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Masters Degrees (Quantitative Biology)

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The Department of Biology offers a Master of Science Degree that can be tailored to meet the needs of the student. Choices include a Thesis Option and a Non-thesis Option. Read more
The Department of Biology offers a Master of Science Degree that can be tailored to meet the needs of the student. Choices include a Thesis Option and a Non-thesis Option. The programs are designed to accommodate both full-time and part-time students.

Please visit the website to see the curriculum for these programs:

http://bio.wcupa.edu/biology/index.php/graduate-degrees.html

Our Mission

The primary mission of the Department of Biology is to provide a high quality educational experience to graduate students. This is achieved by maintaining small class sizes staffed by full-time faculty. Virtually all courses have a laboratory component, facilitating participatory learning. An integrated core curriculum is intended to strengthen the communication, quantitative and analytical skills of all biology majors. Several focused concentrations within the undergraduate curriculum offer options of either specialising for immediate employment upon graduation, or preparing for postgraduate education. 

Masters students receive training as biological scientists primarily for career advancement. Although most students come from the Delaware Valley region, their educational experience is intended to equip them well for careers anywhere. Biology majors are required to perform independent projects in many courses, and are encouraged to work closely with faculty in collaborative research. The combination of unusually broad course selection and individual attention allows students from very diverse backgrounds to excel within the program. A part of the department's mission is to participate in the process of scientific inquiry.

The department expects its faculty to engage in scholarly activity, and encourages research publication and the acquisition of extramural funding. Scholarship enhances the stature of the Department and University, adds exceptionally current information to lecture material, and has helped to secure technologically up-to-date laboratory equipment. The department's research environment also provides an ongoing framework into which graduate and undergraduate student research projects can beincorporated. A strong record of collaborative faculty-student research is one reason for the successful placement of most Biology Department graduates. 

The Biology Department serves the University by supporting coursework for other disciplines, principally in Nursing, Health, Kinesiology and the Forensic and Toxicological Chemistry program, and is actively involved in maintaining the high quality of the Preprofessional Program. The department is working closely with the School of Education in training Secondary school biology teachers, and is strengthening ties with other departments in environmental science. Department faculty serve the community as consultants to government, non-profit organisations, other schools and industry.

Research Opportunities

The faculty of the Department of Biology are nationally recognised for their research programs and publications in prestigious journals. Faculty research is regularly supported by grants from the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, or similar state and national organisations. Research and teaching facilities are equipped with such state-of-the-art equipment as liquid scintillation and gamma counters, spectrophotometers, and a digitised HPLC system. We also have access to a FEI environmental scanning electron microscope, a FEI transmission electron microscope, and Reichart ultramicrotome.

The Biology Department also manages a USDA certified (NIH approved) animal care facility, the 20,000 specimen William Darlington Herbarium, and 100 acre Robert B. Gordon Natural Area for Environmental Studies.

Research opportunities for graduate students are particularly strong in three areas:

(1) Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology;
(2) Physiology, Development, and Cell Biology; and
(3) Molecular Genetics, Immunology, and Microbiology.

Faculty in each of these programs have ongoing research projects and welcome serious student investigators into their laboratories.

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The University of Dundee has a long history of mathematical biology, going back to Professor Sir D'Arcy Wentworth Thompson, Chair of Natural History, 1884-1917. Read more

Mathematical Biology at Dundee

The University of Dundee has a long history of mathematical biology, going back to Professor Sir D'Arcy Wentworth Thompson, Chair of Natural History, 1884-1917. In his famous book On Growth and Form (where he applied geometric principles to morphological problems) Thompson declares:

"Cell and tissue, shell and bone, leaf and flower, are so many portions of matter, and it is in obedience to the laws of physics that their particles have been moved, molded and conformed. They are no exceptions to the rule that God always geometrizes. Their problems of form are in the first instance mathematical problems, their problems of growth are essentially physical problems, and the morphologist is, ipso facto, a student of physical science."

Current mathematical biology research in Dundee continues in the spirit of D'Arcy Thompson with the application of modern applied mathematics and computational modelling to a range of biological processes involving many different but inter-connected phenomena that occur at different spatial and temporal scales. Specific areas of application are to cancer growth and treatment, ecological models, fungal growth and biofilms. The overall common theme of all the mathematical biology research may be termed"multi-scale mathematical modelling" or, from a biological perspective, "quantitative systems biology" or"quantitative integrative biology".

The Mathematical Biology Research Group currently consists of Professor Mark Chaplain, Dr. Fordyce Davidson and Dr. Paul Macklin along with post-doctoral research assistants and PhD students. Professor Ping Lin provides expertise in the area of computational numerical analysis. The group will shortly be augmented by the arrival of a new Chair in Mathematical Biology (a joint Mathematics/Life Sciences appointment).

As a result, the students will benefit directly not only from the scientific expertise of the above internationally recognized researchers, but also through a wide-range of research activities such as journal clubs and research seminars.

Aims of the programme

1. To provide a Masters-level postgraduate education in the knowledge, skills and understanding of mathematical biology.
2. To enhance analytical and critical abilities and competence in the application of mathematical modeling techniques to problems in biomedicine.

Prramme Content

This one year course involves taking four taught modules in semester 1 (September-December), followed by a further 4 taught modules in semester 2 (January-May), and undertaking a project over the Summer (May-August).

A typical selection of taught modules would be:

Dynamical Systems
Computational Modelling
Statistics & Stochastic Models
Inverse Problems
Mathematical Oncology
Mathematical Ecology & Epidemiology
Mathematical Physiology
Personal Transferable Skills

Finally, all students will undertake a Personal Research Project under the supervision of a member of staff in the Mathematical Biology Research Group.

