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If you want to become a produced or published writer, or to develop your writing skills, this programme will give you the chance to be tutored by leading and established writers in a supportive and creative environment. Read more

If you want to become a produced or published writer, or to develop your writing skills, this programme will give you the chance to be tutored by leading and established writers in a supportive and creative environment.

The emphasis is on different forms of scriptwriting - playwriting, screenwriting, dramatic writing, writing for film and television, and writing for radio – but you can also develop imaginative writing in other forms, especially prose fiction. Specialist pathways in screenwriting or writing for theatre are open to you.

Whether you’re an aspiring writer, a teacher or simply want to learn more about the writer’s craft, you’ll be working in an environment dedicated to developing new and emerging talent. Our students come from all over the world, and we have a powerful record for developing successful writers and creative leaders. Through our partnership with the West Yorkshire Playhouse, the course is linked to the Playhouse’s own new writing schemes.

Our tutors are professional dramatists and leading researchers with a wide range of expertise. The Programme Director for the MA is the award-winning playwright, screenwriter and producer Garry Lyons, who established the degree in 2006.

Find out more about Garry Lyons

You’ll be based in our landmark building [email protected], with two professional-standard and publicly licensed theatres that regularly host works by students and visiting theatre companies. You’ll be encouraged to use these facilities to try your work out in workshops, rehearsed readings or full productions, and gain experience of practical drama-making.

The programme also benefits from our close links with external organisations. As well as our partnership with West Yorkshire Playhouse, we work with the BBC’s new talent unit, Writers’ Room. Other partners include Opera North, ITV, Screen Yorkshire, the National Media Museum, Creative England, Red Ladder Theatre Company, True North Productions, Chapel FM Radio, Valley Press and many more.

Course content

A core module will introduce you to creative writing research, including the potential of practice-led research. This will help to equip you for the rest of the programme, giving you the tools to reflect analytically on your writing and compare it with existing writing of a similar genre or style.

In Semester 1 you’ll spend time in intensive workshops refining your own short pieces of narrative writing, exploring the principles of storytelling and more experimental approaches. You'll work in a range of forms - from theatre and radio to screenplays and prose - preparing you to specialise as you progress through the degree.

Options in Semester 2 allow you to focus on film and television writing or work on an original project of your own – individually, in collaboration with students from across the School, or based on a two-week placement with an external organisation.

All of this work will culminate with your major project, which you’ll submit by the end of the programme – this could be an extended piece of creative writing, a conventional dissertation, or performance-led research.

Working with West Yorkshire Playhouse

The MA is partnered with West Yorkshire Playhouse, one of the UK’s leading theatres outside London. This links us to the the Playhouse’s new writing schemes. Directors and associate artists from the Playhouse regularly run workshops and masterclasses for us, and we collaborate with the theatre on joint projects such as new writing events and festivals. The Playhouse occasionally offers work experience opportunities for our students to apply for.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Research Project 60 credits
  • Story Workshop 30 credits
  • Research Perspectives (Writing for Performance and Publication) 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Creative Work 30 credits
  • Performance and Collaborative Enterprise 30 credits
  • Writing for Theatre and Radio 30 credits
  • Writing for Film and Television 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Writing for Performance and Publication MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Writing for Performance and Publication MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Our tutors are professional dramatists and academic specialists in a range of genres, with experience of dealing with theatres, agents, production companies, editors and publishers. We also invite guest speakers from the worlds of theatre, broadcasting, film and publishing to share their insights into the creative industries.

You’ll be taught using a range of methods including lectures, seminars and tutorials as well as practical sessions and workshops. Independent study is also a vital component of this degree, allowing you to conduct your own research and develop your own ideas.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed mostly on the basis of your creative writing, including theatre, screen and radio scripts and short prose stories you’ll develop in your modules. To encourage you to reflect on your practice, you’ll also write commentaries on your own work. Core modules may also use assessment methods such as essays and presentations to allow you to demonstrate your knowledge.

Career opportunities

Many students will want to pursue a career as a professional writer. Although this is a fiercely competitive field, this degree is designed to try to help you realise your ambitions. Alternatively, you could use your additional experience and qualification to progress in your current career or pursue a related path within the creative arts.

You’ll also be well equipped for a future in education, arts administration, script editing, literary management, broadcasting, journalism, advertising, the media, publishing, literary agencies, marketing, PT and many other areas.

The programme has established a powerful record for developing successful writers and creative leaders, from playwrights and television writers to novelists, directors and lecturers.



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​The MA Creative Writing at Cardiff Metropolitan University is taught by published writers and researchers. The course is aimed to support you while you develop and hone your critical and creative writing skills, particularly in the field of fiction. Read more

Course Overview

​The MA Creative Writing at Cardiff Metropolitan University is taught by published writers and researchers. The course is aimed to support you while you develop and hone your critical and creative writing skills, particularly in the field of fiction. You can take our MA for professional development purposes, in order to enhance your career, and to increase your likelihood of publication. The MA will also help you specialise in the areas of creative practice and contemporary writing in order to pave the way for doctoral study.

We have expertise across a number of fields and our academic community is vibrant and dynamic with strong industry links. We have a focus on the contemporary that is underpinned with expertise in historical periods.

One of the great strengths of the programme is its flexibility. MA Creative Writing can be studied either full or part time. Modules can be taken individually, allowing you to control the pace and depth of your postgraduate study. Programme delivery is enhanced by the university's commitment to e-learning.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/education/courses/Pages/Creative-Writing---MA.aspx

​Course Content​​

All of our modules are co​re and are delivered over one year full time or two years part time.

Term 1
- Researching Humanities
Researching Humanities will introduce you to research methods at MA level. The module provides a thorough breakdown of research methods across the fields of Creative Writing and English Literature. This module is taught across all of our MA Creative Writing and English Literature pathways and it is also a great opportunity for you to get to know your peers.

- Short Story Writing
Short Story Writing provides a thorough introduction to the short story. This is done through two distinct, but integrated, approaches: a critical analysis of the development of the short story, with particular focus on twentieth century and contemporary writing; and through the creative practice itself. Each week you'll be encouraged to explore key techniques and approaches in your own writing through writing workshops.

- New & Experimental Writing
In New and Experimental Writing you will encounter a range of transgressive texts from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Starting with the avant-garde, the module proceeds chronologically to the contemporary. We interrogate what it means to transgress aesthetic norms at various points in time and take into consideration historical and cultural context to consider whether there might be a connection between the challenging of literary and social standards. You will be able to approach these texts via a number of methodologies, including theoretical and creative.

Term 2
- Novel Writing
Novel Writing extends and deepens your engagement with fiction writing. The module provides you with a thorough introduction to the novel as a distinct fictional genre focussing on the contemporary. As well as examining key works, you'll also be working on your own creative practice. A key part of the module focuses on the preparation of your work for publication.

- Writing the City
In Writing the City you'll explore representations of urban space through set texts and in your own creative writing. In this module you’ll examine texts that explore the urban in literary fiction, particularly throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

- Critical Practice
Critical Practice prepares you for your dissertation through which you'll be able to submit a substantial body of creative work along with a contextualising critical commentary.

