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Masters Degrees (Qualitative Research)

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This programme provides practical, career-orientated training in social science research methods, including research design, data collection and data analysis relating to both qualitative and quantitative modes of inquiry. Read more

This programme provides practical, career-orientated training in social science research methods, including research design, data collection and data analysis relating to both qualitative and quantitative modes of inquiry.

Students will have the opportunity to specialise in particular methodologies and to learn more about the application of these methodologies to illuminate important issues and debates in contemporary society.

Course Details

The programme is designed to provide a fundamental grounding in both quantitative and qualitative research skills, along with the opportunity to specialise in more advanced training in quantitative research, qualitative research or in practical applications of research techniques.

CORE MODULES:

Semester 1

Approaches to Social Research (20 CATS)

This module offers an introduction to the different styles of social science research as well as guidance and illustrations of how to operationalize research questions and assess them empirically. Students will be shown how to conduct systematic literature searches and how to manage empirical research projects. The module will also explore issues around the ethics of social science research as well as the connection between social science research and policy concerns. It is designed as preparation for undertaking postgraduate research and dissertation work.

Theory and Debates in Social Research (20 CATS)

This module aims to deepen students' understanding of key debates in social theory and research, providing advanced level teaching for those building upon basic knowledge and undertaking postgraduate research. It is designed to demonstrate and explore how social theory is utilised, critiqued and developed through the pursuit of social science research.

The Sources and Construction of Qualitative Data (10 CATS)

The purpose of this module is to illuminate the theoretical underpinnings of qualitative research. The module will discuss the impact of various theories on the nature and conduct of qualitative research particularly around questions of epistemology and ontology. The role of different types of interviewing in qualitative research will be utilised in order to explore the relationship between theory and methods.

The Sources and Construction of Quantitative Data (10 CATS)

The aim of the module is to provide a comprehensive overview of the theory and practice of measurement and constructing quantitative data in the social sciences. Through lectures and practical exercises, this module will provide students with relevant knowledge of secondary data sources and large datasets, their respective uses and usefulness, and their relevance for the study of contemporary social issues

Semester 2

Qualitative Data Analysis (10 CATS)

The module will provide students with an overview of different approaches to qualitative data analysis. It will include introductory training to this skill that includes such techniques as thematic analysis and discourse analysis, as well as computer assisted qualitative data analysis. It will provide the knowledge necessary for the informed use of the qualitative data analysis software package NVivo. The module gives students a base level introduction to the analytical and technical skills in qualitative data analysis appropriate to the production of a Master's dissertation and/or use of CAQDAS software for social science research purposes.

Quantitative Data Analysis: Foundational (10 CATS)

This module provides an introduction to the basics of quantitative data analysis. The module will begin with a brief review of basic univariate and bivariate statistical procedures as well as cover data manipulation techniques. The module is taught through a series of seminars and practical workshops. These two strands are interwoven within each teaching session. Please note that students may be granted an exemption from this module if they have already successfully completed a module that has the equivalent learning outcomes.

Quantitative Data Analysis: Intermediate (10 CATS)

This module advances students' confidence and knowledge in the use of SPSS. The module focuses on multivariate regression models, including the appropriate use and awareness of statistical assumptions underlying regression and the testing and refinement of such models.

Dissertation (60 CATS)

A dissertation of no more than 15,000 words on a topic relevant to social science research methods training. The thesis will involve either carrying out and reporting on a small social science research project which includes a full and considered description and discussion of the research methods employed or the discussion of a research issue or technique to a level appropriate for publication.

OPTIONAL MODULES (all 10 CATS)

We offer a range of advanced modules in quantitative and qualitative research methods, for example, logistic regression, internet-based research and visual research methods. We also provide specialist modules which reflect the teaching team’s diverse research interests, from the social logic of emotional life to conflict and change in divided societies. Optional modules generally run during the Spring semester and are offered subject to sufficient student demand and staff availability. Students will be able to choose a maximum of three to four option modules (depending on whether they need to complete Quantitative Data Analysis: Foundational). Please note that it is unlikely that all the following modules will be available for 2017/8. Please check with the Programme Director for queries about specific modules.

  • Advanced Qualitative Research Methods
  • Social Science Research Online
  • Visual Research Methods
  • Longitudinal Analysis
  • Advanced Quantitative Research Methods
  • Conflict and Change in Northern Ireland: New Sociological Research
  • Researching Emotions and Social Life
  • University Research and Civil Society Organisations


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This programme has been specifically designed for those intending to pursue a career in clinical psychology and to apply for a place on the professional Doctorate in Clinical Psychology, but it is also ideal for those interested in a research career or PhD in the area of clinical psychology and mental health. Read more
This programme has been specifically designed for those intending to pursue a career in clinical psychology and to apply for a place on the professional Doctorate in Clinical Psychology, but it is also ideal for those interested in a research career or PhD in the area of clinical psychology and mental health. The programme enables students to gain detailed knowledge about modern theories and models in relation to psychopathology and psychological assessment as well as about effective psychological interventions and therapies. It also provides broad research training in quantitative and qualitative research, and offers education about the role of professional clinical psychologists along with training in essential clinical skills. The programme includes a Research Apprenticeship in clinical psychology which is a particularly attractive module enabling students to gain experience with professional research in clinical psychology.

-Designed to strengthen the research competence and academic profile of those intending to apply for professional training in clinical psychology
-Offers broad postgraduate research training in quantitative and qualitative research methods relevant to clinical psychology and mental health in general
-Includes a Research Apprenticeship in Clinical Psychology
-Provides education about the role of clinical psychologists as well as training in some essential professional clinical skills
-Uses a blend of adult learning approaches (i.e. lectures, seminars, group work, workshops) to engage students with the content of the taught modules

Why choose this course?