Methods of Teaching

The programme will involve a variety of teaching formats including lectures, tutorials, seminars, journal clubs, case studies, coursework, and an individual research project.

Taught sessions will be supported by individual reading and study.

Students will be guided to prepare their research project plan and to develop skills and competence in research including project management, critical thinking and problem solving, project reporting and presentation.

Career Prospects

The Biomedical Sciences are now recognizing the need for quantitative, predictive approaches to their traditional qualitative subject areas. Healthcare and Biotechnology are still fast-growing industries in UK, Europe and Worldwide. New start-up companies and large-scale government investment are also opening up employment prospects in emerging economies such as Singapore, China and India.

Students graduating from this programme would be very well placed to take advantage of these global opportunities.

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The Master in Conservation Biology, with specialization in Behavioural Ecology and Wildlife Management, aims at providing a critical and conceptually-based understanding of animal behaviour and evolutionary ecology, in the framework of conservation biology and wildlife management. Read more

The Master in Conservation Biology, with specialization in Behavioural Ecology and Wildlife Management, aims at providing a critical and conceptually-based understanding of animal behaviour and evolutionary ecology, in the framework of conservation biology and wildlife management. This two-year master program consists in both lessons and fieldtrips, while half of the second year is devoted to a personal research project conducted by students in an international research team.

OUR MASTER PROGRAM

The Master program has a two-year span, with most of the courses taught in english. Our teaching philosophy is based on the idea that biodiversity conservation must be grounded in a multi-level knowledge approach, mixing key disciplines in ecology and evolution with recent technical advances in the fields of biometry, molecular ecology and management tools. The teaching content is rooted in our established strengths in behavioural ecology, evolutionary biology, conservation biology, quantitative ecology and research design. The master program is enriched by input from professional conservationists and managers, to put courses in the broader context of project management and decision-making policies.

The specific teaching objectives aim at developing and improving students’ skills to:

  • engage with concepts and theory in behavioural ecology, conservation biology and wildlife management from interdisciplinary perspectives at an advanced scientific level.
  • assess the ability of organisms to react, cope with and adjust to environmental change occurring over different spatial and time scales.
  • appreciate the opportunities offered by new technological developments for the future of research on animal behaviour and wildlife management
  • combine theory, hypotheses, methods, data and fieldwork so as to identify and develop innovative research questions and design.

Half of the second year is devoted to conducting a personal research project and writing a thesis of 12,000 words. Research projects are conducted within an international team previously selected by the students, and led with the support of an expert supervisor.

TEACHING & FIELDTRIPS

Teaching consists of lectures, seminars by international researchers, class tutorials and practical training in the laboratory and in the field, providing in-depth exploration of key issues. Our teaching philosophy is to stimulate balanced and evidence-based discussions and debates between academic staff and students. Such interactions provide efficient training to identify and explore theory, methods and practice in an academic environment.

Field courses allow students to apply the methods and ideas developed in the classroom to practical use in the field. Each year, you will attend at least one week-long fieldtrip, and several one-day field sessions. The "Camargue field course" provides the opportunity to work on a model species for wildlife management in the Camargue Natural Regional Park (CNRP): the greater flamingo. Fieldwork will be grounded on extensive research on wildlife populations in the context of the various activities taking place in the CNRP. Other field courses address the quantitative analysis of animal behaviour, the monitoring of wildlife, and ex-situ conservation. The “Parc Polaire fieldtrip”, in the Jura mountains, allows students to experience the role of and, stakes faced by, a park dedicated to the conservation of European wild species such as the European bison and deer species.

CAREER PROSPECTS

The aim of our master program is to train future scientific leaders in animal behaviour and conservation biology, as well as future managers and policy officers in biodiversity, conservation and wildlife management.

Therefore, our program aims at providing both a diversified and specialized expertise in the general fields of animal behaviour and wildlife management. It also combines behavioural ecology and conservation biology as major disciplines with some other relevant topics – ethics and deontology, epistemology, socioeconomics of conservation, structure and management of environmental organizations, in addition to the hard science of biodiversity.

The master's Alumni Office helps alumni keep in touch with each other and organises alumni events.

LIFE IN DIJON, CAPITAL CITY OF BURGUNDY (FRANCE)

The whole of the program takes place at the University of Burgundy-Franche Comté, located in the scenic city of Dijon. The former capital city of the Duchy of Burgundy, Dijon is now a medium-size French city, where you can enjoy a vibrant and active cultural life, as well as quick getaways to the countryside and the world famous neighbouring vineyards of the so-called “Golden coast”.

Life in Dijon is very affordable and accommodation easily accessible. The city is well-equipped with modern tramway and bus lines, making commuting between any place in Dijon and the University easy and convenient.

Showing marks of its medieval past, Dijon has excelled in making any subsequent architectural revolution his own. Dijon possesses a fair number of outstanding museums and remarkable monuments, and is also internationally known as the hometown of the notorious French gastronomy. Dijon has a vibrant cultural life with music and food festivals all over the year. Cultural and leisure attractions are widespread, from classical music concerts to jazz festivals, food fairs, cinemas… Dijon is also host of several top-level professional sports teams (football, basketball, handball, rugby…), while also offering a large diversity of sports facilities for the amateur. From beach-volley fields to suburban hiking and cycling paths, urban parks and the much appreciated Lake Kir, incentives to jump in a pair of trainers will be everywhere.

GRANTS

Up to five fellowship grants (800 € per month, during up to 10 months) will be awarded each year to high quality foreign students, with a particular attention to applications coming from Mediterranean countries and Caribbean island nations and territories.