- Dissertation
The Dissertation module is your opportunity to create a portfolio of writing, such as a collection of short stories or an excerpt of a novel that you are working on. The creative work will be accompanied by a critical reflection in which you contextualise your writing within a critical framework and with reference to other texts.

Learning & Teaching​

​Most modules are taught through group workshops and seminars. Some modules will also include individual tutorials and the dissertation module is delivered entirely through one-to-one tutorials with your supervisor.

In workshops and seminars full use is made of University technology and course materials will be delivered and stored through our Virtual Learning Environment. It will be possible for you to access the Virtual Learning Environment remotely and you will be encouraged to do so.

Most modules are 20 or 30 credits although we also have a 10 credit module and the dissertation is worth 60 credits. In a 10 credit module you will receive 11 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 89 hours of independent study. In a 20 credit module you will receive 22 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 178 hours of independent study. In a 30 credit module you will receive 33 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 267 hours of independent study. The 60 credit dissertation is mainly conducted with independent study. You will receive 6 hours of tutorial supervision (this includes supervisors looking over your work) and you will be expected to conduct 594 hours of independent study.

Each student is appointed a personal tutor who will be available for academic advice, pastoral support and personal development planning. Tutors also have weekly office hours.

A critical but supportive environment is achieved through a combination of workshops, research seminars and e-learning. You will be introduced to the practicalities of preparing and submitting your work for publication.

Assessment

We have a variety of approaches to assessment across the programme depending upon the module. All creative practice modules (Short Story Writing, Novel Writing, Dissertation) are assessed through portfolios of creative work and accompanying critical essays in which you are required to reflect on your creative practice and to contextualise your work with reference to other texts. These modules also include class-based formative peer-assessment in the form of writing workshops. These do not count towards your final grade but the sessions do help you grow and reflect as a critical and creative writer.

In some modules (New and Experimental Writing, Writing the City) you can choose your method of assessment (creative portfolio and critical essay, or essay, or reflection, for example).

In the introductory Researching the Humanities module you will be ask to produce a visual representation of a chosen research method, in the form of a poster. In other modules, such as Writing the City, you will be asked to post your work to a reflective blog.

Modules also make use of Virtual Learning Environments for assessments and you may be asked to view material online and then to respond to it.

You will receive tutor support in class and through our VLE in order to prepare you for each assessment point. We also have library facilities online and at campus.

Employability & Careers​

Many of our students use the course to generate and hone their own writing for publication. Our creative practice modules are designed with eventual publication in mind. For example, in our Novel Writing module you will be taught how to write a synopsis for submission to an agent or publisher. Several of our students have had publication success (see below).

The MA is also a great choice for those wishing to enhance their employment and professional opportunities in editorial and publishing careers. The programme is suitable for those who would like to become teachers of creative writing or who are already teachers. For example, teachers of English at ‘A’ Level and GCSE often find the course suitable for professional development purposes, providing them with skills to enhance their teaching of creative writing within their current curricula or skilling them up to deliver the new Creative Writing ‘A’ Level.

Our MA is appropriate for those who would like careers in community-based education and practice. The course also prepares you for further study at PhD level at Cardiff Metropolitan University and beyond.

This degree will encourage you to develop the valuable transferable skills of autonomy, effective collaboration, self-direction, organisation, initiative and adaptability that are highly regarded in the workplace.

Recent student publishing successes:
Barbara A Stensland (MA Creative Writing) writes a blog about living with MS that has recently been published as a book, Stumbling in Flats (2015). It has been shortlisted for The International Rubery Book Award 2015.

Emre Karatoprak (MA Creative Writing) had his first novel published on Amazon, Türbülans (2013).

Alex Sambrook (MA Creative Writing) had a short story shortlisted in the prestigious Bridport Short Story Competition (2012).

Stacey Taylor, (MA English & Creative Writing), won the It Started With a Kiss competition run by Authonomy in November 2011 with a 416 word flash fiction.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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​MA English Literature & Creative Writing is a rewarding taught degree, combining the study of English Literature with the theoretical and practical component of fiction writing. Read more

Course Overview

​MA English Literature & Creative Writing is a rewarding taught degree, combining the study of English Literature with the theoretical and practical component of fiction writing.

The MA is taught by published writers and researchers. The course is aimed to support you while you develop and hone your critical and creative writing skills, particularly in the field of fiction. You can take our MA for professional development purposes, in order to enhance your career and to increase your likelihood of publication. The MA will also help you specialise in the areas of creative practice as well as contemporary and historical literature in relation to place and space in order to pave the way for doctoral study.

We have expertise across a number of fields and our academic community is vibrant and dynamic with strong industry links.

The English Literature part of the degree analyses historic and contemporary textual representations of place, theorising cultural practices of location and space. The Creative Writing modules are specifically designed to develop you as a writer of fiction.

One of the great strengths of the programme is its flexibility. MA English Literature and Creative Writing can be studied either full or part time. Modules can be taken individually, allowing you to control the pace and depth of your postgraduate study. Programme delivery is enhanced by the university’s commitment to e-learning​.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/education/courses/Pages/English-and-Creative-Writing---MA.aspx

Course Content​​

All of our modules are core and are delivered over one year full time or two years part time.
Term 1
- Researching Humanities
Researching Humanities will introduce you to research methods at MA level. The module provides a thorough breakdown of research methods across the fields of Creative Writing and English Literature. This module is taught across all of our MA Creative Writing and English Literature pathways and it is also a great opportunity for you to get to know your peers.

- Short Story Writing
Short Story Writing provides a thorough introduction to the short story. This is done through two distinct, but integrated, approaches: a critical analysis of the development of the short story, with particular focus on twentieth century and contemporary writing; and through the creative practice itself. Each week you'll be encouraged to explore key techniques and approaches in your own writing through writing workshops.

- Literature and Landscapes
In Literature and Landscapes, you’ll examine artistic and literary representations of landscape, and engage with the complex social, cultural and aesthetic factors that contribute to the formation of identity. The module provides a comparative foundation from which you’ll consider representations of the urban encountered in Writing the City.

Term 2
- Novel Writing
Novel Writing extends and deepens your engagement with fiction writing. The module provides you with a thorough introduction to the novel as a distinct fictional genre focussing on the contemporary. As well as examining key works, you'll also be working on your own creative practice. A key part of the module focuses on the preparation of your work for publication.

- Writing the City
In Writing the City you'll explore representations of urban space through set texts and in your own creative writing. In this module you’ll examine texts that explore the urban in literary fiction, particularly throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

- Critical Practice
Critical Practice prepares you for your dissertation through which you'll be able to submit a substantial body of creative work along with a contextualising critical commentary.

- Dissertation
The Dissertation module is your opportunity to create a portfolio of writing, such as a collection of short stories or an excerpt of a novel that you are working on. The creative work will be accompanied by a critical reflection in which you contextualise your writing within a critical framework and with reference to other texts.

Learning & Teaching​

​Most modules are taught through group workshops and seminars. Some modules will also include individual tutorials and the dissertation module is delivered entirely through one-to-one tutorials with your supervisor.

In workshops and seminars full use is made of University technology and course materials will be delivered and stored through our Virtual Learning Environment. It will be possible for you to access the Virtual Learning Environment remotely and you will be encouraged to do so.

