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Masters Degrees (Public Understanding Of Science)

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eGovernance and the digitalization of the public sector are most likely one of the most important reform trends for the future public sector. Read more

eGovernance and the digitalization of the public sector are most likely one of the most important reform trends for the future public sector. That’s why the public sector of the future needs experts who combine knowledge in public administration and public management on the one hand, and information systems and eGovernance on the other hand. The Erasmus Mundus Master of Science in Public Sector Innovation and eGovernance (PIONEER) is a new and unique programme delivering those experts.

What is the Master of Public Sector Innovation and eGovernance all about?

Experience our excellent research-based education in an international student group, providing you all the opportunities for a rich learning experience. A specific focus is placed on the use of case studies; the emphasis is placed on how new problems in the field of public administration and public policy can be solved through the use of (technological) innovations. Moreover, specific courses are built to help you increase your international experience and interdisciplinary expertise. Added value is created by giving attention to the practical challenges of professionals in policy, administrative and consultative functions.

PIONEER is:

  1. new Erasmus Mundus programme, subsidized by the Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency of the European Commission;
  2. An interdisciplinary programme combining the expertise of the fields of Public Administration, Public Management, Information Systems and eGovernance;
  3. An international initial Master of 120 ECTS, organized jointly by the University of Leuven, the University of Münster and the Tallinn University of Technology. The programme will allow you to study in at least three different countries, starting in Leuven for the 1st semester, continuing in Münster for the 2nd semester and in Tallinn for the 3rd semester. You will dedicate the final semester to your Master Thesis and can decide – according to your desired field of specialization – where to write it.

Structure

The main objective of the PIONEER programme is to provide students with specialised competencies about public sector innovation and the role of ICT and technological evolutions in the innovation process. This is a joint master programme between 3 universities in Europe aimed at both addressing state-of-the art expertise in Public Administration, Information Systems and eGovernance and building bridges between these fields.

Each university will offer courses with a total workload of 30 ECTS. Students start in the first semester at the KU Leuven with courses on Public Administration and Management, a general introduction in the use of information systems in the public sector and an introduction into eGovernance practices.

In the second semester students will move to the University of Münster where they gain insights into the use of ICT in relevant business processes, ICT projects, new approaches of service delivery and the possibilities of ICT for governance purposes.

In the third semester, students move to Tallinn University of Technology to gain in-depth knowledge on the potential benefits, risks, factors of failure/success of eGovernance, the role of eGovernance towards society and trends in public sector innovation. By this semester students will have received enough expertise on Public Administration and Information Systems to reflect from both fields, in an integrated way, on eGovernance and the use of ICT for public sector innovation.

In the fourth semester the students will concentrate on their master thesis (30 ECTS). The master thesis can have two tracks: students can choose to do an internship in a professional organization being an integral part of their master thesis, or they can conduct research at a research institute. All courses are obligatory.

Is this the right programme for me?

  • Do you want to specialize and advance your knowledge in public sector innovation?
  • Are you interested in the actual and future challenges of the public sector?
  • Do you want to be an expert in eGovernance and the digitalization of the public sector?
  • Would you like to gain insight and competencies contributing to innovations to tackle the challenges public administrations are facing?
  • Do you want to study at different established European Universities?

If your answers to the above questions are YES, then the Erasmus Mundus Master of Science in Public Sector Innovation and eGovernance (PIONEER) is the right type of programme for you!

What the PIONEER programme has to offer you?

  • An advanced understanding of and insights into the disciplinary knowledge, specific to public management, public administration, information systems and eGovernance.
  • Specialised knowledge in public administration processes, and the necessary skills to dissect organisational processes to its basic units in order to improve organisational efficiency and effectiveness.
  • The necessary academic skills to build rapid proof of concepts, to reflect on approaches, to question assumptions and to assess ideas.
  • The necessary competencies to define and implement new methods and techniques for the benefit of the public sector. You will be able to translate new techniques successfully, given a profound knowledge of the public sector.
  • A higher level comprehension of how ICT and information sciences can be used in order to innovate proactively the public sector in a changing society.
  • A profound level of methodological and scientific research skills in order to start a PhD in one of the domains.
  • Excellent communication and project management skills so that you will be able to work in different fields of the public sector in terms of culture and work context.

Career paths

This intensive 2-year programme is an excellent opportunity to build expertise that is of increasing interest for many organisations. Our graduates have the opportunity to work in a variety of public organisations, at all levels of government (federal, local or regional) and in European and international institutions. Graduates can also find careers in non-governmental organisations, consultancy companies and the private sector. The programme can also be considered as a preparation for PhD research in public administration or information systems.



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eeGovernance and the digitalization of the public sector are most likely one of the most important reform trends for the future public sector. Read more

eeGovernance and the digitalization of the public sector are most likely one of the most important reform trends for the future public sector. That’s why the public sector of the future needs experts who combine knowledge in public administration and public management on the one hand, and information systems and eGovernance on the other hand. The Erasmus Mundus Master of Science in Public Sector Innovation and eGovernance is a new and unique programme delivering those experts.

Why choose pioneer?

  • Do you want to specialize and advance your knowledge in public sector innovation?
  • Are you interested in the actual and future challenges of the public sector?
  • Do you want to be an expert in eGovernance and the digitalization of the public sector?
  • Would you like to gain insight and competencies contributing to innovations to tackle the challenges public administrations are facing?
  • Do you want to study at different established European Universities?

If your answers to the above questions are YES, then the Erasmus Mundus Master of Science in Public Sector Innovation and eGovernance (PIONEER) is the right type of programme for you!

Organisation

Experience our excellent research-based education in an international student group, providing you all the opportunities for a rich learning experience. A specific focus is placed on the use of case studies; the emphasis is placed on how new problems in the field of public administration and public policy can be solved through the use of (technological) innovations. Moreover, specific courses are built to help you increase your international experience and interdisciplinary expertise. Added value is created by giving attention to the practical challenges of professionals in policy, administrative and consultative functions.

PIONEER is:

  1. A new Erasmus Mundus programme, subsidized by the Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency of the European Commission;
  2. An interdisciplinary programme combining the expertise of the fields of Public Administration, Public Management, Information Systems and eGovernance;
  3. An international initial Master of 120 ECTS, organized jointly by the University of Leuven, the University of Münster and the Tallinn University of Technology. The programme will allow you to study in at least three different countries, starting in Leuven for the 1st semester, continuing in Münster for the 2nd semester and in Tallinn for the 3rd semester. You will dedicate the final semester to your Master Thesis and can decide – according to your desired field of specialization – where to write it.

Learning outcomes

WHAT THE PIONEER PROGRAMME HAS TO OFFER YOU:

  1. An advanced understanding of and insights into the disciplinary knowledge, specific to public management, public administration, information systems and eGovernance.
  2. Specialised knowledge in public administration processes, and the necessary skills to dissect organisational processes to its basic units in order to improve organisational efficiency and effectiveness.
  3. The necessary academic skills to build rapid proof of concepts, to reflect on approaches, to question assumptions and to assess ideas.
  4. The necessary competencies to define and implement new methods and techniques for the benefit of the public sector. You will be able to translate new techniques successfully, given a profound knowledge of the public sector.
  5. A higher level comprehension of how ICT and information sciences can be used in order to innovate proactively the public sector in a changing society.
  6. A profound level of methodological and scientific research skills in order to start a PhD in one of the domains.
  7. Excellent communication and project management skills so that you will be able to work in different fields of the public sector in terms of culture and work context.

Target audience

Successful applicants are holder of a bachelor degree in social sciences, political sciences, public administration, information systems, information science, informatics, engineering, business, law, or an equivalent degree in the mentioned areas. Other applications will be taken into consideration depending on the other selection criteria. The admission policy is intended to ensure equal opportunity of access to higher education for qualified students. In general the programme will assess students individually on the basis of their previous academic record, a letter of motivation, reference letters, and the availability of places. Applicants are required to demonstrate proficiency in English (both spoken and written), either by showing that some of their previous studies were successfully completed in English, or by submitting the results of a recognised English language proficiency test.

Selection procedure

The admission policy is intended to ensure equal opportunity of access to higher education for qualified students. The programme will assess students individually on the basis of their previous academic record, a letter of motivation and the availability of places.

Be aware that you fulfill the registration and application before March 1st 2017. Test-results of the language proficiency test can be provided later, but not later than March 20th 2017. The language requirements are stipulated as following: at least a score of 100 on the TOEFL internet based test (at least 22 on the different components) or 7 on the IELTS-test (at least 6 on the four different components). 

For the application procedure, please follow this link: http://www.kuleuven.be/english/application/instructions.



