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Masters Degrees (Quantitative Methods)

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Big data and quantitative methods are transforming political processes and decisions in everyday life. Read more

Big data and quantitative methods are transforming political processes and decisions in everyday life. Local, national and international administrations are making "open data" available to wide audiences; giant, world-level web organisations are putting more and more "services" in synergy (search, map, data storage, data treatment, trade, etc.); and some private companies or governments are developing strongly ideological projects in relation with big data, which may have major consequence on the means by which we are ruled. All these issues involve data in text, image, numeric and video formats on unprecedented scales. This means there is a growing need for trained specialists who will have the cpacity to compete and/or collaborate with strictly business or technique-oriented actos on the basis of sound knowledge from political and international studies.

Programme content

In contrast to degrees such as Data Science or Data Analytics, where the focus ends up being almost exclusively on data practices and computational tools, the MA in Big Data and Quantitative Methods provides you with a knowledge and understanding of the central and innovative quantitative approaches in political science, the debates they have generated, and the implications of different approaches to issues concerning big data and public policy. The MA also draws on the considerable expertise which Warwick now has in quantitative methods located in PAISSociology, the Centre for Interdisciplinary Methodologies (CIM) and the Q-Step Centre.

Given that a noteworthy part of big data is actually social data, this MA programme seeks to attract students from a variety of social science-related disciplines, including politics, sociology, philosophy and economics; you do not need a background in statistics to be eligible for the course. Students are required to take three core modules: Fundamentals in Quantitative Research Methods (previously Quantitative Data Analysis and Interpretation); Big Data Research: Hype or Revolution?, and Advanced Quantitative Research, and have a range of optional modules to choose from in PAIS or from other departments across Warwick including Law, Philosophy, Sociology and the CIM. Graduates of this degree will be able both to engage technically with data released at a new scale and to keep a critical expertise on their relevance and quality, skills which are increasingly required in the competitive global job market.

In addition to regular modules, the Warwick Q-Step Centre is offering a range of different masterclasses. Topics include Reproducibility, Quantitative text analysis, Web data collection, Geostatistics, Inferential network analysis, Machine learning, Agent-based simulation and Longitudinal data analysis. All masterclasses are designed as comprehensive but gentle introductions to methods that are not covered at length in core method modules. They are intended to broaden your horizons and provide concepts and tools to be applied in your future research.



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Based at the Manchester Metropolitan University Q-Step Centre in the Department of Sociology, this MSc approaches the study of quantitative methods in an innovative way, which emphasises career-ready skills that prepare students for work with data and quantitative analysis, or as suitable preparation for doctoral study. Read more

Based at the Manchester Metropolitan University Q-Step Centre in the Department of Sociology, this MSc approaches the study of quantitative methods in an innovative way, which emphasises career-ready skills that prepare students for work with data and quantitative analysis, or as suitable preparation for doctoral study.

The course focuses on the development and application of key quantitative methods and analytical techniques. It focuses on the use of quantitative methods within ‘real world’ contexts and a key aim is to develop graduates’ career-ready skills in this field.

About The Course

A range of quantitative techniques will be covered including multiple regression, multi-level modelling, questionnaire design and psychometric testing, quantitative evaluation, and data management. One unit, ‘Statistics in Practice’ explores knowledge exchange, mobilisation and achieving impact with research. There is a mixture of core units and specialist options. The course culminates in a placement based dissertation, in which students will produce a piece of research on behalf of one of our partner organisations. We will help you source your placement.



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About the MSc programme. The MSc Quantitative Methods for Risk Management – formerly known as MSc Risk and Stochastics - offers in-depth instruction in probabilistic, statistical, and computational methods to quantify risk arising from, but not limited to, economic, financial, and insurance applications. Read more

About the MSc programme

The MSc Quantitative Methods for Risk Management – formerly known as MSc Risk and Stochastics - offers in-depth instruction in probabilistic, statistical, and computational methods to quantify risk arising from, but not limited to, economic, financial, and insurance applications.

This programme is LSE’s timely response to industry’s strong demand in experts with quantitative expertise in risk management, finance, insurance, and their interface.  

This programme will instruct you in theoretical as well as practical aspects of various quantitative methods to measure and mitigate financial and insurance risk. It draws on diverse disciplines, from mathematical finance, actuarial science to statistics and computation. You will work with real financial data to receive hands-on training in real-world problems and case studies. This programme draws on world class research in modern financial and actuarial mathematics and statistics within the Department.

The programme aims to prepare you for a range of expert careers in financial and insurance industries, in regulatory bodies, and in applied and theoretical research. 

Graduate destinations

The programme offers excellent prospects for employment and further study. You can gain employment in the finance or insurance industries, or go on to do a higher degree. Our alumni have taken up positions in banks, asset management firms, insurance and reinsurance companies, data analytics companies, consulting firms, and world-wide research institutions. 

Students who graduate from this programme are eligible to apply for exemption from the Institute of Actuaries subject 'ST0' on successful completion of the Computational Methods in Finance and Insurance project.



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The Master’s Programme in Quantitative Economics and Finance (MiQE/F) offers a high-quality graduate education in economic theory, finance and quantitative methods. Read more
The Master’s Programme in Quantitative Economics and Finance (MiQE/F) offers a high-quality graduate education in economic theory, finance and quantitative methods. Apart from a common set of core courses, our students are able to select from a large menu of elective courses to specialise in economics, finance, or a combination of both. The MiQE/F prepares students for ambitious careers where a solid understanding of the theoretical foundations of economics and finance and a rigorous competence in quantitative methods are required. This combination provides MiQE/F graduates with a competitive advantage on the job market and direct access to highly selective Ph.D. programmes.