Most modules are 20 or 30 credits although we also have a 10-credit module and the dissertation is worth 60 credits.

In a 10-credit module you will receive 11 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 89 hours of independent study. In a 20-credit module you will receive 22 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 178 hours of independent study. In a 30-credit module you will receive 33 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 267 hours of independent study. The 60-credit dissertation is mainly conducted with independent study. You will receive 6 hours of tutorial supervision (this includes supervisors looking over your work) and you will be expected to conduct 594 hours of independent study.

Each student is appointed a personal tutor who will be available for academic advice, pastoral support and personal development planning. Tutors also have weekly office hours.

A critical but supportive environment is achieved through a combination of workshops, research seminars and e-learning. You will be introduced to the practicalities of preparing and submitting your work for possible publication.

Assessment

We have a variety of approaches to assessment across the programme depending upon the module. All creative practice modules (Short Story Writing, Novel Writing, Dissertation) are assessed through portfolios of creative work and accompanying critical essays in which you are required to reflect on your creative practice and to contextualise your work with reference to other texts. These modules also include class-based formative peer-assessment in the form of writing workshops. These do not count towards your final grade but the sessions do help you grow and reflect as a critical and creative writer.

In some modules (Writing the City) you can choose your method of assessment (creative portfolio and critical essay, or essay, or reflection, for example). In other modules (Literature and Landscapes) you will be asked to produce an essay.

In the introductory Researching the Humanities module you will be ask to produce a visual representation of a chosen research method, in the form of a poster. In other modules, such as Writing the City, you will be asked to post your work to a reflective blog.

Modules also make use of Virtual Learning Environments for assessments and you may be asked to view material online and then to respond to it.

You will receive tutor support in class and through our VLE in order to prepare you for each assessment point. We also have library facilities online and at campus.​

Employability & Careers​

Many of our students use the course to generate and hone their own writing for publication. Our creative practice modules are designed with eventual publication in mind. For example, in our Novel Writing module you will be taught how to write a synopsis for submission to an agent or publisher. Several of our students have had publication success (see below).

The MA is also a great choice for those wishing to enhance their employment and professional opportunities in editorial and publishing careers. The programme is suitable for those who would like to become teachers of English literature and creative writing as well as those who are already teachers. For example, teachers of English at ‘A’ Level and GCSE often find the course suitable for professional development purposes, providing them with skills to enhance their teaching of English literature creative writing within their current curricula or skilling them up to deliver the new Creative Writing ‘A’ Level.

Our MA is appropriate for those who would like careers in community-based education and practice. The course also prepares you for further study at PhD level at Cardiff Metropolitan University and beyond.

This degree will encourage you to develop the valuable transferable skills of autonomy, effective collaboration, self-direction, organisation, initiative and adaptability that are highly regarded in the workplace.

Recent student publishing successes:
Barbara A Stensland (MA Creative Writing) writes a blog about living with MS that has recently been published as a book, Stumbling in Flats (2015). It has been shortlisted for The International Rubery Book Award 2015.

Emre Karatoprak (MA Creative Writing) had his first novel published on Amazon, Türbülans (2013).

Alex Sambrook (MA Creative Writing) had a short story shortlisted in the prestigious Bridport Short Story Competition (2012).

​Stacey Taylor, (MA English & Creative Writing), won the It Started With a Kiss competition run by Authonomy in November 2011 with a 416 word flash fiction.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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A central feature of the work of professionals in education and training today is the evaluation and development of practice, and the ability to bring about change within their institutions. Read more

About the course

A central feature of the work of professionals in education and training today is the evaluation and development of practice, and the ability to bring about change within their institutions. The EdD is a research-based programme focused on the improvement of professional practice. You will work at doctorate level on issues or problems that are of direct relevance to your professional interests and institutional concerns, bringing significant benefit to the organisation in which you work.

You will undertake a programme of studies in the areas of professional development and impact on practice; research approaches and methods appropriate to practice-based research; and leadership issues in promoting the learning of others. In consultation with tutors you will develop a programme of work which leads to the presentation of a thesis.

The programme is intended for professionals with an education or training function from public sector or commercial/business organisations. These include: people working in education settings such as schools, further education, higher education, and local education authorities; trainers and consultants; staff working in inter-agency settings; youth and social workers.

Study themes for Phase 1 (Years 1 and 2) are: issues in professional learning and development; approaches to research.

Study Themes for Phases 2 and 3 (Years 3 to 5) are: professional learning and development of practice-based research, with supervisory support leading to the production of a substantial thesis.

A programme of sessions relating to the themes provides opportunities for you to present and evaluate your own work.

How to apply

Before making your formal application, we recommend that you discuss your proposed research with Dr Jon Berry , to establish that it is appropriate for this award.

Download our information pack on studying for a Doctorate in Education. - https://www.herts.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/83921/Information-pack-2015.pdf

Applications should be returned to Dr Janice Turner, Research Administrator, SSAHRI

Why choose this course?

The Doctorate in Education (EdD) offers the opportunity for those with an enthusiasm for learning to gain the highest level of professional qualification available in the field.

Teaching methods

A series of bi-monthly study days are organised in two-day blocks and single days (including weekend days), supervision meetings, e-learning support and University Research Degrees' Generic Training for Researchers sessions. This research course has a strong cohort experience and attendance to the bi-monthly study days is compulsory. During the study days, which are led by the EdD team, students develop research skills and discuss their ongoing projects. Students are supervised by a principal and up to two second supervisors. The EdD core team includes professionals with a wide range of expertise at the forefront of education and social inquiry:

Jon Berry, PhD. Programme Tutor, Professional Doctorate in education (EdD). Areas of expertise: teachers’ professional autonomy, education policy, the politics of education. Representative publication: Teachers' professional autonomy in England: are neo-liberal approaches incontestable? Forum Vol. 54: 3 2012

Bushra Connors. Current research interests: critical realism, interdisciplinarity, structure and agency interactions, globalisation and Higher Education, pedagogy in a changing world, behaviour management in schools, science teaching pedagogy. Representative publication: Global mechanisms and Higher Education (presented at the Conference of the International Association for Critical Realism, Bologna, 2010).

Joy Jarvis, PhD, Associate Dean, Learning Teaching and Employability. Areas of expertise: professional learning and development including pedagogy in schools and HE, professional identity, professional development and leadership in learning and teaching. Research interests focus on narrative and arts-based forms of enquiry. Representative publication: Other ways of seeing; other ways of being: imagination as a tool for developing multiprofessional practice for children with communication needs (with Trodd, in Child Language Teaching and Therapy, Vol. 24, 2008).

Roger Levy, PhD, Associate Head of School, Research and Enterprise. Areas of expertise: professional learning and development, including mentoring, enquiry into work-based practice and the capacity of organisations to manage change; conceptions of teaching and learning; teacher development, professionalism; curriculum, programme evaluation; qualitative methodology. An active member and past Chair of the International Professional Development Association.

