help you develop your research skills and support you as you work on your research project.

Assessment

Assessment includes: a project report, literature review, oral presentations, including a viva, formal examinations and short reports and essays.

Read less
Welcome to Graduate Studies in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics!. We are an active department with 20 faculty advisors and over 60 graduate students engaged in research in a wide variety of fields. Read more
Welcome to Graduate Studies in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics!

We are an active department with 20 faculty advisors and over 60 graduate students engaged in research in a wide variety of fields. As a graduate student, you have the opportunity to make a contribution to solving important scientific and societal problems. Our proximity to the Fields Institute, the Institute for Quantum Computing, the Perimeter Institute and countless government, industry and academic partners make us an ideal place to engage in collaborative mathematical and statistical research.

Funding Opportunities

Our Graduate students are typically supported through a combination of four sources of funding.
• Graduate Teaching Assistantships (GTAs) are provided to give you teaching, marking and tutoring experience.
• Graduate Research Assistantships (GRAs) are designed to allow you to collaborate with your faculty advisor on your research project.
• Scholarships and bursaries are available from the University of Guelph and the College of Physical & Engineering Science.

Read less
With more than 90 faculty members and over 200 graduate students, ours is among the largest and most diverse graduate physics & astronomy programs in the world. Read more
With more than 90 faculty members and over 200 graduate students, ours is among the largest and most diverse graduate physics & astronomy programs in the world. our faculty are seeking outstanding students who are interested in performing advanced research in
pursuit of the MSc and PhD degrees in physics & astronomy. Our faculty are recognized worldwide for leadership and innovation in physics research and in teaching. the Herzberg and Brockhouse Medals, the Premiers Research Excellence Award/Early Researcher award, the Sloan Fellowship, and the Nobel Prize in Physics are some of the awards our faculty have received.

Our students explore physical phenomena from the subatomic world of quarks and quantum foam, to the collective behavior of quantum and soft materials, to the universe of galaxies and brane worlds. We offer collaborative programs in biophysics, quantum
information, and nanotechnology. if you wish to pursue an MSc or PhD in one of our focus areas, or an MSc in theoretical physics though perimeter scholars international, this may be the right graduate program for you.

Facilities

We work collaboratively with the department of physics and astronomy at the university of Waterloo, the perimeter institute for theoretical physics and the institute for Quantum computing. our faculty and students have access to state-of the-art, in-house laboratory facilities including the nuclear Magnetic resonance centre at Guelph, sophisticated X-ray diffraction and scattering equipment, and a suite of instruments used to study biological and soft interfaces. our faculty are guest investigators at international facilities including, the canadian institute for neutron scattering, the tri-university Meson Facility (triuMF), the canadian light source, and several others. our students access telescope time on ground and earth-orbiting telescopes including the hubble space telescope, the chandra X-ray observatory, the Gemini observatories, the herschel telescope, and the alMa telescope.

We have first-rate computing facilities, which enables large-scale numerical simulations, including the shared hierarchical academic research computing network (sharcnet).

Read less
Theoretical physics is an international and highly competitive field. For several decades, Utrecht University's Institute for Theoretical Physics has been on the forefront of research in this area. Read more

Theoretical Physics

Theoretical physics is an international and highly competitive field. For several decades, Utrecht University's Institute for Theoretical Physics has been on the forefront of research in this area.

This programme serves as a gateway to understanding the fascinating world of physics, ranging from the unimaginably small scales of elementary particles to the vast dimensions of our universe.

The central goal of the Theoretical Physics programme is to obtain a detailed understanding of the collective behaviour of many particle systems from a fully microscopic point of view. In most physical systems, microscopic details determine the properties observed. Our condensed matter theorists and statistical physicists develop and apply methods for explaining and predicting these connections.

Examples include density functional theory, renormalisation-group theory and the scaling theory of critical phenomena. Dynamical properties are studied using such methods as kinetic theory and the theory of stochastic processes. These theories can be quantum mechanical, including theories of the quantum Hall effect, superconductivity, Bose-Einstein condensation, quantum magnetism and quantum computing. More classical are relationships between chaos and transport, nucleation phenomena, polymer dynamics and phase structure and dynamics of colloids.

