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Masters Degrees (Quantum Computing)

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The Department gives MSc students an opportunity to study and perform a research project under the supervision of recognized experts and to acquire specialist knowledge of one or a few topics at the cutting edge of contemporary physics. Read more
The Department gives MSc students an opportunity to study and perform a research project under the supervision of recognized experts and to acquire specialist knowledge of one or a few topics at the cutting edge of contemporary physics.

The project will be devoted to one of several topical areas of modern physics including high-temperature superconductivity, terahertz semiconductor and superconductor electronics, quantum computing and quantum metamaterials, physics of extreme conditions and astrophysics.

Core study areas currently include mathematical methods for interdisciplinary sciences, research methods in physics, superconductivity and nanoscience and a research project.

Optional study areas currently include characterisation techniques in solid state physics, quantum information, advanced characterisation techniques, quantum computing, and physics of complex systems.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/physics/advanced-physics/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Mathematical Methods for Interdisciplinary Sciences
- Research Methods in Physics
- Superconductivity and Nanoscience
- Research Project Part 1
- Research Project Part 2

Optional Modules:
- Characterisation Techniques in Solid State Physics
- Fundamentals of Quantum Information
- Matlab as a Scientific Programming Language
- Advanced Characterisation Techniques
- Quantum Computing
- Physics of Complex systems

Learning and teaching

Knowledge and understanding are acquired through lectures, tutorials, problem classes and guided independent study. Assessment in taught modules is by a combination of examination and coursework. The MSc includes a significant research project completed through guided independent study with a research supervisor.

Careers and further study

The aim of the course is to equip students with key skills they need for employment in industry, public service or academic research.

Why choose physics at Loughborough?

We are a community of approximately 170 undergraduates, 30 postgraduates, 16 full-time academic staff, seven support staff, and several visiting and part-time academic staff.

Our large research student population and wide international links make the Department a great place to work.

- Research
Our research strengths are in the areas of condensed matter and materials, with a good balance between theory and experiment.
The quality of our researchers is recognised internationally and we publish in highly ranked physics journals; one of our former Visiting Professors, Alexei Abrikosov, was awarded the 2003 Nobel Prize in Physics.

- Career Prospects
100% of our graduates were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. They have gone on to work with companies such as BT, Nikon Metrology, Prysmian Group, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS and Smart Manufacturing Technology.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/physics/advanced-physics/

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study High Performance and Scientific Computing at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study High Performance and Scientific Computing at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MSc in High Performance and Scientific Computing is for you if you are a graduate in a scientific or engineering discipline and want to specialise in applications of High Performance computing in your chosen scientific area. During your studies in High Performance and Scientific Computing you will develop your computational and scientific knowledge and skills in tandem helping emphasise their inter-dependence.

On the course in High Performance and Scientific Computing you will develop a solid knowledge base of high performance computing tools and concepts with a flexibility in terms of techniques and applications. As s student of the MSc High Performance and Scientific Computing you will take core computational modules in addition to specialising in high performance computing applications in a scientific discipline that defines the route you have chosen (Biosciences, Computer Science, Geography or Physics). You will also be encouraged to take at least one module in a related discipline.

Modules of High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc

The modules you study on the High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc depend on the route you choose and routes are as follows:

Biosciences route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming

High Performance Computing in C/C++

Operating Systems and Architectures

Software Testing

Programming in C/C++

Conservation of Aquatic Resources or Environmental Impact Assessment

Ecosystems

Research Project in Environmental Biology

+ 10 credits from optional modules

Computer Science route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming

High Performance Computing in C/C++

Operating Systems and Architectures

Software Testing

Programming in C/C++

Partial Differential Equations

Numerics of ODEs and PDEs

Software Engineering

Data Visualization

MSc Project

+ 30 credits from optional modules

Geography route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming

High Performance Computing in C/C++

Operating Systems and Architectures

Software Testing

Programming in C/C++

Partial Differential Equations

Numerics of ODEs and PDEs

Modelling Earth Systems or Satellite Remote Sensing or Climate Change – Past, Present and Future or Geographical Information Systems

Research Project

+ 10 credits from optional modules

Physics route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming

High Performance Computing in C/C++

Operating Systems and Architectures

Software Testing

Programming in C/C++

Partial Differential Equations

Numerics of ODEs and PDEs

Monte Carlo Methods

Quantum Information Processing

Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena

Physics Project

+ 20 credits from optional modules

Optional Modules (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Software Engineering

Data Visualization

Monte Carlo Methods

Quantum Information Processing

Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena

Modelling Earth Systems

Satellite Remote Sensing

Climate Change – Past, Present and Future

Geographical Information Systems

Conservation of Aquatic Resources

Environmental Impact Assessment

Ecosystems

Facilities

Students of the High Performance and Scientific Computing programme will benefit from the Department that is well-resourced to support research. Swansea physics graduates are more fortunate than most, gaining unique insights into exciting cutting-edge areas of physics due to the specialized research interests of all the teaching staff. This combined with a great staff-student ratio enables individual supervision in advanced final year research projects. Projects range from superconductivity and nano-technology to superstring theory and anti-matter. The success of this programme is apparent in the large proportion of our M.Phys. students who seek to continue with postgraduate programmes in research.