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Curating Science will enable you to develop an independent academic and curatorial practice at the intersection of histories, philosophies and social studies of science, science communication and museum studies. Read more

Curating Science will enable you to develop an independent academic and curatorial practice at the intersection of histories, philosophies and social studies of science, science communication and museum studies.

You will engage with current debates in science communication and interpretive practice in museums, including cutting-edge art-science practices that are reimagining ways of knowing and being in the 21st Century. Alongside this, you will be encouraged to develop innovative practices of dialogic and participative engagement, developing their own ways of convening public spaces for debate.

You will undertake a range of active learning activities from developing displays, programmes and events to developing digital content and designing their own research projects. You will be supported throughout by an interdisciplinary academic staff team drawn from museum and curatorial studies and the histories and philosophies of science, as well as professionals from our partner institutions.

Students can specialise in their own areas of interest, through choosing from an array of optional modules that explore contemporary curatorial strategies, technologies and media, cultural memory, histories of medicine, audiences, participation and engagement. You will have the option of undertaking a negotiated placement with a museum or heritage organisation.

Course content

All students on the MA in Curating Science will take three core modules.

The History and Theory of Modern Science Communication allows students to explore how science, technology and medicine have been communicated to a wider public in the past. Students will identify how the processes and purposes of science communication has changed over the last two centuries and debate the consequences for science communication of the introduction of new media, ranging from the radio to the internet. The module addresses these questions by surveying the development of science communication since 1750, and by examining the changing theoretical perspectives that have underpinned these developments. Students will learn to re-examine the processes of contemporary science communication in the light of a deeper understanding of this history.

Interpreting Cultures is underpinned by action learning and puts contemporary curation in an international context. From the outset, students work on an interpretation intervention with one of the archives and collections on campus (such as The Stanley & Audrey Burton Gallery; Special Collections; Treasures of the Brotherton; Marks and Spencer Company Archive; ULITA ― an Archive of International Textiles; Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine). This intensive experience of project planning, management, collaboration and team working prepares students for the option of undertaking a negotiated work placement in the second semester or optional modules exploring audiences, participation or engagement.

Through our Advanced Research Skills modules, students are equipped to undertake assessments and ultimately develop their own research project. The modules build to a symposium in Semester 2 where students present initial research findings towards a dissertation on a research topic of interest.

In addition, students choose from a range of optional modules offered by the School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies and the School of Philosophy, Religion and History of Science. These include the opportunity to complete a placement or consultancy project role in either curational approaches or engagement.

Course structure


Compulsory modules

  • Curating Science Individual project (dissertation / practice-led) 50 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 15 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 25 credits
  • Interpreting Cultures 30 credits
  • History & Theory of Modern Science Communication 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Making Sense of Sound 30 credits
  • Encountering Things: Art and Entanglement in Anglo-Saxon England 30 credits
  • Anthropology, Art and Representation 30 credits
  • Humanity, Animality and Globality 30 credits
  • Technology, Media and Critical Culture 30 credits
  • Placements in Context: Policy, Organizations and Practice 30 credits
  • Historical Skills and Practices 30 credits
  • The Origin of Modern Medicine (Birth of the Clinic) 30 credits
  • Audience Engagement and Impact 30 credits

Learning and teaching

You will be taught by leading researchers and experienced practitioners in their fields, and you’ll benefit from a range of teaching and learning methods. They include lectures and seminars, gallery and museum visits, as well as hands-on experience of specific collections in library sessions.

Assessment

We use a range of assessment methods including essays, presentations, assignments and literature reviews among others, depending on the modules you choose.

Career opportunities

Through a combination of theory and practice, the programme produces graduates who are able to develop professional careers in the museums and heritage sector whilst retaining a critical and reflexive eye on their own practice and that of the institutions in which they work. It will equip you with a good understanding of the issues and approaches to science communication and curation, interpretation and engagement, as well as practical work experience ― a combination which is very valuable to employers.

To get a flavour of the kinds of career trajectories our graduates of allied MAs have taken see the ‘news’ section of the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage and the alumni pages of the School website.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.

Placement opportunities

In Semester 2 you will have the option to undertake a negotiated work placement to gain first-hand experience of curating science.

We have close links with many of the major cultural institutions and organisations in the region, meaning there are plenty of opportunities for you to explore. If you have a particular ambition in mind for your placement, we usually try to find a role that suits you.

Students on allied MAs have completed placements in organisations such as Leeds City Museum, Leeds Art Gallery, Harewood House, the Henry Moore Institute, National Science and Media Museum, York City Art Gallery, National Railway Museum, Impressions Gallery, The Tetley, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Lotherton Hall, Abbey House Museum and the Royal Armouries.



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The Department of Public Health and Policy at the University of Liverpool has a flourishing research portfolio in Public Health and Health Inequalities. Read more

Course Description

The Department of Public Health and Policy at the University of Liverpool has a flourishing research portfolio in Public Health and Health Inequalities. The University of Liverpool has been at the forefront of Public Health for over 150 years and now has an influential voice on the world stage and close links with many institutions, disciplines and public health bodies. The aim of the Department is to contribute to the improvement and maintenance of the health of people, locally, nationally and internationally, through:
• excellence in education and research
• the development of a learning environment that encourages staff and students to fulfil their potential

The Department provides advice to governmental policy makers locally, nationally and internationally and hosts the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre for Policy Research on the Social Determinants of Health. The Department is home to a multi-disciplinary team of academic staff drawn from a range of subjects including medical and health sciences, epidemiology, sociology, community development, policy analysis, statistics, and history. It is actively involved in research, education and health service work related to promoting the health of the public.

The Master of Public Health programme is delivered at both our Liverpool and London campuses. On completion of the Master of Public Health, students should have a foundation in the science and art of public health, including an understanding of the concepts of health and disease and factors, which may affect these. The resulting knowledge, skills and attitudes should enable them to put public health principles into effect in a variety of settings including research, practice and the interface of applied research. They will be able to demonstrate an in-depth systematic understanding of public health research and all students carry out a small-scale original research project that conveys the public health context and implications.

Public Health encompasses a broad range of subjects some of which require traditional analytical scientific thinking (for example statistics) whilst others require a more flexible and creative approach (for example health inequalities). The practice of effective public health requires the synthesis of these aspects and the MPH is designed to enable students to gain competence in the application of these disciplines.

The modules are designed to cover the set syllabus whilst allowing students the flexibility to learn in a way and time best suited to their individual needs. Areas that are most effectively covered by interaction and discussion, as well as those that may be conceptually difficult, are covered by direct contact. Even here a didactic teaching style is used only as necessary, with the emphasis of teaching being on interaction and experiential learning. The intention is to develop the ability in students for self-directed learning, so the styles of teaching and learning change in emphasis through the modules. In the early stages the material is subject based but as the student matures in knowledge and skill the material becomes more interactive and problem solving in approach. Broadly a student will be encouraged and guided in the development of five key areas:

1. In-depth knowledge of the main disciplines of public health.
2. Ability in self-directed learning and management of personal development.
3. Ability to critically evaluate, reflect and analyse.
4. Effective communication of ideas in both written and spoken formats.
5. Ability to work effectively both alone and in teams.

The programme offers the option of full-time study over one year, or part-time for up to 3 years for students who wish to study while in employment and where the programme can form an integral part of their professional development.

Here’s what some of our students said about the MPH Programme at the University of Liverpool:

“I loved the level of interaction and discussion. I’ve really enjoyed this year and I’ve found it very useful.”
“Fantastic lecturers. The most amazing support and constantly guiding the course along.”

“Standard of teaching – lecturers / speakers was exceptional. I enjoyed meeting and interacting with the people in the group as we were from quite different backgrounds. “
“The MPH at Liverpool has been key in enabling progression to my current role.”

“The MPH has proved to be a real asset and I certainly wouldn't have got the job without having studied at Liverpool.”

“The modules covered a wide range of topics and issues relevant to public health.”

“Well coordinated – lots of support. Lots of enthusiastic tutors.”

**Additional Entry Requirement Information

The Master of Public Health (MPH) programme is available to any University graduate in a health or health-related profession, as well as non-health-related graduates and others approved by the University. This includes:

• Graduates in medicine of an approved university who have not less than one year (and preferably longer) post-registration professional experience;
• Other health-related graduates of an approved university or other institution who have not less than two years of professional experience;
• Non-health-related graduates, and others who have satisfied the requirements of approved Exam Boards, or have satisfied the University that they are suitably qualified to undertake a postgraduate course. They must have at least three years approved professional experience, and either completed the final examination of an approved professional institution, or obtained some other qualification approved for this purpose by the University.
• In addition, applicants require a GCSE Grade C or GCE O Level pass in Mathematics and English, or an equivalent qualification.
International students

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The Master of Public Health (MPH) is a multidisciplinary programme of study that aims to provide graduates and holders of relevant medical or non-medical professional qualifications with the advanced academic background required for leadership roles in public health. Read more

The Master of Public Health (MPH) is a multidisciplinary programme of study that aims to provide graduates and holders of relevant medical or non-medical professional qualifications with the advanced academic background required for leadership roles in public health. The course covers the breadth of public health.