Read less
This is a two-year MSc offered by Royal Holloway as part of its South East Physics Network Partnership (SEPnet). SEPnet is a consortium of six universities. Read more
This is a two-year MSc offered by Royal Holloway as part of its South East Physics Network Partnership (SEPnet). SEPnet is a consortium of six universities: University of Kent, Queen Mary University of London, Royal Holloway University of London, University of Southampton, University of Surrey, and University of Sussex. This consortium consists of around 160 academics, with an exceptionally wide range of expertise.

The first year consists mainly of taught courses in the University of London; the second research year can be at Royal Holloway or one of the other consortium members. This is a unique opportunity to collaborate with physics research groups and partner institutions in both the UK and Europe. You will benefit from consortium led events as well as state of the art video conferencing.

With some of the leading physics departments in the world, all the universities have their own accolades in both urban and countryside locations, with a wide choice of accommodation options, sporting facilities, international student organisations and careers services. South East England, with its close connections to continental Europe by air, Eurotunnel, and cross channel ferries, is an ideal environment for international students.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/physics/coursefinder/mscphysics(euromasters).aspx

Why choose this course?

- The course is taught in collaboration with other University of London Colleges and the Universities of Kent, Southampton, Surrey and Sussex, providing an incomparably wide range of options.

- The Department of Physics at Royal Holloway is known internationally for its top-class research. Our staff carry out research at the cutting edge of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Experimental Quantum Computing, Quantum Matter at Low Temperatures, Theoretical Physics, and Biophysics, as well as other areas.

- We offer exceptional teaching quality and are consistently near the top of the league tables.

- The Department has strong links with leading international facilities, including CERN, ISIS and Diamond.

- We hold a regular series of colloquia and seminars on important research topics and host a number of guest lectures from external organisations.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Physics Department is one of the major centres for Physics research within the University of London.

- We have excellent clean rooms for the nanofabrication and testing of devices within the centre for nanophysics and nanotechnology.

- The London Low Temperature Laboratory is a centre for fundamental research in the mK and μK temperature regime and the development of new instrumentation and thermometry.

- The Hubbard Theory Institute combines theoretical studies of strongly correlated matter with experimental activities on the Harwell Campus.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- a systematic understanding of knowledge, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights at the forefront of the discipline

- a comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research or advanced scholarship

- originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and

- enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in the discipline.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different physics-related areas, including careers in industry, information technology and finance. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued studies in physics, and many of our graduates have gone on to study for a PhD.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

Read less
Computer Science influences every aspect of modern life and is one of the fastest-moving academic disciplines. It contributes to everything from the efficiency of financial markets to film and TV graphics and has a huge impact on both economic competitiveness and human wellbeing. Read more
Computer Science influences every aspect of modern life and is one of the fastest-moving academic disciplines. It contributes to everything from the efficiency of financial markets to film and TV graphics and has a huge impact on both economic competitiveness and human wellbeing.


Why study MSc Computer Science at Middlesex?

Our course not only offers a balance between advanced computer science theory and practical experience, but has a very strong focus on contemporary research. Practical work is an important part of every module and the School of Science and Technology has strong links with industry, including companies such as Microsoft and Siemens. The university is very active in the exploration of a number of areas, including computer graphics,mobile development, human-computer interaction, robotics, artificial intelligence, ethics, ubiquitous computing, functional programming, algorithmic biology, image and video analysis, quantum computing, computational biology and visual analytics, and this research influences the course very strongly.

Our course is aimed at students who've studied computing for their first degree, and wish to make themselves stand out further by developing an advanced mastery of the subject.

Course highlights:

The university is home to the Human Interactive Systems Laboratory, acentre of research into haptic technology, and leads the UK Visual Analytics Consortium.

Our specialist multimedia laboratories are well-equipped with industry-standard software and hardware, including both PCs and Macs.

Many of the teaching staff are the authors of widely-used textbooks and learning materials. They include:

Dr Kai Xu, a former senior research scientist with CSIRO, Australia's national science agency;
Dr Elke Duncker-Gassen, aformer systems and software engineer at GEI Gesytec;
Dr Chris Huyck, a former software engineer at Microsoft.
You'll also improve your communication, teamwork, time-management, problem-solving and critical skills.

Read less
This is a one year advanced taught course. The aim of this course is to bring students in twelve months to the frontier of elementary particle theory. Read more
This is a one year advanced taught course. The aim of this course is to bring students in twelve months to the frontier of elementary particle theory. This course is intended for students who have already obtained a good first degree in either physics or mathematics, including in the latter case courses in quantum mechanics and relativity.