The main educational aims of the programme are to provide you with a thorough knowledge about clinical psychology as an academic and professional discipline, and to develop your research competence in a range of quantitative and qualitative research methods of particular relevance to clinical psychology. Core knowledge areas such as psychopathology, psychological assessment and various types of psychological intervention are each taught in specific modules. You will be introduced to leading theories or models in each field and the scientific evidence on which they are based will be critically discussed. Important research paradigms and controversies dominating current scientific debates within clinical psychology will be presented, and you will learn and practice how to critically appraise published research.

You will receive extensive training in a range of essential research skills and we will be discussing various types of research design for investigating the aetiology of mental health problems, for evaluating the effectiveness of psychological therapies and for auditing mental health services. The research training also includes advanced methods of statistical data analysis with exercises in SPSS and you will learn how to professionally report and communicate the findings. Qualitative research methods, for example, Grounded Theory will be taught in a specialist module and you will learn to use software for the coding and interpretation of transcripts. Finally, each student will be allocated to a senior researcher for a Research Apprenticeship, a particularly valuable learning experience enabling you to prepare an impressive MSc Research Project which will be your most important academic achievement of the programme.

The programme also includes a module Professional Clinical Skills introducing you to the role and competencies of professional clinical psychologists within mental health care settings as well as professional standards and ethical considerations. It also provides you with training in some essential clinical skills. More specifically, the programme aims are to:
-Provide students with in-depth knowledge about current theories of psychopathology covering both dimensional and diagnostic approaches for conceptualizing, defining, observing and assessing behavioural and mental indicators of psychopathology
-Provide students with detailed knowledge about psychiatric classification systems for mental health and personality problems as well as alternatives such as formulation
-Provide students with thorough knowledge about different kinds of effective psychological interventions for the treatment or prevention of mental health and behavioural problems
-Educate and train students in various types of quantitative and qualitative research in the area of clinical psychology, their methodological justification as well as criteria of validity to critically evaluate strengths and weaknesses of research proposals or published research
-Provide education about professional standards for clinical psychologists as well as training in professional skills

Professional Accreditations

Please note that this MSc does not replace an accredited doctoral training programme in Clinical Psychology, nor will it guarantee entry to such a programme or provide a professional qualification in clinical psychology.

Careers

This course is ideal for those considering a professional or research career in clinical psychology and wish to strengthen their academic CV.

Teaching methods

We have our own dedicated postgraduate teaching rooms. Teaching includes lectures, seminars, practicals in class, workshops, group work, simulation exercises and individual supervision.

A blend of different assessment methods will be used. Part of the modules is assessed by exams, but the majority of the assignments constitute coursework such essays, data analysis reports, a written paper critique and oral presentations.

Structure

Modules
-Professional Clinical Skills I
-Psychological Assessment
-Psychological Interventions
-Psychopathology
-Qualitative Research Methods
-Research Apprenticeship in Clinical Psychology
-Research Methods and Data Analysis in Clinical Psychology
-Research Project in Clinical Psychology

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The MRes programme will provide a dedicated route for high caliber students who (may have a specific research aim in mind and) are ready to carry out independent research leading to PhD level study. Read more
The MRes programme will provide a dedicated route for high caliber students who (may have a specific research aim in mind and) are ready to carry out independent research leading to PhD level study. Alternatively it would be appropriate for students who are seeking a stand-alone research based qualification suitable for a career in research with transferable skills for graduate employment.

Structure
The MRes has been structured to provide to specialist research skills in the taught element (at least 40 credits) enabling students with the opportunity to progress to undertake a substantial piece of independent based research at the cutting edge of the specific research area (120 credits). It is the normal expectation that the independent research should be of a publishable standard in a high quality peer reviewed journal.

Core Modules:

Quantitative Research Methods: This module aims to provide students with an understanding of quantitative research, its approach to scientific inquiry, its methodologies and related methods; focussing on the application of quantitative research within the health and social care setting. It should enable students to be ‘critical consumers’ of quantitative research, to have sufficient knowledge to contribute in a knowledgeable way to ongoing quantitative research and to develop quantitative research questions and projects. In doing so it should help prepare students for the MSc dissertation stage.

Qualitative Research Methods: This module aims to provide students with an understanding of qualitative research, its approach to scientific inquiry, its methodologies and related methods. It will enable students to focus on the application of qualitative research within the health and social care setting and will also enable students to be ‘critical consumers’ of qualitative research, to have sufficient knowledge to contribute in a knowledgeable way to ongoing qualitative research and to develop qualitative research questions and projects.

Research Project: The research project is the ‘heart’ of the MRes and is an intensive research experience conducted in collaboration with your supervisor that allows you to put your knowledge and skills into practice. In conducting your thesis project, you will develop new skills such as planning, co-operative working, and the academic skills essential to understanding and reporting findings to others. Please note, assessment is primarily aimed at the Research project, which is worth 120 credits, whereas the taught element counts for 60 credits (this is the opposite to our MSc / MA courses, where teaching is worth 120 credits, and the research project is 60 credits).

Optional Modules:

TBC Systematic Review of Synthesis of Evidence: This module is designed to provide participants with a state of the art perspective on specific methodologies of systematic review and synthesis of evidence. It will focus on selected qualitative, quantitative and mixed method evidence review and synthesis.

