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The growing complexity of international communication, involving written, spoken and technology-mediated communication, increasingly requires combined competencies. Read more
The growing complexity of international communication, involving written, spoken and technology-mediated communication, increasingly requires combined competencies.

Recognising this need, this programme is one of the few in the UK that combine translation and interpreting to provide you with the skills and competence you need to perform both tasks professionally.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

This programme combines translation and interpreting studies with a strong focus on technology. It is tailored to meet current market demands and responds to the contemporary concerns of the language industry.

Language-specific translation modules cover specialised translation in domains such as business, finance, science, technology and law. The interpreting modules offer intensive language-specific practice in consecutive interpreting (traditional and short) and dialogue interpreting for business and public service contexts.

The practice-based components of the programme, which include valuable simulations of real-life scenarios, are complemented by modules highlighting different aspects of the profession.

You will practise with the latest computer-assisted translation software and use cutting-edge videoconferencing systems for remote interpreting.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

All programmes operate on a 15 credit modular structure over two semesters. All taught modules are semester based and are worth 15 credits, which is indicative of 150 hours of learning, comprised of student contact, private study and assessment.

The MA Translation and Interpreting is studied over one year (full-time mode) or two years (part-time mode). On successful completion of the programme, you will be awarded a Master’s degree in Translation and Interpreting and can then enter the professional translation and interpreting market.

Language-specific options are paired with English and are subject to demand. If you are a native speaker of English, you can take up to two Specialist Translation or Consecutive and Dialogue Interpreting options (in another language).

If you are not a native speaker of English, you will normally take one Translation option and one Interpreting option (in your mother tongue paired with English).

You can also choose one ab initio language if you wish to expand your portfolio of translation languages. Options ending in ‘I’ in semester 1 must be taken in conjunction with modules ending in ‘II’ in semester 2. Each module provides 15 credits, totalling 120 credits in all.

TEACHING STAFF

Experienced academic staff with excellent research records will help you to develop a broad understanding of the current and future challenges of translation and interpreting, while professional translators and interpreters bring their real-world experience and standards, and up-to-date knowledge of the translation and interpreting market into the classroom.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

In addition to enjoying regular contact with professional translators and interpreters in your practice-based modules, you will benefit from course components that specifically address the business and wider industry aspects of the profession.

Further insights into the industry will be provided by external guest speakers we invite to our Translation Studies seminars. These include professional translators, interpreters, subtitlers and audio describers; professionals working in public services, companies and international organisations; representatives of professional translator/interpreter associations as well as translation/interpreting researchers.

In line with our aim to offer professionally relevant programmes, we have forged close links with the main professional bodies, i.e. the Institute of Translation and Interpreting (ITI) and the Chartered Institute of Linguists (CIoL).

You can join these bodies as a student member during the course and then become a full member after graduation.

In addition, we work closely with many professional language service providers and are a member of the European Language Industry Association (ELIA), which gives you the possibility to apply for a work placement with various translation and interpreting companies that are members of ELIA.

The Centre for Translation Studies has also been granted free access to Memsource software to help further student's education.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Thanks to our continued emphasis on professional development, you will be well-equipped to begin work as freelancers or as language service providers and project managers at international organisations, government bodies, universities and private companies.

We also regularly have students who decide to stay on to study for a PhD and pursue an academic career in Translation and Interpreting Studies.

WHAT MAKES THE PROGRAMME SPECIAL?

The MA programme combines translation and inter­preting studies with a strong focus on technology. It is tailored to meet current market demands and to respond to the contemporary concerns of the language and translation/interpreting industry. You will acquire the practical knowledge, organisational and project management skills necessary to perform translation and interpreting tasks effectively.

Language-specific translation modules cover specialised translation in domains such as business, finance, science, technology and law.

The interpreting modules offer intensive language-specific practice in consecutive interpreting (traditional and short) and dialogue interpreting in a wide range of private and public sector domains (from institutional/diplomatic to business to public service encounters).

The practice-based components of the programme are complemented by background lectures, which will help you to understand the major principles of translation and interpreting, and provide you with a conceptual and methodological framework for analysing, discussing and justifying translation-related decisions.

Our strong emphasis on the use of translation and interpreting technologies will allow you to work hands-on with the latest computer-assisted translation software, state-of-the-art corpus tools and resources, and cutting-edge videoconferencing systems for remote interpreting.

You will have opportunities to immerse yourself in simulations of real-life scenarios and acquire hands-on experience that is invaluable to become a fully-fledged professional language service provider.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The growing complexity of international communication, involving written, spoken as well as technically mediated communication, increasingly requires combined competencies.

Recognising this need, the programme unites translation and interpreting studies, providing students with the skills and the flexibility to perform both tasks professionally in a business context.

The programme relates issues of translation and interpreting to contemporary discourse in corporate and institutional contexts and prepares students for private and public sector employment including corporate business, public services and NGOs.

The programme combines the study of the major principles of, and scholarly approaches to, translation and interpreting with opportunities for application and practice – with the aim of enabling students to:
-Perform relevant translation and interpreting tasks
-Reflect on their own practice, using scholarly and professional writing on relevant aspects of translation and interpreting
-Transfer the acquired skills and knowledge to novel and unpredictable situations of translation and interpreting

Translation and interpreting are rapidly changing due to the impact of globalisation, social change and new technologies. The programme will provide students with insights into recent developments and related research – with the aim of enabling the students to:
-Develop a broad understanding of current and future challenges of translation and interpreting
-Apply scholarly approaches to critically evaluate professional practice in the light of current and future requirements
-Have the capacity for carrying out independent research in an area of translation or interpreting

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the main principles that underpin translation and interpreting, as different yet interrelated activities
-Demonstrate a good understanding of theoretical issues relevant to translation and interpreting
-Demonstrate knowledge of the development of the areas of translation and interpreting in relation to general as well as more specific socio-political issues
-Demonstrate an understanding of translation and interpreting in the context of both globalisation and the contact between different individuals, social groups and (local) institutions
-Demonstrate an understanding of advanced translation techniques in relation to specialised subject fields
-Demonstrate an understanding of advanced interpreting skills and preparation techniques

Intellectual/cognitive skills
-Critically evaluate scholarly and professional writing on a wide range of subjects pertaining to the activities of translation and interpreting
-Strategically retrieve information crucial for the communication situation at hand and efficiently relay the message in the written or oral mode
-Conduct conceptual and advanced terminological research related to specific tasks
-Formulate and address research questions relating to the field of study

Professional practical skills
-Produce high-quality translations in a variety of genres which are appropriate to their context
-Orally present mediated messages in a clear and appropriate fashion
-Confidently deal with interpreting tasks under simulated conditions, especially developing stamina and problem solving techniques under conditions of time and cognitive pressure
-Acquire a sound knowledge of the structures, procedures, code of conduct as well as the professional terminology pertinent to the area
-Function professionally in all situations
-Monitor levels of engagement and impartiality in translation and interpreting situations
-Acquire review/evaluation skills for translation and interpreting purposes
-Combine translation and interpreting skills in a market where flexibility and a varied professional portfolio is an advantage

Key/transferable skills
-Display competence in a range of skills at postgraduate level, including advanced analysis and synthesis of arguments, presentation, the conducting independent research, and the speedy and efficient processing of complex information in English and another language
-Collaborate by working in small teams to achieve a common goal
-Develop knowledge in specialised subject areas and command of terminology
-Organise, research and deliver a sustained piece of work to a high professional standard
-Create and carry out a research project of significant complexity
-Understand the main techniques of translating and interpreting, and transfer those to novel and unplanned situations
-Reflect upon the knowledge gained and incorporate this into independent learning strategies
-Manage learning self-critically
-Exercise initiative and personal responsibility

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Are you keen to improve public health and develop the knowledge required to reflect on current concerns and practice issues within this field?. Read more
Are you keen to improve public health and develop the knowledge required to reflect on current concerns and practice issues within this field?

Popular with both UK-based and international students, the Master of Public Health course has been specifically designed for those who wish to develop their career within public health, in addition to those looking to promote the health of the public as part of their current professional role.Health -Science

Upon successful graduation you will possess in-depth research and enquiry skills, and a critical understanding of their application in a public health employment context.

The practical application of these academic skills will equip you with the knowledge and approaches necessary to implement a broad range of interventions to improve public health outcomes in different employment contexts. For example, dealing with pandemic flu epidemics, increasing accessibility to health care services, reducing obesity or malaria rates and community development to enable disadvantaged communities.

This course is delivered on a full time basis, across a period of 12 or 18 months.

Learn From The Best

This course is taught by a team of experienced lecturers with a practice background in public health or education. We boast close links with local directors, commissioners and practitioners of public health, some of whom are employed as part of our teaching team to provide you with access to professionals that are actively working within public health.

All of our teaching staff possess the accreditations and academic qualifications required to teach, in addition to professional registrations with the Nursing and Midwifery Council or Health Care Professionals Council.

We also welcome external visiting speakers from a variety of public health contexts to contribute to lectures, enabling you learn about the current issues that are defining the public health sector.

Our team have extensive experience of working with both UK and international students and will provide ongoing guidance to support you throughout every step of this course.

Teaching And Assessment

This course will provide you with the opportunity to explore and develop your skills and knowledge of leadership, engagement and collaborative working, public health intelligence and epidemiology, public health fundamentals and research.

Teaching will be delivered via a mix of lectures and seminars, which will be supported by case studies, enquiry-based learning exercises, skills development sessions and independent study.

This course will be assessed through written work, group presentations, essays and academic posters.

You will also produce an in-depth dissertation project around a subject area of your choice. Undertaken under the supervision of a dedicated supervisor, this project will form the final stage of the assessment process.

Module Overview
AC0778 - Research: Approaches, Methods and skills (Core, 30 Credits)
AC0780 - Leadership and Collaborative Working in Public Health and Healthcare (Core, 30 Credits)
AC0782 - Public Health Fundamentals: Concepts, Theories and Frameworks (Core, 30 Credits)
AC0783 - Public Health Intelligence and Epidemiology (Core, 30 Credits)
PP0723 - Project Feasibility Study Dissertation (NotDefined, 60 Credits)
PP0727 - Empirical Project (NotDefined, 60 Credits)
PP0728 - Practice Project (NotDefined, 60 Credits)
PP0729 - Systematic Appraisal (NotDefined, 60 Credits)

Learning Environment

This course is based at our Coach Lane campus and our facilities are some of the most advanced in the country and allow us to ensure your learning evolves in-line with the latest developments in the industry.

Technology is embedded throughout all aspects of your degree and you will receive ongoing support through our innovative e-learning platform, Blackboard, where you can access module handbooks, assessment information, lecture presentation slides and reading lists. Key lectures will also be recorded to allow you to listen again.

If English is not your first language you will also have access to the English for Specific Academic Purposes (ESAP) programmes to help you develop your English language, academic writing and study skills.

