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Masters Degrees (Public Archaeology)

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The Public Archaeology MA at UCL is a unique programme in a rapidly growing sector. Read more
The Public Archaeology MA at UCL is a unique programme in a rapidly growing sector. It provides students with an understanding of the different means of communicating archaeology to the public, and of the real-world political, educational, social, economic and moral/ethical dimensions of public archaeology from a global perspective.

Degree information

Students are introduced to the range of areas in which archaeology has relevance to the wider world, and develop an understanding of how archaeology is communicated, used (and misused) in the public arena. The flexible programme structure allows students to design a theoretically based or practically based degree depending on each individual's interests and needs.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of a core module (30 credits), optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core module - students are required to take the following module:
-Public Archaeology

Optional modules - you are then able to choose further optional modules to the value of 60 credits. At least one of these must be made up from the list below of modules recommended for this degree programme. The other 30 credits may also come from this list or can be chosen from amongst an outstanding range of other Master's programmes offered at the UCL Institute of Archaeology.
-Antiquities and the Law
-Applied Heritage Management
-Archaeology of Modern Conflict
-Archaeology and Education
-Art: Interpretation and Explanation
-British and European Prehistory: Neolithic to Iron Age
-Cultural Heritage and Development
-Experimental Archaeology
-Managing Archaeological Sites
-Managing Museums
-Museum and Site Interpretation
-Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Foundations
-Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Current Issues

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars discussions, practical demonstrations, and field trips to museums and archaeological sites and monuments around the UK. It features a series of distinguished guest lecturers with extensive first-hand experience in the archaeology, museum, cultural and heritage sectors. Assessment is through essays, project reports and the dissertation.

Careers

Some graduates of the programme go on to PhD studies while others pursue careers in professional organisations associated with the archaeology, museum, cultural and heritage sectors. Students benefit from the practical real-world insights and contacts within these sectors that the programme offers. Career paths in these sectors include the growing fields of education and interpretation in museums and heritage sites; policy and research jobs in key national organisations such as English Heritage and Arts Council England; and the growing interest in public archaeology by commercial archaeological units. The growth of Lottery-funded heritage projects also offers extensive opportunities for public archaeologists.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Curatorial and Collections Assistant, Ben Uri Gallery
-Executive Assistant, Watts Gallery
-Senior Archaeologist, Museum of London Archaeology
-Strategic Development Intern, National Museum Of the Royal Navy
-Archaeologist, Ministry of Culture and Sport

Employability
Graduates of the Public Archaeology MA have a distinct set of skills and knowledge that equips them for work across the archaeology, heritage and museum sector. This includes an in-depth understanding of the structure of the sector and its socio-economic, political and cultural contexts, but also a very practical appreciation of public understanding and engagement with the past. These strengths are reflected in the diversity of career paths amongst graduates of the Public Archaeology MA programme, in archaeology, museums, the heritage industry and academia.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

Its outstanding archaeological library is complemented by University College London's main library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries.

UCL is located in central London, within walking distance of the British Museum and the British Library. Students benefit from London's many museums, galleries and other archaeological spaces, but in particular have easy access to UCL's own museums and collections, which form a resource of international importance for academic research.

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History is practised everywhere. by governments, private corporations, universities, museums and galleries, in the tourism and heritage industries, on television programmes and in newspaper columns, and through local history societies, community development projects, and genealogical associations. Read more
History is practised everywhere: by governments, private corporations, universities, museums and galleries, in the tourism and heritage industries, on television programmes and in newspaper columns, and through local history societies, community development projects, and genealogical associations. History and historians play important roles at the level of the both the nation and the neighbourhood, contributing to public debates, policy decisions and popular education and entertainment.

Public history is concerned with the practice of history outside of academia in all its myriad forms and public historians come in all shapes and sizes: they are consultants, museum professionals, archivists, preservationists and curators, cultural resource managers, policy specialists, and community activists, among many other roles. What they share is a commitment to making history relevant, beneficial, informative and instructive within the public sphere. The practice and significance of ‘public history’ has grown significantly in recent years, as historians become more aware of audiences beyond the academy, of the role of history in politics, of the need for their research and analysis to have an impact in the real world, and of the growing public and media interest in popular history and heritage.

This MA will introduce you to key aspects and issues of the practice of public history. It will provide you with the necessary theoretical and practical skills to undertake critical assessments of public history projects and interventions - as well as to create your own. Its focus on public history in practice will provide you with a wide range of examples of different types and methods of public history, from museums and material culture, to public history in the media, to the role of history in policy making. This MA aims to give you a sense of the wide range of public history, the variety of roles played by historians in public, and the importance and impact of public history in politics, culture, and society.

The compulsory modules will introduce you to the systematic study of historiography, the methodologies used in the analysis and interpretation of historical source material, and the contemporary practice of public history. You can explore the enormous breadth of research interests in the Department via the 2 option modules you choose, which are drawn across disciplines including archaeology, classics, the history of art and museology. Finally, the dissertation gives you the chance to pursue your own interests and undertake your own research and critical thinking under the supervision of a member of staff with relevant expertise.