Curriculum

The MiQE/F is a research-oriented programme. The objective of the programme is to educate highly-qualified economists with special skills in the area of quantitative methods. The MiQE/F uniquely combines theoretical concepts, quantitative methods and their application to practical problems. On the basis of well-understood theory and methodology, students develop the skills necessary to analyze and solve complex practical problems.

Students need to successfully complete a course load of 90 ECTS in order to graduate with an M.A. HSG in Quantitative Economics and Finance.
In the MiQE/F programme, the compulsory courses mainly focus on economic theory and quantitative methods. This allows you to choose core electives according to your interests and talents and to shape your profile.

Compulsory courses
In the compulsory courses you will acquire basic methods and a theoretical knowledge of economics, finance and econometrics, as well as mathematics and statistics:
• Econometrics I / II
• Theory of Finance
• Advanced Microeconomics II
• Advanced Macroeconomics II
• Statistics
• Mathematics
• Advanced Mathematics and Statistics

Core electives and specialisations
The core electives involve advanced application- oriented work and problem-solving and allow for various specialisations. The different areas of specialisation include optional courses in econometrics, finance and economics, which are important to prepare for quantitative applications. The three specialisation areas can be flexibly combined. You can choose core electives and will have the possibility to create your profile by specialising within a field of your interest:
• Quantitative economics
• Quantitative finance
• Corporate finance, banking and insurance

Master’s thesis
The topic of the Master’s thesis has to be chosen from the MiQE/F core studies. When writing your thesis, you will be applying the skills you have acquired to explore a special research topic. The thesis must be written in English.

Contextual Studies
Contextual Studies are an opportunity to acquire leadership skills and develop intellectually and culturally beyond the scope of core studies. You are free to choose from Contextual Studies irrespective of your particular Master’s programme.

The Master´s Programme in Quantitative Economics and Finance (MiQE/F) has been continuously renewing its structure and curriculum to meet the changing needs in today's academic and business worlds. For the updated programme content, please refer to the programme's website: http://www.miqef.unisg.ch

Double degree and exchange programmes

By choosing the MiQE/F you can benefit from obtaining a double degree from the HSG and an additional leading European university: SSE, Stockholm (exclusively for economics students); ESADE, Barcelona; HEC, Paris; RSM, Rotterdam; and Bocconi, Milan. By choosing the MiQE/F, you will also have the opportunity to apply for the CEMS Master’s in International Management (CEMS MIM). To extend your choice of courses, the University of St.Gallen and the University of Constance (Germany) have agreed to cooperate at the Master’s Level. MiQE/F students thus have the possibility to choose certain courses from the Master’s Programme in International Economic Relations at the University of Constance, and vice versa.
Furthermore, the University of St.Gallen offers exchange programmes for its students with approx. 200 partner universities worldwide.

Career perspectives - A competitive advantage

Graduates with an economics degree often lack an in-depth education and extensive training in quantitative methods, whereas mathematicians and statisticians often lack the necessary background in economics or finance. The analysis of complex real world problems in international economic policy making, financial sector developments and private industry increasingly requires the use of rigorous quantitative and theoretical methods as they are offered by the MiQE/F.
The MiQE/F programme prepares students for ambitious careers that require a sound training in economics and finance, as well as in statistical and econometric methods. Your competitive advantage on the job market – after graduating from the MiQE/F – is the combination of your expertise in quantitative methods and a profound knowledge of economics and finance.

Language

The programme is taught in English.

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This new and distinctive MRes aims to develop a systematic understanding and critical appreciation of alternative approaches, methodologies and paradigms of social science research. Read more
This new and distinctive MRes aims to develop a systematic understanding and critical appreciation of alternative approaches, methodologies and paradigms of social science research. It will develop fully trained and competent social science researchers, who are able to understand and use research techniques appropriate to their subject area as well as being conversant with approaches used by other social scientists.

The programme has a substantial theoretical and quantitative core but also delivers complementary qualitative training. This will provide an essential foundation for any working researcher, whether they are going on to do a PhD or otherwise engaged in research. The training will enable students to think through how they can use their knowledge and skills of advanced quantitative methods in different contexts and apply them to a variety of problems; and, progressively, to identify their own needs for training.

The MRes joins a suite of interdisciplinary training programmes that are part of the Economics and Social Research Council South West Doctoral Training Partnership. It is a joint initiative between the Universities of Bath, Bristol and Exeter. The course is delivered collaboratively; each semester one core unit is taught intensively, with time spent at each location. This collaborative delivery means that the expertise of academics at each institution can be made available to students from all three universities, enhancing the training capacity of each.

Programme structure

1. Research Design Methods and Skills (15 credits, mandatory): delivered over intensive sessions at each institution (Bath, Bristol, Exeter).
The main topics to be covered include: ontology and epistemology in social research; varieties of approaches to research design from different backgrounds; question design and formulation; criteria for evaluating research and strategies to enhance research quality; critical evaluation of different methodologies; preparing research proposals and communicating research.

2. Mathematics and Programming Skills for Social Scientists (15 credits, mandatory): delivered over intensive sessions at each institution.
The main topics covered are programming statistical and graphical techniques using R; dynamic programming and coding using Python; multi-level modelling theory and application using MLwiN.

3. Introduction to Qualitative Research in the Social Sciences (20 credits, mandatory): delivered at the home institution.
This unit aims to provide a philosophical appreciation of the underpinnings of qualitative research methods, to develop a critical understanding of the potential of various qualitative methodologies and key epistemological and methodological problems raised in qualitative methodologies.