Research-Rich Learning

Research-rich learning is central to the structure of this course and our research-active staff will use examples from the latest studies and their own research to develop your critical understanding and thinking.

You will be encouraged to critically examine and comment on the philosophical underpinnings, methodologies and methods applied to public health studies and begin to design a research proposal to form the basis for your dissertation - a project of self directed study that requires you to undertake independent enquiry around a subject area of your choice.

Northumbria University is ranked in the top quartile in the UK for its research power in Allied Health Sciences and Nursing.

More than 80% of research activity in Allied Health Sciences and Nursing is rated as world-leading or internationally excellent (REF 2014).

Give Your Career An Edge

The Public Health and Wellbeing department works in partnership with local and national services and organisations to produce independent public health and healthcare professionals who are competent, confident, compassionate and able to meet and exceed the professional, statutory and regulatory body standards required of them.

Our partnership with those actively involved in public health will enable you to interact and network with professionals who are currently working within public health, in addition to allowing you to further understand how the skills taught on this course apply to a real working environment.

The Master of Public Health course provides a good foundation for you to develop a portfolio at the level required for your particular role, if you so wish. For those pursuing the specialty training for registrars / supervisors the learning from the course will inform your portfolio development route (Faculty of Public Health 2015).

This course’s modules have been aligned to reflect the core and defined areas of the UK Public Health Skills and Knowledge Framework (2013) and the Faculty of Public Health’s (2015) six domains of public health practice.

Your Future

Upon graduation you will possess the skills required for leadership, management and system-based thinking in public health, all of which will enhance your ability to lead and manage in a variety of public health organisations in the UK and worldwide.

The Master of Public Health qualification is a national and internationally renowned degree that will help you seek employment in public or government services, voluntary organisations, non-governmental organisations and research posts both in the UK and abroad.

Former alumni have gone on to work for non-governmental organisations, hospital management, voluntary and charitable organisations and health improvement posts.

Completion of this course also provides an excellent grounding for progression to PhD or professional doctorate studies.

96% of graduates from Public Health and Wellbeing courses are in work or further study within the first six months of graduation.

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Why do languages change? Why does your mobile device suggest funny completions for words you are typing? How did it happen that Finnish is spoken mostly… Read more
Why do languages change? Why does your mobile device suggest funny completions for words you are typing? How did it happen that Finnish is spoken mostly in Finland, but its linguistic relatives are scattered over a larger area? How can you study a language that does not have a standard orthography? Why can you sometimes tell where other people come from just by their accent? Why do some people stick to their dialect, but others give it up when they move to the city? Should you try to support language diversity? Can we save languages that are spoken by a very small number of people? How can computer-synthesised speech be made to sound more human? Why do some languages seem so much more difficult to learn - are they inherently more complex?

This Master's programme will provide you with an understanding of the nature and diversity of human language and with the theoretical tools for working with language material. If you are interested in languages but are unable to decide which of them you want to study, this Master's programme offers several fields of specialisation. One of them might be just perfect for you.

During your studies, you will:
-Gain an in-depth understanding of the basic structure of language, its subsystems (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics) and their mutual relationships.
-Learn the fundamentals of linguistic analysis and language description.
-Familiarize yourself with linguistic concepts, theories, descriptive models and the associated research methods.
-Learn how language is related to cognition, speech and interaction as well as to social structures, culture and society.
-Learn to use various methods and technical tools in order to manage and analyze language data.
-Gain a good understanding of linguistic variation and diversity: what is common to the world's languages and how they differ, how language changes through time, how languages influence one another, how individuals cope with multilingual situations and how communities speaking endangered languages can be supported.

After completing your studies, you will be able to work independently in various fields that require multidisciplinary expertise in linguistic sciences. You will have the theoretical knowledge and skills that are required for postgraduate studies in the doctoral programme in language studies.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

Linguistic Diversity in the Digital Age is an integrated international programme that offers you a comprehensive view of all subfields of the science of language. As a student in the programme you will be able to choose among four specialist options: (1) General Linguistics, (2) Phonetics, (3) Language Technology, and (4) Diversity Linguistics.

General Linguistics
Gives you comprehensive in-depth training in a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches to language structure and language in use. Special emphasis is put on language typology in a global perspective as well as the documentation and description of endangered and previously undocumented and under-documented forms of speech.

Phonetics
Introduces you to the tools for working with the articulatory, acoustic and perceptional aspects of human speech from a multidisciplinary perspective. At the more advanced level, you will become acquainted with the methods of experimental phonetics.

Language Technology
Combines linguistics with digital technology in an interdisciplinary approach with close links to computer science. The focus areas include natural language processing (NLP) for morphologically rich languages, cross-lingual NLP and language technology in the humanities.

Diversity Linguistics
Encompasses all aspects of linguistic diversity in time and space, including historical linguistics as well as the extralinguistic context of languages: ethnicities, cultures and environ­ments. The areal foci in Diversity Linguistics are Eurasia and Africa.

These four specialist options interact at all levels. There is a study module common to all students in the programme regardless of the specialist option they choose. The integration of these four perspectives into one programme is unique - no similar programme exists anywhere else.

In the context of “Humanities”, the programme has the closest relationship to natural sciences, and many subfields of the programme involve methods directly linked to laboratory sciences, including digital technology and neurosciences.

The teaching in the programme includes lectures and seminars, practical exercise sessions, reading circles, fieldwork excursions, as well as work practice (internship). The broad spectrum of teaching methods guarantees optimal support for your learning processes.

Programme Structure

The scope of the Master of Arts degree is 120 credits. The degree contains the following studies:
-Studies common to all students in the programme (30 credits)
-Advanced studies in the specialist option (at least 60 credits)
-Other studies (up to 30 credits)

The target duration of full-time studies leading to an MA degree is two years.

All students in the programme take the same courses during the autumn semester of the first year.

Then you will focus on your specialist option (general linguistics, phonetics, language technology, or diversity linguistics). This block of studies consists of courses (at least 30 credits) and of the final project, which is your Master's thesis (30 credits).

Additionally, you choose other studies: modules offered either by the other specialist options within this Master's programme or by other programmes within the University of Helsinki. The size of such optional study modules is typically 15, 25 or 30 credits. Courses offered by other universities can also be included here.

The studies in your own specialist option as well as the other studies may also include an internationalization period (e.g. student exchange) and work practice or other working life oriented study units. Working life and career development perspectives are integrated in many courses in the programme.

You will complete your studies systematically. At the beginning of your Master’s studies, you will prepare your first personal study plan (PSP). In this, you will receive support especially from the staff of the Master's programme. Guidance is also given at the Faculty level.

Career Prospects

After graduation, students of the programme find employment in a wide variety of positions, in which special knowledge of language is required.

One path prepares you for a research career, and many graduates work as researchers in Finland and abroad. You can also work in the political, diplomatic, and educational sectors, as well as research administration. Further potential employers are found in the publishing industry, media and journalism, public relations and communications of business and public administration, as well as NGOs.

If you choose a technological orientation, you may work in language technology firms or more generally in the IT sector. Big international companies are in constant need of experts in speech and language technology. Additionally, there is a vibrant field of domestic companies, some established ones and many promising start-ups. Some students have founded their own companies and become entrepreneurs.

Note that it is not possible to graduate as a (subject) teacher in the LingDA Master's programme.

In honour of the University of Helsinki's 375th anniversary, the Faculty of Arts presented 375 humanists during year 2015. Get to know the humanists! http://375humanistia.helsinki.fi/

Internationalization

Linguistics is by definition an international field. Language capacity is a feature common to all human beings, and the objective of linguistics as a science is to study both the universal background of language as a phenomenon and the global diversity of languages as expressions of social and cultural heritage.

In the LingDA programme, internationalization is present in several forms and at several levels:
-The programme functions in English and accepts international students from all countries.
-The programme recruits students representing a variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds.
-The students are encouraged to study and master many languages from both the practical and the theoretical points of view.
-The students are encouraged early on to get engaged in documentational and typological field work among speakers of little documented languages in various parts of the world.
-The students are encouraged to use the opportunities of international exchange that the university offers.

The programme has a high international profile and all teachers have wide international contact networks. At the university of Helsinki, linguistics was internationalized as early as the 19th century. Finland is a country where, in particular, ethnolinguistics and field linguistics were developed and practised much earlier than in most other European countries. Some of the regions where Finnish ethnolinguists have been active include North and Central Eurasia, the Near and Middle East, East Asia, South Asia, and Africa. This tradition of field-work-oriented linguistics is today carried on by the HALS (Helsinki Area and Linguistic Studies) research community. At the same time, the more recent fields of linguistics, including phonetics, language technology, and typology, have developed their own international profiles.

Research Focus

The MA programme Diversity Linguistics in the Digital Age combines several research fields in which the University of Helsinki has long been a global leader. Language research in Helsinki has always maintained its strong commitment to a better understanding of cultural areas and their history. Situated in an ideal place for the study of language history and contact linguistics of various Eurasian language families, the study of Uralic languages has a long tradition in Helsinki. Our interest in the culturally and historically informed study of language reaches well beyond that, though, spanning Asia, Europe and Africa.

Our language research is empirically driven and informed by linguistic typology. The question of linguistic complexity, its significance for language and cultural history, and its intersection with ecological models is a hallmark of the Helsinki School of Linguistics. We explore new horizons in area and language studies by combining cutting edge research in linguistic typology with field work based descriptive linguistics and linguistic anthropology.

A unique asset at the University of Helsinki is the presence of various language technology initiatives at the forefront of the digital humanities. The study of morphologically complex languages plays a great role here, and special attention is paid to lesser researched languages.

Each of the four study lines of our MA programme thus corresponds to a University of Helsinki focus area. Our language-related research is typically multidisciplinary and involves more than one linguistic specialty. This is also a crucial feature in our MA programme. Students receive theoretical, thematic and methodological training for research or other professional careers that require problem-solving skills in order to maintain linguistic diversity and to support people’s linguistic well-being.

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This programme is unique in teaching the collective history of science, medicine, environment and technology. It is also unique as it offers modules that combine imperial, ethical, and military history with general areas of history of science and medicine. Read more
This programme is unique in teaching the collective history of science, medicine, environment and technology. It is also unique as it offers modules that combine imperial, ethical, and military history with general areas of history of science and medicine.

You learn from experts working in these diverse fields, being taught how different societies, cultures, and races have conceptualised disease, reacted to changes in environment and created different technological artefacts and scientific knowledge. You are introduced to the major and recent historiographical and methodological approaches, become familiar with the main archives in the UK and encouraged to approach the history of medicine, science, environment and technology from past as well as contemporary concerns.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/83/history-of-science-medicine-environment-and-technology

About the School of History

The School of History at the University of Kent offers a great environment in which to research and study. Situated in a beautiful cathedral city with its own dynamic history, the University is within easy reach of the main London archives and is convenient for travelling to mainland Europe.