TBC Implementing evidence within public services: theory and practice: This module will enable students to enhance their theory and practice of the implementation of evidence from research (and other resources) into practice and / or policy to improve service effectiveness, efficiency and service users’ experiences

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Develop knowledge and understanding of qualitative and comparative methods as used in health-related research and develop your skills in the use of these methods. Read more
Develop knowledge and understanding of qualitative and comparative methods as used in health-related research and develop your skills in the use of these methods

Gain the capability to use these research methods appropriately for undertaking research and evaluation both as part of postgraduate study and in your working environment. This module may be taken to satisfy the research methods requirements of WMS Masters degree programmes, where applicable. It should normally be taken after Understanding Research and Critical Appraisal and before the Professional Project or Dissertation.

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Our MClin Res Clinical Research course is aimed at nurses, midwives, allied health professionals and other non- medical/dental healthcare professionals who want to work in clinical research, or are already working in this area and want to develop the skills needed for other positions where research plays a key role. Read more

Our MClin Res Clinical Research course is aimed at nurses, midwives, allied health professionals and other non- medical/dental healthcare professionals who want to work in clinical research, or are already working in this area and want to develop the skills needed for other positions where research plays a key role.

You will develop in-depth knowledge of the theoretical underpinnings of clinical research and skills in research methods relevant to applied research in a range of contemporary clinical practice settings.

The course is mainly delivered online, but is complemented by two compulsory four-day campus-based introductory and winter study schools, and one mid-semester study day in Semesters 1 and 2.

Most of the units that make up this course are shared with other students on master's and postgraduate research programmes at Manchester.

Aims

Our course has been designed to provide health professionals with the skills needed to manage and deliver research in clinical and health and social care settings, and to develop careers in clinical research, clinical and academic practice, or academic research with a strong clinical practice component.

The aims of the course are to:

  • enable you to further develop systematic, in-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the nature, purposes, methods and application of research relevant to clinical practice at an individual and/or organisational level;
  • contribute to building capacity and capability for research and evidence-based practice by equipping you with in-depth knowledge and essential skills to critically appraise, apply, design and undertake high quality research in a range of clinical settings;
  • enhance the quality and evidence base for clinical research, practice and service development through the provision of robust research training in a stimulating, challenging and supportive learning environment that draws on outstanding resources and research and practice expertise;
  • promote lifelong learning in students and enhance opportunities to pursue a variety of research careers and/or further research training which support and advance clinical knowledge, research and practice;
  • equip you with key transferable skills in critical reasoning and reflection, effective communication, team and multi-disciplinary working, use of IT/health informatics, logical and systematic approaches to problem-solving and decision-making.

Special features

Interdisciplinary learning

You will learn from renowned lecturers and practitioners from various fields including nursing, midwifery, physiotherapy, social work, speech and language therapy, audiology, psychology, and medicine.

Strong collaborations

We have strong links with other courses at Manchester and with experts from the Manchester Academic Health Science Centre (MAHSC) and the Manchester Academy for Healthcare Scientist Education (MAHSE).

Teaching and learning

The course content is primarily delivered online, giving you more flexibility over how you learn. You will also attend two four-day introductory and winter study schools and two mid-semester study days, allowing you to learn face-to-face and meet other students and staff at Manchester.

We use digital technology to ensure our supervision of and communications with students meet the high standards required for the learning process to work. This includes:

  • individual and group web-based audio-visual tutorials;
  • web-based collaboration areas and discussion boards
  • shared digital documents;
  • online, phone and face-to-face support from supervisors and academic advisors;
  • peer support through course-specific discussion boards and face-to-face meetings.

Find out more about postgraduate teaching and learning at Manchester.

Coursework and assessment

We will assess your progress using a variety of summative assessment methods that enable the integration of theory and practice. They also build on the continuous formative assessment exercises that come with each individual unit, which include interactive, stimulating online exercises with regular self-assessment and feedback.

Course unit details

Our MClin Res  comprises six taught units (90 academic credits in total) and a 90-credit dissertation unit comprising a thesis derived from the undertaking of a supervised, clinical research project.

The PGDip Clin Res  comprises six taught units from (90 academic credits in total) and a mini-dissertation (30 academic credits).

The PGCert Clin Res  comprises four taught units (60 academic credits in total).

Year 1

Full-time study

Six taught units in the following areas, plus a dissertation:

  • Research design
  • Managing research in the clinical setting OR Foundations of research
  • Critical appraisal and evidence synthesis
  • Quantitative research design and analysis
  • Qualitative research design and analysis
  • Statistics

Part-time study

Four taught units from the following areas:

  • Research design
  • Managing research in the clinical setting OR Foundations of research
  • Critical appraisal and evidence synthesis
  • Quantitative research design and analysis
  • Qualitative research design and analysis
  • Statistics

Year 2

Part-time study

Two taught units from the following areas, plus a dissertation:

  • Critical appraisal and evidence synthesis
  • Quantitative research design and analysis
  • Qualitative research design and analysis
  • Statistics

Course collaborators

We collaborate with other courses at Manchester and with experts from the Manchester Academic Health Science Centre (MAHSC) and the Manchester Academy for Healthcare Scientist Education(MAHSE).

Facilities

We are based in Jean McFarlane Building, which houses seminar rooms, IT facilities, clinical and interpersonal skills laboratories, and lecture theatres.

The University of Manchester also offers extensive library and online services to help you get the most out of your studies.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This course is predominantly aimed at health professionals from a range of disciplines who wish to enhance their skills and knowledge in clinically focused research.