APPLICATIONS

During the first year, students take examinations associated with the Master in Conservation Biology, specialized in Behavioural Ecology and Wildlife Management. Examinations must be successfully passed (i.e. obtain 60 ECTS credits) in order to proceed to the second year. In the second year, the thesis following your research project accounts for half the marks of the second year.

For further information about how to apply, please directly contact the head of the master program, Professor Frank Cézilly ().

Please also visit our dedicated webpage (http://www.nature-conservation-ubfc.com/bewm/fr/), and like our facebook page (“Master BEWM – UBFC Dijon”) to stay up to date with the life of and the latest news about our program!



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Introduced in 2004, this course was developed by the Cambridge Computational Biology Institute, an interdisciplinary centre bringing together the unique strengths of Cambridge in medicine, biology, mathematics and the physical sciences. Read more
Introduced in 2004, this course was developed by the Cambridge Computational Biology Institute, an interdisciplinary centre bringing together the unique strengths of Cambridge in medicine, biology, mathematics and the physical sciences.

The course is aimed at introducing students to quantitative aspects of biological and medical sciences. It is intended for mathematicians, computer scientists and others wishing to learn about the subject in preparation for a PhD course or a career in industry. It is also suitable for students with a first degree in biosciences as long as they have strong quantitative skills (which should be documented in the application).

This 11-month course consists of core modules in bioinformatics, scientific programming with R, genomics, systems biology and network biology. Before the start of the first term, students are required to attend an introductory course in molecular biology. Courses are delivered in association with several University departments from the Schools of Biological Sciences and Physical Sciences, groups within the School of Clinical Medicine, the European Bioinformatics Institute and the Sanger Institute. The course concludes with a three-month internship in a university or industrial laboratory.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/maammpcbi

Learning Outcomes

After completing the MPhil in Computational Biology, students will be expected to have:

- acquired a sound knowledge of a range of tools and methods in computational biology;
- developed the capacity for independent study and problem solving at a higher level;
- undertaken an internship project within a laboratory or group environment, and produced a project report;
- given at least one presentation on their project.

Format

The course combines taught lectures (October-April), followed by a summer internship project (May-August). There are typically 3-4 taught modules per term, and each module consists of 16 hours of lectures. Each module is assessed by coursework, and there is one general examination in May.

The Course Director is available throughout the year for individual meetings, and briefly meets termly with each student to check on progress. Each lecturer is also encouraged to arrange an office hour whereby students can talk about their progress.

Lectures: Typically 16 hours per module, with students taking 8 modules.

Journal Clubs: A weekly seminar is held during the first two terms on topics across Computational Biology. These seminars help students to select an appropriate project.

Placements

Students undertake a mandatory internship (May to August) in either a university or industrial laboratory. The Department will compile a list of possible opportunities which students can discuss directly with the host laboratory. Alternatively students may organise their own internship, subject to the approval of the Course Director.

Assessment

A 18,000 word (maximum) report must be written to summarise the student's internship. An oral presentation on this report must also be given.

Students give a 25 minute presentation on their project as part of the formal assessment. Some assessed coursework may also require students to present their work.

Each module is assessed typically by two written assignments. These assignments involve significant computational elements.

A compulsory two-hour general examination is sat in May.

Continuing

MPhil students wishing to apply for a PhD at Cambridge must apply via the Graduate Admissions Office for continuation by the relevant deadline.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities: http://www.2016.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Introduced in 2004, this course was developed by the Cambridge Computational Biology Institute, an interdisciplinary centre bringing together the unique strengths of Cambridge in medicine, biology, mathematics and the physical sciences. Read more
Introduced in 2004, this course was developed by the Cambridge Computational Biology Institute, an interdisciplinary centre bringing together the unique strengths of Cambridge in medicine, biology, mathematics and the physical sciences.

The course is aimed at introducing students to quantitative aspects of biological and medical sciences. It is intended for mathematicians, computer scientists and others wishing to learn about the subject in preparation for a PhD course or a career in industry. It is also suitable for students with a first degree in biosciences as long as they have strong quantitative skills (which should be documented in the application).

This 11-month course consists of core modules in bioinformatics, scientific programming with R, genomics, systems biology and network biology. Before the start of the first term, students are required to attend an introductory course in molecular biology. Courses are delivered in association with several University departments from the Schools of Biological Sciences and Physical Sciences, groups within the School of Clinical Medicine, the European Bioinformatics Institute and the Sanger Institute. The course concludes with a three-month internship in a university or industrial laboratory.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/maammpcbi

Course detail

After completing the MPhil in Computational Biology, students will be expected to have:

- acquired a sound knowledge of a range of tools and methods in computational biology;
- developed the capacity for independent study and problem solving at a higher level;
- undertaken an internship project within a laboratory or group environment, and produced a project report;
- given at least one presentation on their project.

Format

The course combines taught lectures (October-April), followed by a summer internship project (May-August). There are typically 3-4 taught modules per term, and each module consists of 16 hours of lectures. Each module is assessed by coursework, and there is one general examination in May.

Placements

Students undertake a mandatory internship (May to August) in either a university or industrial laboratory. The Department will compile a list of possible opportunities which students can discuss directly with the host laboratory. Alternatively students may organise their own internship, subject to the approval of the Course Director.

Assessment

A 18,000 word (maximum) report must be written to summarise the student's internship. An oral presentation on this report must also be given.

Each module is assessed typically by two written assignments. These assignments involve significant computational elements.

A compulsory two-hour general examination is sat in May.