Specialist equipment includes:

a low-energy positron beam with a highfield superconducting magnet for the study of positronium

a number of CW and pulsed laser systems

scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes

a Raman microscope

a 72 CPU parallel cluster

access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Supercomputer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

The Physics laboratories and teaching rooms were refurbished during 2012 and were officially opened by Professor Lyn Evans, Project Leader of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. This major refurbishment was made possible through the University’s capital programme, the College of Science, and a generous bequest made to the Physics Department by Dr Gething Morgan Lewis FRSE, an eminent physicist who grew up in Ystalyfera in the Swansea Valley and was educated at Brecon College.



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The Quantum Technologies MSc will take students to the cutting-edge of research in the emerging area of quantum technologies, giving them not only an advanced training in the relevant physics but also the chance to acquire key skills in the engineering and information sciences. Read more

The Quantum Technologies MSc will take students to the cutting-edge of research in the emerging area of quantum technologies, giving them not only an advanced training in the relevant physics but also the chance to acquire key skills in the engineering and information sciences.

About this degree

Students learn the language and techniques of advanced quantum mechanics, quantum information and quantum computation, as well as state-of-the-art implementation with condensed matter and quantum optical systems.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research project (90 credits).

Core modules

All students take the following core modules:

  • Atom and Photon Physics
  • Advanced Quantum Theory
  • Quantum Communication and Computation

Optional modules

Students choose one optional module from any of the Physics MSc degrees as well as two of the following optional modules:

  • Advanced Photonic Devices
  • Nanoelectronic Devices
  • Nanoscale Processing for Advanced Devices
  • Optical Transmission and Networks
  • Order and Excitations in Condensed Matter
  • Physics and Optics of Nano-Structures
  • Research Computing with C++
  • Research Software Engineering with Python

Research project and case studies

The MSc programme culminates in the quantum technologies project and attached case studies. All students undertake two case studies related to quantum technologies as well as an independent research project (experimental or theoretical), which will be the subject of a presentation and a dissertation of 10,000-15,000 words. Research-active supervisors will provide topics which will enable the students to make contributions to research in the field.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars, with self-study on two modules devoted to the critical assessment of current research topics and the corresponding research skills. Assessment is through a combination of problem sheets, written examinations, case study reports and presentations, as well as the MSc project dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Quantum Technologies MSc

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

The programme prepares graduates for careers in the emerging quantum technology industries which play an increasingly important role in: secure communication; sensing and metrology; the simulation of other quantum systems; and ultimately in general-purpose quantum computation. Graduates will also be well prepared for research at the highest level in the numerous groups now developing quantum technologies and for work in government laboratories.

Employability

Graduates will possess the skills needed to work in the emerging quantum industries as they develop in response to technological advances.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL offers one of the leading research programmes in quantum technologies anywhere in the world, as well as outstanding taught programmes in the subjects contributing to the field (including physics, computer science, and engineering). It also hosts the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Delivering Quantum Technologies.

The programme provides a rigorous grounding across the disciplines underlying quantum technologies, as well as the chance to work with some of the world's leading groups in research projects. The new Quantum Science and Technology Institute ('UCLQ') provides an umbrella where all those working in the field can meet and share ideas, including regular seminars, networking events and opportunities to interact with commercial and government partners.



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This two-year MSc is offered by Royal Holloway as part of its South East Physics Network Partnership (SEPnet). SEPnet is a consortium of six universities. Read more

This two-year MSc is offered by Royal Holloway as part of its South East Physics Network Partnership (SEPnet). SEPnet is a consortium of six universities: University of Kent, Queen Mary University of London, Royal Holloway University of London, University of Southampton, University of Surrey, and University of Sussex. This consortium consists of around 160 academics, with an exceptionally wide range of expertise linked with world-leading research.

The first year consists mainly of taught courses in the University of London; the second research year can be at Royal Holloway or one of the other consortium members. This is a unique opportunity to collaborate with physics research groups and partner institutions in both the UK and Europe. You will benefit from consortium led events as well as state of the art video conferencing. 

The Department of Physics at Royal Holloway is known internationally for its top-class research. Our staff carry out research at the cutting edge of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Experimental Quantum Computing, Quantum Matter at Low Temperatures, Theoretical Physics, and Biophysics, as well as other areas.

With access to some of the leading physics departments in the world, there is a wide choice of accommodation options, sporting facilities, international student organisations and careers services. South East England, with its close connections to continental Europe by air, Eurotunnel, and cross channel ferries, is an ideal environment for international students.