The course consists of three modules: the first two are the Michaelmas and Epiphany graduate lecture courses, which are assessed by examinations in January and March. The third module is a dissertation on a topic of current research, prepared under the guidance of a supervisor with expertise in the area. We offer a wide variety of possible dissertation topics. The dissertation must be submitted by September 15th, the end of the twelve month course period.

Course Structure

The main group of lectures are given in the first two terms of the academic year (Michaelmas and Epiphany). This part of the lecture course is assessed by examinations. In each term there are two teaching periods of four weeks, with a week's break in the middle of the term in which students will be able to revise the material. Most courses are either eight lectures or 16 lectures in length. There are 14 lectures/week in the Michaelmas term and 14 lectures/week in Epiphany term.

Core Modules

-Introductory Field Theory
-Group Theory
-Standard Model
-General Relativity
-Quantum Electrodynamics
-Quantum Field Theory
-Conformal Field Theory
-Supersymmetry
-Anomalies
-Strong Interaction Physics
-Cosmology
-Superstrings and D-branes
-Non-Perturbative Physics
-Euclidean Field Theory
-Flavour Physics and Effective Field Theory
-Neutrinos and Astroparticle Physics
-2d Quantum Field Theory

Optional Modules available in previous years included:

-Differential Geometry for Physicists
-Boundaries and Defects in Integrable Field Theory
-Computing for Physicists

Learning and Teaching

This is a full-year degree course, starting early October and finishing in the middle of the subsequent September. The aim of the course is to bring students to the frontier of research in elementary particle theory. The course consists of three modules: the first two are the Michaelmas and Epiphany graduate lecture courses. The third module is a dissertation on a topic of current research, prepared under the guidance of a supervisor with expertise in the area. We offer a wide variety of possible dissertation topics.

The lectures begin with a general survey of particle physics and introductory courses on quantum field theory and group theory. These lead on to more specialised topics, amongst others in string theory, cosmology, supersymmetry and more detailed aspects of the standard model.

The main group of lectures is given in the first two terms of the academic year (Michaelmas and Epiphany). This part of the lecture course is assessed by examinations. In each term there are two teaching periods of 4 weeks, with a week's break in the middle of the term in which students will be able to revise the material. Most courses are either 8 lectures or 16 lectures in length. There are 14 lectures/week in the Michaelmas term and 14 lectures/week in Epiphany term they are supported by weekly tutorials. In addition lecturers also set a number of homework assignments which give the student a chance to test his or her understanding of the material.

There are additional optional lectures in the third term. These introduce advanced topics and are intended as preparation for research in these areas.

The dissertation must be submitted by mid-September, the end of the twelve month course period.

Read less
Information Technology is now fundamental in every aspect of our daily lives. IT systems are crucial for delivering every day services such as banking, web based services and information systems. Read more
Information Technology is now fundamental in every aspect of our daily lives. IT systems are crucial for delivering every day services such as banking, web based services and information systems.

The MSc Information Technology is a full time, one year taught course, intended for students who are seeking a professional career in the IT industry. There is no requirement for a first degree in computing, but proficiency in at least one programming language is a requirement.

The course covers a range of topics including advanced programming, user-interface design, software engineering and management.

This course will give you the knowledge of IT from an organisation oriented viewpoint, allowing you to be capable of designing and implementing IT systems for a wide range of organisations.

The course has been specifically designed to suit the requirements of the IT industry, where you will be able to take up technical or management positions. Our graduates enter employment in many roles, including computer programmers, technical authors and research associates.

Course Aims
-Programming: You will gain a thorough grounding of advanced programming concepts using Java including efficient data structures and algorithms and high performance distributed computing.
-User-Interfaces: You will learn the theory of human computer interaction (HCI) and put this into practice in a number of ways, including user centred design of aspects of people's interaction with digital systems.
-Software Engineering: You will learn and be able to apply the principles of software engineering and case studies using UML, software testing techniques, and privacy and security aspect of software systems.

Learning Outcomes
We expect our graduates to be capable of designing and implementing IT systems for a wide range organisations. A thorough understanding of the following subjects are expected:
-Designing user interfaces following sound principles of interface design
-Designing, specifying, implementing and testing software components and systems using UML, Java and a range of software testing techniques
-Dependability of IT systems including topics in privacy and security
-Computer architectures and high performance distributed computing

Project

The dissertation project undertaken by students in Terms 3 and 4 (Summer Term and Vacation Term) is carried out individually, which might involve collaboration with another organisation. The subject matter of projects varies widely; most projects are suggested by members of staff, some by external organisations, and some by students themselves, usually relating to an area of personal interest that they wish to develop further.