Continuing

MPhil students wishing to apply for a PhD at Cambridge must apply via the Graduate Admissions Office for continuation by the relevant deadline.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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We offer an opportunity to train in one of the newest areas of biology. the application of engineering principles to the understanding and design of biological networks. Read more

We offer an opportunity to train in one of the newest areas of biology: the application of engineering principles to the understanding and design of biological networks. This new approach promises solutions to some of today’s most pressing challenges in environmental protection, human health and energy production.

This MSc will provide you with a thorough knowledge of the primary design principles and biotechnology tools being developed in systems and synthetic biology, ranging from understanding genome-wide data to designing and synthesising BioBricks.

You will learn quantitative methods of modelling and data analysis to inform and design new hypotheses based on experimental data. The University’s new centre, SynthSys, is a hub for world-leading research in both systems and synthetic biology.

Programme structure

The programme consists of two semesters of taught courses followed by a research project and dissertation, which can be either modelling-based or laboratory-based.

Compulsory courses:

  • Information Processing in Biological Cells
  • Social Dimensions of Systems and Synthetic Biology
  • Dissertation project
  • Practical Systems Biology
  • Applications of Synthetic Biology
  • Tools for Synthetic Biology

Option courses:

  • Neural Computation
  • Probabilistic Modelling and Reasoning
  • Functional Genomic Technologies
  • Bioinformatics Programming & System Management
  • Stem Cells & Regenerative Medicine
  • Statistics and Data Analysis
  • Biobusiness
  • Gene Expression & Microbial Regulation
  • Bioinformatics Algorithms
  • Biological Physics
  • Computational Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Molecular Phylogenetics
  • Next Generation Genomics
  • Drug Discovery
  • Biochemistry A & B
  • Environmental Gene Mining & Metagenomics
  • Economics & Innovation in the Biotechnology Industry
  • Industry & Entrepreneurship in Biotechnology
  • Introduction to Scientific Programming
  • Practical Skills in Biochemistry A & B
  • Mathematical Biology

Career opportunities

The programme is designed to give you a good basis for managerial or technical roles in the pharmaceutical and biotech industries. It will also prepare you for entry into a PhD programme.



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The Graduate Program in Biology has been a successful component of the University's mission in education, scholarship, and service for over 30 years. Read more
The Graduate Program in Biology has been a successful component of the University's mission in education, scholarship, and service for over 30 years. The Master's degree in Biology has served as both a terminal degree meeting professional requirements, and as a bridge towards the doctoral degree.

Graduate have entered careers in education, research, and government service. Candidates for the master's degree reflect the diversity found in San Antonio and surrounding communities. Hallmarks of graduates are the skills and attitudes to become independent scholars. Two degrees are offered. The Master of Arts in Biology provides a broad background of course work in biology, including molecular and cellular biology, environmental biology, and organismal biology. The Master of Science in Biology provides additional training in laboratory-based or field research through completion of a thesis.

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The revolution in genetic mapping technology and the advent of whole genome sequences has turned quantitative genetics into one of the fastest growing areas of biology. Read more

The revolution in genetic mapping technology and the advent of whole genome sequences has turned quantitative genetics into one of the fastest growing areas of biology.

Quantitative Genetics & Genome Analysis is part of a suite of programmes offering specialist routes in Animal Breeding & Genetics, Evolutionary Genetics, or Human Complex Trait Genetics.

Based in the internationally renowned Institute of Evolutionary Biology, this MSc draws from the wealth of expertise available there, as well as the teaching, research expertise and facilities of Scotland’s Rural College, the University’s Centre for Molecular Medicine, the Medical Research Council’s Human Genetics Unit and the Roslin Institute (birthplace of Dolly the sheep).

Each year the syllabus is fine-tuned to suit current issues in evolutionary, plant, human and animal genetics.

Applicants who wish to select their area of specialisation during the programme should apply for this umbrella programme. Applicants with a preferred programme option should apply via the following links:

Programme structure

This programme consists of two semesters of taught courses followed by a research project, leading to a dissertation.

Compulsory courses

  • Population and Quantitative Genetics
  • Genetic Interpretation
  • Statistics and Data Analysis
  • Linkage and Association in Genome Analysis
  • Research Proposal
  • Dissertation

Option courses (selected according to degree specialisation):

  • Quantitative Genetic Models
  • Molecular Evolution
  • Genetics of Human Complex Traits
  • Animal Genetic Improvement
  • Functional Genomic Technologies
  • Molecular Phylogenetics
  • Bioinformatics
  • Evolutionary Quantitative Genetics

Career opportunities

You will develop the in-depth knowledge and specialised skills required to apply quantitative genetics theory to practical problems, in both the biomedical and animal science industries, and to undertake research in evolutionary genetics, population genetics and genome analysis.



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An interdisciplinary masters course covering the breadth of mathematical applications in biology. Read more
An interdisciplinary masters course covering the breadth of mathematical applications in biology.

Are you a biologically inclined mathematician or physicist, or a biologist with an keen interest in modelling and analysis? Do you want to know how to model fish population dynamics and harvests, to decipher the mathematics of viruses, or understand of the swimming behaviour of microrganisms? The new MSc in Advanced Mathematical Biology aims to provide answers to all of these questions, and more.

The MSc will provide insight into processes over a wide range of scales; from highly symmetric capsids (the cases that surround viruses) to the interactions of entire communities in oceans. Advanced statistical methods, systems biology and biological fluid dynamics will be covered, and there will be emphasis on applications to policy and industry throughout. This programme aspires to fill the language gap between technical mathematical concepts and real world applications in the biological and life sciences. Students will gain a comprehensive grounding in cutting edge theory coupled to training in the subtleties of application.

Biological concepts and mechanisms will be discussed during bespoke sessions in “Issues in modern biology,” and developed during interdisciplinary group projects. There will also be a range of challenging elective modules.

