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Masters Degrees (Psychology Of Education)

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The Psychology of Education MSc will introduce students to key theoretical issues in the psychology of education, critically analysing psychological theory and research, and exploring its contribution to educational issues and practice. Read more
The Psychology of Education MSc will introduce students to key theoretical issues in the psychology of education, critically analysing psychological theory and research, and exploring its contribution to educational issues and practice. It is intended for people who wish to gain Graduate Basis of Certified Status so that they can proceed to professional training as an educational or other psychologist.

Degree information

This programme aims to equip students to develop understanding of the current issues in the psychology of education and provide them with an opportunity to engage in research. On successful completion of the programme students should be able to produce and communicate reasoned and informed argument, both in writing and orally. Students will also be able to critically evaluate theory and evidence in psychology.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Core Topics in the Psychology of Education
-Methodology and Statistics

Optional modules
-Cognitive Development and Learning or Personality and Social Psychology

Students choose one module from the following:
-Atypical Development
-Developmental Psychology and Psychobiology
-Issues in Educational Neuroscience
-Language Development
-Literacy Development
-Psychological Aspects of Counselling
-Reading and Spelling Difficulties
-Social Development

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, including guest speakers, student preparation of tasks and longer presentations, group work, discussion, and computer workshops giving hands-on practice. Assessment is through coursework and one unseen examination. Coursework can involve small exercices, critiques of set research articles and extended pieces of writing on set topics.

Careers

Graduates of this Master's degree are currently working as:
-PhD students
-Researchers in the public and private sectors
-Clinical and educational doctorate students.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Secondary School Head of Year, Unspecified London Borough
-Secondary School Teacher (A level Pyschology, Health and Society, Unspecified Secondary School
-Secondary School Teacher, Unspecified Catholic School and Sixth Form
-Special Educational Needs (SEN) Teaching Assistant, Unspecified Academy
-University Liaison Officer, Overseas Students Service Centre (OSSC)

Employability
This programme offers a comprehensive research training in developmental and educational psychology. It provides a good grounding for doctoral study and valuable preparation for a research career in the academic community, the public sector or in industry.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Institute of Education (IOE) is one of the world's leading centres for education and related areas of social science - students learn from cutting-edge researchers in the field. For the third year in succession the UCL Institute of Education (IOE) has been ranked as the world's leading university for Education (QS World University Rankings 2016). Our alumni include government ministers; heads of schools, other educational institutions and NGOs; and Olympians and prize-winning authors.

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This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Read more
This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology is a three-year full-time, four-year part-time taught doctoral programme leading to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health Care Professions Council (HCPC), accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society (BPS), and recognition within the UK and the EU as a chartered counselling psychologist eligible to practice.

The programme offers a sound and marketable model, combining in-depth competency in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), strong humanistic values, and psychodynamic awareness. The course was re-accredited by the HCPC and the BPS in 2012. It was commended for the depth and breadth of the modules offered; a number of our modules were described as cutting-edge and very well suited to the current zeitgeist and employment market. These modules include a first-year module devoted to working with difference and diversity, and a third-year service evaluation research exercise.

Run by a dedicated team of HCPC registered and BPS accredited chartered counselling and clinical psychologists, this course offers wide-ranging and high quality clinical and research expertise to trainees. Course team members have between one and 11 years of post-qualification clinical experience, and two thirds hold PhD or professional doctoral titles. Two thirds of the staff are academically published authors.

While student numbers are growing, the team prides itself on retaining a small cohort each year of no more than 20 students. This enables us to offer you a relatively high volume of individual attention from staff. All students are assigned a personal tutor and two research supervisors. You are offered a relatively high proportion of research supervision (10 hours in Year 1 and 20 hours each year in Years 2 and 3); safe spaces for clinical group supervision and skills practice; and an experiential and workshop style of teaching and learning. Trainees and staff develop collaborative relationships in relation to learning and personal development.

The programme has a dedicated placements coordinator, and an extensive online placement provider database, accessible prior to training commencement. We offer a comprehensive placements induction in the first week of training, and we encourage and support you to be in placement or at interview stage with placement providers by the beginning of your training.

The first year of training is the equivalent of a Master’s year. Students who exit at the end of Year 1 are eligible for an MSc in Psychological Therapies. This MSc offers eligibility to register with the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP), leading to clinical practice in either in public, private or third sector organisations. However, the course has high student retention rates, with the majority of students continuing from the MSc level into the doctoral level of training in Years 2 and 3. Student satisfaction within the programme is very high; feedback forms regularly comment on the high quality and breadth of teaching, the clinical and research expertise of the lecturers, and the dedication of the staff, both at a personal and professional level. Our students feel valued and attended to by the teaching team because the size of each cohort allows for a more tailored experience for each student.