The MA Public Histories provides relevant training for careers in media, education, museums and heritage, publishing, and policy, and it also provides rigorous training in the historical discipline suitable to prepare you for further personal or professional research, or research at MPhil/PhD level.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
Many Birkbeck historians take very active public roles as policy consultants, columnists in newspapers, editors of digital history websites, and leaders in community history projects. Students on the MA Public Histories will be given the opportunity to benefit from their expertise.
Tutors and potential dissertation supervisors on the course could include Dr. Julia Laite, whose work focuses on aspects of women's history and policy and who is an expert in history online; Professor Matt Cook, who works extensively in community history, oral history and queer history and is a Director of the Samuel Raphael History Centre; Professor David Feldman, who has worked extensively in history and policy related to migration and minorities and is Director of the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism; Professor Orlando Figes, an expert in oral history and the history of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russia; and Dr. Fiona Candlin, an expert in museum studies, whose work focuses on small museums and public heritage.
MA Public Histories will be taught in Bloomsbury, at the heart of academic London, which contains one of the world's greatest concentrations of first-class library facilities, archives, museums, and heritage and public history organisations.
Our Department of History, Classics and Archaeology is one of the leading research and teaching departments for history in the UK. It is ranked 6th in the UK for the percentage of our research deemed world-leading or internationally excellent.
Our academic staff are international authorities in their fields, delivering stimulating, research-led teaching.
Our Department is home to thriving student societies and a number of affiliated research centres that actively run seminars, conferences and other events where some of the world's best scholars present their latest research. These include the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism, the Raphael Samuel History Centre and the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities.
We are located 5 minutes' walk from the British Museum and the British Library, while the Museum of London is easily reachable. The Institute of Historical Research is located in Bloomsbury, near the main Birkbeck campus, and has an internationally renowned library collection and seminars that you can attend.
Birkbeck Library has an extensive history collection, including the major specialist journals, and access to online materials.

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The Archaeology MA. Cultural Archaeology pathway focuses on cultural interpretation in archaeology, both in relation to specific cultures/periods and current research themes. Read more
The Archaeology MA: Cultural Archaeology pathway focuses on cultural interpretation in archaeology, both in relation to specific cultures/periods and current research themes.

There are opportunities to specialise in a range of subjects, including material culture studies, funerary archaeology, British and European prehistory, and Greek and Roman archaeology.

It is an ideal foundation for doctoral research in all fields of cultural archaeology, as well as training in practical and research skills for careers in archaeology and heritage.

We offer the flexibility to upgrade from Certificate to Diploma level and from Diploma to Masters level during your programme as you develop your postgraduate studies. We also offer a Landscape Archaeology pathway on the Archaeology MA.

You will study three core modules:

Archaeological Theory, Method and Interpretation
Material Culture
Funerary Archaeology

In addition, MA and Diploma students choose three optional modules from a wide range of subjects including landscape archaeology, late prehistoric and early medieval Europe, Greek archaeology, ancient Egyptian society, empire and identity in the Roman world, Byzantine archaeology, GIS and spatial analysis, and field survey.

Research training is provided for all postgraduate students, and MA students put this into practice by researching a topic of your own choice for a supervised 15,000-word dissertation.

About the School of History and Culture

The programmes in the School of History and Cultures offer students enquiry based learning within a rich and diverse environment to stimulate debate and challenge conventional thinking.
The programmes derive from departments which are all excellently rated by the QAA both in teaching and research terms (Medieval History 5, Modern History 5 and African Studies 5*). Our staff publish widely, and we are developing and consolidating a strong, supportive research culture in the School.
We are extremely proud to announce in June 2016, that History at Birmingham was ranked the top research department in the country by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The national REF exercise assessed research publications and the public impact of research carried out in all universities in the UK between 2008-2014. Our department had an impressive 45% of its research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Training the next generation of archaeological pioneers. Read more
Training the next generation of archaeological pioneers

Why choose this course?

The MA in Field Archaeology offers a perfect blend of theory and practice, equipping you with wide-ranging, advanced practical skills, while giving you a deep theoretical knowledge and understanding of the logistical challenges, legal requirements and ethics involved in archaeological fieldwork. It is both challenging and rewarding.

York has been called the ‘heritage capital of the UK’. Here, we have routine contact with local, national and international leaders in archaeology and heritage management. We work closely with our neighbours at the Council for British Archaeology, English Heritage and Natural England, as well as local commercial units including York Archaeological Trust. You will also meet visiting lecturers of national standing, including John Oxley, the most experienced Local Authority Archaeologist in the UK, and Patrick Ottaway, formerly Fieldwork Director of York Archaeological Trust and now a respected archaeological consultant. You will also:
-Develop wide-ranging advanced field skills
-Build a deeper understanding of the theoretical, legislative and ethical context of archaeological fieldwork
-Study among a community of practitioners that is unrivalled in the UK
-Gain work experience with nationally significant public and private organisations
-Develop skills and knowledge essential for varied archaeological careers and research
-Learn from leading figures in archaeological research and fieldwork
-Receive close personal mentoring from experienced, well-connected staff

The MA in Field Archaeology is a flexible course, devised to meet demand for professional training in the UK and worldwide. It will give you a thorough knowledge of how, and why, archaeological fieldwork has arrived at its current state and acquaint you with the key methods employed in modern fieldwork, analysis and dissemination. It will enable you to think strategically about project design and tactically about project implementation.