The MSc in Advanced Mathematical Biology is an intensive one year taught programme that will prepare students either for a career in industry in the quantitative life sciences or for further academic research in Mathematical Biology.

Placements

An important part of the programme is a summer work-based placement. At the end of the spring term, students will select a placement from a list of academic and industrial institutions across the sector. Students will spend a period of three months working closely with their chosen institution with a placement supervisor. Students will write a dissertation towards the end of the placement, and will be assessed by their academic supervisor who will also consult with the placement supervisor.

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JCU’s programs in tropical marine ecology and fisheries biology are dedicated to the study of tropical, shallow water marine systems. Read more
JCU’s programs in tropical marine ecology and fisheries biology are dedicated to the study of tropical, shallow water marine systems. There is an emphasis on whole organism biology, the ecology and biogeography of tropical marine organisms, and the evolutionary mechanisms that underlie their diversity.
Proximity to the Great Barrier Reef provides unparalleled opportunities for investigating ecological and evolutionary questions for reef fish, corals, and other marine organisms.
Students will develop their knowledge and skills in quantitative marine ecology, conservation biology, and the biology, life history and taxonomy of tropical marine organisms. Preliminary coursework subjects consist of semester-long offerings. More advanced subjects are offered by block mode, which are 2-week intensive sessions on campus. The courses are flexible, with a range of electives available. Students devise a study program to meet their professional goals, in consultation with the course coordinator. Programs may include a research component if approved.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion, graduates will be able to:
*Demonstrate an advanced level of scientific knowledge from with their chosen major
*Critically analyse scientific theory, models, concepts and techniques from within their chosen major
*Critically read and evaluate quantitative and qualitative research findings from within their chosen major
*Apply analytic tools and methodologies to define and describe scientific problems from within their chosen major
*Communicate effectively and persuasively, both orally and in writing.

Award title

MASTER OF SCIENCE (MSc)

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 570 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 90 (minimum writing score of 21), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 64

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English Language Proficiency Requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University is a leading education and research centre for biology in the tropics.
*Internationally-recognised undergraduate, postgraduate and research programs in biological sciences
*dedicated research vessel, and research stations at Orpheus Island and Paluma
*more tropical courses and subjects than any other institution in the world
*teaching and research facilities including the Advanced Analytical Centre and the Aquaculture Research Facility.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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Today more than ever, quantitative skills form an essential basis for successful careers in ecology, conservation, and animal and human health. Read more

Today more than ever, quantitative skills form an essential basis for successful careers in ecology, conservation, and animal and human health. This Masters programme provides specific training in data collection, modelling and statistical analyses as well as generic research skills. It is offered by the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine (IBAHCM), a grouping of top researchers who focus on combining field data with computational and genetic approaches to solve applied problems in epidemiology and conservation.

Why this programme

  • This programme encompasses key skills in monitoring and assessing biodiversity critical for understanding the impacts of environmental change.
  • It covers quantitative analyses of ecological and epidemiological data critical for animal health and conservation.
  • You will have the opportunity to base your independent research projects at the university field station on Loch Lomond (for freshwater or terrestrial-based projects); Millport field station on the Isle of Cumbrae (for marine projects); or Cochno Farm and Research Centre in Glasgow (for research based on farm animals). We will also assist you to gain research project placements in zoos or environmental consulting firms whenever possible.
  • The uniqueness of the programme is the opportunity to gain core skills and knowledge across a wide range of subjects, which will enhance future career opportunities, including entrance into competitive PhD programmes. For example, there are identification based programmes offered elsewhere, but most others do not combine practical field skills with molecular techniques, advanced informatics for assessing biodiversity based on molecular markers, as well as advanced statistics and modelling. Other courses in epidemiology are rarely ecologically focused; the specialty in IBAHCM is understanding disease ecology, in the context of both animal conservation and implications for human public health.
  • You will be taught by research-active staff using the latest approaches in quantitative methods, sequence analysis, and practical approaches to assessing biodiversity, and you will have opportunities to actively participate in internationally recognised research. Some examples of recent publications lead by students in the programme:
  • Blackburn, S., Hopcraft, J. G. C., Ogutu, J. O., Matthiopoulos, J. and Frank, L. (2016), Human-wildlife conflict, benefit sharing and the survival of lions in pastoralist community-based conservancies. J Appl Ecol. doi:10.1111/1365-2664.12632. 
  • Rysava, K., McGill, R. A. R., Matthiopoulos, J., and Hopcraft, J. G. C. (2016) Re-constructing nutritional history of Serengeti wildebeest from stable isotopes in tail hair: seasonal starvation patterns in an obligate grazer. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom., 30:1461-1468. doi: 10.1002/rcm.7572.
  • Ferguson, E.A., Hampson, K., Cleaveland, S., Consunji, R., Deray, R., Friar, J., Haydon, D. T., Jimenez, J., Pancipane, M. and Townsend, S.E., 2015. Heterogeneity in the spread and control of infectious disease; consequences for the elimination of canine rabies. Scientific Reports, 5, p. 18232. doi: 10.1038/srep18232.
  • A unique strength of the University of Glasgow for many years has been the strong ties between veterinarians and ecologists, which has now been formalised in the formation of the IBAHCM. This direct linking is rare but offers unique opportunities to provide training that spans both fundamental and applied research.

Programme structure

The programme provides a strong grounding in scientific writing and communication, statistical analysis, and experimental design. It is designed for flexibility, to enable you to customise a portfolio of courses suited to your particular interests.