Through postgraduate teaching and workshops across the wider applied psychology subject area, London Met counselling psychology trainees develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills in a broad range of qualitative and quantitative psychological research methods. The course emphasises criticality, epistemological critique and reflexivity across all research teaching and learning. Extensive support in the form of individual and group supervision and teaching is offered, alongside methodology learning, to support trainees in undertaking a piece of doctoral level research that will make an original contribution to the professional practice of counselling psychology, and more widely.

As trainees you will develop a wide range of intellectual and practical skills and knowledge. The training has a solid track record of trainees emerging as robust, sophisticated, and highly employable practitioners of counselling psychology. In recent years, we are proud that a number of our trainees have won BPS Division of Counselling Psychology trainee prizes for written assignments and research poster presentations.

The principle aims and achievements of the course are to produce graduates who are:
-Competent, informed, reflective, ethical and professionally sound practitioners of counselling psychology who are able to work in a range of settings and are committed to their own on-going personal and professional development
-Able to understand, develop and apply models of advanced psychological inquiry and research that enable the creation of new knowledge and which recognise the complex nature of human experience and relationships
-Able to adopt a questioning and evaluative approach to the philosophy, practice, research and theory that constitutes counselling psychology and aware of the wider social, cultural and political domains within which counselling psychology operates
-In possession of a set of skills and competencies that are transferable to a wide variety of professional contexts and which enhance employability
-Able to demonstrate the range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC)

Many students are conducting research in collaboration with National Health Service (NHS) Trusts or non-governmental organisations (NGOs). Graduates find permanent employment within a few months post-qualification, with many trainees holding part-time clinical employment whilst they are in the final year of the training because their clinical skills and knowledge are of such a high standard. Other graduates from the programme find work in academia in visiting or permanent teaching posts or as research fellows.

The course is involved in on-going in-house events and conferences such as CultureShock, and in research and clinical collaborations with five NHS trusts. The programme is also involved in research and in the training of clinical staff with the Freedom from Torture Foundation and Khulisa, both community based organisations close to the Holloway Campus. The programme is also collaborating with the School of Social Sciences and School of Social Professions to link interpreters with clinicians and to establish training inside and outside the University on working with interpreters in mental health settings.

Assessment

A wide range of assessment methods is used on the programme. In Year 1 you'll complete seven master's level assignments, including a reflective essay, case formulation, process report, examination and two short research assignments using qualitative and quantitative methodologies.

You'll also complete a 7,000-word reflexive critical literature review and a 3,000-word proposal towards the end of Year 1. Your proposal must demonstrate an adequate basis for a doctoral level research project for you to proceed into Year 2 of the programme. Year 1 is the most intensive period of assessment on the programme.

If you progress to Year 2 you'll complete an extended clinical case study, integrative process analysis and theoretical essay at the end of the year, reflecting cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic learning. At the end of Year 3 a similar assignment is completed, reflecting a trans-theoretical, pluralistic perspective. You should complete your research project by the end of Year 3, submitting a 25,000 word thesis and subsequently participating in a viva voce examination.

You'll receive research supervision to guide your research throughout the programme. Research progress is formally monitored and evaluated through the submission of annual reports to the Research and Postgraduate Office in Years 2 and 3.

You are required to complete a minimum of 450 clinical hours in a range of placements under supervision over the duration of the programme, as well as a minimum of 60 hours of your own personal therapy.

Supervisors complete six-monthly practice competency evaluations, which enable bidirectional feedback and reflection on your progress and continuing professional development in your practice placements. Your personal and professional development is individually monitored and supported throughout the programme via annual reviews and appraisals with a tutor from the programme team.

Professional accreditation

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology leads to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advanced Research Design and Analysis for Psychology (core, 20 credits)
-Counselling Psychology Practice and Development (core, 20 credits)
-Professional and Ethical Issues (core, 20 credits)
-Psychological Knowledge and Models of Therapy (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project and Critical Skills (core, 60 credits)
-Therapeutic and Reflective Skills (core, 20 credits)
-Working with Difference and Diversity (core, 20 credits)

Year 2 modules include:
-Advanced Psychological Research (core, 160 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 1 (core, 100 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 2 (core, 100 credits)

After the course

Career opportunities for counselling psychologists include posts in a variety of areas. These include National Health Service (NHS) settings such as primary care, Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services, community mental health, drug and alcohol, rehabilitation, eating and personality disorder services, as well as the prison service, voluntary sector, private practice, academia, training, supervision, management and consultancy.

Graduates from the programme frequently go on work in one or more of these areas. Some have gone on to provide practice placements or to supervise or teach students on the programme. The range of advanced clinical and research skills and abilities gained through the course prepare graduates to undertake work in a variety of fields of activity.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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This MSc provides a Master's-level grounding in psychology, paying particular attention to its implications for education and other professional practice. Read more
This MSc provides a Master's-level grounding in psychology, paying particular attention to its implications for education and other professional practice. This pathway will be suitable if you already hold Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) status, or if you do not intend to work as a psychologist in the UK after graduation.