It is aimed at those who wish to pursue clinical/academic research careers eg research nurses, clinical trials coordinators and principal investigators.

The course provides comprehensive training in research, providing an excellent foundation for students who wish to go on to study for a PhD.



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Why study at Roehampton. You can choose to complete this programme as a PGC, PGD or MA. This programme is suitable for students completing research in Business, Education or Social Science. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • You can choose to complete this programme as a PGC, PGD or MA.
  • This programme is suitable for students completing research in Business, Education or Social Science.
  • Roehampton has been ranked the most research-intensive modern university in the country (REF 2014).
  • External assessors have rated the innovative "general research skills" module very highly and commented favourably on the assessment mix.
  • The course has 1+3 recognition from the Economic and Social Research Council.

Course summary

This course is perfect if you are looking to embark on a successful career as a researcher or academic and will provide you with the necessary training as part of your study for your MPhil/PhD.

The course is distinctive in providing students with an exciting opportunity to develop expertise in a range of both quantitative and qualitative research methods of data collection and analysis with a focus on their application to real-world issues.

The course has 1+3 recognition from the Economic and Social Research Council. Only three Education Departments in post-92 universities have this prestigious kitemark.

In order to enhance your engagement with the issues to be examined, and to allow flexibility over how you manage your time, the Social Research Methods programme will be delivered through weekly sessions in the Autumn and Spring semesters supplemented by tutorial support available (both face-to-face and electronically). Evening sessions are provided for part-time students.

Content

All three levels of the programme will include an introduction to the processes and issues involved in designing a quantitative or qualitative research project. You will also undertake modules that will introduce you to the methods of quantitative (including use of SPSS) and qualitative (including use of CAQDAS) research, giving you the skills and confidence to use these approaches to data collection and analysis in your own research.

If you progress to do a PGD or MA you will also explore the philosophy of social science research where you will examine the relationship between epistemology, ontology and methodology. Furthermore, you will explore concepts that underpin educational and social research including empiricism, rationalism, hermeneutics, feminism, post-modernism and critical realism and critique their relation to objectivity, causation, and validity.

You will also focus on key elements of the Research Councils’ Joint Statement of Skills Training for Research Students. You can then choose to study interpretations of the concept of education - and their implications for research - and the role of values in educational theory and research methodologies, or the basic theoretical concepts in social theory, with a particular emphasis on sociology and social policy.

Masters students will complete a dissertation in an area of their choosing in the fields of education or the social sciences.

The PG certificate course addresses core features of social research methods, focusing on different forms of data and how they can be collected and analysed. MA-level study is aimed at students who either want a discrete research-based MA or want to run a pilot study for an MPhil/PhD research project.

Modules

The following is a list of modules that you need to take to complete the different awards: 

PGCert

  • The Design of Social Research
  • Qualitative Research Methods of Data Collection & Analysis
  • Quantitative Research Methods of Data Collection and Analysis

PGDip

  • All of the PGC modules and
  • Philosophy of Social Science Research
  • General Research Skills

plus one of two optional modules:

  • Educational Research & the Social Sciences
  • Social Theory and Social Research

MA

  • All of the PGD modules and
  • Dissertation

Career options

This is THE course for those wishing to be employed in the research field of education and/or social sciences.

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This programme has been designed provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of the physiology of sport and exercise. Read more
This programme has been designed provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of the physiology of sport and exercise. The programme facilitates the integration of theory and professional practice, and throughout the programme the research process and emphasis on student autonomy of learning become increasingly important.

Programme Structure and Content
Research skills oriented modules form the bedrock of SHES’ MRes programmes. As a result taught modules are aligned with both discipline specific and the (higher) cognitive skills our MRes programmes aim to provide. Within a modular structure all students undertake compulsory modules in research skills totalling 40 credits:

Research Skills (20 credits)
and 20 credits from the following modules:

How to Conduct Statistics (20 credits);
Presentation of Statistics (10 credits);
Peer Reviewing (10 credits);
Latent Variable Modelling (10 credits);
plus 20 credits from optional modules and a final compulsory Research Project comprising 120 credits.

Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

How to conduct Statistics and Presentation of Statistics modules
The purpose of these two taught modules is to provide students with an in-depth understanding and critical appreciation of statistical procedures. As independent study based modules, they will enable students to gain a comprehensive understanding of a statistical procedure of their choosing (following consultation with the staff member responsible for the module). Towards this end, students will likely cover (i) relevant background issues; (ii) when to use utilise particular statistical tests;(iii) how to conduct statistical testing via appropriate software; (iv) how to correctly interpret computational output; and (v) how to present the findings following analysis.

Students learn about these themes through a “learning by teaching” paradigm via the development of a statistics oriented verbal presentation and written assignment resembling a book chapter/resource. The verbal presentation will be conducted first in order to obtain developmental feedback for the written assignment.

Peer Reviewing Scientific Research
Students work closely with their supervisor to perform an initial review of a previously submitted (and subsequently published) research article. Students will then follow the paper along the peer review process, discussing their review with their supervisor, and then be required to adequately address concerns which have been raised. Collectively this will mean that the student will cover a contemporary research topic in a highly focused and in-depth manner gaining a comprehensive understanding of how to prepare their own manuscripts (eg research proposal, Research Project) and how to evaluate the research of others. Students will also attend the School’s Research Seminar series.

Latent Variable Modelling
This module introduces postgraduate students to the concepts of Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) and to give a basic grounding in their implementation. It also covers an introduction to SEM using LISREL and topics including: measurement models and structural models; exploratory factor analysis; confirmatory factor analysis (CFA); structural modelling with observed and latent variables; conceptual issues, common misunderstandings and limitations.