You can choose from a range of specialised options that encompass key skills in

  • monitoring and assessing biodiversity – critical for understanding the impacts of environmental change
  • quantitative analyses of ecological and epidemiological data – critical for animal health and conservation
  • ethics and legislative policy – critical for promoting humane treatment of both captive and wild animals.

A total of 180 credits are required, with 50 flexible credits in the second term. See the accompanying detailed course descriptions found in the IBAHCM Masters Programme Overview. When selecting options, please email the relevant course coordinator as well as registering using MyCampus.

Term 1: Core courses (assessment in %)

  • Key research skills (scientific writing, introduction to R, introduction to linear models; advanced linear models, experimental design). Coursework – 60%; scientific report – 40%
  • Spatial Ecology and Biodiversity. Coursework – 60%; assignment – 40%

Term 2: Core courses

  • Programming in R. Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%

Term 2: Optional courses

  • Biodiversity Informatics. Coursework – 25%; assignment – 75%
  • GIS for Ecologists. Set exercise – 60%; critical review – 40%
  • Infectious Disease Ecology & the Dynamics of Emerging Disease. Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Introduction to Bayesian Statistics. Coursework – 50% assignment – 50%
  • Invertebrate Identification. Coursework – 20%; class test – 40%; assignment – 40%
  • Molecular Analyses for Biodiversity and Conservation. Coursework – 40%; assignment – 60%
  • Molecular Epidemiology & Phylodynamics. Coursework – 40%; assignment – 60%
  • Multi-species Models. Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Single-species Population Models. Coursework – 30%; assignment – 70%
  • Vertebrate Identification. Coursework – 20%; class test – 40%; assignment – 40%
  • Human Dimensions of Conservation*. Press statement – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Principles of Conservation Ecology*. Coursework – 30%; set exercise – 15%; poster – 55%
  • Protected Area Management*. Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Animal Ethics. Oral presentation – 50%; reflective essay – 50%
  • Biology of Suffering. Essay – 100%
  • Care of Captive Animals. Report – 100%
  • Enrichment of Animals in Captive Environments. Essay – 100%
  • Legislation & Societal Issues. Position paper – 50%; press release – 50%
  • Welfare Assessment. Critical essay – 100%

Term 3: Core MSc Component

  • Research project. Research proposal – 25%; project report – 60%; supervisor’s assessment –15%

Career prospects

You will gain core skills and knowledge across a wide range of subjects that will enhance your selection chances for competitive PhD programmes. In addition to academic options, career opportunities include roles in zoos, environmental consultancies, government agencies, ecotourism and conservation biology, and veterinary or public health epidemiology.



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Master's specialisation in Medical Epigenomics. The only Master’s specialisation in the Netherlands covering the function of our epigenome, a key factor in regulating gene expression and in a wide range of diseases. Read more

Master's specialisation in Medical Epigenomics

The only Master’s specialisation in the Netherlands covering the function of our epigenome, a key factor in regulating gene expression and in a wide range of diseases.

Our skin cells, liver cells and blood cells all contain the same genetic information. Yet these are different types of cells, each performing their own specific tasks. How is this possible? The explanation lies in the epigenome: a heritable, cell-type specific set of chromosomal modifications, which regulates gene expression. Radboud University is specialised in studying the epigenome and is the only university in the Netherlands to offer a Master’s programme in this field of research.

Health and disease

The epigenome consists of small and reversible chemical modifications of the DNA or histone proteins, such as methylation, acetylation and phosphorylation. It changes the spatial structure of DNA, resulting in gene activation or repression. These processes are crucial for our health and also play a role in many diseases, like autoimmune diseases, cancer and neurological disorders. As opposed to modifications of the genome sequence itself, epigenetic modifications are reversible. You can therefore imagine the great potential of drugs that target epigenetic enzymes, so-called epi-drugs.

Big data

In this specialisation, you’ll look at a cell as one big and complex system. You’ll study epigenetic mechanisms during development and disease from different angles. This includes studying DNA and RNA by next-generation sequencing (epigenomics) and analysing proteins by mass spectrometry (proteomics). In addition, you‘ll be trained to design computational strategies that allow the integration of these multifaceted, high-throughput data sets into one system.

Why study Medical Epigenomics at Radboud University?

- Radboud University combines various state-of-the-art technologies – such as quantitative mass spectrometry and next-generation DNA sequencing – with downstream bioinformatics analyses in one department. This is unique in Europe.

- This programme allows you to work with researchers from the Radboud Institute for Molecular Life sciences (RIMLS), one of the leading multidisciplinary research institutes within this field of study worldwide.

- We have close contacts with high-profile medically oriented groups on the Radboud campus and with international institutes (EMBL, Max-Planck, Marie Curie, Cambridge, US-based labs, etc). As a Master’s student, you can choose to perform an internship in one of these related departments.

- Radboud University coordinates BLUEPRINT, a 30 million Euro European project focusing on the epigenomics of leukaemia. Master’s students have the opportunity to participate in this project.

Career prospects

As a Master’s student of Medical Epigenomics you’re trained in using state-of-the art technology in combination with biological software tools to study complete networks in cells in an unbiased manner. For example, you’ll know how to study the effects of drugs in the human body.

When you enter the job market, you’ll have:

- A thorough background of epigenetic mechanisms in health and disease, which is highly relevant in strongly rising field of epi-drug development

- Extensive and partly hands-on experience in state-of-the-art ‘omics’ technologies: next-generation sequencing, quantitative mass spectrometry and single cell technologies;

- Extensive expertise in designing, executing and interpreting scientific experiments in data-driven research;

- The computational skills needed to analyse large ‘omics’ datasets.