You will study alongside students on the MSc Psychology of Education BPS programme and have access to the same units. The key difference between the two programmes is that you will have more flexibility in your choice of units. You will not be required to undertake work in statistics, and can choose from a wider range of optional units. This programme of study leads to the MSc Education (Psychology of Education), but does not make you eligible for GBC.

Programme structure

Core unit:
-Introduction to Educational Inquiry

And 60 credits from:
-Brain, Mind and Education
-Cognition and Learning
-Developmental Psychology
-Social and Socio-Cultural Psychology
-The Psychology of Individual Differences

Optional units
-Students studying this programme may select 40 credits of optional units from across the school.

Dissertation
-You will also complete a 15,000-word dissertation.

Careers

We offer the academic and personal development opportunities to equip you for the intellectual, social and personal challenges that you will encounter during your career. Our overarching goal is to enable our graduates to display the following characteristics:
-Equipped to demonstrate impact, excellence and distinctiveness in their chosen field
-Visionary, imaginative, innovative, reflective and creative
-High ideals and values, including a strong sense of social justice
-Highly employable throughout the world
-Adaptable, with the potential to be a leader in work and in the community

Graduates of this route have gone on to careers in educational psychology, clinical psychology, occupational psychology, counselling psychology or neuropsychology, and doctoral level research. Read more about the careers of some of our graduates.

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Psycholinguistics, the scientific study of the psychology of language, is one of the most important areas of cognitive psychology. Read more
Psycholinguistics, the scientific study of the psychology of language, is one of the most important areas of cognitive psychology. How we produce, understand, acquire, and use language, and how these processes are affected by ageing and brain damage, are core topics in understanding human behaviour.

Why study Psychology of Language at Dundee?

In addition to its theoretical interest, psycholinguistics has several important applications, including how a second language should best be taught, how children should be taught to learn to read and write, artificial intelligence, computer-assisted communication, and the treatment of developmental and acquired language disorders. Such applications ensure that there is a wealth of professional career paths available to postgraduates in the area in addition to an academic career.

This course is affiliated with our world-leading Language Research Centre (LaRC).

The School of Psychology also has much specialised equipment, dedicated laboratories and world class research facilities. These include EEG labs, many eye tracking systems, 2D and 3D movement tracking systems, and offsite fMRI access via the Clinical Research Centre at Ninewells Teaching Hospital.

Every full-time MSc student in the department is entitled to use computer facilities available in the Psychology department and throughout the University. We provide access to all the basic software tools that you are likely to need for your MSc.

Aims of the Programme

This course will enable you to:

Pursue and develop the advanced study of research methods in Psychology and in particular to address contemporary issues of epistemology, data collection, measurement and data analysis.
Approach problems in research by critical evaluation of existing psychological paradigms and research literature and to apply this to current theoretical or applied issues in Psychology.
Develop advanced research skills which will be relevant to policy and practice in the workplace.
Develop and demonstrate advanced knowledge and skills in research design, methodology and statistical analysis
Develop and demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of current research in a specialised field of experimental or applied Psychology.
Engage in the analysis, synthesis, planning, execution and evaluation of research at an advanced level.
Make an original contribution to scientific knowledge, methodology or practice in a research project either grounded in experimental psychology or in an applied area relevant to the learner's employment.
Develop and practice dissemination and presentation skills to peers and to wider academic and professional audience
provide an advanced understanding of scientific issues in the chosen topic specialisation.

"I enjoyed all aspects of the course, especially the opportunity to conduct two independent pieces of research. Furthermore, I found the taught modules very helpful and a good basis for every researcher. Most importantly, I enjoyed the support of both staff and students in a highly collaborative environment"
MSc student, 2011

Who should study this course?

The course offers students an excellent theoretical and practical grounding in research methods in Psychology, building upon the levels of skill and knowledge attained in their first degree in Psychology (as recognised by the British Psychological Society for Graduate Membership).

The course will provide a first year of research training for students intending to continue with postgraduate research or further professional training within Psychology (e.g. health, occupational or educational psychology) or related disciplines (e.g. sociology, social anthropology, or education).

Postgraduate culture

We have a close postgraduate community with a diverse combination of nationalities. The School runs a Postgraduate seminar and a departmental seminar twice weekly throughout teaching semesters, with invited speakers to the seminars. These seminars are a great way to broaden your awareness of contemporary issues within the field of Psychology, to present your own work, and to network with other postgraduate students.

The School of Psychology also has its own Facebook group, where you can find out more about their activities.