4. Optional units
An appropriate range of optional units is provided at each institution to ensure students can take a full suite at their home institution should they wish to. Optional units may include substantive subject units of interest, or further methods units. At Bristol these may include: Big Data and Society; Spatial Data Analysis; Spatial Regression Modelling and GIS in R; and Explanation, Causation and Longitudinal Analysis. Students can also take options from across the Faculty of Social Sciences and Law, or from Bath and Exeter, subject to timetabling constraints.

5. Dissertation (60 credits, mandatory): An extended research project of between 10,000 and 15,000 words.

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Today more than ever, quantitative skills form an essential basis for successful careers in ecology, conservation, and animal and human health. Read more

Today more than ever, quantitative skills form an essential basis for successful careers in ecology, conservation, and animal and human health. This Masters programme provides specific training in data collection, modelling and statistical analyses as well as generic research skills. It is offered by the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine (IBAHCM), a grouping of top researchers who focus on combining field data with computational and genetic approaches to solve applied problems in epidemiology and conservation.

Why this programme

  • This programme encompasses key skills in monitoring and assessing biodiversity critical for understanding the impacts of environmental change.
  • It covers quantitative analyses of ecological and epidemiological data critical for animal health and conservation.
  • You will have the opportunity to base your independent research projects at the university field station on Loch Lomond (for freshwater or terrestrial-based projects); Millport field station on the Isle of Cumbrae (for marine projects); or Cochno Farm and Research Centre in Glasgow (for research based on farm animals). We will also assist you to gain research project placements in zoos or environmental consulting firms whenever possible.
  • The uniqueness of the programme is the opportunity to gain core skills and knowledge across a wide range of subjects, which will enhance future career opportunities, including entrance into competitive PhD programmes. For example, there are identification based programmes offered elsewhere, but most others do not combine practical field skills with molecular techniques, advanced informatics for assessing biodiversity based on molecular markers, as well as advanced statistics and modelling. Other courses in epidemiology are rarely ecologically focused; the specialty in IBAHCM is understanding disease ecology, in the context of both animal conservation and implications for human public health.
  • You will be taught by research-active staff using the latest approaches in quantitative methods, sequence analysis, and practical approaches to assessing biodiversity, and you will have opportunities to actively participate in internationally recognised research. Some examples of recent publications lead by students in the programme:
  • Blackburn, S., Hopcraft, J. G. C., Ogutu, J. O., Matthiopoulos, J. and Frank, L. (2016), Human-wildlife conflict, benefit sharing and the survival of lions in pastoralist community-based conservancies. J Appl Ecol. doi:10.1111/1365-2664.12632. 
  • Rysava, K., McGill, R. A. R., Matthiopoulos, J., and Hopcraft, J. G. C. (2016) Re-constructing nutritional history of Serengeti wildebeest from stable isotopes in tail hair: seasonal starvation patterns in an obligate grazer. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom., 30:1461-1468. doi: 10.1002/rcm.7572.
  • Ferguson, E.A., Hampson, K., Cleaveland, S., Consunji, R., Deray, R., Friar, J., Haydon, D. T., Jimenez, J., Pancipane, M. and Townsend, S.E., 2015. Heterogeneity in the spread and control of infectious disease; consequences for the elimination of canine rabies. Scientific Reports, 5, p. 18232. doi: 10.1038/srep18232.
  • A unique strength of the University of Glasgow for many years has been the strong ties between veterinarians and ecologists, which has now been formalised in the formation of the IBAHCM. This direct linking is rare but offers unique opportunities to provide training that spans both fundamental and applied research.

Programme structure

The programme provides a strong grounding in scientific writing and communication, statistical analysis, and experimental design. It is designed for flexibility, to enable you to customise a portfolio of courses suited to your particular interests.

You can choose from a range of specialised options that encompass key skills in

  • monitoring and assessing biodiversity – critical for understanding the impacts of environmental change
  • quantitative analyses of ecological and epidemiological data – critical for animal health and conservation
  • ethics and legislative policy – critical for promoting humane treatment of both captive and wild animals.

A total of 180 credits are required, with 50 flexible credits in the second term. See the accompanying detailed course descriptions found in the IBAHCM Masters Programme Overview. When selecting options, please email the relevant course coordinator as well as registering using MyCampus.

Term 1: Core courses (assessment in %)

  • Key research skills (scientific writing, introduction to R, introduction to linear models; advanced linear models, experimental design). Coursework – 60%; scientific report – 40%
  • Spatial Ecology and Biodiversity. Coursework – 60%; assignment – 40%

Term 2: Core courses

  • Programming in R. Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%

Term 2: Optional courses

  • Biodiversity Informatics. Coursework – 25%; assignment – 75%
  • GIS for Ecologists. Set exercise – 60%; critical review – 40%
  • Infectious Disease Ecology & the Dynamics of Emerging Disease. Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Introduction to Bayesian Statistics. Coursework – 50% assignment – 50%
  • Invertebrate Identification. Coursework – 20%; class test – 40%; assignment – 40%
  • Molecular Analyses for Biodiversity and Conservation. Coursework – 40%; assignment – 60%
  • Molecular Epidemiology & Phylodynamics. Coursework – 40%; assignment – 60%
  • Multi-species Models. Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Single-species Population Models. Coursework – 30%; assignment – 70%
  • Vertebrate Identification. Coursework – 20%; class test – 40%; assignment – 40%
  • Human Dimensions of Conservation*. Press statement – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Principles of Conservation Ecology*. Coursework – 30%; set exercise – 15%; poster – 55%
  • Protected Area Management*. Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Animal Ethics. Oral presentation – 50%; reflective essay – 50%
  • Biology of Suffering. Essay – 100%
  • Care of Captive Animals. Report – 100%
  • Enrichment of Animals in Captive Environments. Essay – 100%
  • Legislation & Societal Issues. Position paper – 50%; press release – 50%
  • Welfare Assessment. Critical essay – 100%

Term 3: Core MSc Component

  • Research project. Research proposal – 25%; project report – 60%; supervisor’s assessment –15%

Career prospects

You will gain core skills and knowledge across a wide range of subjects that will enhance your selection chances for competitive PhD programmes. In addition to academic options, career opportunities include roles in zoos, environmental consultancies, government agencies, ecotourism and conservation biology, and veterinary or public health epidemiology.