Philip Woods, PhD FRSA, Professor of Educational Policy, Democracy and Leadership. Areas of expertise: policy, leadership, democracy and education, enterprise and entrepreneurialism, alternative education, sociology, research and evaluation. Representative publication: Transforming education policy: Shaping a democratic future(Policy Press, 2011). Active links with US include University Council for Educational Administration and the New DEEL (Democratic Ethical Educational Leadership) network.

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Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our MA is a stimulating and rewarding course designed to help you develop the craft of excellent writing, enable you to produce original fiction, and equip you with the knowledge to get it published. Read more

Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our MA is a stimulating and rewarding course designed to help you develop the craft of excellent writing, enable you to produce original fiction, and equip you with the knowledge to get it published.

The next intake for this course is October 2018.

Why Study Creative Writing: Writing and Publishing Fiction with us?

This distinctive course comprises four modules – Writing Short Fiction for Publication, Writing Novels for Publication, Getting Published, and The Writing Project – which are taught by a team of published writers, scholars, and editors. Their publications include: flash fiction; novels; prose-poetry and short-story anthologies and collections; articles and essays; interviews; student textbooks; and writers’ guides. Two of the teaching team edit Flash: The International Short-Short Story Magazine, which has published stories by students on the MA.

The Parkgate Road Campus library is well stocked with creative writing textbooks and houses the Flash Fiction Special Collection, the world’s largest archive of flash-related books and magazines.

What will I learn?

You will study and try your hand at writing flash fiction, short stories, novellas, and novels. Getting Published looks at the world of fiction publishing. For The Writing Project, you will be able to write a collection of flashes and/or short stories, a novella, or a novel.

How will I be taught?

Typically, Writing Short Fiction for Publication and Writing Novels for Publication are taught by nine weekly two-hour seminars and two-hour workshops; and Getting Published is taught by five weekly two-hour seminars and two-hour workshops. One-to-one tutorials are also available. For The Writing Project (the final module), you will work one-to-one with a supervisor.

The total workload, including reading, preparation, seminars, workshops, tutorials, research, and writing, is approximately 37.5 hours per week.

How will I be assessed?

Modules are assessed by coursework, including essays, a journal, creative pieces, and a 16,000-word writing project. There are no formal exams.

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please go to: https://www1.chester.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-visit-opportunities

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus at: http://prospectus.chester.ac.uk/form.php



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This course provides you with the opportunity to develop the research skills you need to undertake clinical research within the field of health. Read more
This course provides you with the opportunity to develop the research skills you need to undertake clinical research within the field of health. The course focuses on preparing you to undertake clinically relevant research and develop your knowledge, understanding and practical skills within a range of primary and secondary research methodologies. You also have the opportunity to develop skills in project management, research governance and writing for publication and to gain an in-depth understanding of the context of health-related research and policy.

Course details

The course enables you to:
-Develop the skills and expertise necessary to undertake clinically relevant research
-Develop an in-depth knowledge and understanding of a wide range of research methodologies and data analysis techniques relevant to clinical practice
-Foster a commitment to life-long learning and the independent learning ability necessary for a clinical research career

A flexible approach to course delivery has been taken. You can choose to study either by attending taught sessions, through distance learning or through flexible learning (a combination of both attendance and distance).
-UK students to apply using the online application process
-International students who want to come to the UK to study full-time apply thorough the international office
-International students who want to study in their home county as a distance learner (full or part-time) apply using the online application process

What you study

You study a number of modules throughout the course which aim to develop your knowledge, understanding and practical skills in quantitative, qualitative and systematic review methodologies and data analysis techniques. You also gain an in-depth understanding of the context of health-related research, managing a research project, research governance, applying for ethics and writing for publication. Towards the end of the course you have the opportunity to plan, manage and undertake a research study in an area of interest to you and to write this up for publication.

Core modules
-Clinical Research in Context
-Clinical Research Trials
-Dissertation
-Qualitative Research Methods and Analysis
-Quantitative Research Methods and Analysis
-Research Evidence Synthesis
-Research Project Management

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

A range of teaching and learning methods is used throughout the course. You can choose to study either by attending taught classes or through distance learning or through flexible learning (a combination of attendance and distance). Learning and teaching methods for taught classes include key lectures, seminars, group discussions, computer lab work to develop skills in searching for literature and analysing data, and a range of practical activities to develop your practical research skills. Teaching and learning methods for distance learning are supported through the use of a virtual learning environment, where learning materials are available in a range of formats such as written materials, narrated power points, and practical activities to develop your searching, data analysis and practical research skills. Electronic discussion forums also support your learning. Personal development planning is also a key aspect of the course to support your learning.

Supervision and support are provided throughout the course by the personal tutor, course leader, module leaders and dissertation supervisor.

A range of assessment methods are used throughout the course. These include formative assessment, written essay, written report, proposal, oral and poster presentation, written project and an article for publication.

Employability

The course enhances your career progression by developing your ability to undertake clinically relevant research and will prepare you for either a clinical research career or a PhD.

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The Aberystwyth MA in Creative Writing will help you develop your creative vision and writing abilities through a balanced programme of reading, analysis and writing workshops. Read more

About the course

The Aberystwyth MA in Creative Writing will help you develop your creative vision and writing abilities through a balanced programme of reading, analysis and writing workshops. You will be exposed to a range of contemporary writers of both prose and poetry, so that your own creative approach may be stimulated and develop in confidence and maturity. You will also engage in discussions about technique and undertake an exploration of the wider issues related to the practice of writing, such as the significance of genre and the mechanics of publication.

You will receive individual tuition from the excellent Departmental staff, all of whom are published creative writers. Under their guidance, you will produce a substantial portfolio in the form of a collection of poetry or an extended piece of prose fiction. In addition, you will develop a host of key transferrable skills that will benefit you in a range of academic or employment contexts.

This degree will suit you:

- If you want comprehensive training in advanced methods of creative writing
- If you want to develop your creative vision and writing skills to the highest levels
- If you are looking for a detailed and constructive critique of your work
- If you want to work within a dynamic and supportive environment while producing a portfolio of creative writing

Course content and structure

You will study two core modules together with four option modules from the Department’s portfolio of MA provision or other relevant study areas, including Literary Studies. The core modules will equip you with the research skills and subject-specific knowledge required to master a range of practical and theoretical approaches to writing; and the option modules will enable you to direct your study into areas of specific interest. Each module comprises ten weeks of study with a weekly two-hour group meeting and provision for tutorial consultation. This framework for learning will inspire you to widen your artistic horizons and push you to develop your abilities within a constructive critical environment.

The centrally important component of the course is your Writing Portfolio. This piece, to comprise either prose or poetry, will be accompanied by a critical commentary explaining the work in its context and in appropriate analytical terms. We will take great care in assigning a supervisor to guide you whose interests will be as closely matched to your own as possible.

Core modules:

Research Skills
The Writing Portfolio
Writing and Publication

Optional modules:

Writing Fiction: Methods and Techniques
Writing Poetry: Rhymes and Reasons
Understanding Creativity
Writing Fiction: Wider Explorations
Writing Poetry: Modes in Contemporary Poetry

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of: portfolios of prose and poetry, including critical commentaries and annotated bibliographies; a case study of a research project; and a study of a particular publisher of creative writing or type of publication. In the third semester, each student will complete a Writing Portfolio of creative writing with a critical commentary. The Portfolio can be in the form of poetry (30 pages plus 6,000 words) or prose fiction (14,000 plus 6000 words), but not a combination of the two.