  • The course offers an incomparably wide range of options.
  • Royal Holloway's Physics Department has strong links with leading international facilities, including Rutherford Appleton and National Physical Laboratory, Oxford Instruments, CERN, ISIS and Diamond. 
  • We hold a regular series of colloquia and seminars on important research topics and host a number of guest lectures from external organisations.

Course structure

Year 1

All modules are optional

Year 2

  • Major Project

Optional modules

In addition to these mandatory course units there are a number of optional course units available during your degree studies. The following is a selection of optional course units that are likely to be available. Please note that although the College will keep changes to a minimum, new units may be offered or existing units may be withdrawn, for example, in response to a change in staff. Applicants will be informed if any significant changes need to be made.

Year 1

You will take six from the following:

  • Lie Groups and Lie Algebras
  • Quantum Theory
  • Statistical Mechanics
  • Phase Transitions
  • Advanced Quantum Theory
  • Advanced Topics in Statistical Mechanics
  • Relativistic Waves and Quantum Fields
  • Advanced Quantum Field Theory
  • Functional Methods in Quantum Field Theory
  • Advanced Topics in Classical Field Theory
  • Formation and Evolution of Stellar Clusters
  • Advanced Physical Cosmology
  • Atom and Photon Physics
  • Advanced Photonics
  • Quantum Computation and Communication
  • Quantum Electronics of Nanostructures
  • Molecular Physics
  • Particle Physics
  • Particle Accelerator Physics
  • Modelling Quantum Many-Body Systems
  • Order and Excitations in Condensed Matter
  • Theoretical Treatments of Nano-Systems
  • Physics at the Nanoscale
  • Electronic Structure Methods
  • Computer Simulation in Condensed Matter
  • Superfluids, Condensates and Superconductors
  • Advanced Condensed Matter
  • Standard Model Physics and Beyond
  • Nuclear Magnetic Resonance
  • Statistical Data Analysis
  • String Theory and Branes
  • Supersymmetry
  • Stellar Structure and Evolution
  • Cosmology
  • Relativity and Gravitation
  • Astroparticle Cosmology
  • Electromagnetic Radiation in Astrophysics
  • Planetary Atmospheres
  • Solar Physics
  • Solar System
  • The Galaxy
  • Astrophysical Plasmas
  • Space Plasma and Magnetospheric Physics
  • Extrasolar Planets and Astrophysical Discs
  • Environmental Remote Sensing
  • Molecular Biophysics
  • Cellular Biophysics
  • Theory of Complex Networks
  • Equilibrium Analysis of Complex Systems
  • Dynamical Analysis of Complex Systems
  • Mathematical Biology
  • Elements of Statistical Learning

Year 2

Only core modules are taken.

Teaching & assessment

This high quality European Masters programme follows the European method of study and involves a year of research working on pioneering projects.

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Your future career

This course equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued studies in physics, and many of our graduates have gone on to study for a PhD. 

On completion of the course graduates will have a systematic understanding of knowledge, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights at the forefront of the discipline a comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research or advanced scholarship originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in the discipline.

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different physics-related areas, including careers in industry, information technology and finance.



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Computer Science influences every aspect of modern life and is one of the fastest-moving academic disciplines. It contributes to everything from the efficiency of financial markets to film and TV graphics and has a huge impact on both economic competitiveness and human wellbeing. Read more
Computer Science influences every aspect of modern life and is one of the fastest-moving academic disciplines. It contributes to everything from the efficiency of financial markets to film and TV graphics and has a huge impact on both economic competitiveness and human wellbeing.


Why study MSc Computer Science at Middlesex?

Our course not only offers a balance between advanced computer science theory and practical experience, but has a very strong focus on contemporary research. Practical work is an important part of every module and the School of Science and Technology has strong links with industry, including companies such as Microsoft and Siemens. The university is very active in the exploration of a number of areas, including computer graphics,mobile development, human-computer interaction, robotics, artificial intelligence, ethics, ubiquitous computing, functional programming, algorithmic biology, image and video analysis, quantum computing, computational biology and visual analytics, and this research influences the course very strongly.

Our course is aimed at students who've studied computing for their first degree, and wish to make themselves stand out further by developing an advanced mastery of the subject.

Course highlights:

The university is home to the Human Interactive Systems Laboratory, acentre of research into haptic technology, and leads the UK Visual Analytics Consortium.

Our specialist multimedia laboratories are well-equipped with industry-standard software and hardware, including both PCs and Macs.

Many of the teaching staff are the authors of widely-used textbooks and learning materials. They include:

Dr Kai Xu, a former senior research scientist with CSIRO, Australia's national science agency;
Dr Elke Duncker-Gassen, aformer systems and software engineer at GEI Gesytec;
Dr Chris Huyck, a former software engineer at Microsoft.
You'll also improve your communication, teamwork, time-management, problem-solving and critical skills.

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The Laboratory for Foundations of Computer Science (LFCS) continues to lead the way in the development of mathematical models, theories and tools that probe the possibilities of computation and communication. Read more

The Laboratory for Foundations of Computer Science (LFCS) continues to lead the way in the development of mathematical models, theories and tools that probe the possibilities of computation and communication.