This course is aimed at

Psychology graduates wishing to enhance their knowledge of the psychology of language and communication
Graduates considering a professional training in a language-related discipline (e.g. speech pathology)
Psychology graduates intending to progress to a PhD.

How you will be taught

Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, peer assessments of oral presentations, problem-solving assignments and feedback, and interactive computer assignments. Some of the exercises will be group-based and will be followed by presentation of the results of the analysis. Learners will be expected to be able to respond adequately to questions relating to the interpretation of the analyses.

One-on-one supervision of a research dissertation by a single tutor is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided.

What you will study

Students will take the following modules:

Core modules:

Research Foundations
Qualitative Research Methods
Advanced Quantitative Methods
Research in Practice
Research Dissertation

Two advanced modules, typically from:

Gesture, Cognition and Communication
Reading Development and Disability
Comparative Communication and Cognition
Altered States of Consciousness

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework only.

Each module is worth 20 credits apart from the Research Dissertation Module which is worth 60 credits. The total number of credits awarded is 180 for an MSc course.

Careers

Students from this course have gone on to do PhDs. The higher degree also generally improves job prospects when competing against other Psychology graduates in other fields such as education, artificial intelligence, computer-assisted communication, and the treatment of developmental and acquired language disorders.

Overseas Academic Scholarships

The School of Psychology offers three Overseas Academic Scholarships of £3,000 each to overseas (international) taught postgraduate students. These awards are competitive based on academic merit and a personal statement which details and supports the applicant's interest in their chosen taught postgraduate programme. The deadline to apply for this scholarship is 30th June 2014.

A 5% discount on tuition fees is applicable for international applicants to the School of Psychology who pay the full amount (for the year), in advance, by a given deadline. Please visit our 5% discount webpage for full details.

Other sources of funding for postgraduate students can be found on our Scholarships webpage

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The aims of this course are. Read more
The aims of this course are: to develop critical skills in the evaluation and analysis of current research, theory and practice in psychology and education; foster an ethos of independent and co-operative learning and research; and to provide eligibility for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Status from the British Psychological Society. Graduate Basis for Chartered Status is the first step towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist.

The course is intended to bring graduates from other disciplines up to the academic standard of an honours degree in psychology. It demonstrates how the core areas of psychology (developmental, social, cognitive, psychobiology, individual differences, research methods) can be applied in educational settings. It is therefore an excellent starting point for individuals wishing to pursue a career in educational psychology. However, it should be noted that the MEd does not qualify you to practice as an educational psychologist. Individuals wishing to practice as an educational psychologist also need to complete the Doctorate in Educational and Child Psychology.

Course content includes:
-Psychology of Human Development
-Neurobiology
-Cognition
-Research Issues in Psychology & Education
-Social Psychology of Education
-Current Issues in Special Educational Needs
-Applied Prevention in Education

Teaching and learning

We take a varied approach throughout the course. In terms of teaching and learning, the course units are delivered through lectures, tutorials, group-work, practicals and simulations, case-based approaches, and enquiry-based learning. We encourage both individual and co-operative learning and research and hope to foster an ethos of lifelong learning. Many students are experienced teachers and we appreciate the wealth of knowledge and practical experience you bring with you on the course. During research-based learning sessions we encourage you to use all sources of information, including each other. You will receive comprehensive training in the use of electronic databases, library resources, and statistics and qualitative analysis packages. Many other key skills will be developed during the course.

Coursework and assessment

The form of the assessment varies from unit to unit. Written assessment for a course unit usually totals 3,000 words, and may be in the form of an essay, critical review, research report or research proposal. All assessments will be followed by both formative and summative feedback. The dissertation is the report of an empirical research project investigating an aspect of psychology as applied to education in its broadest sense. It is 15,000 words long.

Career opportunities

As the MEd confers eligibility for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Status from the British Psychological Society, a career pathway for our graduates is professional training as a psychologist (e.g. Doctorate in Educational and Child Psychology) and we have a good conversion rate in this regard with recent MEd graduates accepted onto doctorate-level training in educational, clinical and counselling psychology. The knowledge and skills gained by psychology graduates means that they are highly regarded by employers (Higher Education Careers Services Unit, November 2010) for work in areas such as health and social care, marketing and PR, management and human resources, education, and the public sector. Many of our graduates use the skills they have acquired to gain promotion or develop their existing careers, whilst others take the opportunity to change profession, for example, moving into teaching, research or working as assistant psychologists and in related positions (e.g. child and adolescent mental health worker). A small number of students go on to study for a doctorate by research (PhD) in educational psychology (which in itself opens a career pathway to working as a researcher or lecturer in higher education). More information about careers may be found on the BPS website http://www.bps.org.uk/ .