Employability

Every MA course at Aberystwyth University is specifically designed to enhance your employability. In addition to developing your writing and research abilities. This course will help you to master key skills that are required in wide variety of workplaces. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation so that you can tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence, and confidently present robust projects to the scrutiny of a group. Your MA in Creative Writing will place you in the jobs marketplace as a professional writer with highly desirable skills suitable for a career in the arts, literature, journalism or many other fields.

Key Skills and Competencies

Upon graduating from this MA in Creative Writing, you will have mastered an array of technical and creative skills relating to writing. You will be highly competent in factual research, evaluative writing and problem-solving through the process of writing. You will understand genre and register, narrative viewpoint and voice, and be able to justify your creative choices within your chosen form. You will possess an awareness of your intended readership and identify your place in the wider context of literary fiction and/or poetry. You will also have experience in giving and receiving stringent but supportive criticism within a positive group setting.

Self-Motivation and Discipline

Studying at MA level requires high levels of discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of Departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your MA degree. This process will strengthen your skills in planning, executing and analysing work projects in ways that reflect standard practice in the world of employed work.

Transferable Skills

The MA is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of academic and employment contexts. A significant proportion of postgraduate jobs demand both particular expertise and strength in breadth. Therefore, as a trained writer with proven creative abilities, you will be desirable to any employer seeking individuals who can balance creative flair and artistic vision with a dependable work ethic and highly adaptable writing skills.

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The MSc Public Health creates professionals who can lead and implement change in public health across the world stage. Read more
The MSc Public Health creates professionals who can lead and implement change in public health across the world stage.

The MSc Public Health was designed in consultation with Public Health Wales and supports the development of public health practitioners through enabling them to negotiate, plan, implement and evaluate policy and practice initiatives. The course also addresses wide-ranging public health issues that arise in diverse cultures, settings and environments.

The course curriculum is underpinned by standards set by the UK Public Health Skills and Career Framework, Faculty of Public Health and the National Occupational Standards for Public Health.

The MSc Public Health does not lead to registration on any professional register but can contribute towards preparation for Part A of the Faculty of Public Health examinations.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/618-msc-public-health

What you will study

Modules
- Evidence-based Public Health
- Sustainable Public Health
- Promoting Health in Diverse Environments
- Effective Prioritisation
- Health Promotion and Social Marketing
- Leading Change
- Publication and Dissemination

Plus one optional module from a list such as International Family Health.

Learning and teaching methods

The programme will be delivered using a blended learning approach, which includes lectures, online tools and group work to encourage critical skills. You will be expected to manage your own enquiry-based learning.

Learning alongside students from a wide range of disciplines and from other countries will ensure a rich learning environment concordant with contemporary multi-disciplinary approaches to public health.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

This degree opens up a variety of employment opportunities in the UK and internationally, and across the public and voluntary sectors, e.g, in schools, colleges and universities, advocacy organisations, international non-government organisations, consulting firms, local and national government organisations, health delivery organisations and community development organisations. There is also opportunity to work in global organisations such as the World Health Organisation.

Assessment methods

A range of assessment methods will be used, including poster and powerpoint presentations, academic assignments, production of management briefs, reflective accounts, a literature review and an epidemiology exam.

You will also have the opportunity to prepare a piece of work for potential publication through the Publication and Dissemination module.

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Taught by expert researchers, this innovative MSc combines evolutionary anthropology, focusing on the behaviour of human and non-human primates, with evolutionary, developmental and cognitive psychology. Read more
Taught by expert researchers, this innovative MSc combines evolutionary anthropology, focusing on the behaviour of human and non-human primates, with evolutionary, developmental and cognitive psychology.

You gain an interdisciplinary understanding of the origins and functions of human behaviour and can select from a range of advanced topics such as evolutionary anthropology, primatology, human behaviour, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology and intergroup relationships.

The programme places a strong emphasis on critical thinking and understanding of both the broad fields and the specialisms within. Core to the programme is the development of research methods, culminating in a piece of original research, written up in the form of a publication-ready journal article. The MSc in Evolution and Human Behaviour is a perfect foundation for PhD research: it provides theoretical background, discipline specific knowledge and advanced, quantitative research methods.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/190/evolution-and-human-behaviour

Why study with us?

- A unique, interdisciplinary, combination of Evolutionary Anthropology and Psychology.

- Taught by expert, active researchers in evolutionary approaches to understanding behaviour.

- Select from a range of advanced topics such as Evolutionary Anthropology, Primatology, Human Behaviour, Developmental Psychology & Cognitive Neuroscience.

- Perfect foundation for future PhD research: theoretical background, discipline-specific knowledge and advanced research methods.

- For students with an undergraduate degree in anthropology, psychology, biology or a related discipline.

- A research component that results in a publication-ready journal article.

Course structure

The programme places a strong emphasis on critical thinking and understanding of both the broad field and the specialisms within. Core to the programme is the development of research methods, culminating in a piece of original research, written up in the form of a publication ready journal article.

Modules

Please note that modules are subject to change. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

SE992 - Advanced Topics in Evolutionary Anthropology (15 credits)
SP801 - Statistics and Methodology (40 credits)
SE993 - Advanced Topics in Primate Behaviour (15 credits)
SE994 - Advanced Topics in HUman Behaviour (15 credits)
SP844 - Advanced Topics in Group Processes (20 credits)
SP851 - Advanced Topics in Cognitive Development (20 credits)
SP856 - Groups and Teams in Organisations (15 credits)
SP827 - Current Issues in Cognitive Psychology and Neuropsychology (40 credits)
SP842 - Advanced Developmental Social Psychology (20 credits)
SE855 - Research Project (Evolution & Human Behaviour) (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by computing tests, unseen examinations, coursework and a project report.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide the opportunity for advanced study of human behaviour from an evolutionary perspective, combining approaches from both evolutionary anthropology and evolutionary psychology

- provide teaching that is informed by current research and scholarship and that requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- help you to develop research skills and transferable skills in preparation for entering academic or other careers as an evolutionary scientist

- enable you to manage your own learning and to carry out independent research

- help you develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Careers

As a School recognised for its excellence in research we are one of the partners in the South East Doctoral Training Centre, which is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This relationship ensures that successful completion of our courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

Higher degrees in anthropology create opportunities in many employment sectors including academia, the civil service and non-governmental organisations through work in areas such as human rights, journalism, documentary film making, environmental conservation and international finance. An anthropology degree also develops interpersonal and intercultural skills, which make our graduates highly desirable in any profession that involves working with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Writing Development offers a new type of qualification aimed at graduates and professionals interested in studying, researching and teaching writing. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Writing Development offers a new type of qualification aimed at graduates and professionals interested in studying, researching and teaching writing. The course focuses on writing, rhetoric and literacies research and on the ways this research informs the teaching of writing. The programme is based upon Coventry University’s international reputation in the teaching of academic writing at the Centre for Academic Writing.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

As part of the programme, you will be:
-Teaching academic writing;
-Supporting the research writing of academics and other professionals;
-Developing professional academic writing development techniques;
-Writing programme management and development.