Key benefits

  • Flexible interdepartmental study programme that can be tailored to reflect your academic interests.
  • Regular speakers from local NHS bodies and central government agencies such as Public Health England and the Department of Health.
  • Combines the development of a strong interdisciplinary foundation in public health with the opportunity to develop specialist expertise in one of four distinct pathways.
  • Primarily UK-focused with emphasis on the prevention and control of disease.

Description

The Master of Public Health (MPH) course is an intensive study programme that aims to provide you with the skills and knowledge informing the key domains of public health.

You will:

  • explore the underpinning theoretical frameworks which draw upon a range of disciplines reflecting the wider determinants of health and ill-health. 
  • examine the effectiveness of public health interventions, services and policies. 
  • develop skills of critical appraisal through understanding different research designs and methods that are informing an emerging evidence based public health.
  • be able to put public health principles into effect in a variety of settings and appreciate the complexities of evolving public health concerns and population health needs.
  • study the breadth of public health or pursue a specialist pathway that better meets your specific career advancement needs. 

All students are enrolled onto the Master of Public Health which addresses the key domains of public health practice. The course is made up of optional and required modules.

The required modules are:

  • Basic Epidemiology & Statistics for Public Health,
  • Prevention and Control of Communicable Disease 
  • and a Dissertation Project.

Once accepted onto the course, you may wish to pursue a specialist pathway by selecting the additional required/compulsory modules.

If you are interested in the :

  • Primary Care pathway, you will need to select the module Delivering Public Health in Primary Care: from Theory to Practice
  • Environmental Health pathway will require either the Essentials of Environmental Public Health Science and/or Essentials of Toxicology for Public Health Protection modules
  • Allied Health pathway will require you to study the Exercise as Medicine module

You will also explore a range of optional modules to bring your total credit value up to 180, allowing you to create a unique study plan that reflects your interests.

If you are studying full-time, you will complete the course in one year, from September to September. If you are studying part-time, your programme will take two years to complete.

In addition to the required modules (which total 90 credits), part-time students should plan to take 30-45 optional module credits in their first year and 45-60 optional module credits in their second year.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We use lectures, seminars and group tutorials to deliver most of the modules on the programme. You will also be expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study.

Assessment

The primary method of assessment for this course is a combination of unseen written examinations, coursework and presentations. The research project and dissertation will be assessed on an extended piece of writing. 

Examinations are mainly held during Examination Period 1 (January) and Examination Period 2 (May / early June). The ‘Essentials of Toxicology for Public Health Protection’ examination is, however, normally held during Examination Period 3 (August).

Resit and replacement examinations are normally scheduled during Examination Period 3 (August). Resit and replacement examinations for the 'Essentials of Toxicology for Public Health Protection' module are normally held during the following Examination Period (January).

You’ll submit your first piece of summative coursework towards the end of Term 1, and coursework submissions continue into April. The coursework for the ‘Essentials of Toxicology for Public Health Protection’ module is submitted in August.

The dissertation is submitted in early September (part-time students submit their dissertation at the end of their second year). 

The formal teaching, self-directed study time and assessment methods detailed above are typical and give you a good indication of what to expect. They are however, subject to change.

Regulating body

King’s College is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.

Location

The majority of learning for this degree takes place at the King’s College London Guy’s Campus. Please note that locations are determined by where each module is taught and may vary depending on the optional modules you select.

Career prospects

Job titles of recent MPH graduates include: Public Health Specialist; Head of Public Health Intelligence; Health Partnership Programme Manager; Health Promotion Campaign Manager; Epidemiologist; Health Data Analyst; Project Coordinator; Public Health Advisor; Health Protection Specialist; Public Health Screening Coordinator; Vascular Prevention Programme Coordinator; Health Improvement Practitioner; Public Health Specialist: Healthy Living; and Lecturer in Public Health . Other MPH students have gone on to PhDs at King's and other universities.

A useful source of public health careers information is the NHS Health Careers website. You might find it helpful to review the information on this website as a starting point if you are considering a career in public health, or would like to further your current career in public health.

Sign up for more information. Email now

Have a question about applying to King’s? Email now



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The Master of Public Health award (MPH) is an internationally recognised qualification in Public Health. Read more

The Master of Public Health award (MPH) is an internationally recognised qualification in Public Health. It is aimed at a wide range of people from both the UK and abroad, from NHS and non-NHS backgrounds including those in primary or secondary care, health authorities and primary care trusts, nursing and professions related to medicine, health promotion, health care research, health management and anyone wishing to develop a career in public health.

Distance Learning

Due to a global, national and local focus on public health developments, the Master of Public Health award has increased in popularity over the last few years. The distance learning route allows overseas students to undertake a University of Wolverhampton degree from their own country. The course is also suitable for those unable to travel into University for on-campus courses whether this is due to child-care difficulties, travel issues or general lack of time to enter traditional modules of study.

WLVGlobal features uploading and downloading of module materials such as guides, regulations, reading and research sources/links as well as virtual classrooms whereby students and module leaders can hold discussions to learn collaboratively.

Why Wolverhampton?

The MPH has been delivered for over a decade at the University and recruits around 60 students per year over two intakes. The success rate is high, mainly attributable to the personal tutor support that is provided to students throughout the taught elements of the award and during research supervision. Students are also supported when they have completed the course through regular email updates, opportunities and reference support for job applications.

If you are an International student, our dedicated International Centre staff will support you with the application process and any Visa issues you may have before entry onto the course and when you study with us.

The University has a long history of providing excellent standards of education to students and has been commended for its achievement by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA - this is an independent body whose main aim is to review the standards within University and Higher education establishments in the UK – see http://www.qaa.ac.uk for more information).

The course team are also actively engaged in the Learning for Public Health Network (formerly called the Teaching Public Health Network, supported by the Department of Health). This is a regional teaching enhancement and support group which enables us to ensure that the course aims and outcomes respond to the needs of public health employers (see http://www.lfphwm.org.uk for more information)

Visiting lecturers and honorary lecturers from public health organizations regularly lead classes, sharing their knowledge and experience of contemporary initiatives in public health. Extra curricula activities include a wide range of public lectures within the university.

The Institute of Public Health, Social Work and Care have staff with extensive experience in health care at clinical, managerial and research levels. Research and development are viewed as an integral part of the School’s activities, underpinning learning and teaching within all subject areas. The Centre for Health and Social Care Improvement (CHSCI) is a multi-disciplinary partnership within the School of Health & Wellbeing at the University of Wolverhampton. Our aim is to develop a new understanding between higher education and, health and social care organizations, and businesses to improve planning, delivery and evaluation of services, and development of people. Our vision is to work to continuously improve upon the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life, promoting health and social well-being, and contributing to the development of appropriate policies and interventions locally, nationally and internationally.

The Faculty of Education Health and Wellbeing series of seminars and lectures spans education, sport, care, psychology health and wellbeing, bringing you a variety of engaging speakers and experts from the University of Wolverhampton and many other UK universities, visit http://www.wlv.ac.uk/fehw/lectures

Career path

Career choices encompass many disciplines including roles in public health, health promotion, health statistics, epidemiology, clinical governance, health care research, health technology assessment and public health nursing, where you will find that a Masters-level qualification is increasingly required.

Many of our home students have gone on to work within public health departments in the UK and other related areas of health. International students have developed their careers in public health within their own countries of origin. Students have also gone on to work with the WHO, the UN and other international organizations.

What skills will you gain?

During the course you will analyse practice and policy in health care, developing practical and critical skills – you will also gain a sound understanding of associated theories and will have the opportunity to develop your own special interests and embark on academic research. The programme also covers much of the syllabus required for the Part 1 examinations of the Faculty of Public Health.

Who accredits this course?

The course team are actively engaged in the Learning for Public Health Network (formerly called the Teaching Public Health Network, supported by the Department of Health. This is a regional teaching enhancement and support group which enables us to ensure that the course aims and outcomes respond to the needs of public health employers, see http://www.lfphwm.org.uk/ for more information). They also work closely with the Royal Society of Public Health (RSPH) which helps to inform policy and practice, working to educate, empower and support communities and individuals to live healthily. The RSPH has a membership of over 6000 health professionals and is therefore the largest body representing public health practice in the UK.

The MPH has been developed with employers needs in mind and covers the main elements of the Faculty of Public Health exams. The educational aims of this course have been informed by the Public health skills and career framework 2008 and by the UK Faculty of Public Health.