Who is it for?
The course aims to ground you in European, and particularly UK, archaeology, so it is well suited to graduates of Archaeology. However, graduates in History, Geography and related disciplines often bring complementary perspectives that are greatly valued by both teachers and students. Also lessons and perspectives from Europe are relevant to archaeological fieldwork contexts worldwide. Individuals with some practical experience who wish to develop their careers by advancing their appreciation of the wider context of archaeology will also benefit from this course.

What can it lead to?
The MA in Field Archaeology aims to turn out not just archaeological practitioners, but leaders and creative thinkers with the imagination to advance the discipline, as well as their own careers. Some of our graduates go on to become project officers, curators and managers in the heritage industry. Others progress to further study, including doctoral research.

Placement

MA Field Archaeology students have a unique opportunity to gain practical work experience in a professional field environment with one of the many leading archaeological organisations based in and around York. You will work alongside experienced professionals on projects that enable you to gain new skills, as well as put into use those skills gained during your taught courses.

Aims
-To provide experience of organising archaeological fieldwork and interpreting results within a professional environment.
-To consolidate knowledge and understanding of data gathering or analysis as developed in one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
During your placements you will get involved with one or more of the following:
-Develop a practical understanding of how archaeological fieldwork is planned and carried out in an integrated way.
-Gain detailed knowledge of how ecofactual or artefactual assemblages might be identified, quantified, analysed and interpreted.
-Become familiar with the ways in which field archaeology is organised and administered, and of the pressures it is subject to, working with a local government organisation or national organisation with offices in York.

Placement opportunities
Although the organisations providing placements vary from year to year, according to availability, those regularly offering such opportunities include City of York Council, the Portable Antiquities Scheme, the York Archaeological Trust, AOC Archaeology and various other commercial archaeology units.

Careers

By the end of your MA in Field Archaeology you will have:
-Developed an awareness of the organisational and legislative context within which fieldwork operates in the UK
gained a detailed knowledge of the varied techniques of site evaluation used today
-Become aware of the practicalities, and problems, of implementing archaeological projects and understood the implications of this for strategy and project design
-Grasped the processes of analysing stratigraphic, spatial, artefactual and palaeoecological material, the objectives of this work, and how it is managed
-Surveyed the range of mechanisms for synthesising, archiving and disseminating the evidence generated by fieldwork
-Developed your understanding of how the profession operates in “the real world”, through work placements and field visits
-Developed your ability to gather and organise information and arguments in a critical and independent manner, through writing essays and producing projects
-Undertaken a piece of independent research on a topic within field archaeology
-Developed your presentational skills through the delivery of seminar papers on a range of diverse topics

The practical skills and theoretical knowledge gained on the course are applicable to a wide range of archaeological careers, as well as further study and research.

Course postgraduates have gone on to pursue research degrees or take up managerial positions working for museum, conservation and archaeological services and for local councils, national authorities, field units and heritage bodies. Others have set up their own archaeological businesses, both within the UK and in other countries. Some of the organisations now employing our students include:
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-The National Trust
-Natural England
-Commercial archaeological units
-York Archaeological Trust
-The Council for British Archaeology
-National Park services
-UK and overseas museum services
-Local Authorities
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Portable Antiquities Scheme
-Churches Conservation Trust

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The Archaeology MA. Landscape Archaeology pathway will allow you to develop a thorough knowledge of current approaches to the investigation and interpretation of past landscapes. Read more
The Archaeology MA: Landscape Archaeology pathway will allow you to develop a thorough knowledge of current approaches to the investigation and interpretation of past landscapes.

There are opportunities to specialise in a range of practical techniques, digital landscape studies, and interpretative approaches in thematic and period/area landscape studies. This pathway is ideal for research preparation and as a basis for career development in archaeology and heritage.

We offer the flexibility to upgrade from Certificate to Diploma level and from Diploma to Masters level during your programme as you develop your postgraduate studies. We also offer a Cultural Archaeology pathway on the Archaeology MA.

You will study three core modules:

Archaeological Theory, Method and Interpretation
Landscape Archaeology
GIS and spatial analysis

In addition, MA and Diploma students select three optional modules from a wide range of choices. These can include field survey, virtual landscapes, digital cultures, funerary archaeology, material culture, and cultural studies ranging from European prehistory and Egyptology to Classical and Byzantine archaeology.

Research training is provided for all postgraduate students, and MA students put this into practice by researching a topic of your own choice for a supervised 15,000-word dissertation.