With this background, you can become a researcher at a:

- University or research institute;

- Pharmaceutical company, such as Synthon or Johnson & Johnson;

- Food company, like Danone or Unilever;

- Start-up company making use of -omics technology.

Apart from research into genomics and epigenomics, you could also work on topics such as miniaturising workflows, improving experimental devices, the interface between biology and informatics, medicine from a systems approach.

Or you can become a:

- Biological or medical consultant;

- Biology teacher;

- Policy coordinator, regarding genetic or medical issues;

- Patent attorney;

- Clinical research associate;

PhD positions at Radboud University

Each year, the Molecular Biology department (Prof. Henk Stunnenberg, Prof. Michiel Vermeulen) and the Molecular Developmental Biology department (Prof. Gert-Jan Veenstra) at the RIMLS offer between five and ten PhD positions. Of course, many graduates also apply for a PhD position at related departments in the Netherlands, or abroad.

Our approach to this field

- Systems biology

In the Medical Epigenomics specialisation you won’t zoom in on only one particular gene, protein or signalling pathway. Instead, you’ll regard the cell as one complete system. This comprehensive view allows you to, for example, model the impact of one particular epigenetic mutation on various parts and functions of the cell, or study the effects of a drug in an unbiased manner. One of the challenges of this systems biology approach is the processing and integration of large amounts of data. That’s why you’ll also be trained in computational biology. Once graduated, this will be a great advantage: you’ll be able to bridge the gap between biology, technology and informatics , and thus have a profile that is desperately needed in modern, data-driven biology.

- Multiple OMICS approaches

Studying cells in a systems biology approach means connecting processes at the level of the genome (genomics), epigenome (epigenomics), transcriptome (transcriptomics), proteome (proteomics), etc. In the Medical Epigenomics specialisation, you’ll get acquainted with all these different fields of study.

- Patient and animal samples

Numerous genetic diseases are not caused by genetic mutations, but by epigenetic mutations that influence the structure and function of chromatin. Think of:

- Autoimmune diseases, like rheumatoid arthritis and lupus

- Cancer, in the forms of leukaemia, colon cancer, prostate cancer and cervical cancer

- Neurological disorders, like Rett Syndrome, Alzheimer, Parkinson, Multiple Sclerosis, schizophrenia and autism

We investigate these diseases on a cellular level, focusing on the epigenetic mutations and the impact on various pathways in the cell. You’ll get the chance to participate in that research, and work with embryonic stem cell, patient, Xenopus or zebra fish samples.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/medicalbiology/epigenomics

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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This course is suitable if you. wish to pursue research into molecular and cell biology or disease mechanisms at PhD level. want to improve your knowledge and skills to be competitive in the life science jobs market. Read more

This course is suitable if you

  • wish to pursue research into molecular and cell biology or disease mechanisms at PhD level
  • want to improve your knowledge and skills to be competitive in the life science jobs market
  • are currently employed and seeking to improve your career prospects

Most of your practical work is carried out in our teaching laboratories which contain industry standard equipment for cell culture, quantitative nucleic acid and protein analysis and a sophisticated suite of analytical equipment such as HPLC and gas chromatography. In addition many of our research facilities such as flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and mass spectrometry are used in taught modules and research projects and our tutors are experts in these techniques.

You gain

  • a detailed and up-to-date understanding of molecular biology and cell biology
  • knowledge of how alterations or defects in cellular processes may lead to disease, such as cellular dysfunction leading to degenerative diseases, cell cycle dys-regulation in cancer, and how mutations result in genetic diseases
  • hands-on expertise in the latest techniques including cell culture, flow cytometry, real-time PCR, immuno-histochemistry and recombinant DNA technology
  • professional skills to further your career in research or the life science industry

The teaching on the course is split between formal lectures and tutorials, and laboratory-based work. A third of the course is a laboratory-based research project, where students are assigned to a tutor who is an active researcher in the biomedical research centre. Typically, taught modules have a mixture of lectures and tutorials and involve a significant amount of laboratory time. Other modules are tutorial-led with considerable input from the course leader who acts as personal tutor.

Tutors complete research within the Biomolecular Sciences Research Centre into cancer, musculoskeletal diseases, human reproduction, neurological disease, medical microbiology and immunological basis of disease. Their work is regularly published in international peer-reviewed journals, showing that the course is underpinned by relevant quality research.

Course structure

The masters (MSc) award is achieved by successfully completing 180 credits.

The postgraduate certificate (PgCert) is achieved by successfully completing 60 credits.

The postgraduate diploma (PgDip) is achieved by successfully completing 120 credits. 

Core modules:

  • Biomedical laboratory techniques (15 credits)
  • Cell biology (15 credits)
  • Molecular biology (15 credits)
  • Professional development (15 credits)
  • Research methods and statistics (15 credits)
  • Research project (60 credits)

Optional modules:

  • Biotechnology (15 credits)
  • Applied biomedical techniques (15 credits)
  • Cellular and molecular basis of cancer (15 credits)
  • Human genomics and proteomics (15 credits)

Assessment

Assessment methods include written examinations and coursework including

  • problem-solving exercises
  • case studies
  • reports from practical work.

Research project assessment includes a written report and viva voce. 

Employability

As a graduate you can find work in the expanding area of life sciences or enter a career in research. You can find careers in areas such as • medical research in universities hospital laboratories or research institutes • private industry.

The course also provides the skills and knowledge for those wishing to do research at PhD level.