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The MSc Psychology of Education provides a Master's-level grounding in psychology, paying particular attention to its implications for education and other professional practice. Read more
The MSc Psychology of Education provides a Master's-level grounding in psychology, paying particular attention to its implications for education and other professional practice. It is available on a full-time or a part-time basis. After successfully completing the programme, you will be eligible to apply to the British Psychological Society (BPS) for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership, and for the further professional training accredited by the BPS.

Many students go on to careers in educational psychology, clinical psychology or neuropsychology, or engage in doctoral-level research. Entry to all of these is very competitive, but our MSc graduates have historically been very successful applying for EdD, DEdPsych, PhD and DClinPsy courses.

After completing the MSc programme, you will typically spend at least a year building up relevant experience, for example working with special needs pupils or with vulnerable clients, before making a successful application to a professional training programme.

Programme structure

Core units required for BPS accreditation
-Brain, Mind and Education
-Cognition and Learning
-The Psychology of Individual Differences
-Developmental Psychology
-Introduction to Educational Inquiry
-Social and Socio-Cultural Psychology
-Statistics in Education

Optional units
For students seeking BPS accreditation there is only one optional unit, which must be taken from one of the following:
-Collaboration Across Professional Contexts in Special and Inclusive Education
-Controversial Issues in Special and Inclusive Education
-Counselling Young People and Families
-Developing Thinking
-Inclusive Education and Working with Parents/Carers
-Issues in Neuroscience and Education
-Multivariate Statistical Methods in Education

Dissertation
You will also complete a 15,000-word dissertation.

Careers

We offer the academic and personal development opportunities to equip you for the intellectual, social and personal challenges that you will encounter during your career. Our overarching goal is to enable our graduates to display the following characteristics:
-Equipped to demonstrate impact, excellence and distinctiveness in their chosen field.
-Visionary, imaginative, innovative, reflective and creative.
-High ideals and values, including a strong sense of social justice.
-Highly employable throughout the world.
-Adaptable, with the potential to be a leader in work and in the community.

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The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university. Read more
The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university.

The certificate is offered as an entry qualification for the Oxford Brookes MSc Psychology, but it also meets the entry requirements for other universities' psychology conversion courses.

The course is available from September for part-time students, and from January for full-time and part-time students.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/psychology-qualifying-certificate/

Why choose this course?

- Oxford Brookes has one of the largest groups of developmental psychologists in the UK along with expertise in cognitive neuroscience and qualitative methods.

- Our professionally-accredited courses allow chartered membership of the British Psychological Society.

- Excellent opportunities for progression into courses across psychology, education and health.

- State-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab.

- Strong connections through joint research projects with partners in health, education and industry.

- A comprehensive programme of research seminars offered by the department as well as specialist seminars organised by individual research groups.

Teaching and learning

Our department has a thriving community of research-active staff and research scholars. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects. Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, seminars and practical work.

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, each involving approximately 150 hours of student effort and approximately 36 hours of staff contact.

Each course module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written work. Assessment methods may include essays, formal written examinations or in-class tests.

Specialist facilities

The Psychology Department boasts state-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab. In addition, postgraduate students have a dedicated study and social working space to facilitate group projects and provide a venue for our research seminar series.

Careers

The department offers advice on future career opportunities, including practical help with applications to future training and employment. For many of our students, their postgraduate psychology qualification is a stepping stone to professional training for careers in educational and clinical psychology. Some choose to continue their academic studies, progressing to PhD.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 95% of our research was internationally recognised and 60% of the impact of our research was rated internationally excellent.

Prof. Margaret Harris has been awarded a grant of over £315K from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) to find out whether technological advances to aid children and babies with hearing loss have had a positive effect on deaf children’s literacy.

Prof. Anna Barnett and her colleague Dr Luci Wiggs have been awarded a grant of £59K from The Waterloo Foundation to examine sleep disturbance in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). This condition is characterised by significant movement difficulty and associated psycho-social and educational problems. Previous work suggests that sleep disturbance may be a relevant factor and this project will examine sleep in DCD with extensive and objective measures in relation to child and parent functioning.

Dr Kate Wilmut has been awarded a prestigious ESRC grant of over £160k to conduct research into forward planning of movement in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder. It is hoped that furthering our understanding of the mechanisms underlying this condition may lead to the development of effective intervention programmes.

With funding from the Leverhulme Trust, Prof. Vince Connelly is leading an interdisciplinary project conducting research into the writing problems of children with language difficulties. Embracing psychology, education and linguistics, this ground-breaking project is aimed at bridging the gaps in current knowledge and will help practitioners to develop literacy strategies to help this already disadvantaged group of children.

Dr Clare Rathbone has been awarded a grant from the ESRC to examine the relationship between memory and identity across the lifespan. Memory impairments can lead to more than mere forgetfulness; they can affect our sense of self and identity. This work will explore the changes in memory that take place in both normal ageing and in dementia.