A collaborative project is supervised by a member of the Department, but the collaborating organisation will normally provide an external supervisor. Organisations that have collaborated in projects in the past include Glasgow Town Planning Department, British Rail Passenger Services Department, North Yorkshire Police, North Yorkshire Fire Services, NEDO, the Royal Horticultural Society, Biosis UK, Centre Point sheltered housing, York Archaeological Trust, and the University of York Library.

The subject matter of projects varies widely; most projects are suggested by members of staff, some by external organisations, and some by students themselves, perhaps relating to an area of personal interest that they wish to develop further.

All project proposals are rigorously vetted and must meet a number of requirements before these are made available to the students. The department uses an automated project allocation system for assigning projects to students that takes into account supervisor and student preferences.

Examples of previous project include:
-A Study into the User Experience and Usability of Web Enabled Services on Smartphones
-Agent simulation of large scale complex IT systems
-Do People Disclose their Passwords on Social Media?
-Dynamic Sound Generation for Computer Games
-Iterative linear programming as an optimisation method for buyer resources in online auctions evaluated using a Java-based Monte Carlo simulation
-Qchat (Web-based chat application for quantum physicists)
-Software for dyslexic readers: an empirical investigation of presentation attributes
-Web-based IQ Testing Application for Fluid Intelligence Analysis
-Agent simulation of large scale complex IT systems

Information for Students

Whilst the MSc in Information Technology does not require a formal qualification in computing, we do expect you to have some understanding of computer related issues.

As everyone arrives with different experience, we have put together the following summary of what we expect you to know, with some suggestions of how you can prepare before you arrive.

You'll start the course with a focus on writing and developing Java programs. We assume that you are familiar with programming concepts and terminology, so we advise you to review basic programming concepts, such as:
-Variables and their types
-Control structures (e.g. if-statements, loops)
-Subprograms (e.g. procedures, functions)
-Compilation and debugging.

If you have never used Java, you will benefit greatly from doing some reading and trying out Java programming before you arrive. We will teach you from first principles, but the pace will be fast and you will find it easier to keep up if you've practiced with the basics beforehand. Tutorials and practical exercises are the best way for you to prepare, and the Deitel and Deitel book below is a good source of these.

Careers

Here at York, we're really proud of the fact that more than 97% of our postgraduate students go on to employment or further study within six months of graduating from York. We think the reason for this is that our courses prepare our students for life in the workplace through our collaboration with industry to ensure that what we are teaching is useful for employers.

Read less
This programme provides students with a challenging range of advanced topics drawn from optical communications systems and devices, and optics-related signal processing, including associated enabling technologies. Read more
This programme provides students with a challenging range of advanced topics drawn from optical communications systems and devices, and optics-related signal processing, including associated enabling technologies. It provides an excellent opportunity to acquire the skills needed for a career in the most dynamic fields in optical communications.

This programme builds on the internationally-recognised research strengths of the Photonics and High Performance Networks research groups within the Smart Internet Lab. Optical fibre communications form the backbone of all land-based communications and is the only viable means to support today's global information systems. Research at Bristol is contributing to the ever-increasing requirement for bandwidth and flexibility through research into optical switching technology, wavelength conversion, high-speed modulation, data regeneration and novel semiconductor lasers.

There are two taught units related to optical communications: Optical Networks and Data Centre Networks. Optical Networks focuses on Wavelength Division Multiplexed (WDM) networks, Time Division Multiplexed (TDM) networks including SDH/SONET and OTN, optical frequency division multiplexed networks, and optical sub-wavelength switched networks. Data Centre Networks focuses on networks for cloud computing, cloud-based networking, grid computing and e-science.

The group at Bristol is a world leader in the new field of quantum photonics, with key successes in developing photonic crystal fibre light sources, quantum secured optical communications and novel quantum gate technologies.

The programme is accredited by Institute of Engineering and Technology until 2018, one of only a handful of accredited programmes in the UK.

Programme structure

Your programme will cover the following core subjects:

Semester one (50 credits)
-Communication systems
-Digital filters and spectral analysis
-Mobile communications
-Networking protocol principles
-Optoelectronic devices and systems

Semester two (70 credits)
-Advanced optoelectronic devices
-Data centre networking
-Advanced networks
-Engineering research skills
-Optical communications systems and data networks
-Optical networks

Research project (60 credits)
A substantial research project is initiated during the second teaching block and completed during the summer. This may be based at the University or with industrial partners.