The School of History is a lively, research-led department where postgraduate students are given the opportunity to work alongside academics recognised as experts in their respective fields. The School was placed eighth nationally for research intensity in the most recent Research Excellence Framework, and consistently scores highly in the National Student Survey.

There is a good community spirit within the School, which includes regular postgraduate social meetings, weekly seminars and a comprehensive training programme with the full involvement of the School’s academic staff. Thanks to the wide range of teaching and research interests in the School, we can offer equally wide scope for research supervision covering British, European, African and American history.

At present, there are particularly strong groupings of research students in medieval and early modern cultural and social history, early modern religious history, the history and cultural studies of science and medicine, the medicine, the history of propaganda, military history, war and the media, and the history of Kent.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

HI878 - Methods and Interpretations of Historical Research (30 credits)
HI866 - Science and Medicine in Context (30 credits)
HI817 - Deformed, Deranged and Deviant (30 credits)
HI827 - Home Front Britain, 1914-18 (30 credits)
HI857 - Geiger Counter at Ground Zero: Explorations of Nuclear America (30 credits)
HI881 - Museums, Material Culture and the History of Science (30 credits)
HI883 - Work Placement (30 credits)

Assessment

All courses are assessed by coursework, and the dissertation counts for half the final grade (comprising one third assessed preparation, two thirds actual dissertation).

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- place the study of texts, images and documentaries in their historical contexts, at the centre of student learning and analysis

- ensure that students of the history of science, medicine, environment and technology acquire a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the historical modes of theory and analysis

- enable you to understand and use concepts, approaches and methods of the history of science, medicine, environment and technology in different academic contexts and develop an understanding of the differing and contested aspects between, and within, the relevant disciplines

- develop your capacities to think critically about past events and experiences

- encourage you to relate the academic study of the history of science, medicine, environment and technology to questions of public debate and concern

- promote a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that promotes breadth and depth of intellectual enquiry and debate

- assist you to develop cognitive and transferable skills relevant to your vocational and personal development.

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The resources for historical research at Kent are led by the University’s Templeman Library: a designated European Documentation Centre which holds specialised collections on slavery and antislavery, and on medical science. The Library has a substantial collection of secondary materials to back-up an excellent collection of primary sources including the British Cartoon Archive, newspapers, a large audio-visual library, and a complete set of British Second World War Ministry of Information propaganda pamphlets.

The School has a dedicated Centre for the Study of Propaganda and War, which has a distinctive archive of written, audio and visual propaganda materials, particularly in film, video and DVD. Locally, you have access to: the Canterbury Cathedral Library and Archive (a major collection for the study of medieval and early modern religious and social history); the Centre for Kentish Studies at Maidstone; and the National Maritime Collection at Greenwich. Kent is also within easy reach of the country’s premier research collections in London and the national libraries in Paris and Brussels.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Journal of Contemporary History; English Historical Review; British Journal for the History of Science; Technology and Culture; and War and Society.

Global Skills Award
All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/gsa.html). The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability

Research areas

Medieval and early modern history
Covering c400–c1500, incorporating such themes as Anglo-Saxon England, early-modern France, palaeography, British and European politics and society, religion and papacy.

Modern history
Covering c1500–present, incorporating such themes as modern British, European and American history, British military history, and 20th-century conflict and propaganda.

History of science, technology and medicine
Incorporating such themes as colonial science and medicine, Nazi medicine, eugenics, science and technology in 19th-century Britain.

Careers

As the job market becomes increasingly competitive, postgraduate qualifications are becoming more attractive to employers seeking individuals who have finely tuned skills and abilities, which our programmes encourage you to hone. As a result of the valuable transferable skills developed during your course of study, career prospects for history graduates are wide ranging. Our graduates go on to a variety of careers, from research within the government to teaching, politics to records management and journalism, to working within museums and galleries – to name but a few.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The Department of Public Health and Policy at the University of Liverpool has a flourishing research portfolio in Public Health and Health Inequalities. Read more

Course Description

The Department of Public Health and Policy at the University of Liverpool has a flourishing research portfolio in Public Health and Health Inequalities. The University of Liverpool has been at the forefront of Public Health for over 150 years and now has an influential voice on the world stage and close links with many institutions, disciplines and public health bodies. The aim of the Department is to contribute to the improvement and maintenance of the health of people, locally, nationally and internationally, through:
• excellence in education and research
• the development of a learning environment that encourages staff and students to fulfil their potential

The Department provides advice to governmental policy makers locally, nationally and internationally and hosts the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre for Policy Research on the Social Determinants of Health. The Department is home to a multi-disciplinary team of academic staff drawn from a range of subjects including medical and health sciences, epidemiology, sociology, community development, policy analysis, statistics, and history. It is actively involved in research, education and health service work related to promoting the health of the public.

The Master of Public Health programme is delivered at both our Liverpool and London campuses. On completion of the Master of Public Health, students should have a foundation in the science and art of public health, including an understanding of the concepts of health and disease and factors, which may affect these. The resulting knowledge, skills and attitudes should enable them to put public health principles into effect in a variety of settings including research, practice and the interface of applied research. They will be able to demonstrate an in-depth systematic understanding of public health research and all students carry out a small-scale original research project that conveys the public health context and implications.

Public Health encompasses a broad range of subjects some of which require traditional analytical scientific thinking (for example statistics) whilst others require a more flexible and creative approach (for example health inequalities). The practice of effective public health requires the synthesis of these aspects and the MPH is designed to enable students to gain competence in the application of these disciplines.

The modules are designed to cover the set syllabus whilst allowing students the flexibility to learn in a way and time best suited to their individual needs. Areas that are most effectively covered by interaction and discussion, as well as those that may be conceptually difficult, are covered by direct contact. Even here a didactic teaching style is used only as necessary, with the emphasis of teaching being on interaction and experiential learning. The intention is to develop the ability in students for self-directed learning, so the styles of teaching and learning change in emphasis through the modules. In the early stages the material is subject based but as the student matures in knowledge and skill the material becomes more interactive and problem solving in approach. Broadly a student will be encouraged and guided in the development of five key areas:

1. In-depth knowledge of the main disciplines of public health.
2. Ability in self-directed learning and management of personal development.
3. Ability to critically evaluate, reflect and analyse.
4. Effective communication of ideas in both written and spoken formats.
5. Ability to work effectively both alone and in teams.

The programme offers the option of full-time study over one year, or part-time for up to 3 years for students who wish to study while in employment and where the programme can form an integral part of their professional development.

Here’s what some of our students said about the MPH Programme at the University of Liverpool:

“I loved the level of interaction and discussion. I’ve really enjoyed this year and I’ve found it very useful.”
“Fantastic lecturers. The most amazing support and constantly guiding the course along.”

“Standard of teaching – lecturers / speakers was exceptional. I enjoyed meeting and interacting with the people in the group as we were from quite different backgrounds. “
“The MPH at Liverpool has been key in enabling progression to my current role.”

“The MPH has proved to be a real asset and I certainly wouldn't have got the job without having studied at Liverpool.”

“The modules covered a wide range of topics and issues relevant to public health.”

“Well coordinated – lots of support. Lots of enthusiastic tutors.”

**Additional Entry Requirement Information

The Master of Public Health (MPH) programme is available to any University graduate in a health or health-related profession, as well as non-health-related graduates and others approved by the University. This includes:

• Graduates in medicine of an approved university who have not less than one year (and preferably longer) post-registration professional experience;
• Other health-related graduates of an approved university or other institution who have not less than two years of professional experience;
• Non-health-related graduates, and others who have satisfied the requirements of approved Exam Boards, or have satisfied the University that they are suitably qualified to undertake a postgraduate course. They must have at least three years approved professional experience, and either completed the final examination of an approved professional institution, or obtained some other qualification approved for this purpose by the University.
• In addition, applicants require a GCSE Grade C or GCE O Level pass in Mathematics and English, or an equivalent qualification.
International students

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Students who graduate from the Master’s programme in geography have strong theoretical and practical skills. The education in geography offers a broad understanding in current social and environmental issues. Read more
Students who graduate from the Master’s programme in geography have strong theoretical and practical skills. The education in geography offers a broad understanding in current social and environmental issues. Our students can work as experts in their field, both independently and as members of multi-professional teams.

The teaching within the programme is connected with the work of the geography research groups. It is often possible to write the final thesis as part of work in a research group or a research institute in a related field.

The Master’s programme in geography is divided into three sub-programmes (described in section 4). Our students have been very successful in the job market after completing our programme.

The strengths of students who have completed our Master’s programme when it comes to research and expertise are:
-Their ability to apply theoretical knowledge.
-A broad understanding of multi-layered regional issues.
-Strong interaction skills within multi-disciplinary groups of specialists.
-Their ability to communicate in writing, orally, and graphically about geographical phenomena and research findings.
-Their ability to utilise and interpret various kinds of research data.
-Their versatile knowledge of methodology in geography.
-Their ability to apply the newest methods in geoinformatics and cartography.
-Their embracing of responsible and ethical scientifc practices.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The first year of the advanced module of the Master’s programme contains the method courses of your chosen sub-programme, elective courses, and advanced literature. During this year you will start planning your Master’s thesis.

In the autumn of the second year, you will join a Master’s seminar and take exams on literature related to the MSc thesis. In the spring, you should be ready to present your finished MSc thesis (Pro gradu). In addition, you can take optional courses in both years that support your sub-programme. If you are studying to be a teacher, you will take courses in pedagogy during your second year.

Studying takes many forms. A large part of the instruction is contact teaching. Method and specialisation courses are usually implemented in groups of 10-20 students, where it is easy to discuss professional issues and gain deeper insights. Independent study is supported through workshops supervised by older students, and reading circles. The Master’s programme also includes extensive exams on literature in the field.

Selection of the Major

The Master’s programme in geography is divided into sub-programmes. The sub-programmes offer students the opportunity to specialise in different areas of geography. The Master’s programme contains both general and sub-programme-specific courses. The teaching within the Master’s programme in geography is seamlessly connected with the Master’s programme in urban studies and planning, which is jointly implemented with Aalto University.

The sub-programmes in the Master’s programme for geography are:
-Physical Geography
-Human Geography and Spatial Planning
-Geoinformatics

Physical Geography
Physical geography is an area of geography that studies natural systems and the regional interaction between nature and humans. The main parts of physical geography are geomorphology, climatology, hydrogeography, biogeography, and research into global change.

The Master’s courses in physical geography work towards deeper regional syntheses, explain the physical surroundings and their changes as a part of the function of regional systems, and analyse and model the relationships between different sectors. Focus areas in the Master’s programme in physical geography are the effect of global change on natural systems, watershed research, and the regional modelling of geomorphological processes and local climates. A considerable part of the Master’s programme in physical geography consists of work in small groups or in the field, where you will learn to implement theories in practice.