Research Project
Under the guidance of their supervising tutor(s), students will pro-actively determine the content of this unit. The initial stages of the Research Project will develop the work of the project proposal and taught phases of the MRes programmes. This will involve the surveying and reviewing of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to their area of inquiry. Ethical approval of the study will be obtained before data may be collected, thereby introducing students to this integral part of the research process. Throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field. It is expected that the resulting projects will be publishable in international, peer-reviewed journals.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

Optional Modules:

In addition to the core/compulsory modules students choose a further 20 credits from the following optional modules:

The taught programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

Read less
This programme has been designed provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of the psychology of sport and exercise. Read more
This programme has been designed provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of the psychology of sport and exercise. The programme facilitates the integration of theory and professional practice, and throughout the programme the research process and emphasis on student autonomy of learning become increasingly important.

Programme Structure and Content
Research skills oriented modules form the bedrock of SHES’ MRes programmes. As a result taught modules are aligned with both discipline specific and the (higher) cognitive skills our MRes programmes aim to provide. Within a modular structure all students undertake compulsory modules in research skills totalling 40 credits:

Research Skills (20 credits)
and 20 credits from the following modules:

How to Conduct Statistics (20 credits);
Presentation of Statistics (10 credits);
Peer Reviewing (10 credits);
Latent Variable Modelling (10 credits);
plus 20 credits from optional modules and a final compulsory Research Project comprising 120 credits.

Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

How to conduct Statistics and Presentation of Statistics modules
The purpose of these two taught modules is to provide students with an in-depth understanding and critical appreciation of statistical procedures. As independent study based modules, they will enable students to gain a comprehensive understanding of a statistical procedure of their choosing (following consultation with the staff member responsible for the module). Towards this end, students will likely cover (i) relevant background issues; (ii) when to use utilise particular statistical tests;(iii) how to conduct statistical testing via appropriate software; (iv) how to correctly interpret computational output; and (v) how to present the findings following analysis.

Students learn about these themes through a “learning by teaching” paradigm via the development of a statistics oriented verbal presentation and written assignment resembling a book chapter/resource. The verbal presentation will be conducted first in order to obtain developmental feedback for the written assignment.

Peer Reviewing Scientific Research
Students work closely with their supervisor to perform an initial review of a previously submitted (and subsequently published) research article. Students will then follow the paper along the peer review process, discussing their review with their supervisor, and then be required to adequately address concerns which have been raised. Collectively this will mean that the student will cover a contemporary research topic in a highly focused and in-depth manner gaining a comprehensive understanding of how to prepare their own manuscripts (eg research proposal, Research Project) and how to evaluate the research of others. Students will also attend the School’s Research Seminar series.

Latent Variable Modelling
This module introduces postgraduate students to the concepts of Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) and to give a basic grounding in their implementation. It also covers an introduction to SEM using LISREL and topics including: measurement models and structural models; exploratory factor analysis; confirmatory factor analysis (CFA); structural modelling with observed and latent variables; conceptual issues, common misunderstandings and limitations.

Research Project
Under the guidance of their supervising tutor(s), students will pro-actively determine the content of this unit. The initial stages of the Research Project will develop the work of the project proposal and taught phases of the MRes programmes. This will involve the surveying and reviewing of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to their area of inquiry. Ethical approval of the study will be obtained before data may be collected, thereby introducing students to this integral part of the research process. Throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field. It is expected that the resulting projects will be publishable in international, peer-reviewed journals.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

Optional Modules:

In addition to the core/compulsory modules students choose a further 20 credits from the following optional modules:

Sport Psychology;
Effective Coaching;
Exercise Psychology;
Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete.
The taught programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

Read less
This programme has been designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of sport and exercise sciences. Read more

This programme has been designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of sport and exercise sciences. In contrast to our MRes programmes in Sport and Exercise Physiology and Psychology, this programme gives students the option to study elements of both physiology and psychology. The programme facilitates the integration of theory and professional practice, and throughout the programme the research process and emphasis on student autonomy of learning become increasingly important.

Programme Structure and Content

Research skills oriented modules form the bedrock of SHES’ MRes programmes. As a result taught modules are aligned with both discipline specific and the (higher) cognitive skills our MRes programmes aim to provide. Within a modular structure all students undertake compulsory modules in research skills totalling 40 credits:

Research Skills (20 credits)

and 20 credits from the following modules:

How to Conduct Statistics (20 credits);

Presentation of Statistics (10 credits);

Peer Reviewing (10 credits);

Latent Variable Modelling (10 credits);

plus 20 credits from optional modules and a final compulsory Research Project comprising 120 credits.

Research Skills

Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

How to conduct Statistics and Presentation of Statistics modules

The purpose of these two taught modules is to provide students with an in-depth understanding and critical appreciation of statistical procedures. As independent study based modules, they will enable students to gain a comprehensive understanding of a statistical procedure of their choosing (following consultation with the staff member responsible for the module). Towards this end, students will likely cover (i) relevant background issues; (ii) when to use utilise particular statistical tests;(iii) how to conduct statistical testing via appropriate software; (iv) how to correctly interpret computational output; and (v) how to present the findings following analysis.