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JCU’s programs in tropical marine ecology and fisheries biology are dedicated to the study of tropical, shallow water marine systems. Read more
JCU’s programs in tropical marine ecology and fisheries biology are dedicated to the study of tropical, shallow water marine systems. There is an emphasis on whole organism biology, the ecology and biogeography of tropical marine organisms, and the evolutionary mechanisms that underlie their diversity.
Proximity to the Great Barrier Reef provides unparalleled opportunities for investigating ecological and evolutionary questions for reef fish, corals, and other marine organisms.
Students will develop their knowledge and skills in quantitative marine ecology, conservation biology, and the biology, life history and taxonomy of tropical marine organisms. Preliminary coursework subjects consist of semester-long offerings. More advanced subjects are offered by block mode, which are 2-week intensive sessions on campus. The courses are flexible, with a range of electives available. Students devise a study program to meet their professional goals, in consultation with the course coordinator. Programs may include a research component if approved.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Graduate Certificate of Science, graduates will be able to:
*Integrate and apply specialised theoretical and technical knowledge in one or more science disciplines
*Retrieve, analyse, synthesise and evaluate knowledge from a range of sources
*Plan and conduct reliable, evidence-based laboratory and/or field experiments/practices by selecting and applying methods, techniques and tools, as appropriate to one or more science disciplines
*Organise, analyse and interpret complex scientific data using mathematical, statistical and technological skills
*Communicate complex scientific ideas, arguments and conclusions clearly and coherently to a variety of audiences through advanced written and oral English language skills and a variety of media
*Identify, analyse and generate solutions to unpredictable or complex problems, especially related to tropical, rural, remote or Indigenous contexts, by applying scientific knowledge and skills with initiative and high level judgement
*Explain and apply regulatory requirements, ethical principles and, where appropriate, cultural frameworks, to work effectively, responsibly and safely in diverse contexts
*Reflect on current skills, knowledge and attitudes to manage their professional learning needs and performance, autonomously and in collaboration with others.

Award title

Graduate Certificate of Science (GCertSc)

Course articulation

Students who complete the Graduate Certificate of Science are eligible for entry to the Graduate Diploma of Science, and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under the Graduate Certificate.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.5 (no component lower than 6.0), OR
*TOEFL – 570 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) –90 (minimum writing score of 21), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 64

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University is a leading education and research centre for biology in the tropics.
*Internationally-recognised undergraduate, postgraduate and research programs in biological sciences
*dedicated research vessel, and research stations at Orpheus Island and Paluma
*more tropical courses and subjects than any other institution in the world
*teaching and research facilities including the Advanced Analytical Centre and the Aquaculture Research Facility.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

Read less
JCU’s programs in tropical marine ecology and fisheries biology are dedicated to the study of tropical, shallow water marine systems. Read more
JCU’s programs in tropical marine ecology and fisheries biology are dedicated to the study of tropical, shallow water marine systems. There is an emphasis on whole organism biology, the ecology and biogeography of tropical marine organisms, and the evolutionary mechanisms that underlie their diversity.
Proximity to the Great Barrier Reef provides unparalleled opportunities for investigating ecological and evolutionary questions for reef fish, corals, and other marine organisms.
Students will develop their knowledge and skills in quantitative marine ecology, conservation biology, and the biology, life history and taxonomy of tropical marine organisms. Preliminary coursework subjects consist of semester-long offerings. More advanced subjects are offered by block mode, which are 2-week intensive sessions on campus. The courses are flexible, with a range of electives available. Students devise a study program to meet their professional goals, in consultation with the course coordinator. Programs may include a research component if approved.

Course learning outcomes

The graduates of James Cook University are prepared and equipped to create a brighter future for life in the tropics world-wide.
JCU graduates are committed to lifelong learning, intellectual development, and to the display of exemplary personal, professional and ethical standards. They have a sense of their place in the tropics and are charged with professional, community, and environmental responsibility. JCU graduates appreciate the need to embrace and be acquainted with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples of Australia. They are committed to reconciliation, diversity and sustainability. They exhibit a willingness to lead and to contribute to the intellectual, environmental, cultural, economic and social challenges of regional, national, and international communities of the tropics.
On successful completion of the Graduate Diploma of Science, graduates will be able to:
*Integrate and apply advanced theoretical and technical knowledge in one or more science disciplines
*Retrieve, analyse, synthesise and evaluate knowledge from a range of sources
*Plan and conduct reliable, evidence-based laboratory and/or field experiments/practices by selecting and applying methods, techniques and tools, as appropriate to one or more science disciplines
*Organise, analyse and interpret complex scientific data using mathematical, statistical and technological skills
*Communicate complex scientific ideas, arguments and conclusions clearly and coherently to a variety of audiences through advanced written and oral English language skills and a variety of media
*Identify, analyse and generate solutions to unpredictable or complex problems, especially related to tropical, rural, remote or Indigenous contexts, by applying scientific knowledge and skills with initiative and high level judgement
*Explain and apply regulatory requirements, ethical principles and, where appropriate, cultural frameworks, to work effectively, responsibly and safely in diverse contexts
*Reflect on current skills, knowledge and attitudes to manage their professional learning needs and performance, autonomously and in collaboration with others.

Award title

GRADUATE DIPLOMA OF SCIENCE (GDipSc)

Course articulation

Students who complete the Graduate Diploma of Science are eligible for entry to the Master of Science, and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under the Graduate Diploma.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.5 (no component lower than 6.0), OR
*TOEFL – 570 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) –90 (minimum writing score of 21), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 64

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University is a leading education and research centre for biology in the tropics.
*Internationally-recognised undergraduate, postgraduate and research programs in biological sciences
*dedicated research vessel, and research stations at Orpheus Island and Paluma
*more tropical courses and subjects than any other institution in the world
*teaching and research facilities including the Advanced Analytical Centre and the Aquaculture Research Facility.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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