Professor Margaret Harris and Dr Mark Burgess were awarded £640k by the Technology Strategy Board, a public research council that facilitates innovative technological collaboration between businesses and researchers. They are conducting multi-method research into the critical socio-psychological factors that underpin people’s transition from traditional combustion engine cars to ultra low carbon vehicles and are feeding their results back to car manufacturers, energy companies, and the government.

Research areas and clusters

Developmental Psychology Research Group
There are three main strands to research in this group:
1. Cognitive & Social Development - this includes work on the impact of socio-cultural contexts on human cognition and identity development, children’s evaluation of other people as sources of information, children’s understanding of emotion, the nature of mother-child interactions, children’s interactions with their peers and explanations for school bullying

2. Language & Literacy - this has a focus on the development of speech, reading, spelling, writing and handwriting

3. Developmental Disorders - this includes research on children with hearing impairment, Specific Language Impairment, Dyslexia, Developmental Coordination Disorder, Autism and sleep disorders.

Some of our research focuses on the description of typical development and explanation of developmental processes in different domains. Other work is concerned with understanding the mechanisms underlying atypical development and an examination of ways to support children and their families. Several staff in this research group work with professionals from other disciplines including health and education and are concerned with the production of practical assessment tools and the evaluation of intervention approaches to help children achieve their full potential.

- Adult Cognition Research Group
Research in this group covers the exploration of basic mechanisms as well as higher order processes in normal and atypical populations. A variety of methods are employed (behavioural and psychophysical measures, eye-tracking, movement analysis, and neuropsychological instruments). Specific research interests include: memory processes in ageing, autobiographical memory and identity processes, visual and attentional processing, reading and, perception and action

- Applied Social Psychology
The work of this group involves the application of a variety of different research methods and theoretical perspectives to investigate a range of contemporary issues and social problems. Members of the group share research interests in the psychological processes that underpin significant life transitions, the self and identify, mental and physical health experiences, attitudes, autism and sex differences.

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Promoting the scientific study of health, illness and healthcare to improve health outcomes for patients and the public. Read more
Promoting the scientific study of health, illness and healthcare to improve health outcomes for patients and the public.

Who is it for?

The course is for highly motivated students who have intellectual curiosity to learn about complex problems of health and healthcare and the ambition to conduct research that may lead to a solution to these problems. The programme is especially suited to students who want to go on to do doctoral studies – either a DPsych Health Psychology (for practitioner training) or a PhD (for research training).

The Health Psychology course is also for those who have an undergraduate degree that is accredited by the British Psychological Society. If you are an international student and would like to undertake a Masters degree in this subject but do not have the BPS accreditation, we offer the MSc Psychology and Health as an alternative programme (with identical modules) for students who have not achieved the Graduate Basis for Registration with the British Psychological Society.

Objectives

Health psychology explores the psychological and behavioural processes that influence the development of illness, the promotion of health, and the delivery of healthcare through rigorous research that feeds into evidence-based practice.

Teaching at City promotes the scientist-practitioner model in which research influences how we practice, while allowing our experiences in practice to shape the research questions we ask.

We recognise that great research will not make a difference to people’s lives unless the insights feed into evidence-based practice. You will therefore learn how to make research evidence accessible to help maximise its impact. Taught by a team of leading research-active academics, who are members of the Centre for Health Services Research (CHSR), the MSc Health Psychology programme is designed to give you the foundations that will propel you to an exciting career in the discipline.

Here are some examples of the kinds of questions the course poses:
-How can we help people cope with a diagnosis?
-What are the main challenges facing individuals living with long-term conditions?
-What is psychological theory and how can this be used to understand health and illness behaviours?
-How can we make complex interventions more effective by using theory and empirical evidence?

Academic facilities

City University has recently opened the TECS Lab, a dedicated ‘smart home’, to showcase some of the exciting technologies that are being implemented around the UK to support patients with long-term conditions and complex health and social care needs.

This is a one-of-a-kind resource that is already being used for teaching and research purposes. You will visit the TECS Lab in the spring term and the resource will be available to conduct your own dissertation research on a related topic. As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

The course uses a range of teaching methods including classroom teaching, seminars and workshops. You will be assessed through a varied combination of formats throughout the programme including coursework, examination, a diary component, online discussion forums and a significant piece of empirical research.