About the School of History and Culture

The programmes in the School of History and Cultures offer students enquiry based learning within a rich and diverse environment to stimulate debate and challenge conventional thinking.
The programmes derive from departments which are all excellently rated by the QAA both in teaching and research terms (Medieval History 5, Modern History 5 and African Studies 5*). Our staff publish widely, and we are developing and consolidating a strong, supportive research culture in the School.
We are extremely proud to announce in June 2016, that History at Birmingham was ranked the top research department in the country by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The national REF exercise assessed research publications and the public impact of research carried out in all universities in the UK between 2008-2014. Our department had an impressive 45% of its research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

Read less
UCL is a world-leading centre for research and teaching in the archaeology of Egypt and the Near East. The programme is ideally suited to students seeking to combine advanced study of these regions with new technical and interpretative skills, and offers an ideal grounding for doctoral research. Read more
UCL is a world-leading centre for research and teaching in the archaeology of Egypt and the Near East. The programme is ideally suited to students seeking to combine advanced study of these regions with new technical and interpretative skills, and offers an ideal grounding for doctoral research.

Degree information

UCL’s wide range of archaeological expertise provides a unique opportunity to study Egypt and the Near East in a truly comparative context, and for students to develop a programme and research dissertation tailored to individual interests. These may include the application of new skills in archaeological science, exploring new theoretical perspectives, or the significance of archaeology for the wider cultural heritage of these regions.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), two or three optional modules (45 credits), and a dissertation.

Core modules - all students must take the following:
-Archaeology of Egypt and the Near East: A Comparative Approach
-Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Foundations

Optional modules
-Ancient Cyprus: Colonisations, Copper and City-States (by arrangement with King's College London)
-Archaeologies of Asia
-Aegean Prehistory: major themes and debates
-Beyond Chiefdoms: Archaeologies of African Political Complexity
-Egyptian Archaeology: An Object-Based Theoretical Approached
-Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
-Introductory Akkadian (by arrangement with SOAS)
-Mediterranean Dynamics
-Mediterranean Prehistory
-Middle Egyptian Language
-Society and Culture in Ancient Egypt
-The Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of the Near East: The emergence of villages and urban societies
-Subject to approval a third module can be taken from the overall options available at the Institute of Archaeology or more widely within UCL and the University of London.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project, with guidance from an assigned supervisor, which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
Teaching at the Institute of Archaeology is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars to support student interaction, and examination is primarily through module-based essays and the individual dissertation. Depending on the options taken, teaching may also include object handling, museum work, and laboratory practicals.

Careers

The first cohort of students on the Archaeology of Egypt and the Near East MA is due to graduate in 2018, therefore no specific career destinations are currently available.

Previous UCL graduates in these areas have regularly gone on to undertake doctoral research, or found employment in related areas of the public, museum and heritage sector.

Employability
In addition to receiving advanced training in their chosen subject areas, students will have the opportunity to acquire a strong combination of general research skills, communication skills, skills in teamwork and networking and overall personal effectiveness.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Your instructors on this degree will be world-class scholars whose research is at the cutting-edge of their disciplines. Students will also benefit from the first-class institutions located within walking distance of the Institute of Archaeology, including the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, the British Museum, and the Egypt Exploration Society, and from the institute’s own collections, including the Petrie Palestinian Collection.

Egyptian and Near Eastern Archaeology at UCL are embedded in the vibrant research environment of the Bloomsbury Campus, in the centre of one of the most exciting cities in the world. Our institute includes over twenty researchers with regional expertise in these areas, including both prehistory and the historical periods.

With its international staff and student body, the Institute of Archaeology (IoA) is well known for its welcoming atmosphere, challenging intellectual climate, and supportive feedback structure. It is regularly rated in first place among UK archaeology departments for student experience.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Public History and Heritage at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Public History and Heritage at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Public History and Heritage is a flexible programme designed to offer academic training and and employability in the fields of public history and heritage.

A key aspect of the MA Public History and Heritage programme is the opportunity for students to engage both with external heritage organisations and with staff projects in public history and heritage, which are of growing importance to the College's research culture and impact strategy. Modules on the MA in Public History and Heritage include the study of heritage, public history, ancient history, ancient Egyptian culture, history, Welsh identities, media, museum theory, archive/communication practice, museum practice and a work placement.

Key Features of MA in Public History and Heritage

MA Public History and Heritage programme offers:

- the opportunity for students on the Public History and Heritage programme to engage both with external heritage organisations
- exciting opportunities for hands-on experience with staff projects in heritage and public history
- a compulsory work placement module where students will gain practical experience in the heritage sector
- optional practice-based dissertation
- students on the Public History and Heritage programme can choose from a range of modules covering topics from Ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome to contemporary local history

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This two-year programme combines the strengths of the MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia with intensive language training in Japanese or Korean. Read more
This two-year programme combines the strengths of the MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia with intensive language training in Japanese or Korean. Students study the arts of China, Korea and Japan, exploring a wide range of East Asian arts, from Chinese archaeology to Japanese prints, Korean installation works to Buddhist monuments, in historical and contemporary periods. Instruction in the language of their choice is provided by teachers in the Faculty of Languages and Cultures. By the end of the programme, which includes a summer language school abroad, students have received sufficient instruction to reach near-proficiency in the language.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of East Asia, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as East Asian Music, Film and Media, as well as the expertise of specialist language teachers.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/ma-art-and-archaeology-of-east-asia-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Students take two intensive language units and one East Asian History of Art and Archaeology unit in their first year. During the summer, they participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, they take one intensive language unit in their second year and two East Asian History of Art and Archaeology units. The dissertation is written on East Asian History of Art and Archaeology and submitted in September of year 2.