Having completed the Master’s programme in physical geography, you will be able to analyse and model regional systems of nature, as well as the interaction between nature and humans. In addition, the programme teaches you to analyse sustainable use of natural resources, and evaluate environmental impact. You will learn to implement theoretical knowledge and regional methods in planning a scientific thesis, implementing it in practice, and presenting your results orally and in writing. Further, the courses will train you to take specimens independently, analyse them, and interpret them. The teaching at the Master’s stage is closely connected with research on physical geography: theses are done in collaboration with a research group or research institute.

Human Geography and Spatial Planning
Human geography and spatial planning is a sub-programme, where regional structures and related planning is studied. Urban structures, regional social structures, statewide regional structures, the regional development in the European Union, and globalisation are studied. At the core of the sub-programme is the spatial transformation of society. The Master’s programme studies such phenomena as the divergence of regional and urban structures, urban culture, as well as the political-geographical dynamics of regions. In addition, sustainability, multiculturalism, segregation, housing, and migration are at the core of the sub-programme. Relevant themes for the sub-programme are also regional and urban planning, the political ecology of use of natural resources and land, and gobal development issues. These geographical phenomena and themes are studied through both theoretical and empirical questions, which can be analysed with different qualitative and quantitative methods.

The programme goes into how theories on cities and regional systems can be transformed into empirical research questions. After completing their Master’s theses, students can independently gather empirical data on the main dimensions of regional and urban structures and regional development, they can analyse these data with both qualitative and quantitative methods, and they can evaluate the planning practices connected with regional and social structures. After graduating from the Master’s programme, students will be able to communicate about phenomena and research findings in regional and urban structures, both orally and in writing.

Geoinformatics
Geoinformatics is an effective approach to the study and understanding of complex regional issues. Geoinformatics studies and develops computational methods for gaining, processing, analysing, and presenting positioning data. As a part of geography, geoinformatics is a research method on the one hand, to be used in the study of complex regional issues from urban environments to natural ones, from studying local environments to issues of sustainability in developing countries. On the other hand, the methods are the object of research. In urban environments, the methods of geoinformatics can be used to study accessibility and mobility, for example, or to plan a good park network. In the context of developing countries, the research into climate change, land use, or interaction between humans and environment with the help of quantitative, qualitative, and involving methods rises into the front. Students in geography reach a basic understanding of geoinformatics methods in the study of geographical issues, the sources and use of different sets of data (remote sensing, global and national databases, geographical Big Data), analysis methods, and effective visualisation of results.

At the Master’s level, as a student specialising in geoinformatics you will advance your skills both theoretically and technically, developing your methodological expertise from data acquisition to data refinement and visualisation with the help of geoinformatics methods. The instruction is directly connected with the work of research groups and theses are often written as a part of research work. After graduating, you will be able to utilise versatile approaches in geoinformatics in research into geographical questions. You will be able to follow the rapid development of the subject independently, and participate on your own.

Programme Structure

The Master’s programme in geography comprises 120 credits (ECTS) and you should graduate as a Master of Science in two academic years. The following courses are included in the degree:
-60 credits of shared advanced courses or according to sub-programme (including MSc thesis 30 credits).
-60 credits of other courses from your own or other programmes.
-60 credits of courses in pedagogy for teaching students.
-The other studies may include working-life or periods of international work or study.
-Working-life orientation and career planning.
-Personal study plan.

Career Prospects

The Master’s programme in geography provides you with excellent abilities to work in research or as specialists. Our graduates have found good employment in the public and private sectors, in Finland and abroad. Their postings include:
-Evaluation of environmental effects and environment consultation.
-Positioning and remote-sensing work.
-Regional and urban planning.
-Governmental community and regional administration.
-Governmental posts in ministries.
-Organisational posts.
-Development cooperation projects.
-Communication and publishing work.
-Teaching.

Internationalization

The Master’s programme in geography offers many opportunities for international work:
-Student exchange in one of the exchange locations of the faculty or university.
-Traineeship abroad.
-Participation in international projects and expeditions (e.g. to the Taita research station in Kenya).
-Participation in international research groups (writing your thesis).
-Participation in language courses at the University of Helsinki (a wide range of languages, including rare ones).

Research Focus

In physical geography:
-Research into global change, especially the environmental effects of climate change.
-Watershed research, the physical-chemical quality and ecological status of water systems.
-Natural systems, their function and change.
-Regional analytics and modelling in research into natural systems.
-Positioning and remote-sensing methods and their application when studying the status and changes in natural environments.
-‘Big data,’ analysis of regional and temporal data.
-The Arctic areas: status, change and vulnerability.

In human geography and spatial planning:
-Transformation and segregation in the social and physical urban environment.
-The changing rationalities and concepts of regional and urban planning.
-Regional policy and geopolitics.
-Urbanisation and changing relationships between state and cities.
-Internationalisation of cities and states.
-The spatial planning system of the European Union.
-Regional policy of data-intensive economics.
-The political ecology and management of natural resources and land use.
-Globalisation.

In geoinformatics:
-Spatial data analysis, new information sources.
-Development of remote-sensing methods for environmental study, especially hyper-spectral remote-sensing data and drone applications.
-Application of geoinformatics methods to environmental and urban research.

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Our highly sought-after graduates benefit from a programme that integrates training in identifying, framing and effectively researching social problems with a leading computational approach to social science. Read more
Our highly sought-after graduates benefit from a programme that integrates training in identifying, framing and effectively researching social problems with a leading computational approach to social science.

Furthermore, we are home to the Centre for Research in Social Simulation (CRESS) and its world-leading expertise in agent-based modelling.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Interest in simulation has grown rapidly in the social sciences. New methods have been developed to tackle this complexity. This programme will integrate traditional and new methods, to model complexity, evolution and the adaptation of social systems.

These new methods are having an increasing influence on policy research through a growing recognition that many social problems are insufficiently served by traditional policy modelling approaches.

The Masters in Social Science and Complexity will equip you to develop expertise in the methods necessary to tackle complex, policy-relevant, real-world social problems through a combination of traditional and computational social science methods, and with a particular focus on policy relevance.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Data Analysis
-Field Methods
-Computational Modelling
-Theory Model Data
-Modelling the Complex World
-Policy Modelling
-Theory and Method
-Statistical Modelling
-Evaluation Research
-Dissertation

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The main aims of the programme are to:
-Provide an appropriate training for students preparing MPhil/PhD theses, or for 
 students going on to employment involving the use of social science and policy research
-Provide training that fully integrates social science, policy modelling and computational methodologies to a high standard
-Provide training resulting in students with high quality analytic, methodological, computational and communication skills

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES
The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
-Develop skills in tackling real world policy problems with creativity and sound methodological judgment
-Cover the principles of research design and strategy, including formulating research 
questions or hypotheses and translating these into practicable research designs and models
-Introduce students to the methodological and epistemological issues surrounding research in the social sciences in general and computational modelling in particular
-Develop skills in programming in NetLogo for the implementation of agent-based models for the modelling of social phenomena
-Develop skills in the acquisition and analysis of social science data
-Make students aware of the range of secondary data available and equip them to evaluate its utility for their research
-Develop skills in searching for and retrieving information, using library and Internet resources
-Develop skills in the use of SPSS, and in the main statistical techniques of data analysis, including multivariate analysis
-Develop skills in the use of CAQDAS software for the analysis of qualitative data
-Develop skills in writing, in the preparation of a research proposal, in the presentation ofresearch results and in verbal communication
-Help students to prepare their research results for wider dissemination, in the form of seminar papers, conference presentations, reports and publications, in a form suitable for a range of audiences, including academics, stakeholders, policy makers, professionals, service users and the general public

Knowledge and understanding
-Show advanced knowledge of qualitative, quantitative and computational methodologies in the social science
-Show advanced knowledge of modelling methodologies, model construction and analysis
-Show critical understanding of methodological and epistemological challenges of social science and computer modelling
-Show critical awareness and understanding of the methodological implications of a range of sociological theories and approaches
-Show understanding the use and value of a wide range of different research approaches across the quantitative and qualitative spectra
-Show advanced knowledge in data collection, analysis and data driven modelling
-Show advanced knowledge of policy relevant social science research and modelling
-Show advanced understanding of the policy process and the role of social science and modelling therein
-Show advanced knowledge of statistical modelling

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Systematically formulate researchable problems; analyse and conceptualise issues; critically appreciate alternative approaches to research; report to a range of audiences
-Conceptual development of Social Science and Complexity models to creatively enhance the understanding of social phenomena
-Integration of qualitative, quantitative and computational data
-Judgement of problem-methodology match
-Analyse qualitative and quantitative data drawn both from ‘real world’ and ‘virtual world’ environments, using basic and more advanced techniques, and draw warranted conclusions
-Develop original insights, questions, analyses and interpretations in respect of research questions
-Critically evaluate the range of approaches to research

Professional practical skills
-Formulate, design, plan, carry out and report on a complete research project
-Use the range of traditional and computational techniques employed in sociological research
-Ability to produce well founded, data driven and validated computational models
-Generate both quantitative and qualitative data through an array of techniques, and select techniques of data generation on appropriate methodological bases
-Employ a quantitative (SPSS) and qualitative software package to manage and analyse data
-Plan, manage and execute research as part of a team and as a sole researcher
-Ability to communicate research findings models in social science and policy relevant ways
-Ability to manage independent research

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate complex ideas, principles and theories by oral, written and visual means
-Apply computational modelling methodology to complex social issues in appropriate ways
-Creativity in approaching complex problems and a the ability of communicating and justifying problem solutions
-Apply computing skills for computational modelling, research instrument design, data analysis, and report writing and presentation
-Work to deadlines and within work schedules
-Work independently or as part of a team
-Demonstrate experience of a work environment

PLACEMENTS

On the MSc Social Science and Complexity, we offer the opportunity to take a research placement during the Easter vacation. This will provide you with first-hand experience of real-life policy research in action.

Organisations in which placements might be possible are a number of consultancies (e.g. Sandtable), government departments (e.g. Defra) and academic research centres (e.g. Centre for Policy Modelling at Manchester).

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Computational methods and especially computer-based simulations, are becoming increasingly important in academic social science and policy making.

Graduates might find career opportunities in government departments, consultancies, government departments, consultancies, NGOs and academia.

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Are you looking for a Masters-level qualification that will open doors to jobs and promotions in the field of information science? This course combines core modules in information science with options that range across the sub-disciplines of data analytics, library management and records management. Read more
Are you looking for a Masters-level qualification that will open doors to jobs and promotions in the field of information science? This course combines core modules in information science with options that range across the sub-disciplines of data analytics, library management and records management.

The core modules cover topics such as human information behaviour, interactive information retrieval, user-centred design and persuasive technologies. You will solve problems from a number of perspectives: as a developer of rigorous technical solutions, as a manager who wants to achieve a profitable and sustainable advantage, and as an ethical and socially aware information professional who understands the role of information within the wider social context.

For your optional modules, you have the flexibility to pick and choose from different sub-disciplines of information science. If you are sure that you want to focus on just one sub-discipline, we offer a suite of more focused courses: MSc Information Science (Data Analytics), MSc Information Science (Library Management), and MSc Information Science (Records Management).