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This new and distinctive MRes aims to develop a systematic understanding and critical appreciation of alternative approaches, methodologies and paradigms of social science research. Read more
This new and distinctive MRes aims to develop a systematic understanding and critical appreciation of alternative approaches, methodologies and paradigms of social science research. It will develop fully trained and competent social science researchers, who are able to understand and use research techniques appropriate to their subject area as well as being conversant with approaches used by other social scientists.

The programme has a substantial theoretical and quantitative core but also delivers complementary qualitative training. This will provide an essential foundation for any working researcher, whether they are going on to do a PhD or otherwise engaged in research. The training will enable students to think through how they can use their knowledge and skills of advanced quantitative methods in different contexts and apply them to a variety of problems; and, progressively, to identify their own needs for training.

It is a joint initiative between the Universities of Bath, Bristol and Exeter. The course is delivered collaboratively; each semester one core unit is taught intensively, with time spent at each location. This collaborative delivery means that the expertise of academics at each institution can be made available to students from all three universities, enhancing the training capacity of each.

This programme has been accredited by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as part of the South West Doctoral Training Centre.

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Are you looking for a solid training in microeconomic and macroeconomic principles as well as quantitative methods?. Are you interested in how applied and policy-oriented research of economic data has relevance for real-world economists?. Read more
  • Are you looking for a solid training in microeconomic and macroeconomic principles as well as quantitative methods?
  • Are you interested in how applied and policy-oriented research of economic data has relevance for real-world economists?
  • Are you focused on a career after your masters or would like to meet the entry requirements of our more advanced MSc in Economics?

Manchester is a leading centre for economics and research-led teaching. Graduate students from across the globe come to study economics at Manchester, attracted by its first-class postgraduate training and supervision in the core and specialist areas of economics.

Many famous names from the world of economics have worked here at Manchester, including three Nobel Prize winners. Interdisciplinary study is also actively pursued here with many course units involving a number of different Schools at the university.

The Economics MA course is designed to meet the growing demand for those students who seek a degree that combines a solid training in microeconomic and macroeconomic principles with quantitative methods and research informed applied economics units.

This course is clearly different from the existing MSc Economics courses at Manchester because of its focus on mainstream but less theoretical units that need to be completed.

Students who choose the Economics MA will take compulsory courses in both Microeconomics and Macroeconomics; they will further advance their quantitative skills and techniques in the core courses in Introduction to Econometrics, Mathematical Methods in Economic Analysis and Further Econometrics; and, as part of their MA dissertation, they will focus on applied and/or policy-oriented research of economic data as relevant to policy makers and economics professionals.

The programme suits students who are interested in a career straight after the MA and not those students interested in postgraduate research. The latter group may find our MSc Economics more appropriate.

Aims

  • Provide instruction and rigorous training in economics and the relevant methods of mathematical economics and econometrics research in this area
  • Develop your powers of inquiry, critical analysis and logical thinking, and your ability to apply theoretical knowledge to current issues of policy and practice in economics
  • Encourage initiative, independent learning, awareness of analytical and theoretical approaches in the field of economics, exposure to recent research and the state-of-the-art tools in applied work in economics
  • Train you in research methods and core skills in microeconomics, macroeconomics, econometrics, mathematical economics, problem-solving, written and oral expression, communication and presentation skills
  • Equip you with the intellectual apparatus and practical skills necessary for an economist working in private or public organisations
  • Enable you to apply advanced research skills to a relevant research area either in economics, via course units and a dissertation

Special features

Quantitative methods preparation for the MA

1. Please visit our Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Economics website where you will find information about the minimum level of knowledge of mathematics and statistics that you should possess from your current or previous training.

2. On the same website, please look at the details and content of our Introduction course on Quantitative Methods in Economics which builds on the knowledge resumed in (1) and which is designed to equip you with further technical skills that you will require before starting the MSc. You are strongly advised to attend this course which is offered, free of charge. The course will run during induction week and we recommend that you spend some time between July 1 and September studying and familiarising yourself with the course material on the website, especially if you might not be able to attend the course. The significance of this course is illustrated by the fact that the obtained marks contribute 10% to the final marks of the Maths Methods and Econometrics compulsory units of semester 1.

Teaching and learning

IMPORTANT NOTE ON PART-TIME STUDY

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.  

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.  

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

The demand for economists continues to grow worldwide. This demand exists across a host of institutions ranging from the public sector (like universities, central banks, international organisations) to the private sector (commercial banks and insurance providers).

With the range of applied economics skills provided in the MA Economics students are perfectly place to seek a career in business and place themselves ahead of competition. At the same time this degree is ideal for students who seek further education via MSc-research degrees across the UK and the world.



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Do you want a course that provides a thorough grounding in advanced quantitative methods taught within an applied social science framework?. Read more
  • Do you want a course that provides a thorough grounding in advanced quantitative methods taught within an applied social science framework?
  • Would you like to learn methods of data analysis, including advanced statistics for complex data?
  • Would you like a skills-based course with practical training that is highly regarded for future employment within government and academia?