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September of year 2.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This programme studies the ancient Greek and Roman worlds from the Iron Age to the late Roman and early Christian period through their material remains including sculpture, funerary art, topography and visual cultures. Read more

This programme studies the ancient Greek and Roman worlds from the Iron Age to the late Roman and early Christian period through their material remains including sculpture, funerary art, topography and visual cultures.

Focusing on the ancient Mediterranean world, broadly defined, you’ll explore not simply the archaeology of Greece and Rome but also the near east and north-western Europe.

Through our interdisciplinary approach, you’ll also be able to work with staff from all areas of the School. Several members of classics have ongoing excavations in Italy, Georgia and Macedonia, which students are welcome to attend.

The programme aims to familiarise you with the various methods used in the study of classics, enabling you to work in a manner that is theoretically and methodologically engaged.

Programme structure

We offer a range of courses, which has been designed to reflect the research interests of our lecturers and help you develop a particular topic of interest for your dissertation.

You will complete a compulsory course, five option courses and a 15,000 word dissertation.

The compulsory course is:

  • Skills and Methods in Classics

Option courses previously available include:

  • Early Greek Art;
  • Classical Greek Sculpture;
  • Greek Vase Painting;
  • The Topography and Monuments of Athens and Attika;
  • Hellenistic Art and Archaeology;
  • The Hellenistic City;
  • Archaeology of the Roman Economy;
  • Roman Funerary Art;
  • Roman Imperial Monuments;
  • Roman Archaeology;
  • Constantinople, the City of a World’s Desire 300–600;
  • Late Antique Visual Culture;
  • Byzantine Archaeology: The Archaeology of the Byzantine
  • Empire and its Neighbours AD 600–1000;
  • Etruscan Italy, 1000–300 BC;
  • Gallia from the Third Century BC to Augustus;
  • Bronze Age Civilisations of the Near East and Greece.

Learning outcomes

The programme aims to:

  • provide students with the intellectual background, training and support necessary for the conduct and critical assessment of research in Classical Art and Archaeology
  • provide students with advanced knowledge of and competency in a specific area of Classics
  • familiarise students with various methods used in the study of Classical Art and Archaeology and enable them to work in a manner that is theoretically and methodologically engaged
  • equip students with knowledge of Greek and/or Roman artefacts and their interpretation through study of original objects and monuments and careful analysis of secondary literature
  • develop and test the ability of students to formulate and sustain a substantial piece of research in Classical Art and Archaeology

Career opportunities

Our students view the programme and a graduate degree from Edinburgh as an advanced qualification valued and respected by many employers. Those students interested in long-term academic careers consider the programme as preparation for a PhD.

The programme provides a toolkit of transferable skills in organisation, research and analysis that will be highly prized in any field of work. This programme can form the stepping stone to many career options, such as further academic research, museum and art curation, literary translation or analysis, education or public heritage. Recent Classics graduates are now putting their skills to use as tutors, archivists, writers and conference coordinators for a range of employers including the RSPB.



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Study at the cutting edge of post-medieval archaeological investigation. Historical Archaeology is the study of relatively recent documented periods, from the end of the Middle Ages to the 21st century. Read more
Study at the cutting edge of post-medieval archaeological investigation.

Why choose this course?

Historical Archaeology is the study of relatively recent documented periods, from the end of the Middle Ages to the 21st century. It is one of the most rapidly expanding aspects of archaeology, dealing with many exciting issues that relate directly to the world we have inherited today, drawing on a diverse range of material and documentary sources.

The skills you develop working with material culture, landscapes and archival sources, as well as presenting short papers and writing essays and your dissertation, will provide an unrivalled insight into the past and present and prepare you for a wide range of jobs and careers, as well as further research.
-Explore dynamic and globally significant themes, from capitalism to colonialism.
-Gain practical training in analysing and interpreting evidence, from excavations and standing buildings to landscapes and material culture.
-Develop knowledge and skills that will give you a head start in many heritage, historic-environment and other post-graduate careers and research.
-Study in the archaeological capital of Britain – experience historical archaeology in action.
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including laboratories, libraries and internationally important archives, resources and collections in York.
-Receive career and research advice and guidance from staff with significant professional knowledge and experience.

What does the course cover?
The MA in Historical Archaeology examines themes such as the development of consumption and capitalism, colonialism and globalisation from British and international perspectives. It builds out from the unique experience of Britain in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to consider the global impact of changing economic, political and cultural values as the modern world took shape.

We examine data sources including excavated material alongside material culture from museums and collections, standing buildings, landscapes and documentary sources of all kinds, which relate to both the UK, its former colonies and the wider world.

Who is it for?
This course is ideally suited for students from a wide range of backgrounds, which need not necessarily include Archaeology. The course appeals to anyone interested in the material culture and landscapes of the post-medieval period. Past students have included graduates of History, Art History, Heritage, English Literature and many more subjects, as well as mid-career professionals looking to enhance their knowledge, expertise and qualifications.

What can it lead to?
The course provides you with highly valued and transferrable skills, knowledge and experience essential for a wide variety of careers. Many students go on to further study or take up employment with a range of organisations both within and outside the heritage sector, including the civil service and law firms, heritage consultancies and museums.