Our students benefit from being part of one of the largest and strongest groups of theoretical computer scientists in the world.

Our research is aimed at establishing deep understanding of computation in its many forms. Using advanced mathematical principles, we create theories and software tools allowing fundamental capabilities of computation to be explored, as well as designing languages that can be used to construct safe and effective programs.

Areas of interest within LFCS include: algorithms and complexity, cryptography, databases, logic, programming languages and semantics, performance modeling, quantum computing, security and privacy, software modeling and testing, and verification.

Training and support

As a research student at LFCS, you will have access to our highly respected academic staff community, which includes Fellows of the Royal Society and a winner of a Blaise Pascal medal. Our students regularly receive ‘best paper’ awards at conferences.

You will carry out your research within a research group under the guidance of a supervisor. You will be expected to attend seminars and meetings of relevant research groups and may also attend lectures that are relevant to your research topic. Periodic reviews of your progress will be conducted to assist with research planning.

A programme of transferable skills courses facilitates broader professional development in a wide range of topics, from writing and presentation skills to entrepreneurship and career strategies.

The School of Informatics holds a Silver Athena SWAN award, in recognition of our commitment to advance the representation of women in science, mathematics, engineering and technology. The School is deploying a range of strategies to help female staff and students of all stages in their careers and we seek regular feedback from our research community on our performance.

Facilities

The award-winning Informatics Forum is an international research facility for computing and related areas. It houses more than 400 research staff and students, providing office, meeting and social spaces.

It also contains two robotics labs, an instrumented multimedia room, eye-tracking and motion capture systems, and a full recording studio amongst other research facilities. Its spectacular atrium plays host to many events, from industry showcases and student hackathons to major research conferences.

Nearby teaching facilities include computer and teaching labs with more than 250 machines, 24-hour access to IT facilities for students, and comprehensive support provided by dedicated computing staff.

Among our entrepreneurial initiatives is Informatics Ventures, set up to support globally ambitious software companies in Scotland and nurture a technology cluster to rival Boston, Pittsburgh, Kyoto and Silicon Valley.

Career opportunities

Our graduates are in high demand for postdoctoral academic roles. In addition, the skills you will graduate with can be applied to roles in industry, particularly finance, software development and consultancy.



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Our MSc Physics by Research course is ideal both for graduates who would like to undertake original research without committing themselves to a three-year PhD, and for students who want to gain a research-based Masters before embarking on their PhD. Read more

Our MSc Physics by Research course is ideal both for graduates who would like to undertake original research without committing themselves to a three-year PhD, and for students who want to gain a research-based Masters before embarking on their PhD.

The Department of Physics is known internationally for its top-class research. Our staff carry out research at the cutting edge of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Experimental Quantum Computing, Quantum Matter at Low Temperatures, Theoretical Physics, Dark Matter, Particle Physics and Biophysics, as well as other areas. Together they form a vibrant, intrernational community dedicated to collaborative research that has a global impact. 

Royal Holloway's Physics Department has strong links with leading international facilities, including Rutherford Appleton and the National Physical Laboratory, Oxford Instruments, SNOLAB, CERN, ISIS and Diamond.

Our Masters courses are taught in collaboration with other University of London Colleges, providing you with a wide range of options.

  • You'll join a major centre for Physics research-led teaching in the University of London and be part of a friendly, close-knit community.
  • Our research portfolio continues to expand through the exploration of exciting new research directions and strategic research partnerships.
  • We hold a regular series of colloquia and seminars on important research topics and host a number of guest lectures from external organisations.

Course structure

The major element of this course is a research project which is carried out under supervision. There is also a minor taught element, with classes covering a wide range of generic research-related topics.

Major Project

An original research project in one of the research areas of the Department, carried out under supervision. Makes up 75% of total mark.

Taught modules

You will take three modules, which together make up 25% of the total mark. For a full of these please see here.

Teaching & assessment

This course is assessed by the completion of a major research project (75% of the final mark) as well as other coursework assignments (25% of the final mark).

Your future career

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different areas, including careers in industry, information technology and finance. 

This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued studies in physics; around 50% of the graduates of this course progress onto PhD study at Royal Holloway



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The Master of Applied Science (MASc) in Electrical and Computer Engineering Program is for students interested in pursuing advanced studies and research in Biomedical Technologies, Communications Systems, Computer and Software Systems, Energy Systems, or Micro and Nano Technologies. Read more

The Master of Applied Science (MASc) in Electrical and Computer Engineering Program is for students interested in pursuing advanced studies and research in Biomedical Technologies, Communications Systems, Computer and Software Systems, Energy Systems, or Micro and Nano Technologies. Electrical and Computer Engineers develop computing systems, from chip architecture to mobile applications, to communications protocols as well as the energy systems to allow these devices and all other electrical systems to function. The discipline has a huge impact on society because it helps to design the systems we use in everything from health to finance to safety.