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The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based. Read more
The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by a Second Supervisor and often a Practical Supervisor. The role of each Supervisor is:

- Principal Supervisor: takes responsibility for experimental oversight of the student's research project and provides day-to-day supervision.
- Second Supervisor: acts as a mentor to the student and is someone who can who can offer impartial advice. The Second Supervisor is a Group Leader or equivalent who is independent from the student's research group and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives.
- Practical Supervisor: provides day-to-day experimental supervision when the Principal Supervisor is unavailable, i.e. during very busy periods. The Practical Supervisor is a senior member of the student's research team and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives. For those Principal Supervisors who are unable to monitor their students on a daily basis, we would expect that they meet semi-formally with their student at least once a month.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s Principal Supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a Group Leader whose area of research most appeals to them. The Department of Oncology’s research interests focus on the prevention, diagnosis and treatments of cancer. This involves using a wide variety of research methods and techniques, encompassing basic laboratory science, translational research and clinical trials. Our students therefore have the opportunity to choose from an extensive range of cancer related research projects. In addition, being based on the Cambridge Biomedical Research Campus, our students also have access world leading scientists and state-of-the-art equipment.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. The Cambridge Cancer Cluster, of which we are a member department, provides the 'Lectures in Cancer Biology' seminar series, which is specifically designed to equip graduate students with a solid background in all major aspects of cancer biology. Students may also attend undergraduate lectures in their chosen field of research, if their Principal Supervisor considers this to be appropriate. We also require our students to attend their research group’s ‘research in progress/laboratory meetings’, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation (of 20,000 words or less), followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Course objectives

The structure of the MPhil course is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are exceptionally well-equipped to go onto doctoral research, or employment in industry and the public service.

The MPhil course provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
- the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of cancer research;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvocmpmsc

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. Most research training provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. However, informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring by fellow students and members of staff. To enhance their research, students are expected to attend seminars and graduate courses relevant to their area of interest. Students are also encouraged to undertake transferable skills training provided by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of their MPhil course, students should:

- have a thorough knowledge of the literature and a comprehensive understanding of scientific methods and techniques applicable to their own research;
- be able to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- the ability to critically evaluate current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems;
- be able to act autonomously in the planning and implementation of research; and
- have developed skills in oral presentation, scientific writing and publishing the results of their research.

Assessment

Examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation of not more than 20,000 words in length, excluding figures, tables, footnotes, appendices and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. This is followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil Medical Sciences degree is designed to accommodate the needs of those students who have only one year available to them or, who have only managed to obtain funding for one year, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree. However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Oncology (Basic Science) course via the following 2 options:

(i) Complete the MPhil then continue to the three-year PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

(ii) Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil. If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Oncology does not have specific funds for MPhil courses. However, applicants are encouraged to apply to University funding competitions: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding and the Cambridge Cancer Centre: http://www.cambridgecancercentre.org.uk/education-and-training

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MPhil in History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine is a full-time 9-month course that provides students with the opportunity to carry out focused research under close supervision by senior members of the University. Read more
The MPhil in History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine is a full-time 9-month course that provides students with the opportunity to carry out focused research under close supervision by senior members of the University. Students will acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests, as well as a critical and well informed understanding of the roles of the sciences in society. Those intending to go on to doctoral work will learn the research skills needed to help them prepare a well planned and focused PhD proposal. During the course students gain experience of presenting their own work and discussing the issues that arise from it with an audience of their peers and senior members of the Department; they will attend lectures, supervisions and research seminars in a range of technical and specialist subjects central to research in the different areas of History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine.

The educational aims of the programme are:

- to give students with relevant training at first-degree level the opportunity to carry out focussed research in History, Philosophy of Science and Medicine under close supervision;
- to give students the opportunity to acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests;
- to enable students to acquire a critical and well informed understanding of the roles of the sciences in society; and
- to help students intending to go on to doctoral work to acquire the requisite research skills and to prepare a well planned and focussed PhD proposal.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hphpmpstm

Course detail

The MPhil course is taught by supervisions and seminars and assessed by three research essays and a dissertation.

The topics of the essays and dissertation should each fall within the following specified subject areas:

1. General philosophy of science
2. History of ancient and medieval science, technology and medicine
3. History of early modern science, technology and medicine
4. History of modern science, technology and medicine
5. History, philosophy and sociology of the life sciences
6. History, philosophy and sociology of the physical and mathematical sciences
7. History, philosophy and sociology of the social and psychological sciences
8. History, philosophy and sociology of medicine
9. Ethics and politics of science
10. History and methodology of history, philosophy and sociology of science, technology and medicine

Format

The MPhil seminars are the core teaching resource for this course. In the first part of year these seminars are led by different senior members of the Department and focus on selected readings. During the rest of the year the seminars provide opportunities for MPhil students to present their own work.

Students are encouraged to attend the lectures, research seminars, workshops and reading groups that make the Department a hive of intellectual activity. The Department also offers graduate training workshops, which focus on key research, presentation, publication and employment skills.

The MPhil programme is administered by the MPhil Manager, who meets all new MPhil students as a group in early October, then sees each of the students individually to discuss their proposed essay and dissertation topics. The Manager is responsible for finding appropriate supervisors for each of these topics; the supervisors are then responsible for helping the student do the research and writing needed for the essays and the dissertation. Students will see each of their supervisors frequently; the MPhil Manager sees each student at regular intervals during the year to discuss progress and offer help and advice.

Supervisions are designed to provide students with the opportunity to set their own agenda for their studies. The supervisor's job is to support the student's research, not to grade their work – supervisors are formally excluded from the examination process.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hphpmpstm

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will have:

- Knowledge and Understanding -

- developed a deeper knowledge of their chosen areas of History, Philosophy of Science and Medicine and of the critical debates within them;
- acquired a conceptual understanding that enables the evaluation of current research and methodologies;
- formed a critical view of the roles of the sciences in society.

- Skills and other attributes -

By the end of the course students should have:

- acquired or consolidated historiographic, linguistic, technical and ancillary skills appropriate for research in their chosen area;
- demonstrated independent judgement, based on their own research;
- presented their own ideas in a public forum and learned to contribute constructively within an international environment.

Assessment

- A dissertation of up to 15,000 words. Examiners may request an oral examination but this is not normally required.
- Three essays, each of up to 5,000 words.

Students receive independent reports from two examiners on each of their three essays and the dissertation.

Continuing

The usual preconditions for continuing to the PhD are an overall first class mark in the MPhil, a satisfactory performance in an interview and agreement of the PhD proposal with a potential supervisor.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Rausing Studentships
- Raymond and Edith Williamson Studentships
- Lipton Studentships
- Wellcome Master's Awards

Please see the Department's graduate funding page for more information: http://www.hps.cam.ac.uk/studying/graduate/funding.html

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Our MSc in Politics provides an advanced grounding in contemporary political science, focusing on empirical and normative democratic theory, political institutions, public policy and citizenship across different political systems and diverse social contexts.The MSc brings together many of the existing strengths of the department in different parts of the world. Read more
Our MSc in Politics provides an advanced grounding in contemporary political science, focusing on empirical and normative democratic theory, political institutions, public policy and citizenship across different political systems and diverse social contexts.The MSc brings together many of the existing strengths of the department in different parts of the world.

The programme can be tailored to specific regional interests through option courses in West Europe and North America, East Europe, Africa, India, and the Middle East. The degree will provide you with a firm academic foundation in the study of comparative politics and a base of knowledge for careers in fields such as policymaking, development, and NGOs.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpolitics.aspx

Why choose this course?

- the Department of Politics and International Relations is a young, vibrant and rapidly-rising department and was ranked in the Top 10 small politics departments in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE, 2008)

- the course is taught by world-class scholars and informed by cutting-edge research

- offers an advanced grounding in international public policy while allowing you to specialise in particular issues or regions of interest.

- taught by academics, current and retired public policy practitioners

- our international cohort of students will provide you with excellent opportunities to obtain genuinely global perspectives.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Centre for European Politics was officially launched by Lord Mandelson in September 2007, with the mission of producing research in two principal areas: the study of democracy in Europe, and Europe as an actor in world politics. Under the leadership of Co-Directors Dr Alsiter Miskimmon and Dr James Sloam, it has hosted a number of high-profile speakers, including Lord Mandelson, Professor Simon Hix (LSE), Roger Liddle (Policy Network), John Peet (The Economist), Sir Stephen Wall (former European policy advisor to Tony Blair), David Willets MP (Shadow Secretary of State for Innovations, Universities and Skills) and Dr Vince Cable. Recent funded research projects include: a European Union Committee of the Regions consultancy on EU External Relations and European Neighbourhood Policy; an EU-funded Workshop on the Review of the European Union Budget; and Teaching Democracy. Recent publications include, Bendetto and Milio (eds) European Union budget reform: institutions, policy and economic crisis (Palgrave, 2012) and James Sloam, 'New Voice, Less Equal: the Civic and political Engagement of Young People in the United States and Europe', Comparative Political Studies 2012.