The course is designed to be accessible to non-statisticians, yet is more focussed than many other existing master's courses in social research methods. You'll need a base level of knowledge in undergraduate research methods which you will build on throughout the course to gain comprehensive statistical and analytical skills.

The course has a strong connection with the Cathie Marsh Institute for Social Research (CMIST), reflecting our commitment to interdisciplinary, integrated research. Research activities within the Social Statistics discipline area are both methodological and substantive. They focus on a wide range of subject areas including social inequalities, population dynamics and survey methodology. The SRMS MSc course is recognised by both the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the North West Doctoral Training Centre, from whom we receive a large number of Advanced Quantitative methods (AQM) and CASE awards each year.

The MSc course aims to develop future social scientists who will have a thorough grounding in research, and are equipped with the tools for collecting and analysing statistical data.

Those completing the MSc course are well suited to roles within central and local government, academia and commercial research and our rate of employability is especially high.

Contact the Course Director:

Professor Wendy Olsen

Email: 

Tel: 0161 2753043

or Admissions Tutor:

Dr K. Purdam

Email: 

Follow us on Twitter too

Course unit details

The SRMS course provides a thorough grounding in advanced quantitative methods, taught within an applied social science framework. Whilst the training focuses on advanced quantitative methods, the course is designed to be accessible to students coming from a broad range of disciplinary backgrounds and with varying levels of prior statistical knowledge.

The course is available full-time over one year or part-time over two-years, and may be studied as either an MSc or a Postgraduate Diploma.

All students (MSc and Postgraduate Diploma) take course units totalling 120 credits (eight 15-credit courses) over the year.

Course units typically include:

  • Methodology and Research Design
  • Introduction to Statistical Modelling
  • Statistical Foundations
  • Qualitative Research Methods
  • Survey Research
  • Multilevel Modelling
  • Longitudinal Data Analysis
  • Advanced Survey Methods
  • Social Network Analysis
  • Introduction to Demography
  • Structural Equation Modelling

All students proceeding to MSc must complete a research dissertation of up to 15,000 words. Those on the Postgraduate Diploma may upgrade to the full MSc subject to satisfactory course performance.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

There is an increasing need for well-trained social scientists who are able to apply advanced methods of analysis to complex data. Graduates of our programme in Social Research Methods and Statistics are in a good position to obtain jobs in central government, including the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the academic sector, local government and within the commercial research sector. We have excellent links with ONS and government departments such as the Department for Children, Schools and Families, local authorities and many commercial organisations and thus well placed to assist students in finding jobs. A number of our students already hold research positions (typically in local government or overseas) and take the MSc as part of career development programmes. The SRMS course is ideal preparation for students wishing to pursue doctoral study, and is a formal component of our 1+3 PhD training model. CMIST usually have a number of funded PhD studentships each year and many studentships are taken up by graduates of the SRMS programme.



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Are you keen to apply your interest and skills in economics to the study of financial markets?. Do you want to combine a rigorous training in core economics with a solid introduction to the key theoretical techniques used in finance?. Read more
  • Are you keen to apply your interest and skills in economics to the study of financial markets?
  • Do you want to combine a rigorous training in core economics with a solid introduction to the key theoretical techniques used in finance?
  • Do you plan to work as a portfolio manager, risk management consultant, or financial analyst?

The demand for highly skilled experts in financial economics continues to increase rapidly in the modern economy. This demand exists in the public sector (central banks, international organisations, academic institutions) and especially in the private sector (commercial banks and insurance companies). This course is designed to meet this demand for those students who seek a quantitative degree in financial economics, by combining a solid training in microeconomic and macroeconomic principles, as well as the quantitative methods and theory needed for the analysis of financial markets.

Financial Economics is a fascinating area, having a history marked by outstanding achievements. A remarkable feature of this discipline is that its theoretical highlights (such as the Black-Scholes formula) turned out to be extremely important in practice. Fundamental ideas and tools of Financial Economics that were developed at the interface between Mathematical Economics and Finance created new markets essentially based on concepts suggested by academics. A central goal of the course is to demonstrate the use of these ideas and tools in contexts where they are indispensable and widely exploited. The course will expose students to quantitative techniques and theory that will be useful to anyone in the financial industry - a portfolio manager, risk management consultant, or financial analyst.

Special features

Quantitative methods preparation for the MSc

1. Please visit our Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Economics website where you will find information about the minimum level of knowledge of mathematics and statistics that you should possess from your current or previous training.

2. On the same website, please look at the details and content of our Introduction course on Quantitative Methods in Economics which builds on the knowledge resumed in (1) and which is designed to equip you with further technical skills that you will require before starting the MSc. You are strongly advised to attend this course which is offered, free of charge. The course will run during induction week and we recommend that you spend some time between July 1 and September studying and familiarising yourself with the course material on the website, especially if you might not be able to attend the course. The significance of this course is illustrated by the fact that the obtained marks contribute 10% to the final marks of the Maths Methods and Econometrics compulsory units of semester 1.

Teaching and learning

IMPORTANT NOTE ON PART-TIME STUDY

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.  

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.  

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is usually by written examination at the end of each semester in which a course unit is taught. Some units may require a course work element that may be assessed. Progression to the summer dissertation element requires completion of the taught element at least at the pass-level.

Course unit details

The program offers four core units in Semester 1 (Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, Econometric Methods, Mathematical Methods in Economic Analysis) and in Semester 2 three core units (Mathematical Finance, Financial Economics, Financial Econometrics or Applied Macroeconometrics orCross Section Econometrics) plus one optional module from a list of choices (eg, Monetary Economics, Public Economics, and Economic Growth). Such modules as Mathematical Finance and Financial Economics not only contain the material which is a recognised classic in the field, but also reflect new trends in the area (eg elements of Behavioural Economics and Finance).