The assessment for the Doctorate includes:
-A reflective report (3,000 words) detailing how supervised practice has enabled you to fulfil the generic professional competence.
-A report (1,000 words) summarising the involvement of service users and/or carers in your training.
-Log of experiences that enabled you to gain competence in each component of all core units over the equivalent of two years’ full-time supervised practice (this should include a record of your attendance at core CPD workshops)
-A case study (3,000 words excluding appendices) with supporting evidence in appendices.
-A contract and working agreement conditions document (3,000 words, excluding appendices) with supporting evidence in appendices.
-Two teaching and training case studies (1 x 1,000 & 1 x 2,000 words, excluding appendices) with supporting evidence in appendices. One of the populations must be health care professionals and an observer’s report (500 words)
-A case study describing the process of conducting a psychological intervention that has been implemented through face-to-face work with an individual client (3000 words, excluding appendices) with supporting evidence in appendices.
-A case study (2,000 words, excluding appendices) describing the process of conducting a psychological intervention that has been delivered through a medium other than face-to-face with an individual client with a reflective report on delivering this intervention included in the appendices.
-A research thesis (approximately 15,000 words, excluding appendices) to be written to a standard acceptable for publication in peer-reviewed academic journals.
-A systematic review (6,000 words excluding appendices) to be written to a standard acceptable for publication in peer-reviewed academic journals.

You will also be able to learn from our on-site TECS lab. This is a dedicated smart home equipped with tele-health and tele-care applications and an adjacent monitoring system.

The purpose of the TECS lab is to enable researchers to monitor long-term conditions, and use technology to track an individual’s health in real time. For example seat and bed occupancy sensors enable health psychologists to monitor physical movement and intervene when routine behaviours are disrupted.

Modules

The programme consists of eight compulsory modules and all the teaching takes place in the first two terms. In term one you will be introduced to behavioural medicine, lifestyle, gender and culture, theoretical foundations of health psychology and research design and statistics. In the second term you study understanding and managing long term conditions, developing complex interventions, professional practice and contextual issues in health psychology and advanced research design and statistics. The third term is dedicated to the dissertation.

You may have the opportunity to interact directly with patients or healthcare professionals at the dissertation stage of this Masters degree. You will be conducting your own independent research and this may, for example, involve interviewing patients or professionals about a particular subject, or delivering behaviour change interventions.

To become a qualified researcher and practitioner, you will need to be able to understand and critique published research and to understand practitioner issues, so you can conduct your own research from scratch. At City we will encourage you to conduct research on the front line working on projects that require ethical approval, where you are engaging with real people so you can have a direct impact on their lives.

Core modules
-Theoretical foundations of health psychology (15 credits)
-Behavioural medicine (15 credits)
-Understanding and managing long-term conditions (15 credits)
-Lifespan, gender & culture (15 credits)
-Developing complex interventions (15 credits)
-Professional and contextual Issues in health psychology (15 credits)
-Introduction to research design & statistics (15 credits)
-Advanced research design & statistics (15 credits)
-Dissertation (60 credits)

Career prospects

Health psychologists work in academia as researchers and within the NHS and the wider healthcare sector. The nature of the work means you will be trying to influence public health policy in terms of the way that health care is practised. You will also be evaluating how health care professionals do their work while adhering to the best clinical standards.

As a UK student, because the Health Psychology MSc is accredited, it is known as Stage 1 of the standard training in healthcare psychology. By successfully completing this course you will be able to move on to Stage 2 training (a doctoral level qualification in health psychology). This leads to becoming a fully recognised health psychologist whereby you can apply for Chartered Membership of the British Psychological Society (BPS) and apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

Full membership of the Division of Health Psychology means you will also be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a Chartered Health Psychologist. You can only use the protected title ‘Health Psychologist’ by registering with the HCPC, the statutory regulator.

Graduates of the MSc in Health Psychology and MSc in Psychology & Health take a variety of career paths across the NHS and wider public sector. Here are some examples of the kinds of roles our graduates go on to do:
-A PhD student studying a Professional Doctorate in Health Psychology.
-A research assistant in higher education, NHS or the private sector.
-An assistant psychologist in an applied setting.
-An NHS or third sector healthcare professional, such as a smoking cessation officer, or a public health and health promotion practitioner.

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Programme description. As a multidimensional phenomenon, it is essential that pain is managed through planned multidisciplinary initiatives and inputs that aim to ease patient suffering and improve quality of life. Read more

Programme description

As a multidimensional phenomenon, it is essential that pain is managed through planned multidisciplinary initiatives and inputs that aim to ease patient suffering and improve quality of life. Through a solid, theoretical understanding of the biological, psychological and social concepts that drive, develop and maintain pain, students will explore the multifaceted nature of pain and its effects. Students will gain an advanced understanding of the specialist area of pain management and will develop the core skills and knowledge required of an advanced pain practitioner.

Each course of the programme is divided into a set of themed sections in which material is presented in a blend of short online lectures, practical case studies, directed readings, podcasts and webinars. This is supplemented by discussion boards that provide directed assessment tasks while input from expert guest lecturers and tutors offer students opportunity for collaborative critical discourse and debate of current issues.