Peer Reviewing Scientific Research

Students work closely with their supervisor to perform an initial review of a previously submitted (and subsequently published) research article. Students will then follow the paper along the peer review process, discussing their review with their supervisor, and then be required to adequately address concerns which have been raised. Collectively this will mean that the student will cover a contemporary research topic in a highly focused and in-depth manner gaining a comprehensive understanding of how to prepare their own manuscripts (eg research proposal, Research Project) and how to evaluate the research of others. In order to place their highly specialised knowledge into a more holistic perspective, students will also attend the School’s Research Seminar series.

Latent Variable Modelling

This module introduces postgraduate students to the concepts of Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) and to give a basic grounding in their implementation. It also covers an introduction to SEM using LISREL and topics including: measurement models and structural models; exploratory factor analysis; confirmatory factor analysis (CFA); structural modelling with observed and latent variables; conceptual issues, common misunderstandings and limitations.

Research Project

Under the guidance of their supervising tutor(s), students will pro-actively determine the content of this unit. The initial stages of the Research Project will develop the work of the project proposal and taught phases of the MRes programmes. This will involve the surveying and reviewing of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to their area of inquiry. Ethical approval of the study will be obtained before data may be collected, thereby introducing students to this integral part of the research process. Throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field. It is expected that the resulting projects will be publishable in international, peer-reviewed journals.

Optional Modules

In addition to the core/compulsory modules students choose a further 20 credits from the following optional modules:

Clinical Exercise Physiology;

Sport Psychology;

Effective Coaching;

Exercise Psychology;

Performance Physiology;

Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete.

The taught programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).



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Our MRes Health and Social Care course is designed to give you an in-depth understanding of and skills in theoretical underpinnings and research methods relevant to applied research in contemporary health and social care contexts. Read more

Our MRes Health and Social Care course is designed to give you an in-depth understanding of and skills in theoretical underpinnings and research methods relevant to applied research in contemporary health and social care contexts.

The course is designed for those who want to pursue a career in health and/or social care where research is a core component. Most of the units on this course are shared with other MSc and PhD programmes.

You will learn how to conduct and apply health and social care research to practice at both an individual and organisational level, drawing on the expertise of renowned lecturers and practitioners from fields including social work, nursing, midwifery, speech and language therapy, audiology, psychology and medicine.

The bulk of the course content is delivered online and is complemented by two compulsory four-day campus-based introductory and winter study schools, and one mid-semester study day in both Semester 1 and 2.

Aims

This course aims to:

  • enable you to further develop systematic, in-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the nature, purposes, methods and application of research relevant to health and social care practice at an individual and/or organisational level;
  • contribute to building capacity and capability for research and evidence-based practice by equipping you with in-depth knowledge and essential skills to critically appraise, apply, design and undertake high-quality research in a range of health and social care settings;
  • enhance the quality and evidence base for health and social care research, practice and service development through the provision of robust research training in a stimulating, challenging and supportive learning environment that draws on outstanding resources and expertise in research and practice;
  • promote lifelong learning and enhance opportunities to pursue a variety of research careers and/or further research training that support and advance clinical and health and social care knowledge, research and practice;
  • equip you with key transferable skills in critical reasoning and reflection, effective communication, team and multi-disciplinary working, use of IT/health informatics and logical and systematic approaches to problem-solving and decision-making.

Special features

Interdisciplinary focus

You will learn from nationally and internationally renowned lecturers and practitioners from fields including nursing, midwifery, social work, speech and language therapy, physiotherapy, audiology, psychology and medicine.

Strong collaborations

This course has strong links with other subjects within the Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, as well as the NHS and social care organisations.

Teaching and learning

This course is primarily delivered online to maximise access and increase flexibility. Online components are complemented by opportunities for face-to-face learning and networking between students, course and research staff through two four-day campus-based introductory and winter study schools and two mid-semester study days.

The relationship and communication between academic staff and students is recognised as an essential element of the learning process. We maintain high standards of supervision and communication through:

  • individual and group web-based audio-visual tutorials;
  • web-based collaboration areas and discussion boards;
  • shared digital documents;
  • online, telephone and face-to-face support from supervisor and academic advisors;
  • peer support through course-specific discussion boards and face-to-face meetings.

Coursework and assessment

We use a variety of summative assessment methods that enable the integration of theory and practice. These methods build on continuous formative assessment exercises that are part of each unit with a variety of interactive, stimulating online exercises, with regular self-assessment and feedback being a key feature.

Course unit details

The MRes route comprises six taught units (90 academic credits in total) and a 90-credit dissertation unit comprising a thesis derived from a supervised, research project relevant to health and/or social care.

The PGDip route comprises six taught units (90 academic credits in total) and a mini-dissertation (30 academic credits).

The PGCert comprises four taught units (60 academic credits in total).

Year 1

Full-time study

Six taught units in the following areas, plus a dissertation:

  • Foundations of research or Managing research in a clinical setting
  • Research design
  • Critical appraisal and evidence synthesis
  • Quantitative research design and analysis
  • Qualitative research design and analysis
  • Statistics

Part-time study

Four taught units from the following areas:

  • Foundations of research or Managing research in a clinical setting
  • Research design
  • Critical appraisal and evidence synthesis
  • Quantitative research design and analysis
  • Qualitative research design and analysis
  • Statistics

Year 2

Part-time study

Two taught units from the following areas, plus a dissertation:

  • Critical appraisal and evidence synthesis
  • Quantitative research design and analysis
  • Qualitative research design and analysis
  • Statistics

Facilities

This course is based in Jean McFarlane Building, which houses seminar rooms, IT facilities, clinical and interpersonal skills laboratories and lecture theatres.