Career opportunities

Employment opportunities for students in Financial Economics are traditionally very good. The high reputation of The University of Manchester, and especially its Economics division having rich historical traditions, will serve as an excellent recommendation for job applicants. The high-quality training obtained in the course of the study within the MSc in Financial Economics Programme will facilitate the future career of those who have got this degree.



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This course provides you with training that will prepare you for doctoral-level work, and provides a stand-alone qualification in social science research.The Master of Research is a faculty-wide, cross-disciplinary research training course with an education strand. Read more

This course provides you with training that will prepare you for doctoral-level work, and provides a stand-alone qualification in social science research.The Master of Research is a faculty-wide, cross-disciplinary research training course with an education strand. It provides high-quality training to potential doctoral students as well as a stand-alone qualification for social science researchers.

Depending on your research interests you will be placed in a research group within the Department of Education, which will have seminar and reading group activities that you can join.

You will also spend a short period of time shadowing an experienced researcher.

The course aims to:

  • teach you to systematically review alternative approaches, methodologies and paradigms of research in social and educational enquiry
  • enable you to critically evaluate the application of these approaches in the specific areas of social and educational enquiry in which you specialise
  • support you within an active research community, in identifying and investigating your own original research questions
  • equip you with the skills to contribute to research projects using any of the main methodologies of the social sciences

South West Doctoral Training Partnership

This MRes is delivered by the Economics & Social Research Council (ESRC), specifically, as part of the larger South West Doctoral Training Partnership (SWDTP). It can be taken as a course in its own right or as part of the 1+3 (MRes + PhD) pathway, which enables successful graduates to proceed to a PhD.

If you apply for the 1+3 you must indicate your preferred PhD route in your application. Progression from the MRes to the MPhil or PhD stage is dependent on an acceptable level of achievement.

Course structure

This course lasts 1 year. Occasionally we make changes to our programmes in response to, for example, feedback from students, developments in research and the field of studies, and the requirements of accrediting bodies. You will be advised of any significant changes to the advertised programme, in accordance with our Terms and Conditions.

Units

Compulsory course units

These compulsory units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

Semester 1

  • Short research apprenticeship project (MRes)
  • Quantitative methods 1: introduction to quantitative methods
  • Qualitative methods 1
  • Principles & skills of social research
  • Contemporary issues in education research 1: critical users

Semester 2

  • Long research apprenticeship project (MRes)
  • Contemporary issues in educational research 2: competent producers
  • Quantitative methods 2 or Qualitative methods 2

Summer

  • MRes dissertation

Optional course units

You can choose from a number of optional units. Here are some examples of the units currently being studied by our students.

  • Quantitative methods 2
  • Qualitative methods 2
  • Independent research essay

Learning and assessment

Learning

  • Laboratory sessions
  • Lectures
  • Online resources
  • Practical sessions
  • Seminars
  • Tutorials
  • Workshops

Assessment

  • Coursework
  • Dissertation
  • Multiple choice examination
  • Practical work
  • Seminar
  • Work-based placement


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Who is it for?. The demand for specialists in health economics continues to increase. Whether you have a quantitative, sciences’ or economics background, the MSC in Economic Evaluation in Healthcare is designed to help you meet that demand. Read more

Who is it for?

The demand for specialists in health economics continues to increase. Whether you have a quantitative, sciences’ or economics background, the MSC in Economic Evaluation in Healthcare is designed to help you meet that demand.

From economic evaluation, health economics and quantitative methods to welfare economics and epidemiology, this course will give you the expertise to pursue a rewarding career in health economics.

Objectives

This course has been designed to meet the demand for health economics’ quantitative and analytical skills for decision-making in the healthcare sector.

The Economic Evaluation in Healthcare MSc helps you:

  • Develop your analytical and modelling abilities.
  • Understand the background and theoretical foundations of health economics.
  • Recognise the conceptual bases for economic evaluation and advanced quantitative methods relevant to healthcare decision-making.
  • Gain the skills and the experience you need to work as a health economist.

The Department of Economics hosts both the City Health Economics Centre (CHEC) and the London Health Economics Group (LHEG)

Placements

Placements provide you with a unique opportunity to apply the skills you have learned during the MSc and acquire experience in the workplace.

Companies and organisations are invited to meet with you and propose subjects for your dissertation, which will be done during a placement. Organisations and students liaise directly with the approval of the academic supervisor.

Our students secure placements with a wide range of companies, such as:

  • Boehringer Ingelheim
  • Janssen-Cilag
  • Eli Lilly
  • Campbell Alliance
  • Office of Health Economics
  • Otsuka
  • Celgene
  • Curo
  • IMS Health
  • And many others.

Academic facilities

As a Master’s student at City, you will benefit from state-of-the art student-geared facilities, including a bright new gym and meeting points. Most importantly, you will benefit from City’s central London location.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by research-active academic staff, teaching assistants, and industry speakers and visiting lecturers.

We have also invited speakers to present specialised topics in Health Economics.

Assessments are typically a combination of unseen written examinations (70% for each module) and coursework (30% for each module), but this can vary by module.

About two-thirds of our students secure a placement at a firm. The placement is used to learn about the sector while writing the dissertation.