This course can also be completed through distance learning - for more information, please view this web-page: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/information-science-msc-dl-dtdinz6/

Accreditation

All of Northumbria’s information science postgraduate courses are accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals, with our Records Management pathway also accredited by the Archives and Records Association. These accreditations make our courses stand out and enhance their credibility and currency among employers, and are also crucial for progressing to Chartership status once qualified.

CILIP assessors particularly commended the way in which the programme had been developed to take account of the changing requirements of employers and feedback from students. The resulting course was particularly strong in the digital elements of information work, and in developing students’ transferable skills.

Learn From The Best

Our teaching staff include cutting-edge researchers whose specialisms overlap with the content of this course, helping ensure that teaching is right up-to-date. Specialisms include big data, data mining, decision-making, digital literacy, information behaviour, information retrieval systems, recommender systems, and the link between information science and cognitive psychology.

Our eminent academics have written books that regularly appear on reading lists for information science courses at universities all over the world. They also work as external examiners and reviewers of courses at other UK and non-UK universities.

Our course is delivered through the Northumbria iSchool, which is one of only six iSchools in the UK. A hallmark of an iSchool is an understanding that expertise in all forms of information is required for progress in science, business, education and culture. This expertise must cover the uses and users of information, the nature of information itself, as well as information technologies and their applications.

Our course is delivered through the Northumbria iSchool, which is one of only six iSchools in the UK. A hallmark of an iSchool is an understanding that expertise in all forms of information is required for progress in science, business, education and culture. This expertise must cover the uses and users of information, the nature of information itself, as well as information technologies and their applications.

Teaching And Assessment

Our teaching is linked to what you want to learn and also to what you need to learn in order to achieve greater success in information science. Our long established relationship with employers ensures that you receive the most relevant and up-to-date knowledge to bring innovation, relevance, ethical sensitivity and currency to all you do. There is an emphasis on learning by doing; coursework will include projects, portfolios of work, reports and presentations as well as essays. All this helps you to make sense of the subject, getting a clear understanding of important concepts and theories.

While some assessments contribute to your final grade, there are other assessments that are provided purely to guide your progress and reinforce your learning. You can expect both your tutors and your peers to provide useful comments and feedback throughout the course.

Module Overview
KC7013 - Database Modelling (Optional, 20 Credits)
KC7020 - Information Organisation and Access (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7021 - Statistics and Business Intelligence (Optional, 20 Credits)
KC7022 - Information Systems and Technologies (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7023 - Research Methods and Professional Practice (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7024 - User Behaviour and Interaction Design (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7025 - The library professional: management, leadership and outreach (Optional, 20 Credits)
KC7026 - Masters Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)
KC7027 - Information and digital literacy (Optional, 20 Credits)
KC7038 - Recordkeeping Practice: Processes, systems and tools (Optional, 20 Credits)
KC7039 - Recordkeeping Principles: Theory and Concepts (Optional, 20 Credits)

Learning Environment

Northumbria uses a range of technologies to enhance your learning, with tools including web-based self-guided exercises, online tests with feedback, videos and tutorials. These tools support and extend the material that is delivered during lectures, and are available anywhere anytime. Group work and peer interaction feature prominently in our learning and teaching, this reflects the practices you’re likely to encounter within the working environment.

You will have 24/7 term-time access to Northumbria’s library, which has over half a million print books as well as half a million electronic books available online. Our library was ranked #2 in the Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey for 2015 and, since 2010, it has been accredited by the UK Government for Customer Service Excellence.

The University has advanced search software and database tools, including NORA Power Search that allows you to use a single search box to get fast results from across a wide and reliable range of academic resources. The use of such software and tools is an important aspect of our information science courses.

Research-Rich Learning

In fast-moving fields like information science it’s particularly important for teaching to take account of the latest research. Northumbria is helping to push out the frontier of knowledge in a range of areas including:
-Digital consumers, behaviours and literacy
-Digital socio-technical design
-Digital libraries, archives and records

As a student, you will be heavily engaged in analysing recent insights from the field of information science. You will undertake a major individual study that will require you to evaluate relevant literature as well as to develop your ideas within the context of existing research. Your study will be tailored to your particular interests but the underlying theme will be the relationships between information, people and technology. Many of our students publish their own research and present at professional and academic conferences, before or soon after graduating.

Give Your Career An Edge

This course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals. This reflects the relevance of the curriculum, which is informed by contact with employers and close professional links. The following features of the programme were particularly commended by CILIP assessors:
-The way in which the programme had been developed to take account of the changing requirements of employers and feedback from students. The resulting course was particularly strong in the digital elements of information work, and in developing students’ transferable skills;
-The strong relationships with local employers and the active contribution which the department makes to the regional professional network;
-The areas of good practice reflected in the programme, such as the high level of support provided to distance learners, including dedicated library provision, and the use of innovative approaches to assessment.

The topics and activities in the course have a strong emphasis on employability. For example you will develop skills in how to analyse, monitor and evaluate user behaviour. You will also learn how to evaluate and use a range of appropriate technologies for solving problems and supporting decision-making in organisations. Your knowledge and practical skills will help you take a lead on research-informed approaches that give organisations and professionals a valuable advantage.

Your Future

Information science has an exciting future as massive increases in processing power transform the accessibility and utility of data. With an MSc Information Science, you can play a full and rewarding role in that future.

Employers are looking for information professionals who can develop new insights through mastery of their subject and critical scholarship. With your Masters qualification, you will be equipped to make a difference, advance your practice and make well-balanced judgements. You could work for a wide range of employers in the public, private and third sector, who need information scientists or you could consider freelance roles as a consultant. Your Masters qualification can also form the basis for further postgraduate studies at a higher level.

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The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based. Read more
The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by a Second Supervisor and often a Practical Supervisor. The role of each Supervisor is:

- Principal Supervisor: takes responsibility for experimental oversight of the student's research project and provides day-to-day supervision.
- Second Supervisor: acts as a mentor to the student and is someone who can who can offer impartial advice. The Second Supervisor is a Group Leader or equivalent who is independent from the student's research group and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives.
- Practical Supervisor: provides day-to-day experimental supervision when the Principal Supervisor is unavailable, i.e. during very busy periods. The Practical Supervisor is a senior member of the student's research team and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives. For those Principal Supervisors who are unable to monitor their students on a daily basis, we would expect that they meet semi-formally with their student at least once a month.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s Principal Supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a Group Leader whose area of research most appeals to them. The Department of Oncology’s research interests focus on the prevention, diagnosis and treatments of cancer. This involves using a wide variety of research methods and techniques, encompassing basic laboratory science, translational research and clinical trials. Our students therefore have the opportunity to choose from an extensive range of cancer related research projects. In addition, being based on the Cambridge Biomedical Research Campus, our students also have access world leading scientists and state-of-the-art equipment.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. The Cambridge Cancer Cluster, of which we are a member department, provides the 'Lectures in Cancer Biology' seminar series, which is specifically designed to equip graduate students with a solid background in all major aspects of cancer biology. Students may also attend undergraduate lectures in their chosen field of research, if their Principal Supervisor considers this to be appropriate. We also require our students to attend their research group’s ‘research in progress/laboratory meetings’, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation (of 20,000 words or less), followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Course objectives

The structure of the MPhil course is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are exceptionally well-equipped to go onto doctoral research, or employment in industry and the public service.

The MPhil course provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
- the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of cancer research;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvocmpmsc

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. Most research training provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. However, informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring by fellow students and members of staff. To enhance their research, students are expected to attend seminars and graduate courses relevant to their area of interest. Students are also encouraged to undertake transferable skills training provided by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of their MPhil course, students should:

- have a thorough knowledge of the literature and a comprehensive understanding of scientific methods and techniques applicable to their own research;
- be able to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- the ability to critically evaluate current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems;
- be able to act autonomously in the planning and implementation of research; and
- have developed skills in oral presentation, scientific writing and publishing the results of their research.

Assessment

Examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation of not more than 20,000 words in length, excluding figures, tables, footnotes, appendices and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. This is followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil Medical Sciences degree is designed to accommodate the needs of those students who have only one year available to them or, who have only managed to obtain funding for one year, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree. However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Oncology (Basic Science) course via the following 2 options:

(i) Complete the MPhil then continue to the three-year PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

(ii) Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil. If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Oncology does not have specific funds for MPhil courses. However, applicants are encouraged to apply to University funding competitions: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding and the Cambridge Cancer Centre: http://www.cambridgecancercentre.org.uk/education-and-training

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MPhil in History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine is a full-time 9-month course that provides students with the opportunity to carry out focused research under close supervision by senior members of the University. Read more
The MPhil in History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine is a full-time 9-month course that provides students with the opportunity to carry out focused research under close supervision by senior members of the University. Students will acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests, as well as a critical and well informed understanding of the roles of the sciences in society. Those intending to go on to doctoral work will learn the research skills needed to help them prepare a well planned and focused PhD proposal. During the course students gain experience of presenting their own work and discussing the issues that arise from it with an audience of their peers and senior members of the Department; they will attend lectures, supervisions and research seminars in a range of technical and specialist subjects central to research in the different areas of History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine.

The educational aims of the programme are:

- to give students with relevant training at first-degree level the opportunity to carry out focussed research in History, Philosophy of Science and Medicine under close supervision;
- to give students the opportunity to acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests;
- to enable students to acquire a critical and well informed understanding of the roles of the sciences in society; and
- to help students intending to go on to doctoral work to acquire the requisite research skills and to prepare a well planned and focussed PhD proposal.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hphpmpstm

Course detail

The MPhil course is taught by supervisions and seminars and assessed by three research essays and a dissertation.

The topics of the essays and dissertation should each fall within the following specified subject areas:

1. General philosophy of science
2. History of ancient and medieval science, technology and medicine
3. History of early modern science, technology and medicine
4. History of modern science, technology and medicine
5. History, philosophy and sociology of the life sciences
6. History, philosophy and sociology of the physical and mathematical sciences
7. History, philosophy and sociology of the social and psychological sciences
8. History, philosophy and sociology of medicine
9. Ethics and politics of science
10. History and methodology of history, philosophy and sociology of science, technology and medicine

Format

The MPhil seminars are the core teaching resource for this course. In the first part of year these seminars are led by different senior members of the Department and focus on selected readings. During the rest of the year the seminars provide opportunities for MPhil students to present their own work.

Students are encouraged to attend the lectures, research seminars, workshops and reading groups that make the Department a hive of intellectual activity. The Department also offers graduate training workshops, which focus on key research, presentation, publication and employment skills.

The MPhil programme is administered by the MPhil Manager, who meets all new MPhil students as a group in early October, then sees each of the students individually to discuss their proposed essay and dissertation topics. The Manager is responsible for finding appropriate supervisors for each of these topics; the supervisors are then responsible for helping the student do the research and writing needed for the essays and the dissertation. Students will see each of their supervisors frequently; the MPhil Manager sees each student at regular intervals during the year to discuss progress and offer help and advice.