Careers

This one-year MSc programme gives you a world-class education in all aspects of current and future optical communication systems, along with associated signal processing technologies. It will prepare you for a diverse range of exciting careers - not only in the communications field, but also in other areas such as management consultancy, project management, finance and government agencies.

Our graduates have gone on to have rewarding careers in some of the leading multinational communications companies, such as Huawei, China Telecom, Toshiba, China Mobile and Intel. Some graduates follow a more research-oriented career path with a number of students going on to study for PhDs at leading universities.

Read less
his is a one year advanced taught course. The aim of this course is to bring students in twelve months to the frontier of elementary particle theory. Read more
his is a one year advanced taught course. The aim of this course is to bring students in twelve months to the frontier of elementary particle theory. This course is intended for students who have already obtained a good first degree in either physics or mathematics, including in the latter case courses in quantum mechanics and relativity.

The course consists of three modules: the first two are the Michaelmas and Epiphany graduate lecture courses, which are assessed by examinations in January and March. The third module is a dissertation on a topic of current research, prepared under the guidance of a supervisor with expertise in the area. We offer a wide variety of possible dissertation topics. The dissertation must be submitted by September 15th, the end of the twelve month course period.

Course Structure
The main group of lectures are given in the first two terms of the academic year (Michaelmas and Epiphany). This part of the lecture course is assessed by examinations. In each term there are two teaching periods of 4 weeks, with a week's break in the middle of the term in which students will be able to revise the material. most courses are either 8 lectures or 16 lectures in length. There are 14 lectures/week in the Michaelmas term and 14 lectures/week in Epiphany term.

Core Modules
- Introductory Field Theory
- Group Theory
- Standard Model
- General Relativity
- Quantum Electrodynamics
- Quantum Field Theory
- Conformal Field Theory
- Supersymmetry
- Anomalies
- Strong Interaction Physics
- Cosmology
- Superstrings and D-branes
- Non-Perturbative Physics
- Euclidean Field Theory
- Flavour Physics and Effective Field Theory
- Neutrinos and Astroparticle Physics
- 2d Quantum Field Theory
- Optional Modules
- Differential Geometry for Physicists
- Boundaries and Defects in Integrable Field Theory
- Computing for Physicists.

For further information on this course, please visit the Centre for Particle Theory website (http://www.cpt.dur.ac.uk/GraduateStudies)

Read less
We invite MPhil proposals in any of our research areas. In Pure Mathematics our two main fields are functional analysis and geometric algebra. Read more
We invite MPhil proposals in any of our research areas. In Pure Mathematics our two main fields are functional analysis and geometric algebra. In Applied Mathematics our research is predominantly in fluid mechanics, astrophysics and cosmology.

As a research postgraduate in the School of Mathematics and Statistics you will be working under the supervision of an expert in your chosen field. To help you identify a topic and potential supervisor, we encourage you to find out more about our staff specialisms.

Research areas

Within each field of Pure Mathematics there are multiple subgroups. In analysis, one subgroup concentrates on operator theory and function theory, the other on Banach algebras, cohomology and modules. In algebra there are subgroups devoted to the study of infinite groups, and finite classical groups and their geometries

Our Applied Mathematics staff have research interests in:
-Fluid dynamics, including numerical modelling of quantum fluids (superfluid liquid Helium and Bose-Einstein condensates)
-Classical and astrophysical fluids (the Earth's core, planetary dynamos, accretion discs and galaxies)
-Cosmology, including the very early universe and quantum gravity

Research seminars and events

We run weekly research seminars in algebra and geometries, analysis, and applied mathematics, as well as postgraduate seminars led by students.

Specialist courses are offered through the MAGIC distance learning consortium, sponsored in part by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Partnerships and networks

We are part of:
-The North British Functional Analysis Seminar
-The North British Geometric Group Theory Seminar
-Algebra and Representation Theory in the North, funded by the London Mathematical Society and the Edinburgh Mathematical Society

With Durham University, we are part of the Joint Quantum Centre broadly dedicated to various aspects of quantum science.

Facilities

You will have access to online research facilities via your own desktop PC in a shared postgraduate work space. There is also a teaching cluster (of about 150 PCs) within the School.

As well as the library resources provided by the main Robinson Library, you will have access to the School's mathematics and statistics library and reading room.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X