As students on the Academic Writing course you will be able to:
-Teach academic writing to students;
-Develop and manage a writing programme;
-Support professional academic writing for publication, including publication-writing in English as an additional language.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

Mandatory modules
-Teaching Academic Writing
-Supporting Academics, Postgraduates and Professionals in Writing for Publication
-Forms and Practices of Disciplinary Writing
-Writing Programme Development and Management

HOW WILL THIS COURSE BE TAUGHT?

The programme will be delivered in both part-time and full-time modes. In part-time mode, it will involve blended learning, including one four-day face-to-face session and on-line seminars for each module. In full-time mode, it will involve classroom (lectures, seminars, and workshops) delivery at Coventry University. Each module is worth 15 credits.

Students can enrol for the PG Certificate as this is a qualification aim in its own right. In addition, the PG Certificate serves as a fall back award for students who aim for the Diploma but do not pass enough modules to achieve that award.

Assessment is normally completed at or soon after the end of the ten weeks of teaching for all 15-credit modules.

The 1 year full-time course is campus based, and the 1 year part-time course is a blended learning mode. For international students, the 1 year full-time option only is available.

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Traditional news outlets are moving towards online products at an accelerated pace. Digital technology is profoundly changing journalism, with innovations like hyperlocal news and mobile media reporting becoming increasingly prevalent. Read more

Why this course?

Traditional news outlets are moving towards online products at an accelerated pace.

Digital technology is profoundly changing journalism, with innovations like hyperlocal news and mobile media reporting becoming increasingly prevalent.

This course is designed to equip you with the necessary skills to produce multimedia news and features. You’ll develop sound analytical, ethical and entrepreneurial skills in order to perform at a high level in the digital media world.

We aim to produce high quality, fresh-thinking graduates who have a passion to communicate and can articulate their ideas through effective story-telling.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/digitaljournalism/

You’ll study

You’ll work in the University’s simulated news environment and also report externally using mobile media. You’ll also:
- pursue real-life stories
- produce your own journalism packages
- experiment with entrepreneurial projects
- report, write and edit using text, pictures, video and audio to tell multimedia stories effectively

In Semester 2, you devise, launch, produce and market your own online publication.

In the Entrepreneurial Journalism class, which is run in collaboration with the University’s Hunter Centre for Entrepreneurship, you’ll learn about developing a portfolio career, personal branding and creating new ventures.

Throughout the course, there are opportunities to work on various projects with organisations from journalism and the creative industries.

Core classes

Core classes are as follows:
- Multimedia Journalism
- Entrepreneurial Journalism
- Producing Media
- Scots Law for Journalists
- Media Ethics

Optional classes

You'll choose from:
- Investigative Journalism: History & Theory
- Journalism & Society

Academic Dissertation : you will choose to undertake either an academic dissertation or a production dissertation.

Work placement

You’ll gain professional work experience by undertaking a placement at a newspaper, news agency or broadcast organisation.

You’re expected to arrange your own placement. This is normally for a period of up to four weeks during December/January or March/April.

Previous students have completed placements at the Herald and Times Group, the BBC, STV, the Independent, various local newspapers, company press offices and NGOs, such as the Scottish Refugee Council.

Facilities

You'll work in the University's simulated news environment.
You'll report externally using mobile media and digital recorders and cameras. You'll have access to industry standard audio and video editing software.

Student competitions

In 2013, the MLitt Digital Journalism students won the Multimedia Publication of the Year award, sponsored by the Herald, at the Scottish Student Journalism Awards. The award was for their online news site, the Inner Circle.
The class of 2014 also won with their publication, The Wee G, which offers readers an alternative insight into news and current affairs in Glasgow.

Scottish Student Journalism Awards 2014:
- Sam Shedden won Student Journalist of the Year and Feature of the Year
- Luciano Graca won Sport Story of the Year
- Mark Simpson won Scoop of the Year and a commendation in the Feature of the Year category
- Gillian Furmage, Christopher Morton and Stewart Ross were all nominated in various categories

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.
To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

[[Learning & teaching]
The course is delivered by lectures and seminars, during which a range of teaching and learning strategies are used.
These include formal talks, discussions, presentations, role-playing exercises and discussion of recorded material.
You'll also pursue real-life stories, produce your own journalism packages and experiment with entrepreneurial projects in extended workshops. You'll devise, launch and produce your own online publications predominantly through independent learning.

Guest lectures

We've a programme of visiting speakers including:
- Calum Macdonald- Herald digital editor
- Matt Roper- STV online editor

The Literary Lunch series is run by our own Literary Fellow, Keith Wright. The series showcases the best in Scottish writing and features poets and novelists such as Liz Lochhead, James Robertson and Andrew Greig.

Assessment

Assessment is via various means depending on the nature of the class.
Academic subjects are generally assessed by written essays, case studies and presentations.
In the Media Ethics class, students complete an innovative assessment, which requires them to work together in groups to research, create and produce a short video that explores a journalism ethics topic.
In practical journalism classes, students produce individual multimedia journalism packages, portfolios of their own work and a group online news site.
Peer assessment is also used in some of these classes.

Careers

Graduates of the course are employed at organisations such as:
- the Herald and Times Group
- the Press and Journal (Aberdeen)
- BBC
- STV
- DC Thomson
- the Daily Record

as well as running their own entrepreneurial ventures such as JournoWave.

Job titles include:
- content producers
- social media managers
- editorial offers
- communications officers

How much will I earn?

- the average starting salary for a broadcast journalist is around £15,000 - £20,000. Starting salaries vary significantly between local and national broadcasters.*
- according to the National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ) 's 2013 survey, Journalists at Work, the average salary for a newspaper journalist is £22,250.*

*information is intended only as a guide. Figures taken from Prospects.

To recognise academic achievement, the Dean's International Excellence Award offers students a merit-based scholarship of up to £3,000 for entry onto a full-time Masters programme in the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences.
http://www.strath.ac.uk/studywithus/scholarships/humanitiessocialsciencesscholarships/deansinternationalexcellenceawards/

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/studywithus/scholarships/

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The term creative director originated in advertising agencies, but in the last few years has also become prevalent in the fashion and beauty industries. Read more

Overview

The term creative director originated in advertising agencies, but in the last few years has also become prevalent in the fashion and beauty industries. The role of creative director within fashion and beauty is multi-faceted and varied. Generally speaking, creative directors find themselves responsible for the creative direction and visual identity of a brand, publication, website or event.

- Students study a curriculum with a unique focus on the increasingly in-demand role of art director.
- Students learn how to strategically guide imagery, style and brand to align with overarching creative and corporate directions.
- This course is specifically geared towards those who wish to pursue art direction within the fashion and beauty industry.
- After graduation, students will be able to apply their knowledge to a range of areas within fashion and beauty including magazine publication, event production, e-commerce and advertising.
- The professional practice unit gives students the chance to delve deep into their chosen industry, researching potential next steps and exploring career opportunities.
- Students benefit from the course’s strong focus on employability and are expected to carry out one month of work experience during their studies.
- Course staff hold a wealth of experience within fashion, beauty and the wider creative industries, opening up opportunities for industry engagement and guest speakers.