Supervisions are designed to provide students with the opportunity to set their own agenda for their studies. The supervisor's job is to support the student's research, not to grade their work – supervisors are formally excluded from the examination process.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hphpmpstm

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will have:

- Knowledge and Understanding -

- developed a deeper knowledge of their chosen areas of History, Philosophy of Science and Medicine and of the critical debates within them;
- acquired a conceptual understanding that enables the evaluation of current research and methodologies;
- formed a critical view of the roles of the sciences in society.

- Skills and other attributes -

By the end of the course students should have:

- acquired or consolidated historiographic, linguistic, technical and ancillary skills appropriate for research in their chosen area;
- demonstrated independent judgement, based on their own research;
- presented their own ideas in a public forum and learned to contribute constructively within an international environment.

Assessment

- A dissertation of up to 15,000 words. Examiners may request an oral examination but this is not normally required.
- Three essays, each of up to 5,000 words.

Students receive independent reports from two examiners on each of their three essays and the dissertation.

Continuing

The usual preconditions for continuing to the PhD are an overall first class mark in the MPhil, a satisfactory performance in an interview and agreement of the PhD proposal with a potential supervisor.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Rausing Studentships
- Raymond and Edith Williamson Studentships
- Lipton Studentships
- Wellcome Master's Awards

Please see the Department's graduate funding page for more information: http://www.hps.cam.ac.uk/studying/graduate/funding.html

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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As populations grow and competition for space and resources increases, society’s most pressing issues will need to be addressed by those who can work in collaboration with cognitive, occupational and social psychologists, as well as architects, educationalists, environmental scientists, engineers, landscape architects and planners. Read more
As populations grow and competition for space and resources increases, society’s most pressing issues will need to be addressed by those who can work in collaboration with cognitive, occupational and social psychologists, as well as architects, educationalists, environmental scientists, engineers, landscape architects and planners.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

How do individuals and groups react to different environmental situations (home, office, hospital, street, shop, and so on)? What psychological processes are triggered by our environment, and how do they affect our perception, attitude and actions?

How can individuals and groups change their environment so that it provides a more stimulating, less stressful and more enabling setting in which to live? How are our identities tied up with place? How might sustainability in environmental policy be better informed by current research?

Our MSc Environmental Psychology programme will help you gain advanced knowledge and understanding of theory and practice in environmental psychology.

You will also acquire a range of research skills that will give you the confidence and ability to undertake environmental psychology research in a professional setting.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Ergonomics and Human Factors
-Inquiry and Design
-Dissertation
-Qualitative Research Methods
-Quantitative Research Methods
-Key Questions in Environmental Psychology: People and Place
-Psychology of Sustainable Development
-Preparation for Academic Research in Psychology
-Conducting Health Psychology Research
-Social Change and Influence
-Maintaining Health Throughout the Lifespan
-Psychological Neuroscience: Electrophysiology

FUNDING

Funding is now linked to continuation funding for a PhD – that is, successful applicants to the Economic and Social Research Council will be given a grant for the MSc year and then further support (subject to satisfactory progress) to enable them to undertake a PhD.

Occasionally students receive financial support from industry through sponsorship. This would involve students undertaking a piece of research for their dissertation which would be of interest and value to industry or commerce, in return for which they will be given a grant by the commissioning company.

In the past, this sponsorship has ranged from £500 to £6,000. This is mutually beneficial to both the student and sponsor, and allows the student to undertake a ‘real’ piece of research that has practical or policy implications, whilst receiving a sum of money to assist with fees and subsistence costs.

ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY AT SURREY

The School of Psychology at the University of Surrey was the first in the world to establish an MSc in Environmental Psychology, in 1973. Since then there have been well over 250 graduates of the programme from over 25 countries worldwide.

It remains one of a few such postgraduate programmes in the world and the only one in the UK.

The MSc Environmental Psychology programme is part of a larger modular programme, thereby providing a flexible teaching and learning structure. The School of Psychology has a reputation for developing professional and innovative programmes reflecting contemporary societal concerns and employment opportunities.

Environmental Psychology at Surrey has always sought to be a multidisciplinary research activity. We are driven by psychological theories and methodologies, but draw on other social sciences, as well as the environmental and design disciplines.

We investigate environment behaviour relationships at every spatial scale and environment, from personal space and office design, through neighbourhood renewal, to the public understanding of global climate change.

PSYCHOLOGY AT SURREY

The School of Psychology at the University of Surrey is one of the most active and highly regarded psychology departments in the country. We specialise in applied and policy-oriented teaching and research within a strong theoretical context. The international, interdisciplinary, policy and applied strengths of the School mean that students’ theoretical and methodological research puts them at the cutting edge of the discipline.

We are one of the highest ranked Schools in the country for graduates entering employment, and also one of the largest providers of postgraduate training in the UK.

The University of Surrey’s School of Psychology has been the centre for many cross-national studies and has attracted funding from research councils and local and national government departments, such as:
-ESF
-Defra
-The Ministry of Defence
-Home Office
-The Environment Agency
-The Countryside Agency
-Surrey County Council
-The EU

If you choose to study psychology at the University of Surrey, you will be provided with a combination of opportunities that would be hard to match elsewhere. We offer you a degree that provides a thorough grounding in the theories, methods and practice of contemporary psychology.

Our programmes lay particular emphasis on the application of psychology to real-world problems, and also consider issues related to professional practice in preparation for your career as a professional psychologist.

The basis of good postgraduate programmes is the research activity of staff, the incorporation of current research programmes in teaching material and a reciprocal relationship between theory development and applied research in everyday contemporary issues.

We believe in involving all postgraduate students in the research life of the School through active participation in one of the research groups, attendance at research seminars and, where possible, an attachment to ongoing research projects.

As a student of the School of Psychology, you will also have access to a number of conferences, seminars and workshops hosted throughout the year.

COLLABORATIONS

Environmental psychology researchers have always enjoyed collaboration with other disciplines.

Current and recent research collaborations include an EPSRC funded research project on energy technologies in homes (REDUCE) with colleagues of environmental sciences (CES) and communications technology (CCSR), a DEFRA/ESRC-funded research programme on lifestyles in transition (SLRG) and a major ESRC funded research program on sustainable lifestyles (RESOLVE: research on lifestyles, values and the environment) both with colleagues from sociology, economics and environmental sciences.

We have long-established links with national and international academic institutions including the Department of Architecture at the University of Strathclyde, the Centre for Transport Studies at the University of West England and the Department of Psychology at Bath University.

The environmental psychology community is strongly international and this is reflected in the long-term active teaching and research collaboration we enjoy with the universities of Groningen, Madrid, La Coruña, Umeå and Rome.

Students on the MSc programme are encouraged to take advantage of these links during their dissertations.

MSc students are actively encouraged to participate in ongoing research projects. Our recent research clients include:
-Building Research Establishment
-Surrey County Council
-Eden Project
-Defra
-Environment Agency
-Forestry Commission
-European Commission
-Rentokil Initial
-King Sturge

RESEARCH

The Environmental Psychology Research Group (EPRG), of which students on the MSc in Environmental Psychology are automatically members, has been undertaking research for more than 30 years and has gained an international reputation.

Research undertaken by the EPRG is both ‘fundamental’ (that is, contributing to the development of the discipline and our understanding ofpsychological processes) and ‘applied and policy-oriented’.

Both government and business are concerned with effective policy development and delivery, and it is increasingly recognised that these can only be successfully achieved by informed evidence.

Students on the MSc Environmental Psychology programme are encouraged to make their research not only useful, but useable.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Recent graduates have progressed into careers in central and local government, undertaking policy-oriented research on a variety of environment behaviour (E-B) issues. Many of our graduates have become practice consultants, using their E-B research skills.

This could be a specialist E-B practice or an architecture, planning, design or engineering practice where graduates with a sensitivity to people-environment issues and a training in E-B research can provide an important and unique set of skills and expertise.

Those who have a background in architecture, landscape architecture, planning or design often return to their profession, but with an enhanced range of skills.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The aims of the programme are as follows:
-To provide students with theoretical and qualitative/quantitative methodological expertise to conduct environmental psychological research by training them in the informed and systematic conduct of basic and applied research involving the critical reading of theories and empirical findings
-To provide students with an in depth knowledge of contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches to the discipline
-To enable students to link theoretical and empirical questions to social and environmental issues and to provide them with an in depth understanding of the practical applications and action implications of environmental psychological theories and empirical findings
-To provide students with the skills to evaluate possible interventions in a variety of environmental domains
-To offer opportunities to develop the basic interpersonal, technical and creative skills required for the effective analysis and formulation of problems into research questions and, where appropriate, testable hypotheses

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
Knowledge and understanding
-Contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches to environmental psychology
-The practical applications and action implications of environmental psychological theories and empirical findings
-The principles of research design
-Quantitative and qualitative techniques and strategies to manage and analyse psychological data
-Ethical considerations when undertaking research and framing interventions

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Critically assess and comment on sources of research relevant to environmental psychology
-Critically evaluate the contributions and limitations of environmental psychological theories and research methods in environmental behaviour issues
-Evaluate actual and potential psychologically informed interventions in a variety of environmental domains
-Design, conduct and evaluate environmental psychological research
-Apply insights from environmental psychological theory and research to other domains of psychology

Professional practical skills
-Communicate work in a professional manner for academic and non-academic audiences in written and verbal formats
-Apply problem solving techniques to environmental and psychological topics effectively
-Use effective learning strategies
-Analyse and interpret environmental psychological theoretical analyses and quantitative and qualitative empirical evidence in a competent and critical manner

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate theories and methods in relation to environmental psychology by oral and written means
-Use information technology effectively
-Manage own personal development

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Whether you're looking for a broad-ranging business degree or the ability to become a specialist in key business discipline, the Master of Business will develop your professional expertise and advance your business career. Read more
Whether you're looking for a broad-ranging business degree or the ability to become a specialist in key business discipline, the Master of Business will develop your professional expertise and advance your business career.

An innovative and industry-focused course, the Master of Business has a strong emphasis personal development, ethics, corporate governance and social responsibility. A key feature of the course is the personal development program which will enhance your leadership and interpersonal skills and transform the way you operate in professional contexts.

The course addresses all facets of business development, and provides a solid foundation for those without business experience. It connects research and practice to make you a stronger communicator and problem-solver, and will broaden your understanding of management and business ethics.

As part of the course you can build your knowledge and extend your expertise in one of the following specialisations:

Business, ethics and society
Commercialisation
Information technology
Law and responsible business
Managing human capital
Marketing
Project management
Quantitative business analysis
Risk management
Supply chain management
Sustainability

The flexible structure of the Master of Business enables you select units that give you a broadly applicable business qualification. Alternatively, you may prefer to choose one of the listed specialisations, effectively tailoring your studies to your particular interest or career aspirations.