In this program students can choose to contribute to research on technologies very close to or already in the market, or technologies that are in the early stages of research such as quantum computing or carbon nanotubes.

What makes the program unique?

Electrical and Computer Engineering is one of the largest graduate programs at The University of British Columbia with over 75 faculty members and 400 students. All of our faculty members lead distinguished research programs. Our faculty members also collaborate with colleagues in the Faculty of Medicine and Faculty of Science as well as with industry leaders. These collaborations allow our students to work beside world-leaders in their area of interest. Our students use cutting-edge technologies at The University of British Columbia’s many research facilities and centres of excellence as well as in the field. 

Career options

The 24-month M.A.Sc. program Electrical and Computer Engineering prepares students for employment directly after completing the degree or to pursue further studies in a Ph.D. program. Some of our recent graduates are now working with Google, Microsoft, Facebook, Intel, Samsung, D-wave, BC Hydro, Bell Mobility, Sierra Wireless, PMC-Sierra, TELUS, Bank of Montreal, BC Children’s Hospital, The Government of Canada, Drobo, Siemens Canada, Celestica, Cisco, Alpha Technologies, etc. Many of our M.A.Sc. graduates have also gone on to pursue their Ph.D. with us at UBC. Some of our graduates have completed their PhDs at institutions such as Stanford, MIT, UC Berkeley and The Chinese University of Hong Kong. Some of our graduate students have also founded companies; a recent example is Veridae that was acquired by Tektronix.



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The MSc in Mathematics and Foundations of Computer Science, run jointly by the. Mathematical Institute. and the. Department of Computer Science. Read more

The MSc in Mathematics and Foundations of Computer Science, run jointly by the Mathematical Institute and the Department of Computer Science, focuses on the interface between pure mathematics and theoretical computer science. 

The mathematical side concentrates on areas where computers are used, or which are relevant to computer science, namely algebra, general topology, number theory, combinatorics and logic. Examples from the computing side include computational complexity, concurrency, and quantum computing. Students take a minimum of five options and write a dissertation.

The course is suitable for those who wish to pursue research in pure mathematics (especially algebra, number theory, combinatorics, general topology and their computational aspects), mathematical logic, or theoretical computer science. It is also suitable for students wishing to enter industry with an understanding of the mathematical and logical design and concurrency.

The course will consist of examined lecture courses and a written dissertation. The lecture courses will be divided into two sections:

  • Section A: Mathematical Foundations
  • Section B: Applicable Theories

Each section shall be divided into schedule I (basic) and schedule II (advanced). Students will be required to satisfy the examiners in at least two courses taken from section B and in at least two courses taken from schedule II. The majority of these courses should be given in the first two terms. 

During Trinity term and over the summer students should complete a dissertation on an agreed topic. The dissertation must bear regard to course material from section A or section B, and it must demonstrate relevance to some area of science, engineering, industry or commerce.

It is intended that a major feature of this course is that candidates should show a broad knowledge and understanding over a wide range of material. Consequently, each lecture course taken will receive an assessment upon its completion by means of a test based on written work. Students will be required to pass five courses, that include two courses from section B and two at the schedule II level - these need not be distinct - and the dissertation.

The course runs from the beginning of October through to the end of September, including the dissertation.



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Our graduate program in Electrical and Computer Engineering provides you with comprehensive knowledge and proficiency in. advanced mathematics and stochastic processes. Read more

Our graduate program in Electrical and Computer Engineering provides you with comprehensive knowledge and proficiency in:

  • advanced mathematics and stochastic processes
  • linear systems and digital communications
  • computer architecture and system design
  • parallel computing, networks, and integrated circuit designs
  • areas of specialization such as computer security, quantum computing, nanotechnology, signal processing, and information technology

The 30-credit curriculum also offers a thesis option in which you’ll take six credits relating to thesis courses. This allows you to gain specialization in areas that make you better qualified for specific research and development opportunities.

Our Entrepreneurship and Technology Innovation Center in Old Westbury offers you the opportunity to join research projects in areas such as cybersecurity, health care, and energy. This may lead to your work getting published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at major conferences. You can also join us at the annual Cybersecurity Conference at our Manhattan campus, where we welcome experts from academic, business, and government worldwide.



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Nanotechnology is an interdisciplinary science to a large extent. It combines the laws of physics, chemical processes and biological principles with one another at the nanoscale level. Read more

Sought-after experts in many areas

Nanotechnology is an interdisciplinary science to a large extent. It combines the laws of physics, chemical processes and biological principles with one another at the nanoscale level. The high level of interdisciplinarity leads to the necessity that scientists need to acquire additional skills and knowledge, for example in the fields of characterization techniques, nanooptics, nanoelectronics, nanomaterials and biotechnology.