- The Centre for Global and Transnational Politics is devoted to the multi-disciplinary exploration of global and transnational processes. Led by its Co-Directors Professor Chris Rumford and Professor Sandra Halperin, its central concern is to theorise and conceptualise the substance of, and connections between and among, political processes that operate at all levels or scales: the local, national, international, transnational, and global. Professor Rumford and Professor Halperin edit the Routledge Series in Global and Transnational Politics and host the Global Studies Association and a BISA Working Group of Global and Transnational Politics in the Centre.

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Prof Andrew Chadwick, Prof Ben O’Loughlin and Dr Cristian Vicarri. Recent publications include Chadwick’s The Hybrid Media System (Oxford University Press, 2013) and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O’Loughlin and Laura Roselle, Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). As well as hosting a large number of PhD students working in new political communication, Chadwick edited the Oxford University Press Series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and O’Loughlin is co-editor of the journal, Media, War and Conflict.

- The Contemporary Political Theory Research Group was founded in October 2009, as a result of the development of political theory at postgraduate level and growth in academic staff numbers having created the critical mass it required. The group organizes its activities collectively, and its work focuses on issues around contemporary pluralism, liberalism, democratic theory and radical politics. It brings together staff working in contemporary Continental philosophy, normative political theory, and American pragmatism, and its postgraduate members include two students on the College’s most prestigious studentship, the Reid Award. The group also has ties to the College’s Philosophy Team and the interdepartmental Humanities and Arts Research Centre

Course content and structure

Core course units:
- The Politics of Democracy You will be provided with a sound understanding of contemporary thinking about democracy and political participation through the analysis of liberal democracy and its political institutions. The unit will draw upon a variety of contemporary and historical sources with particular reference to the political systems of Britain and the USA.

- Comparative Political Executives This unit explores the political executives of established democratic systems, focusing on institutions – presidents, prime ministers, cabinets and so on – and how they function and interact with other parts of the political system. You will gain knowledge of the ‘nuts and bolts’ of the executives in question, and will also gain useful insights into the difficulties of political leadership, the centrality of political executives and the interdependence of executives with other parts of the political system.

- European Union Politics and Policy This course provides students with an insight into the development and governance of the European Union as a political system. Particular attention is placed on the functions of the EU’s executive, legislative and judicial institutions as well as on a number of key policy areas in which the European Union’s sovereignty has developed in recent years. The course provides students with a solid theoretical background in understanding both the institutional politics and public policy of the EU.

- Political Parties
Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations You will be introduced to quantitative methods commonly used in the study of Politics and International Relations. You will acquire the skills to understand, critically analyse, and carry out a range of quantitative techniques, using statistical software packages such as SPSS.
Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Politics and International Relations You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications. You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting search research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

- Dissertation (MSc only) The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of Politics in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12-15,000 words.

Elective course units:
- Internet and New Media Politics Drawing predominantly upon specialist academic journal literatures, this unit focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new technologies on the values, processes and outcomes of: global governance institutions; public bureaucracies; representative institutions including political parties and legislatures; pressure groups and social movements.

- Elections and Voting Behaviour

- Social Media and Politics

- Public Opinion and political participation

- Human Rights: From Theory to Practice

- Advanced Quantitative Methods

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments related to public policy, democracy, politics, international relations and governance

- a sound knowledge of the texts, theories and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes and phenomena associated with particular fields of public policy, politics and international relations

- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods within the disciplines of politics and international relations

- a solid foundation for progression to either a politics-related career, public policy careers, research or continued academic study.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different politics and international relations-related areas, including roles as officials in local government, personnel officers and higher education lecturers. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Our MSc History of Science, Technology and Medicine taught master's course focuses on a broad range of mostly 19th and 20th century case studies, from the local to the global. Read more

Our MSc History of Science, Technology and Medicine taught master's course focuses on a broad range of mostly 19th and 20th century case studies, from the local to the global.

We will explore key debates such as:

  • Why does Britain have a National Health Service?
  • Can better science education cure economic problems?
  • How did epidemic disease affect the colonial ambitions of the European powers?
  • Why do we end up depending on unreliable technologies?

Your studies will pay particular attention to the roles of sites, institutions, and schools of thought and practice, and to the changing ways in which scientists and medics have communicated with non-specialist audiences.

You will learn through lectures, seminars and tutorials and gain experience of historical essay-writing, before researching and writing an extensive dissertation on a specialised topic, supervised by experienced researchers.

This MSc focuses on humanities skills, but may be taken successfully by students from any disciplinary background. It works both as an advanced study course for students with undergraduate experience in the history of science, technology and medicine, and as a conversion route for students from other backgrounds, often in the sciences, but also including general history, social policy, and other fields.

The History of Science, Technology and Medicine pathway is appropriate if you have wide-ranging interests across the field, or are interested in the histories of the physical sciences or the life sciences in particular.

If you wish to focus on biomedicine or healthcare, you may prefer the Medical Humanities pathway. If you are particularly interested in contemporary science communication or policy, you should consider the MSc Science Communication course.

Aims

This course aims to:

  • explore the histories of theories, practices, authority claims, institutions and people, spaces and places, and communication in science, technology and medicine, across their social, cultural and political contexts;
  • provide opportunities to study particular topics of historical and contemporary significance in depth, and to support the development of analytical skills in understanding the changing form and function of science, technology and medicine in society;
  • encourage and support the development of transferable writing and presentational skills of the highest standard, and thereby prepare students for further academic study or employment;
  • provide a comprehensive introduction to research methods in the history of science, technology and medicine, including work with libraries, archives, databases, and oral history;
  • enable students to produce a major piece of original research and writing in the form of a dissertation.

Special features

Extensive support

Receive dedicated research support from the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine , the longest-established centre for the integrated study of the field.

Extra opportunities

Take up optional classes and volunteering opportunities shared with the parallel MSc Science Communication course at Manchester, including science policy, science media, museums and public events activities.

Explore Manchester's history

Manchester is the classic 'shock city' of the Industrial Revolution. You can relive the development of industrial society through field trips and visits.

Convenient study options

Benefit from flexible options for full or part-time study.

Teaching and learning

Teaching includes a mixture of lectures and small-group seminar discussions built around readings and other materials. We emphasise the use both of primary sources, and of current research in the field.

Most students will also visit local museums and other sites of interest to work on objects or archives.

All students meet regularly with a mentor from the Centre's PhD community, a designated personal tutor from among the staff, and, from Semester 2, a dissertation supervisor. 

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is mostly based on traditional essay-format coursework submission.

All MSc students undertake a research dissertation (or optionally, for Medical Humanities students, a portfolio of creative work) accounting for 60 of the 180 credits.

Course unit details

You are required to complete 180 credits in the following course units to be awarded this MSc:

Semester 1 course units (credits)

  • Major themes in HSTM (30 credits)
  • Theory and practice in HSTM and Medical Humanities (15)
  • Research and communication skills (15)

Semester 2: two optional course units (30 credits each) from the below list, or one from the below plus 30 credits of course units from an affiliated programme:

  • Shaping the sciences
  • Making modern technology
  • Medicine, science and modernity

plus:

  • Dissertation in the history of science, technology and/or medicine (60)

Course structure (part-time)

Part-time students study alongside full-timers, taking half the same content each semester over two years.

You are required to complete 180 credits in the following course units to be awarded this MSc:

Semester 1: Major themes in HSTM (30 credits).

Semester 2: one optional course unit (30 credits each) from

  • Shaping the sciences
  • Making modern technology
  • Medicine, science and modernity

Semester 3:

  • Theory and practice in HSTM and Medical Humanities (15)
  • Research and communication skills (15)

Semester 4: one further optional course unit (30) from CHSTM as seen above, or 30 credits of course units from an approved affiliated programme.

Plus:

  • Dissertation in HSTM (60 credits) across second year and during the summer

Facilities

All MSc students have use of a shared office in the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, including networked computer terminals and storage space, and use of the dedicated subject library housed in the PhD office nearby.

The Centre is located within a few minutes' walk of the University of Manchester Library , the largest non-deposit library in the UK.

Resources for student research projects within the University include the object collections of theManchester Museum , also nearby on campus, and the John Rylands Library special collections facility in the city centre.

CHSTM also has a close working relationship with other institutions offering research facilities to students, notably the Museum of Science and Industry .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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This stream provides the knowledge and skills necessary to improve the health of populations across high-, middle- and low-income settings. Read more

This stream provides the knowledge and skills necessary to improve the health of populations across high-, middle- and low-income settings. The emphasis is on the use, development and critical evaluation of conceptual models; evidence and methods of analysis; and on practical, effective interventions.