The strong reputation of the Master of Business means our graduates are highly sought after, both in Australia and overseas. Graduates of the course pursue careers across the spectrum of business, including roles in human resources, management, marketing, science and commercialisation, project management, risk management or logistics.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/business-b6005?domestic=true

Overview

Please select a specialisation for more details:

Business, ethics and society

Business, ethics and society investigates and activates the role of business as ethical and social leaders. The specialisation equips students with an understanding of the theoretical foundations and practical issues of internal and external ethical and societal forces that businesses face, respond to and activate. Business, ethics and society especially develops students' critical engagement and leadership capabilities to manage diversity, inclusiveness, and work and life. These capacities are developed within a strong context of ethics and corporate responsibility, and the domestic and international environments in that organisations operate. The specialisation prepares students for active managerial roles within organisations in the private, public and not-for-profit sectors.

Commercialisation

Commercialisation is the process or cycle of introducing a new product or production method into the market. The commercialisation process or cycle can be applied in many different contexts, including: art, design, and architecture; arts and humanities; business and economics; education; engineering; information technology; law; medicine, nursing and health sciences; pharmacy and pharmaceutical sciences; and science and technology. The specialisation provides a comprehensive business-focused setting to help students develop the necessary business and entrepreneurial acumen and commercialisation knowledge to succeed. Commercialisation especially develops students' new venture finance, patenting, innovation, and wealth pathways skills and knowledge. The specialisation prepares students, particularly facilitated by the commercialisation project, for commercialisation and entrepreneurial roles within organisations in the private, public and not-for-profit sectors.

Information technology

The information technology discipline allows students to build upon the core program with six units dealing with current practices and emerging strategies for the application of information technology in business management. Students are introduced to management of the creation, storage, recall and dissemination of business records within organisation-wide frameworks and they will gain a high-level of understanding of the processes of project management. Units are taught by the Faculty of Information Technology.

Law and responsible business

The fortunes of a business can quickly turn around if it does not pay proper attention to the laws that regulate its organisation and activities. The law provides the framework for all aspects of business from the internal management of business organisations to their relationships with clients, consumers and the public. The units in this specialisation provide students with an understanding of the legal framework within which business operates and the fundamental laws that regulate business activities and transactions, with particular emphasis on how legal and social responsibility considerations should impact business decision-making.

Managing human capital

Managing human capital is the recognition of people as valuable contributors, and the systems and operations for investing in people to enhance their contributions. The specialisation equips students with an understanding of the theoretical foundations and practical issues of managing and developing people within an international context. Managing human capital develops students' strategic and operational people management knowledge and skills, particularly for diverse, inclusive, and productive workplaces. This specialisation prepares students for careers in human resource management, industrial relations, consulting, public sector management, and general people management roles.

Marketing

Marketing is a fun, dynamic, complex activity (and discipline) that focuses on providing value to both organisations and consumers. Very simply, marketing is about matching what an organisation has (or can do) with someone who wants it. Marketing is about selling, it is about advertising, but it also so much more. The study and practice of the 'so much more' is what makes marketing so interesting!

In today's dynamic and global business environment, marketing permeates all areas of operations and forms an integral element of business growth and achievement. Highly qualified, innovative and international marketing practitioners, supported by well researched and pertinent marketing knowledge, are increasingly in demand.

Project management

A project is a collection of activities and resources undertaken to achieve planned objectives, which could be defined in terms of time, quality and cost or economic outcomes. Project management is the process of ensuring defined goals are achieved in relation to a project. This specialisation provides graduates with the knowledge, technology and processes employed in project management that allow them to pursue such professional roles in industry and government. This specialisation will provide graduates with an understanding and ability to apply the theories and concepts of project management, and will assist in a variety of roles in industry or government. Graduates will be able to analyse requirements for the management of given projects, identify the applicable methods and develop innovative project management strategies and processes.

Quantitative business analysis

Students will be provided with advanced quantitative skills required to carry out statistical analysis in business, economics and finance. They will also develop skills to report on the findings of their quantitative analysis.

Risk management

Risk is defined by AS/NZS ISO 31000: 2009 as 'the effect of uncertainty on objectives'. The management of risk is an evolving discipline that builds on current knowledge in a diverse range of activities. The risk management specialisation focuses on operational and financial risk in today's commercial world. It provides extended skills in the strategic and process applications of risk management and prepares for the increasingly complex risk management issues faced in many areas of business and government. It prepares graduates for roles that are required to address business, insurance and financial risk. The range of units undertaken will greatly assist those seeking employment in managerial positions where risk management is an expanding field of practice.

Supply chain management

Supply chain management involves the coordination of people, organisations, technologies and processes to ensure optimal supply of products and services. This specialisation develops students' capacity to design and optimise supply chains, and to manage them to achieve strategic business outcomes. Supply chain management enhances students' skills and knowledge in innovation and improvement, business optimisation, services and operations management, and sustainable operations management. The specialisation prepares students for careers in supply chain management roles in the private, public and not-for-profit sectors.

Sustainability

The sustainability specialisation focuses on current practices and emerging strategies for improving corporate sustainability, particularly in social, economic and environmental domains. The units within this specialisation will provide insights into sustainability from the perspectives of governance, ethics and management. This specialisation is suited to those who want to enhance their knowledge and skills in both business and sustainability issues and who seek employment in environmental governance or corporate sustainability management. It will also suit those who want to enable organisational and individual change in support of sustainability.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/business-and-economics

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/business-b6005?domestic=true#making-the-application

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The Animal Science Master's Degree within the Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences, Aberystwyth, UK, offers you the opportunity of biological, scientific and professional training in the field of Animal Science. Read more
The Animal Science Master's Degree within the Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences, Aberystwyth, UK, offers you the opportunity of biological, scientific and professional training in the field of Animal Science. The Masters Degree in Animal Science will provide you with the knowledge and skills required to pursue leading careers in animal research, development, academia, training, public and private commercial enterprise, advisory work, government agencies and other non-government organisations throughout the world.

The Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences (IBERS), Aberystwyth, UK, has over 30 years of experience in teaching at masters level in areas related to Animal Science. The Institute also has an internationally renowned reputation for research in the field of Animal Science. Recently the Institute was awarded the Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education and was among the very best in the 2010 student satisfaction survey. This puts IBERS in a unique position to provide you with the research led high quality post graduate training needed to produce post graduates with the competence to pursue leading careers in a wide range of Animal Science related fields throughout the world.

Key benefits

- Our students have won the “Biology Student of the Year” award at the European Science, Engineering, and Technology (SET) Awards, and the Welsh Ornithologists’ Union Student Prize!

- Our Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences (IBERS) received the ''Outstanding Contribution to Innovation and Technology'' award at the 2013 Times Higher Education Awards.

- Our Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences (IBERS) in conjunction with Bangor University had the 5th strongest submission in the UK for the Research Excellence Framework assessment (2014).

- Recently the Institute was awarded the Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education, and in 2013, for the sixth year running, was among the top 10 universities in the UK in the Student Satisfaction Survey. This puts IBERS in a unique position to provide you with the research-led, high quality postgraduate training needed to produce post graduates with the competence to pursue leading careers in a wide range of fields related to the Animal Sciences.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/animal-science-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you wish to study a research-led MSc specialising in the science of the management of livestock and horses.
- If you want to have the choice of a wide range of career opportunities, including in scientific research, consultancy services, in the livestock and equine industries as well as in education.
- If you want to use a multidisciplinary approach to explore collaborations with veterinarians, scientists and industrial partners.
- If you want to learn about the latest biotechnologies and their application to livestock and horses

Course detail

The Animal Science Masters Degree within the Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences, Aberystwyth, UK, offers you the opportunity of a biological, scientific and professional training in the field of Animal Science. The course will provide you with the knowledge and skills required to pursue leading careers in animal research, development, academia, training, public and private commercial enterprise, advisory work, government agencies, non-government organisations etc throughout the world.

Appropriate management is essential in order to optimise animal welfare. Ensuring good animal welfare is an increasing concern to all those involved in managing and training animals. However, this needs to be balanced against the demands of production (meat, milk), athletic performance (equine sport, racing) or leisure. Through the study of animal biology and its application to nutrition, breeding and animal management, the post graduate in Animal Science will be ideally placed to ensure that these demands of production and welfare are appropriately balanced through the development and implementation of innovative management practices and dissemination of knowledge and advice to practitioners.

Format

The first part of the course is 120 credits of taught material, delivered in 2 semesters running from Sept to June. Part 2 is the dissertation. This is your opportunity to specialise and investigate in depth an area that excites you. Your dissertation can be done in our state of the art laboratories or possibly at another University. Assessment will be by course work such as essays, seminar presentations, case studies, poster presentations and final examinations in January and May.

A range of biological science modules will be taught in the first semester which will cover animal immunology, parasitology, bacteriology, endocrinology, growth and development, animal breeding, genetics, molecular genetics and principles of nutrition. This will provide you with an advanced biological science knowledge which will then be applied in semester 2. In semester 2 you will study statistical methodology in preparation for your Dissertation research, advances in bio and veterinary sciences and be given the choice of modules from a suite of livestock and equine science modules covering subjects such as: livestock or equine reproductive physiology and technology, grassland science, livestock or equine nutrition, equine anatomy, equine behaviour. Throughout the course, especially in the second semester, you will have an opportunity to explore specific areas of your own interest culminating in your research dissertation. In addition to gaining specialised knowledge in Animal Science the course aims to develop your more general skills such as written and oral communication, research skills, data handling and statistics, team work, information technology, problem solving etc.

Core modules

- Infection And Immunity BRM1620
- Research Methodology And Advances In Biosciences BRM5500
- Animal Breeding And Genetics BRM5820
- Research Methodology And Advances In Biosciences BRM5520

Assessment

Assessment will be by course work such as essays, seminar presentations, case studies, poster presentations and final examinations in January and May.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. The MSc in Animal Science has been designed to meet the increasing demand for suitably qualified personal to work in animal research, development, lecturing, training, public and private commercial enterprise, advisory work, government agencies, as well as non-government organizations throughout the world.

Key Skills and Competencies:

- Study Skills:

You will develop an in-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the key contemporary topics affecting the Animal Sciences. You will master the research process and contribute to the knowledge base of the subject through your dissertation. Throughout this you will encounter many opportunities to develop as a reflective, autonomous researcher, with a wide and expert understanding of the impact these technologies can have.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:

Studying at MSc level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of staff from IBERS, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process will strengthen your skills as a self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by all employers.