Objective

The program prepares the students for a professional career and ensures that they are able to improve existing products and processes within the organizations they work in, and this on a long-term basis. This course of studies therefore contributes to the sought-after and highly demanded qualified experts that are needed within the field of nanotechnology. After successful completion one is awarded the academic degree "Master of Science" (M.Sc.).

Target group

The target group of this program is first and foremost professionals who are already working in industry, research institutes, universities and clinics, both nationally as well as abroad. The requirement for being admitted to this 3-year master program is a completed undergraduate course of studies in either engineering, science or medicine, taken at a university or polytechnic / university of applied science. Relevant working experience of at least one year has to be proven when applying for admission. With the application for acceptance to the distance learning course "Nanotechnology" one also has to hand in a written confirmation that a fitting institution is willing to supervise the applicant's master thesis topic. An attestation of the institution must be submitted to the Student's Administration Office by the end of the fourth semester. Admission to the course "Nanotechnology" is also possible if one has completed the certificate program "Nanobiotechnology" and the above mentioned eligibility criteria are met.

This course is held entirely in English – therefore good English language skills are a necessity.

Applicants may also be accepted who have relevant work experience but have not graduated for a university. They must hold a diploma qualifying for university admission, be able to prove several years of relevant work experience and pass an aptitude test. More information about the admission requirements and the aptitude test can be found here and the application form can be found here. Here is additional information about the application process.
For the enrolment to the English-language Master distance education program "Nanotechnology" a sufficient proof of English proficiency is necessary. These can be evidenced by:

an English-language first degree
Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages): C1
Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency (CPE): Grade C
IELTS: 6.0
TOEFL computer: 213
TOEFL Paper: 550
TOEFL Internet: 79

If you have otherwise acquired English language skills, e.g. from occupation or education, please fill out this declaration and send this with your application form: http://www.zfuw.uni-kl.de/fileadmin/downloads/pdf/Zulassungsvoraussetzungen/Declaration_of_proficiency_in_English_05-2014.pdf

Program content

The distance learning master program "Nanotechnology" encompasses a basic course of studies of one semester, focus studies that take four semesters and the master thesis itself for which one semester is planned. The fields of study include amongst others: Semiconductor theories, quantum computing, characterization techniques of nanostructures, screening methods in biology, nanooptics, biomaterials for transplants, processing ceramics and composites, using nanoparticles in medicine and pharmaceutics, nanoelectronics and nanomagnetism. The topics being taught are oriented on the possible career fields and working areas of the participants in the course. These include the semiconductor and electronics industries, the IT sector, the automotive sector, the chemical industry, biotechnology companies, optics and laser technology, the pharmaceutical industry, medicine and medical technology and for the development of new materials.

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The MSc by Research in Applied Physics and Materials enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The MSc by Research would normally terminate after a year. Read more

The MSc by Research in Applied Physics and Materials enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The MSc by Research would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree. 

As a research student in Applied Physics and Materials, you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work. 

Key Features of Applied Physics and Materials

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a Postgraduate Physics Student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

The three main research groups within the Department of Physics currently focus on the following areas of research:

Applied Physics and Materials Group

  • Next Generation Solar Cells
  • Materials and Devices for Photodetection
  • Physics of Next Generation Semiconductors
  • Bioelectronics
  • Material Physics
  • Biophysics
  • Novel sensors for medicine 

Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group

  • Antihydrogen, positronium and positrons
  • Quantum control
  • Cold atoms and quantum optics
  • Nano-scale physics and the life sciences
  • Analytical laser spectroscopy unit
  • Ultrafast Dynamics, Imaging and Microscopy
  • Quantum Computation and Simulation
  • Quantum Control and Optomechanics 

Particle Physics And Cosmology Theory Group

  • Integrability and AdS/CFT
  • Higher spin holography
  • Dense quark matter at strong coupling and gauge/string duality
  • Quantum fields in curved spacetime
  • Theoretical cosmology
  • Amplitudes in gauge and supergravity theories
  • Non-abelian T-duality and supergravity solutions
  • Holography and physics beyond the Standard Model
  • Large-N gauge theories, supersymmetry and duality
  • Lattice studies of strongly interacting systems
  • Lattice QCD at nonzero temperature
  • Dense quark matter and the sign problem
  • High-performance computing

Applied Physics and Materials Structure

The Physics Department is always keen to attract high-quality postgraduate students to join our research groups.

All Physics Research Degrees take 12 months of study, including the dissertation. For MSc by Research programmes you will be guided by internationally leading researchers through an extended one-year individual research project. There is no taught element.

The MSc by Research in Applied Physics and Materials degree enables you to pursue a one year individual programme of research and would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree. 

The Applied Physics and Materials programme has a recommended initial research training module (Science Skills & Research Methods), but otherwise has no taught element and is most suitable for you if you have an existing background in geography or cognate discipline and are looking to pursue a wholly research-based programme of study.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach. 