Graduates from this stream work in health care, health policy and public health organisations at local, national and international level in service and academic public health roles.

If your main interest is public health in low-income countries please refer to the MSc Public Health for Development.

Duration: one year full time; part-time or split-study over two years. Modes of study explained.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/files/phph_progspec.pdf)

This course is accredited by the Agency for Accreditation of Public Health Education in the European Region (APHEA) which is the accreditation body of the Association of Schools of Public Health in the European Region (ASPHER).

Visit the website https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/public-health-general-stream

An additional requirement for the MSc Public Health (all streams) is some evidence of ability in mathematics, post-16 year education. Preference will also be given to applicants with relevant work experience.

Any student who does not meet the minimum entry requirement above but who has relevant professional experience may still be eligible for admission. Qualifications and experience will be assessed from the application.

Objectives

By the end of this stream students should be able to demonstrate ability to apply knowledge of the core disciplines of public health, consisting of statistics; epidemiology; health economics; and social research, to real health problems. In addition, they should be able to:

- critically assess key public health functions

- demonstrate knowledge and skills in a range of topics related to public health

- formulate, implement and evaluate appropriate policy responses to public health problems

- show competence in critically evaluating and communicating research evidence

Structure

Term 1:

Students complete the Public Health common core, consisting of four compulsory modules:

Basic Statistics for Public Health & Policy

Basic Epidemiology

Introduction for Health Economics

Principles of Social Research

In addition, students intending to follow this stream must take Issues in Public Health. The remaining module can be selected from:

Environment, Health & Sustainable Development

Health Promotion Theory

Health Policy, Process & Power

Health Services

Terms 2 and 3:

Students take a total of five study modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). The list below shows recommended modules. There are other modules which may be taken only after consultation with the Course Directors.

- Slot 1:

Drugs, Alcohol and Tobacco

Economic Evaluation

Health Care Evaluation

Health Promotion Approaches and Methods

Research Design & Analysis

Study Design: Writing a Study Proposal

- Slot 2:

Conflict and Health

Design & Analysis of Epidemiological Studies

Health Systems

History & Health

Qualitative Methodologies

Statistical Methods in Epidemiology

- Slot 3:

Applied Communicable Disease Control

Economic Analysis for Health Policy

Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases

Medical Anthropology and Public Health

Organisational Management

- Slot 4:

Analytical Models for Decision Making

Design & Evaluation of Mental Health Programmes

Environmental Epidemiology

Epidemiology & Control of Communicable Diseases

Ethics, Public Health & Human Rights

Evaluation of Public Health Interventions

Globalisation & Health

Nutrition Related Chronic Diseases

Reviewing the Literature

- Slot 5:

Principles and Practice of Public Health (compulsory)

By arrangement, students may be able to substitute specified Distance Learning modules for up to two modules in certain timetable slots. Any such substitutions will need to be discussed with the Course Directors. Full details are contained in the MSc Course Handbook.

Further details for the course modules - https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/public-health-general-stream#structure

Project Report:

Students prepare a project report during the summer months (July - August), for submission by early September.

Intercalating this course

Undergraduate medical students can take a year out either to pursue related studies or work. The School welcomes applications from medical students wishing to intercalate after their third year of study from any recognised university in the world.

Why intercalate with us?:

Reputation: The School has an outstanding international reputation in public health & tropical medicine and is at the forefront of global health research. It is highly rated in a number of world rankings including:

- World’s leading research-focused graduate school (Times Higher Education World Rankings, 2013)

- Third in the world for social science and public health (US News Best Global Universities Ranking, 2014)

- Second in UK for research impact (Research Exercise Framework 2014)

- Top in Europe for impact (Leiden Ranking, 2015)

Highly recognised qualification: possessing a Master's from the School will give you a focused understanding of health and disease, broaden your career prospects and allow you to be immersed in research in a field of your choice.

Valuable skills: you will undertake an independent research project (summer project) in your chosen topic, equipping you with research skills that will distinguish you in a clinical environment. While your medical qualification will give you a breadth of knowledge; undertaking an intercalated degree will allow you to explore your main area of interest in greater depth.

Alumni network: the School has a strong international and diverse alumni community, with more than 20,000 alumni in over 180 countries.

MSc vs. BSc: undertaking an MSc is an excellent opportunity to develop in-depth specialist knowledge in your chosen topic and enhance your skills in scientific research. Postgraduate qualifications are increasingly sought after by clinicians and possessing a Masters qualification can assist you in your future career progression.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/public-health-general-stream#how-to-apply



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This programme is intended for those who wish to enhance their understanding of the role of microorganisms in animal health and disease, and provides an excellent grounding in molecular biology, immunology, epidemiology and microbiology. Read more

This programme is intended for those who wish to enhance their understanding of the role of microorganisms in animal health and disease, and provides an excellent grounding in molecular biology, immunology, epidemiology and microbiology.

This grounding leads into the study of the complex mechanisms of host/microbe interactions that are involved in the pathogenesis of specific animal diseases, and provides insights into diagnosis and interventions, such as vaccines, essential for disease control.

You will enhance your critical and analytical skills and gain hands-on experience in the diagnosis of veterinary diseases, such that you may identify problems, formulate hypotheses, design experiments, acquire and interpret data, and draw conclusions.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Who is the programme for?

This is a full or part-time programme, intended mainly for graduates, those already working in veterinary diagnostic/research laboratories and staff from other laboratories who want to enhance their understanding of the role of microorganisms in animal health and disease.

Pharmaceutical research personnel, policymakers, veterinarians, public health personnel and environmental biologists will also benefit.

Part-time and short course study

Most modules are offered as standalone short courses. The fee structure for short courses is different to that for registered students, and details may be obtained via admissions enquiries, please refer to the contact details on this page.

The option to study the MSc on a part-time basis is only available following successful completion of three modules as stand-alone/CPD. Please contact the for further information.

Programme partners

This Masters programme is delivered by a consortium comprising the University of Surrey and two world class veterinary microbiology institutions: the BBSRC funded Pirbright Institute (PI), and the Government sponsored Animal & Plant Health Agency (APHA).

The Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) and Public Health England (PHE) also contribute to the programme.

Visits

You will have the unique opportunity to gain hands-on experience in the diagnosis of important veterinary diseases within the world reference laboratories of the APHA and Pirbright Institute (PI).

There will also be an opportunity to visit Public Health England (PHE) to gain a detailed knowledge of how zoonotic diseases outbreaks are investigated, and to visit the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD), a livestock abattoir and an intensive livestock farm.

Colleagues from the CEFAS laboratory will also contribute to the programme, and further research training will be provided during your practical research project.

Educational aims of the programme

This is a one year full-time programme aimed at preparing graduates to work in a range of fields in which a detailed understanding of veterinary microbiology is a valuable asset.

These fields include research, commerce, government and policy, reference laboratory and diagnostic work, epidemiology and disease mapping, veterinary science, farming especially animal production, wild and zoo animal conservation and education.

As such, it is intended that graduates will achieve the highest levels of professional understanding of veterinary microbiology within a range of contexts.

The programme combines the study of the theoretical foundations of, and scholarly approaches to, understanding the application and various practices of veterinary microbiology within the contexts described above along with the development of practical and research skills.

The main aims are to enable students to:

  • Acquire sound knowledge of the major principles of veterinary microbiology
  • Develop the skills to perform relevant interpretation and evaluation of data
  • Apply those acquired skills in practice through research
  • To utilise acquired knowledge and evaluative skills to communicate successfully with stakeholders

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas.

The learning outcomes have been aligned with the descriptor for qualification at level 7 given in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) produced by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) for Higher Education.

Knowledge and understanding

Following completion of the programme, students should display knowledge of:

  • The main principles of current veterinary microbiology
  • The methods and approaches used for the molecular characterisation, and diagnosis of disease agents
  • The main principles of infectious diseases epidemiology
  • The analysis of disease and disease carriage that impact on the development and application of control measures to combat diseases
  • Modes of control of infectious diseases
  • Modes of transmission
  • The various aspects of host pathology and immune responses to disease agents
  • Analytical skills to allow interpretation of data and formulation of conclusions

Intellectual/cognitive skills

Following completion of the programme, students should be able to:

  • Critically appraise scholarly and professional writing on a wide range of subjects pertaining to the various aspects of veterinary microbiology
  • Critically analyse experimental data to enable the formulation of hypotheses
  • Design relevant experiments to test formulated hypotheses
  • Efficiently analyse new developments in technology and critically assess their utilisation to answer existing and new problems

Professional practical skills

Following completion of the programme, students should be able to:

  • Plan and execute an experiment/investigation, act autonomously and demonstrate originality
  • Analyse numerical data using appropriate computer tools including specialist computer packages
  • Communicate experiments at a project level, including report writing
  • Perform specific specialised experimental skills

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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The Organic food and farming sector within Europe is continuing to develp in response to governmental Action Plans and CAP policy development. Read more
The Organic food and farming sector within Europe is continuing to develp in response to governmental Action Plans and CAP policy development. The organic sector requires highly trained individuals to work as certification officers, advisers, agronomists, farmers, farm managers and livestock specialists. SRUC offers this programme to enable students with a variety of academic and working experiences to gain a fast-track understanding of the key technical production, marketing and management aspects of organic farming and food.