The University of Manchester offers extensive library and online services to help you get the most out of your studies.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability and Advisory Support Service 

Career opportunities

This course is designed for health and social care professionals and others who seek a research career or require research training as a constituent part of their current or future roles. It is also for researchers who want research training focused on health and social care.

The course provides a comprehensive education and training in health and social care research as an excellent foundation for PhD study.

Associated organisations



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This course focuses on sport and exercise physiology. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Read more
This course focuses on sport and exercise physiology. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Research Skills;
Independent Study (a one to one supervised programme of work leading to the development of the proposal for the Research Project);
Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and could include directed work with a specified client group or individual;
Research Project relevant to the programme being studied.
Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

Independent Study
The Independent Study should consist of a critical and concise review of the research literature pertaining to a particular research question. A rationale for the proposed research question must be provided, along with a sound methodology for exploring the research question, planned analyses, and expected outcomes. Further, anticipated problems such as resources, equipment, possible ethical issues, informed consent forms, a statement of feasibility of the project and expected costs must be discussed.

Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (eg Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (ie evidence of reflective practice).

Overview and Format of the Research Project module
The Research Project is an independent piece of research, and acts as the culmination of the academic challenges faced by the student. The module comprises 60 credits (ie equivalent to three double modules) and will formally equate to some 600 hours of student time.

Students work closely with their supervisor to develop the work on their research proposal submitted during the Independent Study module. As External Examiners have noted, throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field, with the resulting projects being published in international, peer reviewed journals.

Specifically, this will involve a review of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to the area of enquiry. The supervisor provides excellent expert guidance throughout the process.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

External Examiner for Physiology Programmes (May 2011)

"I viewed a range of Research Projects this year. As always they are aligned to staff expertise – I strongly support this focus as I think it enriches the student experience to work with a knowledgeable and often highly motivated staff member."

In addition to the core modules listed above, students choose an optional module from:

Sport Psychology;
Effective Coaching;
Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete.
Students also undertake two further compulsory modules in Clinical Exercise Physiology and Performance Physiology.

The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

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The course programme will suit graduates in Sport Sciences or Physical Therapy who are interested in exercise rehabilitation in particular. Read more

The course programme will suit graduates in Sport Sciences or Physical Therapy who are interested in exercise rehabilitation in particular. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Research Skills;

Independent Study (a one to one supervised programme of work leading to the development of the proposal for the Research Project);

Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and could include directed work with a specified client group or individual patient;

Research Project relevant to the programme being studied.

Research Skills

Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

Independent Study

The Independent Study should consist of a critical and concise review of the research literature pertaining to a particular research question. A rationale for the proposed research question must be provided, along with a sound methodology for exploring the research question, planned analyses, and expected outcomes. Further, anticipated problems such as resources, equipment, possible ethical issues, informed consent forms, a statement of feasibility of the project and expected costs must be discussed.

Supervised Experience

The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (e.g. Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (i.e. evidence of reflective practice).

Overview and Format of the Research Project module

The Research Project is an independent piece of research, and acts as the culmination of the academic challenges faced by the student. The module comprises 60 credits (ie equivalent to three double modules) and will formally equate to some 600 hours of student time.

Specifically, this will involve a review of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to the area of enquiry. The supervisor provides excellent expert guidance throughout the process.

In addition to the above, students also undertake compulsory modules in Clinical Exercise Physiology (including disease and aging), Exercise Psychology and Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete. This latter module covers theoretical perspectives in sports injury rehabilitation; psychological response to sports injury; the role of confidence in injury and rehabilitation; exercise, training principles and biomechanics of rehabilitation; plus returning the athlete to competition; failure to rehabilitate; current trends in injury rehabilitation research and future research directions; and critical assessment of sports rehabilitation research.

The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours (including formal contact).

You will also have the opportunity to gain a REPs* accredited Level 2 Gym Instructor vocational qualification free of charge to supplement your MSc academic qualification. This will depend on prior learning and it is expected that MSc students on the Exercise Rehabilitation programme will be able to gain this qualification by carrying out approximately half the typical work load. This vocational qualification is a required qualification within the exercise referral industry.

* Register of Exercise Professionals



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This course provides a focus on sport and performance. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Read more

This course provides a focus on sport and performance. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Research Skills;

Independent Study (a one to one supervised programme of work leading to the development of the proposal for the Research Project);

Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and could include directed work with a specified client group or individual;

Research Project relevant to the programme being studied.

Research Skills

Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

Independent Study

The Independent Study should consist of a critical and concise review of the research literature pertaining to a particular research question. A rationale for the proposed research question must be provided, along with a sound methodology for exploring the research question, planned analyses, and expected outcomes. Further, anticipated problems such as resources, equipment, possible ethical issues, informed consent forms, a statement of feasibility of the project and expected costs must be discussed.

Supervised Experience

The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (eg Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (ie evidence of reflective practice).

Overview and Format of the Research Project module

The Research Project is an independent piece of research, and acts as the culmination of the academic challenges faced by the student. The module comprises 60 credits (ie equivalent to three double modules) and will formally equate to some 600 hours of student time.

Students work closely with their supervisor to develop the work on their research proposal submitted during the Independent Study module. As External Examiners have noted, throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field, with the resulting projects being published in international, peer reviewed journals.

Specifically, this will involve a review of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to the area of enquiry. The supervisor provides excellent expert guidance throughout the process.

Students also choose optional modules from:

Performance Physiology;

Sport Psychology;

Exercise Psychology;

Clinical Exercise Physiology;

Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete:

Effective Coaching.

The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).