Pre-sessionals

Pre-sessional activities covering Statistics, Microeconomics, Stata, Excel and Mathematics run in September before the start of term. These are available for all students who secure a place on the MSc Economic Evaluation and Healthcare course. Pre-sessionals are included in your degree fee and are designed to prepare you for the course. We therefore strongly encourage you to make every effort to attend. Dates of the sessions are as follows:

  • Statistics – date TBC
  • Mathematics – date TBC
  • Stata – date TBC
  • Excel – date TBC
  • Microeconomics – date TBC

Please note that you are not required to register for the above pre-sessionals, you just need to turn up on the day. Further information, such as the exact times and locations, will be provided in your induction schedule.

Full-time and part-time assessment

The teaching takes place over two terms, from September to June.

Full-time students take 20 weeks of lectures, plus dissertation and examination periods over one year.

Full-time students who pass all the taught modules during the main exam sessions will finish the programme at the end of September, when they submit their dissertation.

Full-time students who successfully complete the taught modules in the August re-sit exam session will submit their dissertation in December.

Part-time students take 20 weeks of lectures, plus dissertation and examination periods spread over one year and three months.

Part-time students complete all modules over the course of four terms, from September to June, before undertaking their dissertation.

Part-time students who successfully pass all the taught modules during the main exam sessions will finish the programme in December, when they submit their dissertation. Part-time students who successfully pass all the taught modules in August submit in March of the following year.

Modules

You will complete 180 credits. This includes modules worth 120 credits (one module worth 30 credits and six modules worth 15 credits). The research project is worth 60 credits.

Each module typically has a weekly two-hour lecture and a one-hour tutorial, but this may vary.

This course is taught on Thursdays and Fridays only. A full-time student can expect to spend all day Thursday and Friday at City, for 10 or 11 weeks in the Autumn term and the Spring term.

Please note: it is not possible to give an exact indication of hours per week, as these can vary from one term to the other, depending on which electives you choose.

Part one: route core module

You will take Quantitative Methods and Economic Evaluation on Thursdays during the first term and Health Economics and Advanced Economic Evaluation on Thursdays during the second term.

You will take Epidemiology on Fridays during the first term and Welfare Economics and Economic Evaluation Workshops (Modelling) on Fridays during the second term.

Part-time students will take only what is taught on Thursdays during the first year and what is taught on Fridays during the second year.

  • Quantitative methods (Health) (30 credits)
  • Advanced Economic Evaluation in Health Care (15 credits)
  • Economic evaluation (15 credits)
  • Economic evaluation workshops (15 credits)
  • Welfare economics (15 credits)
  • Epidemiology (15 credits)
  • Health Economics (15 credits)

Part two: route core module

  • Economics research project (60 credits)

Career prospects

This MSc prepares you for a wide range of career opportunities in economic consultancies, think-tanks, the pharmaceutical industry, professional associations, governmental bodies and non-governmental organisations. It will also enable you to explore teaching and research positions in academic institutions.

Our MSc Economic Evaluation and Healthcare graduates have gone on to work for companies such as:

  • Abacus International
  • NICE
  • Optum
  • IMS Health
  • Research International
  • NHS
  • Kovis
  • Eli-Lilly
  • OHE
  • United Nations
  • Fidelity
  • Oxford Outcomes
  • Gallaher
  • Johnson&Johnson
  • Novo Nordisk
  • Synovate
  • Tomtah

The MSc also provides a solid academic foundation for students wishing to pursue doctoral research in economics. Our Master’s graduates have pursued PhDs at UCL, York, City, University of London and Warwick.



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This course provides an understanding of social research, with a particular focus on social statistics and quantitative methods. Read more

Introduction

This course provides an understanding of social research, with a particular focus on social statistics and quantitative methods. The course includes orientation material on social research methods as a whole, and detailed training on a wide range of statistical methods, with advanced modules on data management and emerging priority research areas, such as big data and social network analysis.
Teaching covers the theories behind the methods, and the practical work in using datasets and analysing them with statistical software. Students will gain a variety of highly marketable skills in the areas of social research and social statistics.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Start date: Full-time: SeptemberPart-time: September/JanuarySee semester dates
- Course Director: Dave Griffiths
- Location: Stirling Campus

Course objectives

This course provides an understanding of social research, with a particular focus on social statistics and quantitative methods. The course includes orientation material on social research methods as a whole, and detailed training on a wide range of statistical methods, with advanced modules on data management and emerging priority research areas, such as big data and social network analysis.
Teaching covers the theories behind the methods, and the practical work in using datasets and analysing them with statistical software. Students will gain a variety of highly marketable skills in the areas of social research and social statistics.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20

For more information go to http://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard.

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

Students will undertake four core modules, two option modules and complete a 15,000 word dissertation. In the full time programme, 3 modules are completed during the Autumn semester, 3 in the Spring, and the dissertation submitted in the summer. Module either cover wider topics in social research, or focus on understanding and implementing advanced quantitative methods.

Core modules

- Research Design and Process
- Quantitative Data Analysis
- Advanced Data Analysis
- Advanced Data Management
- Using Big Data in Social Research

Option modules
Students will also select two option modules from a range of applied social research topics. The recommended option is Social Network Analysis.

Other options include The Nature of Social Enquiry, Policy Analysis and Evaluation Research, Qualitative Analysis and Research Methods in Criminology and Socio-Legal Studies. Some of these modules will be particularly suitable for students with an interest in mixed methods research.

Delivery and assessment

Modules are generally a combination of lectures and workshops. Teaching largely takes place on Tuesdays, although some components might take place on other days. The contact hours are sympathetic to those working alongside their studies. Most teaching is performed in smaller classes, with group activities. Modules are usually assessed by an examination, software based assignments, and essays.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Career opportunities

Social statistics are an important area within applied social research, offering employment opportunities within the private, public and voluntary sectors, as well as further study. Students will develop thorough knowledge of software and learn a range of sought-after technical skills, including accessing, preparing, analysing and summarising complex quantitative datasets. The course is also designed to provide the technical skill set required for further PhD study.