This enables students to build on their existing expertise and aspirations, and to give them enhanced career opportunities as practitioners, promoters and facilitators within the sector.

The organic farming courses are offered on a part-time distance learning basis to allow those in continuing employment or with family commitments to be able to participate. Course participants come from a wide range of backgrounds, including farmers, growers, vets and other agricultural and food sector workers who wish to develop their career and businesses in the organic food and farming sector, as well as those from unrelated backgrounds wishing to increase their knowledge and understanding of organic systems.

Specific course objectives are to provide graduates with:
- An ability to critically appraise organic farming as an agricultural system
- A good understanding of the organic sector
- A sound knowledge of the science underpinning organic farming
- An understanding of the marketing, business & quality assurance requirements for organic produce
- Work placement experience
- Research skills (MSc only)

The course is accessible through its delivery by part-time on-line distance learning.

Course Content

The course modules comprise of a mix of technical production, marketing and management, and skill development modules.

Organic Forage and Livestock Production

This module will provide an understanding of the role of forage legumes in organic systems and describe grassland management systems that maximise the contribution of legumes. Students will also be given an understanding of the organic approach to livestock production, particularly in terms of animal welfare, preventative health management and nutrition.

Soils and Nutrient Cycling

This module will aim to provide the students with the tools for optimal management of their soils. Ultimately, they should be able to describe soil properties, evaluate soil fertility and assess management requirements in the context of organic farming. The module provides an understanding of the chemical, physical and biological features of soil fertility and nutrient cycling and develops practical skills in soil assessment and whole farm nutrient budgeting.

Organic Crop Production

This module will provide an understanding of methods of crop production for arable and vegetable field crops, with particular reference to organic farming in the UK. The module will develop an understanding of breeding, establishment, nutrition, protection, harvesting and storage in the context of organic crop production of field crops.

Organic Farming Case Study

This module will improve the student's ability to undertake whole farm analysis and in particular organic conversion planning. Whole farm analysis involves a range of skills and examination of a wide range of issues: technical, financial, marketing and environmental. The module will require the student to integrate the knowledge gained in other modules, to provide an evaluation and plan for the conversion to organic production of an actual farm example.

Organic Farming Profession

This module will provide an overview of the philosophy, principles, history and development of the organic farming industry. The organic standards will be introduced and the ways in which they are used to regulate the organic food and farming industry at UK, European and world levels will be covered. The roles of the main UK organisations that influence the development of the organic sector will also be explored.

Organic Farming Work Placement

This module will allow students to become familiar with an organisation or business in the organic food and farming sector during a 6-week (or equivalent) work placement. The student will gather relevant and unique material to enable them to carry out a technical and business analysis and make recommendations for future development of the organisation or business in question. The material will also be used in class discussion and to contribute to group learning.

Issues in Organic Farming

This module explores the public goods delivered by organic farming. It develops an understanding of food quality and the role and application of Quality Assurance (QA) Schemes in the organic food sector to meet the needs of relevant legislation and consumer concerns. The module also provides an overview of the principles of environmental management in the context of organic agriculture, helping students gain an appreciation of the potential impacts of agricultural enterprises on the environment, measures for minimising such impacts, and opportunities for incorporating positive environmental management measures into farm business plans.

Marketing and Business Management in the Organic Farming Sector

This module will provide an understanding of the concepts, principles and techniques involved in marketing management and how they are applied in the context of the organic farming sector. Financial accounts are one source of information regarding an organic business, and aid the process of planning and control. This module will provide an understanding of accounts to assist in the process of setting goals within a business and assessing the financial consequences of alternatives.

Course Format

This course is studied part time through on-line distance learning. This allows those in continuing employment or with family commitments to participate. With the exception of several weekend schools and a short study tour, the learning is carried out in the student's home or work place.

The MSc Project (taken following successful completion of taught modules)
Provides an opportunity for in-depth individual research on a topic related to organic farming.

Postgraduate Diploma

The PgDip is a high level learning course taught at university post-graduate level for students who opt not to progress to the Masters. Students are required to complete all taught modules detailed above. Typically a student will study 4 modules per year and complete the PgDip in two years. This would normally take an average of 12 to 15 hours study time a week.

Study Tour

The study tour is used to visit a range of organic and conventional farms as well as businesses operating in the organic food supply and distribution chain. In the taught modules an element of student choice is often built in through the use of essay and other course work topics that cover areas of potential interest. There is also a Work Placement module. Students following the distance learning course may gain exemption from the practical element of the placement but will require to complete a report of their work experience.

The study weekends and short study tour are an integral part of teaching delivery and students are strongly recommended to attend these if they are to succeed in this course.

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Occupational Therapy (OT) at Brunel is one of the largest, longest established, and most highly regarded programmes in the world. Read more

About the course

Occupational Therapy (OT) at Brunel is one of the largest, longest established, and most highly regarded programmes in the world. In fact, we are the original ‘London School of Occupational Therapy.’

The MSc Occupational Therapy (Pre-Registration) provides a Master's level route for graduates to become competent occupational therapists equipped for life-long, safe and effective practice within the global marketplace. This course is for those who are not already qualified as occupational therapists. It is a professional full-time programme, which will prepare you to become a competent occupational therapist in a variety of health and social care settings. It also allows students to be eligible to apply for:

Registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).
Membership of the British Association of Occupational Therapists/College of Occupational Therapists.

In December 2016 our programme was granted “Preaccreditation Status” by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE), which confirms that Brunel has successfully completed steps one and two in the three-step accreditation process – see more at AOTA OT Master's-Level Programs - Developing and visit our Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) information page.

The programme will now proceed with step three – the on-site evaluation, scheduled for April 2017, followed by an accreditation decision by mid-2017.

Aims

This programme differs from other Master's programmes in that it is a professional programme at postgraduate level and is full-time. It is not for those who are already qualified occupational therapists. Nevertheless, this course aims to prepare you to become a competent occupational therapist equipped for lifelong, safe and effective practice in a variety of health and social care settings. We provide a high quality educational programme, which ensures that you are properly qualified, prepared and safe to practise.

Occupational therapy students typically choose this career for the following reasons:

variety of work
the challenge
personal and one-to-one contact
client/patient appreciation
its holistic approach
the desire to help disabled people
to work in health settings
job availability
the chance to be creative.

If you are considering studying Occupational Therapy at Brunel University London then you are committed to working jointly with the NHS to demonstrate the values and beliefs of the NHS Constitution.

NHS values
Patients, public and staff have helped develop this expression of values that inspire passion in the NHS and that should underpin everything it does. Individual organisations will develop and build upon these values, tailoring them to their local needs. The NHS values provide common ground for co-operation to achieve shared aspirations, at all levels of the NHS.

Course Content

Programme Structure

The MSc (pre-registration or pre-reg) occupational therapy programme benefits from being integrated with other programmes within the College of Health and Life Sciences. In their first year of study, MSc (pre-registration) occupational therapy students undertake components from a number of the current BSc modules/study blocks, as well as shared teaching with post-graduate students from the divisions of occupational therapy, physiotherapy, social work and community health and nursing studies. In their second year of study, students share modules with other post-graduate students within the division of occupational therapy. Where learning is shared with the undergraduates, the content has been integrated into master's level modules and is assessed at master's level.

The programme comprises two years full time study. Taught modules are within a three-term structure. To provide a balance between academic and practice placements and still meet the minimum of 1,000 hours of practice placements required by the World Federation of Occupational Therapists and the College of Occupational Therapists, three of the practice placement modules extend beyond the term boundaries over the summer.

Academic modules are based at Brunel University in Uxbridge and practice placement modules are provided in a range of health and social care setting and increasingly in voluntary and private organisations including non-traditional settings.

Year One: The Skilled Practitioner – the How, What and Why of Occupational Therapy
Year 1 of the programme introduces students to the "how, what and why" of occupational therapy and aims to give them the opportunity to develop, explore and critique the core occupational concepts and skills of the profession in depth. The arrangement of study blocks and the two practice placement modules (that occur prior to the commencement of academic study in year 2), allow for a reciprocal exchange of academic knowledge and professional skills that develop the student’s understanding and knowledge of the profession further. Applying and evaluating research in practice is essential for occupational therapists, who are required to adopt evidence-based practice. Therefore the students are made aware from the onset of the programme of how research impacts on practice through clinical reasoning and decision-making skills gained in study blocks and also an inter-professional module HH5609: Approaches to Research.