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The course focuses on developing a student’s scientific understanding of the human mind, behaviour and experience, and of the complex interactions between these and the domain of sport and exercise. Read more
The course focuses on developing a student’s scientific understanding of the human mind, behaviour and experience, and of the complex interactions between these and the domain of sport and exercise. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Research Skills;
Independent Study (a one to one supervised programme of work leading to the development of the proposal for the Research Project);
Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and could include directed work with a specified client group or individual;
Research Project relevant to the programme being studied.
Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

Independent Study
The Independent Study should consist of a critical and concise review of the research literature pertaining to a particular research question. A rationale for the proposed research question must be provided, along with a sound methodology for exploring the research question, planned analyses, and expected outcomes. Further, anticipated problems such as resources, equipment, possible ethical issues, informed consent forms, a statement of feasibility of the project and expected costs must be discussed.

Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (eg Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (ie evidence of reflective practice).

Overview and Format of the Research Project module
The Research Project is an independent piece of research, and acts as the culmination of the academic challenges faced by the student. The module comprises 60 credits (ie equivalent to three double modules) and will formally equate to some 600 hours of student time.

Students work closely with their supervisor to develop the work on their research proposal submitted during the Independent Study module. As External Examiners have noted, throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field, with the resulting projects being published in international, peer reviewed journals.

Specifically, this will involve a review of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to the area of enquiry. The supervisor provides excellent expert guidance throughout the process.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

Students also undertake additional compulsory modules in Sport Psychology and Exercise Psychology, and choose one optional module from Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete or Effective Coaching.

The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours (including formal contact).

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Social Research Methods at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Social Research Methods at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

This Master's degree in Social Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in a range of research methods used in the social sciences.

Key Features of MSc in Social Research Methods

Teaching and Employability:

- Teaching is carried out by highly-respected, research active, professionals conducting research across a range of research areas and publishing in top international journals

- Students benefit from state-of-the-art technology with over twenty general purpose research rooms and numerous specialised testing facilities

- Specialist modules in criminology, social work and human geography, research leadership and management

- Emphasis on development of ethical, knowledgeable, skilful social researchers” through critical discussion, up to date information, debates and presentations

MSc Social Research Methods is a highly regarded and prestigious qualification which has been developed to:

- enable students to develop practical research skills and advanced methodological expertise (both qualitative and quantitative);

- instil familiarity with research ethics and governance, and

- gain knowledge about theoretical research concerns across the spectrum of social science disciplines.

Elective modules and a dissertation provide scope for specialisation in applied social sciences, including but not limited to: criminology, human geography, social work and health.

This Master’s degree in Social Research Methods has ESRC accreditation and provides advanced training in a range of research methods used in the social sciences. The degree instils familiarity with research ethics and governance, and students gain knowledge about theoretical research concerns across the spectrum of social science disciplines.

Students on the Social Research Methods course are encouraged to devise research dissertations themselves (supported by an academic supervisor).

Modules

Modules on the Social Research Methods programme typically include:

Qualitative Research Methods

Introduction to Research and Study Skills

Data Collection Methods

Ethics and Philosophy of Social Research

Quantitative Research Methods

Advanced Research in Human Geography

Research Leadership and Project Management

Case Studies in Applied Social Research: Social Work

Case Studies in Applied Social Res: Applied Research in Crime & Criminal Justice

Dissertation (Social Research)

Social Research Methods Course Structure

Teaching is in the form of lectures, seminars, group-project work and individual study. All Social Research Methods students are assigned a Personal Tutor and Dissertation Supervisor appropriate to their chosen area of study.

The Social Research Methods course is made up of six 20-credit modules (Part 1) and a 60-credit dissertation (Part 2).

Who should apply?

The Social Research Methods course is suitable for:

- students who want to prepare themselves for the challenge of MPhil or PhD study; who are already professionally involved in working with people in the social sector and want to develop their own skills and professional expertise

- students from different academic disciplines who are interested in conducting social research and are interested in seeking employment or already have employment in both public and private sectors

- previous students are those with backgrounds in social policy, sociology, law, criminology, human geography, politics, arts and humanities, ageing studies , psychology and health science

- anyone wanting to add a valuable qualification as part of developing a full academic career

- anyone who is interested in society, social behaviour, and social change and would like to learn more

- anyone working in, or wishing to work in, government or voluntary organisations, and commercial areas where social research is undertake

Career Prospects

Past Social Research Methods students have gone on to be employed in public and private sectors, research work, PhD , vocational work, the criminal justice system, social work, environmental health, teaching, local government, the Office of National Statistics (ONS) and health and social care.

Staff Expertise

Contributing lecturers are renowned nationally and internationally. For example, Professor David Hughes has published on the universal coverage healthcare reforms of Thailand and Turkey, Debbie Jones jointly led on The Student Sex Workers' project from Swansea University's Centre for Criminal Justice and Criminology.

The MSc Social Research methods is serviced by research active staff, many of whom are leaders in their field of research. The team has strong links with Criminology whose staff have been awarded Howard league Research Medal 2013 for work on the Swansea Bureau Youth Scheme. Lecturers from the course also include those from the world renowned Centre for Innovative Aging and also Human Geography.

Postgraduate Community

The College of Human and Health Sciences has a vibrant postgraduate community with students drawn from a variety of backgrounds and nationalities. The College is known for its friendly, welcoming and supportive environment, which combined with its extensive facilities, state-of-the-art technology and superb beachside location, helps to ensure that students benefit from an exceptional student experience.

In addition, students have access to a wide range of excellent facilities and equipment for realistic workplace experiences.



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