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a postgraduate student in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

  • Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
  • positronium
  • CW and pulsed laser systems
  • Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
  • Raman microscope
  • CPU parallel cluster
  • Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80\% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

Particle Physics And Cosmology Theory Group

The Particle Physics and Cosmology Theory Group has fifteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

Applied Physics and Materials Group

The Applied Physics and Materials (APM) Group has been very recently established at our department and is supported by grants from the European Union, Welsh Government, National Science Foundation, Australian Research Council, Welsh European Funding Office, and EPSRC. Its main areas of research range from Biophotonics, covering nano- and micro-structured materials, biomimetics, analyte sensing and light-tissue interaction, over Nanomedicine to Sustainable Advanced Materials, such as Next generation semiconductors, bioelectronic materials and devices, optoelectronics including photodetection, solar energy conversion, advanced electro-optics and transport physics of disordered solids.



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The MSc by Research Experimental Physics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The MSc by Research would normally terminate after a year. Read more

The MSc by Research Experimental Physics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The MSc by Research would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree. 

As a research student in Experimental Physics, you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work. 

Key Features of Experimental Physics

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a Postgraduate Physics Student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

The three main research groups within the Department of Physics currently focus on the following areas of research:

Applied Physics and Materials Group

  • Next Generation Solar Cells
  • Materials and Devices for Photodetection
  • Physics of Next Generation Semiconductors
  • Bioelectronics
  • Material Physics
  • Biophysics
  • Novel sensors for medicine 

Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group

  • Antihydrogen, positronium and positrons
  • Quantum control
  • Cold atoms and quantum optics
  • Nano-scale physics and the life sciences
  • Analytical laser spectroscopy unit
  • Ultrafast Dynamics, Imaging and Microscopy
  • Quantum Computation and Simulation
  • Quantum Control and Optomechanics 

Particle Physics And Cosmology Theory Group

  • Integrability and AdS/CFT
  • Higher spin holography
  • Dense quark matter at strong coupling and gauge/string duality
  • Quantum fields in curved spacetime
  • Theoretical cosmology
  • Amplitudes in gauge and supergravity theories
  • Non-abelian T-duality and supergravity solutions
  • Holography and physics beyond the Standard Model
  • Large-N gauge theories, supersymmetry and duality
  • Lattice studies of strongly interacting systems
  • Lattice QCD at nonzero temperature
  • Dense quark matter and the sign problem
  • High-performance computing

Experimental Physics Structure

The Physics Department is always keen to attract high-quality postgraduate students to join our research groups.

All Physics Research Degrees take 12 months of study, including the dissertation. For MSc by Research programmes you will be guided by internationally leading researchers through an extended one-year individual research project. There is no taught element.

The MSc by Research in Experimental Physics degree enables you to pursue a one year individual programme of research and would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree. 

The Experimental Physics programme has a recommended initial research training module (Science Skills & Research Methods), but otherwise has no taught element and is most suitable for you if you have an existing background in geography or cognate discipline and are looking to pursue a wholly research-based programme of study.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach. 

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a postgraduate student in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

  • Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
  • positronium
  • CW and pulsed laser systems
  • Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
  • Raman microscope
  • CPU parallel cluster
  • Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80\% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

Particle Physics And Cosmology Theory Group

The Particle Physics and Cosmology Theory Group has fifteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

Applied Physics and Materials Group

The Applied Physics and Materials (APM) Group has been very recently established at our department and is supported by grants from the European Union, Welsh Government, National Science Foundation, Australian Research Council, Welsh European Funding Office, and EPSRC. Its main areas of research range from Biophotonics, covering nano- and micro-structured materials, biomimetics, analyte sensing and light-tissue interaction, over Nanomedicine to Sustainable Advanced Materials, such as Next generation semiconductors, bioelectronic materials and devices, optoelectronics including photodetection, solar energy conversion, advanced electro-optics and transport physics of disordered solids.



Read less
The MSc by Research Theoretical Physics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The MSc by Research would normally terminate after a year. Read more

The MSc by Research Theoretical Physics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The MSc by Research would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree. 

As a research student in Theoretical Physics, you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work. 

Key Features of Experimental Physics

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a Postgraduate Physics Student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

The three main research groups within the Department of Physics currently focus on the following areas of research:

Applied Physics and Materials Group

  • Next Generation Solar Cells
  • Materials and Devices for Photodetection
  • Physics of Next Generation Semiconductors
  • Bioelectronics
  • Material Physics
  • Biophysics
  • Novel sensors for medicine 

Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group

  • Antihydrogen, positronium and positrons
  • Quantum control
  • Cold atoms and quantum optics
  • Nano-scale physics and the life sciences
  • Analytical laser spectroscopy unit
  • Ultrafast Dynamics, Imaging and Microscopy
  • Quantum Computation and Simulation
  • Quantum Control and Optomechanics 

Particle Physics And Cosmology Theory Group

  • Integrability and AdS/CFT
  • Higher spin holography
  • Dense quark matter at strong coupling and gauge/string duality
  • Quantum fields in curved spacetime
  • Theoretical cosmology
  • Amplitudes in gauge and supergravity theories
  • Non-abelian T-duality and supergravity solutions
  • Holography and physics beyond the Standard Model
  • Large-N gauge theories, supersymmetry and duality
  • Lattice studies of strongly interacting systems
  • Lattice QCD at nonzero temperature
  • Dense quark matter and the sign problem
  • High-performance computing

Theoretical Physics Structure

The Physics Department is always keen to attract high-quality postgraduate students to join our research groups.