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The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. Read more
The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme.

The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/

Aims and Outcomes

The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

- Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools;
- Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods.

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

- Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing.

- Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test).

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

- Ethnographic methods and participant observation;
- Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research;
- The logistics of long-term fieldwork;
- Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures;
- Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
- Language training.

The Training Programme

In addition to optional courses that may be taken (see below), the student must successfully complete the following core course:

- Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011).

This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15PPOH035, a 0.5 unit course hosted by Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

Dissertation

MA/MPhil Students meet regularly with their supervisor to produce a systematic review of the secondary and regional literature that forms an integral part of their dissertation/research proposal. The dissertation, Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (15 PAN C998), is approximately 15,000 words and demonstrates the extent to which students have achieved the key learning outcomes during the first year of research training. The dissertation takes the form of an extended research proposal that includes:

- A review of the relevant theoretical and ethnographic literature;
- An outline of the specific questions to be addressed, methods to be employed, and the expected contribution of the study to anthropology;
- A discussion of the practical, political and ethical issues likely to affect the research; and
- A presentation of the schedule for the proposed research together with an estimated budget.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. Two soft-bound copies of the dissertation, typed or word-processed, should be submitted to the Faculty of Arts and Humanities Office by 16:00 and on Moodle by 23:59 on the appropriate day.

Exemption from Training

Only those students who have clearly demonstrated their knowledge of research methods by completing a comparable program of study in qualitative and quantitative methods will be considered for a possible exemption from the taught courses. All students, regardless of prior training, are required to participate in the Research Training Seminar.

Programme Specification 2013/2014 (msword; 128kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/file39765.docx

Teaching & Learning

This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory.

The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date). Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC)

Destinations

Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Studying Finance at Royal Holloway, University of London means that you will learn from internationally renowned experts at one of the UK’s top ten teaching and research centres. Read more

Studying Finance at Royal Holloway, University of London means that you will learn from internationally renowned experts at one of the UK’s top ten teaching and research centres. This programme provides you with an opportunity to study a portfolio of courses in the first year designed to bring you up to the entry standard for the Masters degree; ideal if you have graduated from disciplines other than Economics, Finance, and a highly quantitative discipline. You will learn how to analyse issues in finance and corporate policy and build your analytical and technical expertise. On graduation you will be ready to start a career in the financial services, business and banking sectors; we have an impressive employment record, 90% of our economics students have jobs in six months.

In the first year you will study undergraduate level courses and in the second year, subject to progression, you will progress to the year-long Masters in Finance. Through your studies you will gain a strong grounding in core areas of finance and have the flexibility to specialise in areas such as fixed income securities and derivatives, investment and portfolio management or decision theory and behaviour. On graduation you will be skilled in investment analysis, mathematical statistics financial econometrics and you will have the tools to analyse how investment decisions.

Our balanced approach to research and teaching guarantees high quality teaching from subject leaders, cutting edge materials and intellectually challenging debates. You will be taught by people who have worked and are still working in the finance industry in the broad areas of asset allocation and risk, as well as algorithmic trading. 

  • Excellent career prospects; economics has an impressive employment record and graduates’ starting salaries are amongst the highest in the country.
  • Small groups with individual support; being part of a small group means you’ll feel part of a team and have close contact with the academic staff. You will also receive individual support from the course director.
  • Quality research and teaching; one of only economics departments in the country placed in the top ten for both research and student satisfaction (Research Assessment Exercise, 2014 and National Student Survey 2015).

Course structure

Pre-course preparation

Quantitative Methods

In this module you will develop an understanding of basic mathematical methods that are used in the study of Economics and Finance, including basic matrix analysis, topology, statistics, and probability theory. You will look at differentiation and integration of standard functions, and basic manipulations of vectors and matrices. You will also examine various optimisation problems and theorems leading to certain basic results in calculus.

Core modules

Year 1

  • Microeconomics
  • Macroeconomics
  • Quantitative Methods in Economics

Year 2

  • Corporate Finance
  • Foundations of Finance
  • Quantitative Methods in Finance
  • Financial Economics
  • Mathematical Methods
  • Dissertation

Optional modules

In addition to these mandatory course units there are a number of optional course units available during your degree studies. The following is a selection of optional course units that are likely to be available. Please note that although the College will keep changes to a minimum, new units may be offered or existing units may be withdrawn, for example, in response to a change in staff. Applicants will be informed if any significant changes need to be made.

Year 1

  • Game Theory
  • Financial Econometrics
  • Financial Economics

Year 2

  • Decision Theory and Behaviour
  • Investment and Portfolio Management
  • Fixed Income Securities and Derivatives
  • Private Equity
  • The Economics of Banking

Teaching & assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Your future career

A Finance masters degree at Royal Holloway will equip you with an enviable range of transferable skills and can lead into a variety of career paths as well as the knowledge and a solid foundation for continued PhD studies. Employers recognise and reward the real knowledge and skills developed in a Finance degree.

We will help students to recognise their own strengths, skills and abilities so that they can make strong applications for their chosen job or further study. We also provide careers support including application and interview coaching, career strategy discussions and the opportunity to network with major employes.

  • Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many areas within the financial sector, including careers as economists, financial analysts, accountants, bankers, journalists and business analysts. 
  • Our graduates are currently working for firms such as Accenture, TNS, Bloomberg, Citigroup, Royal Bank of Scotland, Credit Suisse, Pricewaterhouse Cooper and Baker and Mackenzie.


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