The industry -

Creative directors specialise in reading, interpreting and making use of complex visual language; using their unique vision of fashion and beauty to sell products and support brands across a range of different visual mediums. Southampton Solent’s MA Creative Direction for Fashion and Beauty programme offers students a unique opportunity to build the image-making, creative thinking and project management skills required to thrive in this prominent role.

The course examines a wide range of processes and practices found in high-level creative leadership, helping students to develop an expert understanding of fashion and beauty imagery within the contexts of culture, ethics and sustainability.

The programme -

Solent’s fashion and beauty programmes have strong links with industry, giving students the chance to work with experienced academics and industry professionals. Students can leverage these industry links when they are looking for work placements as part of the essential work-based learning unit.

Students also benefit from a programme of guest lectures throughout the course, with representatives from fashion, beauty, media, retail and other creative industries coming to campus and sharing their experiences. Recent events have included a guest lecture from professional makeup artist Laura Mercier, as well as visits from representatives of MAC, Illamasqua, Trendstop and Charles Fox.

The course culminates in a final major project, where students can either write a thesis or produce a major practical outcome. Students will have access to a wide range of industry-standard facilities in support of this project. Available facilities include photography studios; film studios; make-up studios; cameras; location lighting kits; ‘infinity cove’ studios and Mac suites with the latest industry software.

Course Content

Teaching, learning and assessment -

The course will be taught through a combination of seminars, technical workshops, small group sessions and 1:1 tutorials.

Work Experience -

The professional practice unit has been specifically designed to equip master’s students with an in-depth knowledge of their chosen industry and to give them the insights required to plan their long-term career. Students will be supported as they produce reflective professional development plans.

Work-based learning is essential to student development development. Students will be required to secure a work placement, freelance assignment or relevant work related experience in order to strengthen their knowledge and refine practical skills.

Assessment -

Assessment is through projects, reports and a dissertation.

Our facilities -

Available facilities include photography studios; film studios; make-up studios; camera loans; location lighting kits; an ‘infinity cove’ facility; and Mac suites with the latest industry software.

Web-based learning -

The course will be supported by a dedicated set of online resources. The course’s virtual learning environment will contain the unit descriptor, reading list, week by-week teaching and learning schemes, tutors’ contact details and availability, assessment briefs, grading criteria and details of assessment submission.

Students will also be expected to engage with social and web based media as a part of their professional development. This may include Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Tumblr, Snapchat, Twitter and blogging platforms.

Students will also benefit from access to online journals and subscription based websites including Berg Fashion Library, WGSN, WWD and Mintel.

Why Solent?

What do we offer?

From a vibrant city centre campus to our first class facilities, this is where you can find out why you should choose Solent.

Facilities - http://www.solent.ac.uk/about/facilities/facilities.aspx

City living - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/southampton/living-in-southampton.aspx

Accommodation - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/accommodation/accommodation.aspx

Career Potential

The role of creative director has become prevalent in the fashion and beauty industries in recent years. Generally speaking, creative directors find themselves responsible for the creative direction and visual identity of a brand, publication, website or event. As such, graduates may find themselves working with fashion and beauty brands, magazines, retail businesses, media production companies or communications agencies.

Links with industry -

Industry professionals share their knowledge and experiences with students through guest presentations, lectures, one-to-one tutorials and portfolio-viewing workshops.
Recent visiting lecturers have included: Caryn Franklin, Perry Curties, Iain R Webb, Wayne Johns, Bruce Smith, Ellen Rogers, Hannah Al-Shemmeri, Elaine Waldron, Maria Bonet and Richard Billingham.

Transferable skills -

The programme area and its staff have strong links with the industry, recently hosting a guest lecture from professional makeup artist Laura Mercier, as well as visits from representatives of MAC, Illamasqua, Trendstop and Charles Fox.

Tuition fees

The tuition fees for the 2016/2017 academic year are:

UK and EU full-time fees: £6,695 per year

International full-time fees: £11,260 per year

UK and EU part-time fees: £3,350 per year

International part-time fees: £5,630 per year

Other costs -

Compulsory costs: Hard drive, hosting, domain name

Optional costs: Creative software packages.

Trips offered to undergraduate students include New York and Paris - costs vary according to current prices. It is anticipated that these trips will also be offered to postgraduate students.

Graduation costs -

Graduation is the ceremony to celebrate the achievements of your studies. For graduates in 2015, there is no charge to attend graduation, but you will be required to pay for the rental of your academic gown (approximately £42 per graduate, depending on your award). You may also wish to purchase official photography packages, which range in price from £15 to £200+. Graduation is not compulsory, so if you prefer to have your award sent to you, there is no cost.
For more details, please visit: http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/graduation/home.aspx

Next steps

Solent’s MA Creative Direction for Fashion and Beauty programme encourages students to develop high level research and critical thinking skills. For those who wish to pursue PhD study after graduation, this represents the perfect opportunity to identify potential research areas.

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We offer research programmes in a variety of areas based on the work being carried out by our Research Centres and groups (http://www.bath.ac.uk/elec-eng/research/index.html). Read more
We offer research programmes in a variety of areas based on the work being carried out by our Research Centres and groups (http://www.bath.ac.uk/elec-eng/research/index.html).

Our philosophy

The Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering (http://www.bath.ac.uk/elec-eng/index.html) is in the vanguard of progress in a fast-moving discipline. It offers a broad spectrum of research expertise supported by state-of-the-art facilities.

Its international reputation reflects substantial levels of research income and journal publication, and it offers outstanding opportunities in postgraduate research.

The dissemination of research findings is seen as a vital component of the research process and graduate students are encouraged to prepare papers for publication as part of their research training.

Our applicants

We encourage a wide range of interests. Academic staff are always open to ideas which extend existing work or introduce new topics to their existing subject areas.

Successful applicants are welcomed very much as junior academic colleagues rather than students, and are expected to play a full and professional role in contributing to the Department’s objective of international academic excellence.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/elec-elec-engi-mphi/

Structure

The MPhil programme combines taught research training and applied research practice. Candidates join the Department as a member of the Research Centre in which they initially have a broad research interest and that will have overseen their acceptance into the Department.

Candidates are expected to carry out supervised research at the leading edge of their chosen subject, which must then be written up as a substantial thesis.

International students

Please see the International students website (http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/international/) for details of entry requirements based on qualifications from your country.

All non-native speakers of English are required to have passed English language tests.

If you need to develop your English language skills, the University’s Academic Skills Centre (http://www.bath.ac.uk/asc/) offers a number of courses.

About the department

The Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering offers a broad spectrum of research expertise supported by state-of-the-art facilities. Its international reputation reflects substantial levels of research income and journal publication, and it offers outstanding opportunities in postgraduate research.

91% of our research activity was graded as either world-leading or internationally excellent in the Research Excellence Framework 2014 (http://www.bath.ac.uk/research/performance/).

- Postgraduate facilities:
The postgraduate laboratories are well-equipped with state-of-the-art equipment and instrumentation. Postgraduate facilities include PCs and powerful workstations which also give direct and ready access to the University’s central computer system and the internet. Additional specialist research facilities are available within the department’s three research centres.