Year Two: Mastery of Occupational Therapy – Advancing Practice
Year 2 of the programme aims to provide students with a more advanced exploration of the occupational therapy profession. Students acquire mastery in critical knowledge and evaluation of key issues on professional practice as well as critical analysis, synthesis and evaluation of theoretical concepts central to occupational therapy. In addition, students study one optional module that enables an in-depth consideration of a specialist area of current practice. Students’ research skills are further enhanced in the second year and culminate in the students producing a research thesis, in the form of a detailed research dissertation. There are two practice placements in Year 2, one at the beginning of the year and one at the end.

Core Modules

Year 1

Introduction to Occupational Therapy Theory and Philosophy
Informing Sciences
Knowledge and Skills for Occupational Therapy 1
The Process of Occupational Therapy Practice
Preparing for the Work Place 1
Occupational Therapy Practice in Context
Knowledge and Skills for Occupational Therapy 2
Lifestyle Redesign Through Occupation
Preparation for Dissertation

Year 2

Preparing for the Work Place 2
Strategies and Visions for Professional Development
People and Communities
The Art and Science of Occupational Therapy

Optional Modules

Occupational Therapy for Children, Young People and their Families
Occupational Therapy in Mental Health
Occupational Therapy in Neurorehabilitation
Occupational Therapy for Active Ageing

Immunisation requirements for the course

Please be aware that the University does not pay for any of the vaccinations or blood tests required to undertake this course, this is the responsibility of each applicant. The University does not offer a service to provide these and therefore we recommend you go to your GP or local travel clinic and start as early as possible. Until the University has evidence that you have these immunisations we will not be able to allow you to enter the clinical environment on practice placement so it is vital that you meet these requirements, ideally before you commence study. You must obtain immunisation against the following and further information can be found on the NHS website.

Please be aware that as occupational therapy students you will be working in hospitals and therefore in contact with patients who have infections so these immunisations are required for students as outlined in the Green Book by the Department of Health.

Hepatitis B x 3 vaccinations over a 6 month period and a blood test is then taken 6-8 weeks after the third dose, to check that the vaccinations have worked. Please note that the Hep B vaccination programme from the initial first vaccination to blood test upon completion, takes 8 months.
Also required is Polio & Tetanusè Rubella, Measles or MMR x 2 è BCG è Varicella Zoster, and evidence of chicken pox or vaccination x 2, or blood test to confirm immunity.
Blood tests are required for Hepatitis B and also for Measles, Rubella and Chicken Pox if there is no evidence in the students medical records. Immunisations are compulsory and are required for clinical placements.

Teaching

The programme reflects educational developments and encourages reflection, self-reliance and deep learning in the programme - to prepare students for the challenges of employment within a changing health and social care system.

Teaching, learning and assessment are designed to ensure that successful students are able to:

Seek out, appraise critically and use appropriate sources of knowledge and expertise within their academic and practice-related studies.
Utilise intellectual, subject-specific and key transferable skills.
Reflect on their experiences and learn from these.

Students’ learning is also supported by web based resources on Blackboard Learn with all modules having lecture and tutorial material posted on this site. Other features of Blackboard Learn are also utilised, such as on-line tests, virtual blackboards, discussion groups and podcasts.

The teaching and learning approaches are founded on the belief that occupational therapy should be grounded in evidence. This is achieved through the integration of academic and practice education which encourages evidence-based activity.

Programme, study and module block descriptors delineate learning outcomes to ensure clarity and promote the active preparation of students. Placements require students to reflect on their personal strengths and weaknesses and set objectives for their learning.
Completion of student evaluation forms requires students to appraise their own learning experiences.

All study and module blocks are core to the curriculum apart from one optional module in the second year, which must be chosen from four options. All modules are compulsory. This policy was adopted to ensure the programme meets with the professional requirements of the Health and Care Professions Council and the College of Occupational Therapists.

Assessment

The assessment procedures within the programme reflect the learning outcomes of each study and module block. Assessments are carried out in assessment blocks. The University term structure allows the student to have assessments spread across the academic year to assist learning.

In order to promote independent learning, a variety of assessment modes are used such as case studies, essays, practical assessments, placement reports, presentations, written examinations, literature reviews and a research dissertation. These assessments are designed to not only reflect master’s level academic requirements, but also professional skills in preparation for practice.

At the beginning of each year the student is provided with the assessment schedule, including assessment and feedback dates. Each assessment is explained clearly to students, both verbally and in the programme handbook, giving notification of assignment block requirements early in the commencement of the relevant study or module blocks. This information is also provided via Blackboard Learn (BBL). Preparation for assessment blocks is co-ordinated by the relevant year leader and undertaken through identified sessions within study blocks.

Special Features

You will complete an integrated research dissertation as part of the Master’s.

You will have the opportunity to work and learn with international students.

You will have the opportunity to learn in a wide range of practice areas.

The programme is accredited by the College of Occupational Therapists (COT) and the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). It is recognised by the World Federation of Occupational Therapy.

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This MSc aims to educate a new generation of public policymakers and policy analysts, familiarising them with the necessary concepts, theories, methods and principles involved in the formulation and analysis of public policy. Read more

This MSc aims to educate a new generation of public policymakers and policy analysts, familiarising them with the necessary concepts, theories, methods and principles involved in the formulation and analysis of public policy. The programme draws on many disciplines, including political science, economics, law, public management and public health.

About this degree

Students develop a working knowledge of many aspects of political science theory relevant to understanding how public policies are formulated, implemented and evaluated. They gain a basic understanding of economic approaches to public policy analysis and of the concepts of economic efficiency and equity as societal objectives. Students also learn extensively about research methods which gives them the tools necessary to understand political processes and to analyse important policy issues.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Theories and Actors of the Policy Process (30)
  • Public Policy Economics and Analysis (PPEA) (15)
  • Introduction to Qualitative Methods or Advanced Qualitative Methods (15)
  • Introduction to Quantitative Methods or Advanced Quantitative Methods (15)

Optional modules

  • Choose one of the following 15 credit modules (the other two remain available as options):
  • Law and Regulation (15)
  • Public Management: Theories and Innovations (15)
  • Agenda Setting and Public Policy (15)
  • Choose further modules up to a value of 30 credits in total from a list available on the departmental website
  • The following are suggestions:
  • Health, Policy and Reform (15)
  • Non-Profit and Voluntary Sector Policy and Management (15)
  • Energy and Climate Policy (15)
  • Making Policy Work (15)
  • Policy-Making & Regulation in Europe (15)
  • The European Union in the World (15)
  • Public Ethics (15)
  • British Government and Politics (15)
  • International Political Economy (15)
  • The Political Economy of Development (15)
  • Democratic Political Institutions (15)
  • Foreign Policy Analysis (15)
  • Gendering the Study of Politics: Theory and Practice (15)
  • Democracy and Accountability: Holding Power to Account (15)

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an individual research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and case studies, and is taught by scholars who have carried out theoretical and empirical research in the field. Students will be assessed by a variety of methods: unseen examinations, long essays, course work and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Public Policy MSc

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates go on to a range of destinations both nationally and internationally including:

  • civil servants in central or local government in the UK and overseas, think tanks, NGOs and consultancies
  • policy officers and researchers for UK members of parliament and members of the European Parliament
  • the European Commission
  • other public and private sector organisations in a range of sectors, for example, Universities UK, Transport for London, the Legal Services Commission, Accenture, Japan International Cooperation Agency, Overseas Development Institute, United Nations Development Programme, Deloitte and Touche, Serco, KPMG, Confederation of British Industry, Civil Service Faststream, the Institute of Government, the Legatum Institute
  • further research study at UCL or elsewhere.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Assistant Economist, HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC)
  • Economics Officer, Ministry of Finance
  • Implementation Manager, NSPCC
  • Research Analyst, World Bank Group
  • Strategy and Communication Officer, Labour

Employability

The training that students receive in policy analysis, research methods, political science, economics and other disciplines equips them to work in a range of different organisations engaged in policy-making and policy analysis. Additionally, the emphasis on independent research, through the dissertation, enables students to think critically about policy problems and devise innovative solutions to such problems.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Political Science is recognised as a centre of excellence in the field and offers a uniquely stimulating environment for the study of public policy.

The interdisciplinary aspect of this programme provides participants with the opportunity to address some of the key issues of contemporary governance and public sector reform.

UCL is uniquely well placed to draw together theory and practice in the field of public policy in health, where perhaps the most far-reaching of all public sector reforms has taken place.



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