All Physics Research Degrees take 12 months of study, including the dissertation. For MSc by Research programmes you will be guided by internationally leading researchers through an extended one-year individual research project. There is no taught element.

The MSc by Research in Theoretical Physics degree enables you to pursue a one year individual programme of research and would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree. 

The Theoretical Physics programme has a recommended initial research training module (Science Skills & Research Methods), but otherwise has no taught element and is most suitable for you if you have an existing background in geography or cognate discipline and are looking to pursue a wholly research-based programme of study.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach. 

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a postgraduate student in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

  • Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
  • positronium
  • CW and pulsed laser systems
  • Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
  • Raman microscope
  • CPU parallel cluster
  • Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80\% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

Particle Physics And Cosmology Theory Group

The Particle Physics and Cosmology Theory Group has fifteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

Applied Physics and Materials Group

The Applied Physics and Materials (APM) Group has been very recently established at our department and is supported by grants from the European Union, Welsh Government, National Science Foundation, Australian Research Council, Welsh European Funding Office, and EPSRC. Its main areas of research range from Biophotonics, covering nano- and micro-structured materials, biomimetics, analyte sensing and light-tissue interaction, over Nanomedicine to Sustainable Advanced Materials, such as Next generation semiconductors, bioelectronic materials and devices, optoelectronics including photodetection, solar energy conversion, advanced electro-optics and transport physics of disordered solids.



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This is a one year advanced taught course. The aim of this course is to bring students in 12 months to the frontier of elementary particle theory. Read more

This is a one year advanced taught course. The aim of this course is to bring students in 12 months to the frontier of elementary particle theory. This course is intended for students who have already obtained a good first degree in either physics or mathematics, including in the latter case courses in quantum mechanics and relativity.

The course consists of three modules: the first two are the Michaelmas and Epiphany graduate lecture courses, which are assessed by examinations in January and March. The third module is a dissertation on a topic of current research, prepared under the guidance of a supervisor with expertise in the area. We offer a wide variety of possible dissertation topics. The dissertation must be submitted by September 15th, the end of the twelve month course period.

Course Structure

The main group of lectures are given in the first two terms of the academic year (Michaelmas and Epiphany). This part of the lecture course is assessed by examinations. In each term there are two teaching periods of four weeks, with a week's break in the middle of the term in which students will be able to revise the material. Most courses are either eight lectures or 16 lectures in length. There are 14 lectures/week in the Michaelmas term and 14 lectures/week in Epiphany term.

Core Modules

  • Introductory Field Theory
  • Group Theory
  • Standard Model
  • General Relativity
  • Quantum Electrodynamics
  • Quantum Field Theory
  • Conformal Field Theory
  • Supersymmetry
  • Anomalies
  • Strong Interaction Physics
  • Cosmology
  • Superstrings and D-branes
  • Non-Perturbative Physics
  • Euclidean Field Theory
  • Flavour Physics and Effective Field Theory
  • Neutrinos and Astroparticle Physics
  • 2d Quantum Field Theory.

Optional Modules available in previous years included:

  • Differential Geometry for Physicists
  • Boundaries and Defects in Integrable Field Theory
  • Computing for Physicists.

Course Learning and Teaching

This is a full-year degree course, starting early October and finishing in the middle of the subsequent September. The aim of the course is to bring students to the frontier of research in elementary particle theory.

The course consists of three modules: the first two are the Michaelmas and Epiphany graduate lecture courses. The third module is a dissertation on a topic of current research, prepared under the guidance of a supervisor with expertise in the area. We offer a wide variety of possible dissertation topics.

The lectures begin with a general survey of particle physics and introductory courses on quantum field theory and group theory. These lead on to more specialised topics, amongst others in string theory, cosmology, supersymmetry and more detailed aspects of the standard model.

The main group of lectures is given in the first two terms of the academic year (Michaelmas and Epiphany). This part of the lecture course is assessed by examinations. In each term there are two teaching periods of 4 weeks, with a week's break in the middle of the term in which students will be able to revise the material. Most courses are either 8 lectures or 16 lectures in length. There are 14 lectures/week in the Michaelmas term and 14 lectures/week in Epiphany term they are supported by weekly tutorials. In addition lecturers also set a number of homework assignments which give the student a chance to test his or her understanding of the material.

There are additional optional lectures in the third term. These introduce advanced topics and are intended as preparation for research in these areas.

The dissertation must be submitted by mid-September, the end of the twelve month course period.



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