Careers

This course will give you a thorough grounding in the rapidly growing field of Historical Archaeology and equip you with valuable skills and experience for a career in this and related fields. It also provides valuable transferable skills which are recognised across a wide range of professional graduate careers.

By the end of the course you will:
-Be familiar with current research agendas and a broad range of issues in historical archaeology.
-Have detailed knowledge of topics and themes using material from Britain, Europe, North America, Africa and the Caribbean.
-Have developed key skills to organise information and arguments in a critical and independent manner in written form and in presentations.
-Have undertaken an extended piece of independent research on a topic of your choice in the field of historical archaeology.
-Have delivered a short lecture on a chosen topic in historical archaeology.

Course postgraduates have gone on to work with many organisations, including landscape and environmental consultancies, professional bodies, heritage organisations such as English Heritage and the National Trust, the media and museums.

Others have used the skills gained to pursue careers in other sectors, including:
-Local government and development
-Civil service and law
-Chartered surveying
-Computing and IT services
-Business and administration
-Marketing and public relations
-Education
-Accountancy and financial services

Others have gone on to pursue PhDs in the UK and overseas.

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The MSc Archaeological Science will provide you with a solid grounding in the theory and application of scientific principles and techniques within archaeology. Read more
The MSc Archaeological Science will provide you with a solid grounding in the theory and application of scientific principles and techniques within archaeology. The programme also develops critical, analytical and transferable skills that prepare you for professional, academic and research careers in the exciting and rapidly advancing area of archaeological science or in non-cognate fields.

The programme places the study of the human past at the centre of archaeological science enquiry. This is achieved through a combination of science and self-selected thematic or period-based modules allowing you to situate your scientific training within the archaeological context(s) of your choice. The programme provides a detailed understanding of the foundations of analytical techniques, delivers practical experience in their application and data processing, and the ability to design and communicate research that employs scientific analyses to address archaeological questions. Upon graduation you will have experience of collecting, analysing and reporting on data to publication standard and ideally equipped to launch your career as a practising archaeological scientist.

Distinctive features

The MSc Archaeological Science at Cardiff University gives you access to:

• A flexible and responsive programme that combines training in scientific enquiry, expertise and vocational skills with thematic and period-focused archaeology.

• Materials, equipment, library resources and funding to undertake meaningful research in partnership with a wide range of key heritage organisations across an international stage.

• A programme with core strengths in key fields of archaeological science, tailored to launch your career in the discipline or to progress to doctoral research.

• A department where the science, theory and practice of archaeology and conservation converge to create a unique environment for exploring the human past.

• Staff with extensive professional experience in researching, promoting, publishing, and integrating archaeological science across academic and commercial archaeology and the wider heritage sector.

• An energetic team responsible for insights into iconic sites (e.g. Stonehenge, Çatalhöyük), tackling key issues in human history (e.g. hunting, farming, food, and feasts) through the development and application of innovative science (e.g. isotopes, residue analysis, DNA, proteomics)

• A unique training in science communication at every level - from preparing conference presentations and journal articles, to project reports, press releases and public engagement, our training ensures you can transmit the excitement of scientific enquiry to diverse audiences.

• Support for your future career ambitions. From further study to science advisors to specialists – our graduates work across the entire spectrum of archaeological science as well as moving into other successful careers.

Structure

There are two stages to this course: stage 1 and stage 2.

Stage 1 is made up of:

• 40 credits of Core Skills and Discipline-Specific Research Training modules for Archaeology and Conservation Master's students
• A minimum of 40 credits of Archaeological Science modules
• An additional 40 credits of Archaeological Science or Archaeology modules offered to MA and MSc students across the Archaeology and Conservation department

Stage 2 comprises:

• 60 credit Archaeological Science Dissertation (16-20,000 words, topic or theme chosen in consultation with academic staff)

Core modules:

Postgraduate Skills in Archaeology and Conservation
Skills and Methods for Postgraduate Study
Archaeological Science Dissertation

Teaching

Teaching is delivered via lectures, laboratory sessions, interactive workshops and tutorials, in addition to visits to relevant local resources such as the National Museum Wales and local heritage organisations.

Lectures take a range of forms but generally provide a broad structure for each subject, an introduction to key concepts and relevant up-to-date information. The Archaeological Science Master's provides students with bespoke training in scientific techniques during laboratory sessions. This includes developing practical skills in the identification, recording and analysis of archaeological materials during hands on laboratory sessions. These range from macroscopic e.g. bone identification, to microscopic e.g. material identification or status with light based or scanning electron microscopy, to sample selection, preparation and analysis e.g. isotopic or aDNA and include health and safety and laboratory management skills. Students will be able to develop specialist practical skills in at least one area of study. In workshops and seminars, you will have the opportunity to discuss themes or topics, to receive and consolidate feedback on your individual learning and to develop skills in oral presentation.

This programme is based within the School of History, Archaeology and Religion and taught by academic staff from across Cardiff University and by external speakers. All taught modules within the Programme are compulsory and you are expected to attend all lectures, laboratory sessions and other timetabled sessions. Students will receive supervision to help them complete the dissertation, but are also expected to engage in considerable independent study.