- Transferable Skills:

The MSc programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. The course is made up of a number of taught modules plus guided independent student centred study. This provides you with a framework which allows you to develop your subject knowledge, through pursuing specific areas of interest and develop your skills of original thought, analysis, interpretation and reasoning. Regular assessment through reports, essays, seminar presentations, précis and case studies will prepare you for the many demands of the modern workplace.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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Our MSc in Politics provides an advanced grounding in contemporary political science, focusing on empirical and normative democratic theory, political institutions, public policy and citizenship across different political systems and diverse social contexts.The MSc brings together many of the existing strengths of the department in different parts of the world. Read more
Our MSc in Politics provides an advanced grounding in contemporary political science, focusing on empirical and normative democratic theory, political institutions, public policy and citizenship across different political systems and diverse social contexts.The MSc brings together many of the existing strengths of the department in different parts of the world.

The programme can be tailored to specific regional interests through option courses in West Europe and North America, East Europe, Africa, India, and the Middle East. The degree will provide you with a firm academic foundation in the study of comparative politics and a base of knowledge for careers in fields such as policymaking, development, and NGOs.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpolitics.aspx

Why choose this course?

- the Department of Politics and International Relations is a young, vibrant and rapidly-rising department and was ranked in the Top 10 small politics departments in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE, 2008)

- the course is taught by world-class scholars and informed by cutting-edge research

- offers an advanced grounding in international public policy while allowing you to specialise in particular issues or regions of interest.

- taught by academics, current and retired public policy practitioners

- our international cohort of students will provide you with excellent opportunities to obtain genuinely global perspectives.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Centre for European Politics was officially launched by Lord Mandelson in September 2007, with the mission of producing research in two principal areas: the study of democracy in Europe, and Europe as an actor in world politics. Under the leadership of Co-Directors Dr Alsiter Miskimmon and Dr James Sloam, it has hosted a number of high-profile speakers, including Lord Mandelson, Professor Simon Hix (LSE), Roger Liddle (Policy Network), John Peet (The Economist), Sir Stephen Wall (former European policy advisor to Tony Blair), David Willets MP (Shadow Secretary of State for Innovations, Universities and Skills) and Dr Vince Cable. Recent funded research projects include: a European Union Committee of the Regions consultancy on EU External Relations and European Neighbourhood Policy; an EU-funded Workshop on the Review of the European Union Budget; and Teaching Democracy. Recent publications include, Bendetto and Milio (eds) European Union budget reform: institutions, policy and economic crisis (Palgrave, 2012) and James Sloam, 'New Voice, Less Equal: the Civic and political Engagement of Young People in the United States and Europe', Comparative Political Studies 2012.

- The Centre for Global and Transnational Politics is devoted to the multi-disciplinary exploration of global and transnational processes. Led by its Co-Directors Professor Chris Rumford and Professor Sandra Halperin, its central concern is to theorise and conceptualise the substance of, and connections between and among, political processes that operate at all levels or scales: the local, national, international, transnational, and global. Professor Rumford and Professor Halperin edit the Routledge Series in Global and Transnational Politics and host the Global Studies Association and a BISA Working Group of Global and Transnational Politics in the Centre.

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Prof Andrew Chadwick, Prof Ben O’Loughlin and Dr Cristian Vicarri. Recent publications include Chadwick’s The Hybrid Media System (Oxford University Press, 2013) and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O’Loughlin and Laura Roselle, Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). As well as hosting a large number of PhD students working in new political communication, Chadwick edited the Oxford University Press Series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and O’Loughlin is co-editor of the journal, Media, War and Conflict.

- The Contemporary Political Theory Research Group was founded in October 2009, as a result of the development of political theory at postgraduate level and growth in academic staff numbers having created the critical mass it required. The group organizes its activities collectively, and its work focuses on issues around contemporary pluralism, liberalism, democratic theory and radical politics. It brings together staff working in contemporary Continental philosophy, normative political theory, and American pragmatism, and its postgraduate members include two students on the College’s most prestigious studentship, the Reid Award. The group also has ties to the College’s Philosophy Team and the interdepartmental Humanities and Arts Research Centre

Course content and structure

Core course units:
- The Politics of Democracy You will be provided with a sound understanding of contemporary thinking about democracy and political participation through the analysis of liberal democracy and its political institutions. The unit will draw upon a variety of contemporary and historical sources with particular reference to the political systems of Britain and the USA.

- Comparative Political Executives This unit explores the political executives of established democratic systems, focusing on institutions – presidents, prime ministers, cabinets and so on – and how they function and interact with other parts of the political system. You will gain knowledge of the ‘nuts and bolts’ of the executives in question, and will also gain useful insights into the difficulties of political leadership, the centrality of political executives and the interdependence of executives with other parts of the political system.

- European Union Politics and Policy This course provides students with an insight into the development and governance of the European Union as a political system. Particular attention is placed on the functions of the EU’s executive, legislative and judicial institutions as well as on a number of key policy areas in which the European Union’s sovereignty has developed in recent years. The course provides students with a solid theoretical background in understanding both the institutional politics and public policy of the EU.

- Political Parties
Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations You will be introduced to quantitative methods commonly used in the study of Politics and International Relations. You will acquire the skills to understand, critically analyse, and carry out a range of quantitative techniques, using statistical software packages such as SPSS.
Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Politics and International Relations You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications. You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting search research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

- Dissertation (MSc only) The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of Politics in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12-15,000 words.

Elective course units:
- Internet and New Media Politics Drawing predominantly upon specialist academic journal literatures, this unit focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new technologies on the values, processes and outcomes of: global governance institutions; public bureaucracies; representative institutions including political parties and legislatures; pressure groups and social movements.

- Elections and Voting Behaviour

- Social Media and Politics

- Public Opinion and political participation

- Human Rights: From Theory to Practice

- Advanced Quantitative Methods

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments related to public policy, democracy, politics, international relations and governance

- a sound knowledge of the texts, theories and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes and phenomena associated with particular fields of public policy, politics and international relations

- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods within the disciplines of politics and international relations

- a solid foundation for progression to either a politics-related career, public policy careers, research or continued academic study.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different politics and international relations-related areas, including roles as officials in local government, personnel officers and higher education lecturers. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This highly focused MSc explores some of the mathematics behind modern secure information and communications systems, specialising in mathematics relevant for public key cryptography, coding theory and information theory. Read more
This highly focused MSc explores some of the mathematics behind modern secure information and communications systems, specialising in mathematics relevant for public key cryptography, coding theory and information theory. During the course critical awareness of problems in information transmission, data compression and cryptography is raised, and the mathematical techniques which are commonly used to solve these problems are explored.

The Mathematics Department at Royal Holloway is well known for its expertise in information security and cryptography and our academic staff include several leading researchers in these areas. Students on the programme have the opportunity to carry out their dissertation projects in cutting-edge research areas and to be supervised by experts.

The transferable skills gained during the MSc will open up a range of career options as well as provide a solid foundation for advanced research at PhD level.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mathematics/coursefinder/mscmathematicsofcryptographyandcommunications(msc).aspx

Why choose this course?

- You will be provided with a solid mathematical foundation and a knowledge and understanding of the subjects of cryptography and communications preparing you for research or professional employment in this area.

- The mathematical foundations needed for applications in communication theory and cryptography are covered including Algebra, Combinatorics Complexity Theory/Algorithms and Number Theory.

- You will have the opportunity to carry out your dissertation project in a cutting-edge research area; our dissertation supervisors are experts in their fields who publish regularly in internationally competitive journals and there are several joint projects with industrial partners and Royal Holloway staff.

- After completing the course former students have a good foundation for the next step of their career both inside and outside academia.

Department research and industry highlights

The members of the Mathematics Department cover a range of research areas. There are particularly strong groups in information security, number theory, quantum theory, group theory and combinatorics. The Information Security Group has particularly strong links to industry.

Course content and structure

You will study eight courses as well as complete a main project under the supervision of a member of staff.

Core courses:
Advanced Cipher Systems
Mathematical and security properties of both symmetric key cipher systems and public key cryptography are discussed as well as methods for obtaining confidentiality and authentication.

Channels
In this unit, you will investigate the problems of data compression and information transmission in both noiseless and noisy environments.

Theory of Error-Correcting Codes
The aim of this unit is to provide you with an introduction to the theory of error-correcting codes employing the methods of elementary enumeration, linear algebra and finite fields.

Public Key Cryptography
This course introduces some of the mathematical ideas essential for an understanding of public key cryptography, such as discrete logarithms, lattices and elliptic curves. Several important public key cryptosystems are studied, such as RSA, Rabin, ElGamal Encryption, Schnorr signatures; and modern notions of security and attack models for public key cryptosystems are discussed.

Main project
The main project (dissertation) accounts for 25% of the assessment of the course and you will conduct this under the supervision of a member of academic staff.

Additional courses:
Applications of Field Theory
You will be introduced to some of the basic theory of field extensions, with special emphasis on applications in the context of finite fields.

Quantum Information Theory
‘Anybody who is not shocked by quantum theory has not understood it' (Niels Bohr). The aim of this unit is to provide you with a sufficient understanding of quantum theory in the spirit of the above quote. Many applications of the novel field of quantum information theory can be studied using undergraduate mathematics.

Network Algorithms
In this unit you will be introduced to the formal idea of an algorithm, when it is a good algorithm and techniques for constructing algorithms and checking that they work; explore connectivity and colourings of graphs, from an algorithmic perspective; and study how algebraic methods such as path algebras and cycle spaces may be used to solve network problems.

Advanced Financial Mathematics
In this unit you will investigate the validity of various linear and non-linear time series occurring in finance and extend the use of stochastic calculus to interest rate movements and credit rating;

Combinatorics
The aim of this unit is to introduce some standard techniques and concepts of combinatorics, including: methods of counting including the principle of inclusion and exclusion; generating functions; probabilistic methods; and permutations, Ramsey theory.

Computational Number Theory
You will be provided with an introduction to many major methods currently used for testing/proving primality and for the factorisation of composite integers. The course will develop the mathematical theory that underlies these methods, as well as describing the methods themselves.

Complexity Theory
Several classes of computational complexity are introduced. You will discuss how to recognise when different problems have different computational hardness, and be able to deduce cryptographic properties of related algorithms and protocols.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a suitable mathematical foundation for undertaking research or professional employment in cryptography and/or communications

- the appropriate background in information theory and coding theory enabling them to understand and be able to apply the theory of communication through noisy channels

- the appropriate background in algebra and number theory to develop an understanding of modern public key cryptosystems

- a critical awareness of problems in information transmission and data compression, and the mathematical techniques which are commonly used to solve these problems

- a critical awareness of problems in cryptography and the mathematical techniques which are commonly used to provide solutions to these problems

- a range of transferable skills including familiarity with a computer algebra package, experience with independent research and managing the writing of a dissertation.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation. The examinations in May/June count for 75% of the final average and the dissertation, which has to be submitted in September, counts for the remaining 25%.

Employability & career opportunities

Our students have gone on to successful careers in a variety of industries, such as information security, IT consultancy, banking and finance, higher education and telecommunication. In recent years our graduates have entered into roles including Principal Information Security Consultant at Abbey National PLC; Senior Manager at Enterprise Risk Services, Deloitte & Touche; Global IT Security Director at Reuters; and Information Security manager at London Underground.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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