Main areas of research

Electronic and electrical engineering research is essential in the modern technological society and our department does much significant work in this area.

We collaborate proactively with other departments on many projects. We also collaborate extensively with leading industries and educational establishments around the world.

Research Centres:
Many internationally-recognised research activities are undertaken by our three interdisciplinary research centres: the Centre for Space Atmospheric & Oceanic Science (http://www.bath.ac.uk/elec-eng/research/csaos/), the Centre for Advanced Sensor Technology (http://www.bath.ac.uk/elec-eng/research/cast/) and the Centre for Sustainable Power Distribution (http://www.bath.ac.uk/elec-eng/research/cspd/). Other research work includes the EPSRC funded Invert Centre (http://www.bath.ac.uk/elec-eng/invert/) for Imaging Science and additional research units.

We actively promote translation of our research into our teaching, with all taught postgraduate programmes including a detailed research project.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/engineering/graduate-school/research-programmes/how-to-apply/index.html

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This is an innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme, combining taught modules and a dissertation, which allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris. Read more
This is an innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme, combining taught modules and a dissertation, which allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris.

The programme allows you to choose from the full range of our MA literature modules. The list of what’s on offer is regularly added to by academics keen to explore new areas of thinking with students and to draw you in to our established areas of research strength.

Following a similar path to our English and American Literature MA, the Paris option allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent academic and recreational facilities. For the spring term you relocate to our Paris centre, studying in a historic corner of Montparnasse - close to the famous Latin Quarter, the Sorbonne University and the glorious Jardin du Luxembourg.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/223/english-and-american-literature-canterbury-and-paris

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)
EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
FR866 - Literature and Theory (30 credits)
EN871 - Origins of Modern Poetry (30 credits)
FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12,000 word dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- extend and deepen through coursework and research your understanding of a body of literatures in English, with special emphasis on modern and postcolonial literatures, and on literary and critical theory

- enable you to develop an historical awareness of literary traditions

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- introduce you to bibliographic method and scholarship and to foster in you the research methods that facilitate advanced literary study

- provide a basis in knowledge and skills if you intend to teach English and American literature, especially in higher education

- develop your understanding and critical appreciation of the expressive resources of language

- offer opportunities for you to develop your potential for creative writing (where such a module is taken)

- offer scope for the study of literature within an interdisciplinary context, notably that provided by history

- develop your ability to argue a point of view with clarity and cogency, both orally and in written form

- develop your knowledge and understanding of relevant aspects of contemporary Paris and the cultural history of the city as reflected in modern European, English and American literatures and other artistic media.

Research areas

Research in the School of English comes roughly under the following areas. However, there is often a degree of overlap between groups, and individual staff have interests that range more widely.

Eighteenth Century
The particular interests of the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century converge around gender, class, nation, travel and empire, and the relationship between print and material culture. Staff in the Centre pursue cutting-edge approaches to the field and share a commitment to interdisciplinary methodologies.

The Centre regularly hosts visiting speakers as part of the School of English research seminar programme, and hosts day symposia, workshops and international conferences.

Nineteenth Century
The 19th-century research group is organised around the successful MA in Dickens and Victorian Culture and the editorship of The Dickensian, the official publication outlet for new Dickens letters. Other staff research interests include literature and gender, journalism, representations of time and history, sublimity and Victorian Poetry.

American Literature
Research in north American literature is conducted partly through the Faculty-based Centre for American Studies, which also facilitates co-operation with modern US historians. Staff research interests include 20th-century American literature, especially poetry, Native American writing, modernism, and cultural history.

Creative Writing
The Centre for Creative Writing is the focus for most practice-based research in the School. Staff organise a thriving events series and run a research seminar for postgraduate students and staff to share ideas about fiction-writing. Established writers regularly come to read and discuss their work.

Medieval and Early Modern
The Faculty-based Canterbury Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies has a distinctive brand of interdisciplinarity, strong links with local archives and archaeological trusts, and provides a vibrant forum for investigating the relationships between literary and non-literary modes of writing in its weekly research seminar.

Modern Poetry
The Centre for Modern Poetry is a leading centre for research and publication in its field, and participates in both critical and creative research. Staff regularly host visiting speakers and writers, participate in national and international research networks, and organise graduate research seminars and public poetry readings.

Postcolonial
Established in 1994, the Centre for Colonial and Postcolonial Research has acquired an international reputation for excellence in research. It has an outstanding track record in publication, organises frequent international conferences, and regularly hosts leading postcolonial writers and critics. It also hosts a visiting writer from India every year in association with the Charles Wallace Trust.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The Doctor of Medicine is a research degree which will prepare you for publication of high-quality clinical research. It will also provide intensive clinical training which is ideal preparation for completion of MRCP(UK). Read more
The Doctor of Medicine is a research degree which will prepare you for publication of high-quality clinical research. It will also provide intensive clinical training which is ideal preparation for completion of MRCP(UK). This is an exciting opportunity to join a novel training course developed by the University of Chester along with the Countess of Chester Hospital in partnership with the Royal College of Physicians, London (including support for the candidates to obtain General Medical Council registration at the beginning of the course). The course constitutes a combination of three years of rotational hands-on training in all the major clinical specialities (e.g. Cardiology, Acute Medicine, Stroke Medicine and Neurology and others) in a top UK hospital, alongside comprehensive development of research skills.

Why Study Internal Medicine with us?

You will join a team of clinical, educational and research supervisors from Countess of Chester Hospital and the University of Chester in a well-developed three-year structured course, in which you will have opportunity to gain theoretical, clinical and research skills in all main specialities of Medicine. The research topic will be jointly run by the research team at the Institute of Medicine and the medical staff at one of the Countess of Chester Hospitals.

You will have the opportunity to:
- Stay and work in one of the oldest universities in the UK.
- Gain experience in a variety of research projects and methodologies, leading to publication(s) in peer reviewed journals.
- Gain hands-on training in all major specialities of clinical medicine supported by named supervisors.
- Clinical training portfolios akin to the UK local training programme in partnership with RCP London, enabling completion of MRCP.
- Work as a junior doctor (paid work up to 20 hours a week) alongside the local graduates.

This course is ideal for ambitious International Doctors who will benefit from a Clinical MD, intensive clinical training, MRCP, options for working in the NHS and research training. We expect graduates from the course to become prominent clinical academics in their country of origin.

What will I learn?

You will design and complete a variety of research studies with the support of our researchers and clinicians. You will also compete a rotation through the clinical specialities, developing your clinical knowledge and skills.

The dissertation comprises a portfolio of publishable works.

How will I be taught?

You will be fully supported and encouraged to prepare and obtain the MRCP as well as producing a portfolio of research outputs suitable for publication. These will include clinical audits, systematic reviews and research papers. You will also have the opportunity to complete specialist modules from our MSc courses.

On average students should expect to be in clinics, clinical simulations, lectures, seminars, tutorials or data collection for 30 hours per week.

How will I be assessed?

Degrees will be rewarded after successful completion of the dissertation, including viva voce examination and the final examination at the end of three years.

Work Based Learning

You will have the opportunity to gain intensive clinical experience.

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