Assessment

The 120 credits of taught Modules within Stage 1 of the Programme are assessed through in-course assessments, including:

Extended essays
Oral presentations
Poster presentations
Statistical assignments
Critical appraisals
Practical skills tests
Data reports
Research designs

You must successfully complete the taught component of the programme before progressing to Stage 2 where assessment is:

Dissertation (16-20,000 words)

Career prospects

After successfully completing this MSc, you should have a broad spectrum of knowledge and a variety of skills, making you highly attractive both to potential employers and research establishments. You will be able to pursue a wide range of professional careers, within commercial and academic archaeology and the wider heritage sector. Career paths will generally be specialist and will depend on the choice of modules. Graduates will be well placed to pursue careers as a specialist in isotope analysis, zooarchaeological analysis or human osteoarchaeology. They will also be in a position to apply for general laboratory based work and archaeological fieldwork. Working within science communication and management are other options. Potential employers include archaeological units, museums, universities, heritage institutions, Historic England and Cadw. Freelance or self-employment career routes are also common for animal and human bone analysts with postgraduate qualifications.

The archaeology department has strong links and collaborations across the heritage sector and beyond. British organisations that staff currently work with include Cadw, Historic England, English Heritage, Historic Scotland, National Museum Wales, the British Museum, the Welsh archaeological trusts and a range of other archaeology units (e.g. Wessex Archaeology, Oxford Archaeology, Cambridge Archaeology Unit, Archaeology Wales). In addition, staff are involved with archaeological research across the world. You will be encouraged to become involved in these collaborations via research projects and placements to maximise networking opportunities and increasing your employability.

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The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems course will provide you with applied practical experience and critical theoretical engagement with a full range of computing systems and technology used for publishing, archiving, analysing, visualising and presenting archaeological information today. Read more
The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems course will provide you with applied practical experience and critical theoretical engagement with a full range of computing systems and technology used for publishing, archiving, analysing, visualising and presenting archaeological information today.

The University of York’s Archaeology Department has been at the forefront of researching and developing archaeological computer applications since the early days of digital practice in the discipline and has hosted the first online peer-reviewed e-journal for archaeology since 1996. It also hosts the world-leading Archaeology Data Service, which is the UK’s national digital data archive for the historic environment.

• Gain applied practical experience in internet applications, database design and management, GIS technology, CAD and computer modelling systems.
• Build a broad foundation of expertise in archaeological computing applications.
• Access the University of York’s world-leading expertise in e-publishing and digital archiving.
• Develop IT knowledge and skills that are highly valued in heritage-sector careers.
• Access a full suite of research computing hardware and software
• Receive tailored careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training, research and work placements, you will:
• Develop vital knowledge of the digital and internet technologies used for disseminating, publishing and archiving archaeological information.
• Learn practical skills in 3-D modelling, GIS, CAD and other technologies used for analysing and visualising archaeological information.

The course provides a detailed introduction to the broad range of information systems used in archaeology, and provides the opportunity to apply these systems in practice. The work placement and dissertation enable you to specialise in a particular technique or approach, giving you valuable practical experience in your areas of interest.

Who is it for?

The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems is designed for people who have a basic grounding in computer literacy and an interest in archaeology and heritage, and who wish to follow vocational training in archaeological information systems.

What can it lead to?

Many of our graduates go onto careers in archaeological computing, working in contract units or county-based records organisations. Others have founded their own consultancy businesses. Some apply their computing skills in more mainstream archaeological work, in museums, or in the wider world. Others have pursued further research at doctoral level. Click on the alumni tab above to find out what our alumni and current students have to say about the course.

Content

This one-year MSc course is taught via a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. You will study two core modules, two optional modules and four shorter skills modules of your choice. You will also gain valuable practical experience of applying information systems in the workplace on a work placement module. Finally, in the summer term you will develop your research and presentation skills by producing a dissertation and giving an assessed lecture.

Placement

Your work placement is a key feature of the course, providing valuable experience of using IT in an archaeological work environment. The placement offers you the chance to gain practical experience in a professional, academic or heritage environment. You will be able to work on projects that help you develop new skills or put into practice skills gained from your taught courses.

Aims
-To provide experience of computer applications within a workplace in the historic environment sector.
-To consolidate knowledge and understanding of computer applications from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing your placement you should have:
-Gained detailed knowledge of how information technology is applied in the workplace in the historic environment sector, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-Developed an understanding of the contexts in which IT is applied, and of real world limitations.
-Developed your IT skills in one or more of the core areas covered by the taught programme (i.e. database design, web technologies, digital archiving, electronic publication, CAD, GIS and virtual reality modelling).

Placement providers
Although the organisations offering placements change from year to year, and you have the option of proposing other providers that match your specific interests, the following list is a good indication of some of the choices available:
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Archaeology Data Service
-City of York Council
-Internet Archaeology
-York Archaeological Trust
-Centre for Christianity and Culture
-L-P: Archaeology
-On Site Archaeology
-Council for British Archaeology
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-National Trust

Careers

The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems offers practical, careers-focused training for many essential roles in the professional world of archaeology. By the end of the course you will:
-Have examined how computers are applied in archaeology and their impact on the development of the discipline
-Understand the concept of the internet, be able to find and use relevant information and add materials to it
-Have the skills to evaluate critically the claims made for different computer applications and select the correct application for a given problem
-Have an understanding of authoring tools and be able to create an electronic text
-Have an understanding of database design and be able to design and implement a simple relational database
-Have an understanding of CAD and GIS and be able to create effective applications in each
-Have an awareness of digital archiving principles, resource discovery and metadata

Many graduates from this course go on to careers in archaeological computing with contract and county-based records units, or found their own consultancy businesses. Some apply their computing skills to more mainstream archaeological settings, such as museums, or in a range of the others sectors and roles, including:
-Archive management
-Social media management
-Local government and development
-Computing and IT services
-Business and administration
-Marketing and public relations
-Education

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Programme description. This programme offers you the chance to develop a detailed understanding of the application of geographical information science (GIS) and related technologies within the field of archaeology. Read more
Programme description
This programme offers you the chance to develop a detailed understanding of the application of geographical information science (GIS) and related technologies within the field of archaeology. The programme retains a distinctive Scottish flavour, and students will benefit from the guidance of internationally recognised staff. The programme combines the pedigree of Edinburgh’s GIS expertise with a long-established reputation in archaeological teaching and research. You will gain a broad understanding of the use of GIS in archaeological surveying, recording and research and will be equipped with the analytical and communication skills necessary to work in this vibrant area. Demand for the application of GIS within archaeology is growing at an unprecedented rate, including searching for new archaeological sites, determining the societal context of existing sites and examining the interplay between successive occupations of a site.

The proven ability of our GIS graduates in employment means our programme is held in high regard by a wide range of employers.

Programme structure

The programme is organised into two semesters of taught courses, delivered through lectures and seminars, after which you will work towards your individual dissertation.

Compulsory courses typically include*:

Principles of GIS for Archaeologists
Introduction to Spatial Analysis
Spatial Modelling
Research Practice & Project Planning
Dissertation

Option courses:

In consultation with the Programme Director, you will choose from a range of option courses*. We particularly recommend:

Distributed GIS
Frontiers in Archaeology: Research Seminars
Fundamentals for Remote Sensing
Object Oriented Software Engineering: Principles
Object Orientated Software Engineering: Spatial Algorithms
Advanced Spatial Database Methods
Byzantine Archaeology: The Archaeology of the Byzantine Empire and its Neighbours AD500–850
GeoVisualisation
Further Spatial Analysis
Hyperspectral Remote Sensing
Introduction to Radar Remote Sensing
The Scottish Lowlands: Archaeology and Landscape before the Normans
Theoretical Archaeology
Archaeology and Environment

*Please note: courses are offered subject to timetabling and availability and are subject to change each year.

Field trip:
The programme typically includes a field trip where students focus on techniques for capturing geospatial information. This trip has historically taken place at the Kindrogan Field Centre in Perthshire, Scotland.

Career opportunities

The expertise gained on this programme will allow you to continue to study or to pursue a career in surveying, illustration and 3D visualisation, digital archiving, heritage management, terrain modelling, database management, geomatics or consultancy.

Our GIS graduates have gained work in both public and private sector organisations, including Historic Scotland, English Heritage, the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland, thinkWhere (formerly Forth Valley GIS) and CFA Archaeology.

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A research degree offers you the opportunity to acquire a highly advanced set of conceptual skills developed in the pursuit of new knowledge, which can be applied within or beyond an academic or scholarly context. Read more
A research degree offers you the opportunity to acquire a highly advanced set of conceptual skills developed in the pursuit of new knowledge, which can be applied within or beyond an academic or scholarly context. Research training in any academic discipline helps to channel creativity into critical innovatory reasoning. The legitimate authority of original, independent research depends upon persuasive analytical arguments supported by critically evaluated evidence.

Our research areas include: classical Greek, Hellenistic and Roman Republican archaeology; Roman provincial archaeology; and late antique and early medieval Western European archaeology. Key specialisms include: archaeology of urban settlement, archaeology of cult and ritual, death and burial, social archaeology, attitudes to the past, and interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary studies in history and archaeology.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), History at Birkbeck was ranked 6th in the UK for the percentage of our research deemed world-leading or internationally excellent. 94% of our eligible staff submitted research and we achieved 100% for a research environment supporting world-leading and internationally excellent research.

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This programme is an unrivalled opportunity to study the arts of China, Korea and Japan. Read more
This programme is an unrivalled opportunity to study the arts of China, Korea and Japan. Students consider a wide range of East Asian arts, from Chinese archaeology to Japanese prints, Korean installation works to Buddhist monuments, exploring their specificity and the links between them, in historical and contemporary periods. In many parts of East Asia archaeological evidence is key to understanding early societies. The programme therefore relates excavated materials to the history of art.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of East Asia, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as East Asian Music, Film and Media. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the languages, history, religions and cultures of East Asia.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

This MA can also be pursued over a two-year period combined with intensive language study in Japanese or Korean (http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/ma-art-and-archaeology-of-east-asia-and-intensive-language/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/maaaea/

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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