This part-time, fully online programme attracts an international and multi-professional student cohort and offers a unique opportunity to have direct contact with others working in pain management across the world. Within this context, students will gain the knowledge, understanding and evaluative skills to provide advanced clinical care so as to improve outcomes for people living in pain.

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Health Academy.

Online learning

By studying at the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine at the University of Edinburgh, students will join a rich tradition of education – one of the oldest institutions in the UK - but also one of the most progressive and dynamic.

The University of Edinburgh has a growing portfolio of established and highly regarded online distance learning postgraduate programmes, with thousands of students currently taking advantage of this mode of education. As a postgraduate student at the University of Edinburgh, you will become part of a supportive online community, able to take advantage of the University’s strong academic tradition, while studying together students and tutors from across the world.

Programme structure

The University of Edinburgh offers a number of outcome awards from its suite of pain management programmes. For those wishing to complete a short option, there are continuing professional development (CME/CPD) courses and for others, who may wish to pursue a longer programme option, there are University awards of Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert), Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) and Master of Science (MSc) – all delivered online using methods that are fully supported by the University’s award-winning online learning environments.

The key differences between the University awards are the number of credits needed to achieve each award:

  • Postgraduate Certificate: this is 60 successfully completed credits of study
  • Postgraduate Diploma: this is 120 successfully completed credits of study
  • Master of Science: this is 180 successfully completed credits of study

Postgraduate Certificate - Level 1 (60 credits)

The Postgraduate Certificate level courses allow students to gain a solid, theoretical understanding of the biological, psychological and social concepts that drive, develop and maintain pain.

Through six core courses covering, assessment and measurement of pain, mechanisms of pain, and the pharmacological and non-pharmacological management of pain, students will explore pain's multifaceted and dynamic nature. In the final core course, students will examine selected conditions seen in clinical practice.

Postgraduate Diploma - Level 2 (60 credits)

(not all Level 2 courses will be offered every year) On successful completion of the Postgraduate Certificate courses, the 60 credits at Postgraduate Diploma level allow students to select courses that focus on areas of pain management that are congruent with students' career goals and clinical or personal interests.

Through a number of course options, including, but not limited to, courses in cancer pain, medical pain, acute pain, neuropathic pain and pain in ageing populations, students will gain an advanced understanding of key areas in pain management. At this level, students may opt to begin to take courses in the areas of either headache management or veterinary medicine to gain a named PGDip or MSc award.

Master of Science - Level 3 (60 credits)

On the successful completion of 120 credits, students are able to proceed to the Master of Science level of the programme. There are a number of options at this level:

  • Fully taught option – successfully complete 60 credits from the Level 2 courses, or,
  • Successfully complete a written dissertation (60 credits), or,
  • Successfully complete a project (60 credits)

Degree Awards with a Headache or Veterinary Designation?

We also offer Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) and Master of Science (MSc) awards in the focussed clinical areas of headache management and veterinary medicine.

Alongside the core pain programme content, students have the option to take a number of courses in specific clinical areas to gain the award of PGDip/MSc Clinical Management of Pain (Headache) or PGDip/MSc Clinical Management of Pain (Veterinary). To gain a named award (i.e. a Headache or Veterinary designation), students must complete at least one third of the credits of the award in the focussed area.

Postgraduate Professional Development (PPD)

Postgraduate Professional Development is aimed at working professionals who want to advance their knowledge through a postgraduate-level course, without the time - or financial - commitment of a full Masters degree, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate. We offer short, focussed, academic credit-bearing courses that provide education on key subjects in pain management.

You may take a maximum of 50 credits worth of courses through our Postgraduate Professional Development (PPD) scheme. These credits are recognised in their own right as postgraduate-level credit, or may be put towards gaining a higher award, such as a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or MSc at the University of Edinburgh or another academic institution.

Career opportunities

By combining academic excellence with the University of Edinburgh’s world-class reputation, graduates from our suite of programme are well placed to continue and advance their clinical careers within the NHS or other health services, pursue advanced academic study, or work in industry. Equally, graduates can expect to be academically confident and may choose to pursue academic careers in related fields.



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Educational and developmental psychologists focus on how people develop and learn throughout their lifetime. They work with individuals, families, groups and organisations in a range of settings and have varying roles such as school psychologist, guidance officer, and child and adolescent counsellor. Read more
Educational and developmental psychologists focus on how people develop and learn throughout their lifetime. They work with individuals, families, groups and organisations in a range of settings and have varying roles such as school psychologist, guidance officer, and child and adolescent counsellor. They conduct psychological and educational assessments and instructional planning for exceptional children, adolescents and adults.The Master of Educational and Developmental Psychology is an Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC) accredited fifth and sixth-year sequence in psychology and prepares graduates to practise as educational and developmental psychologists in settings including schools, health and welfare services, care facilities, and within business environments.

The course develops you as an independent specialist with a professional commitment to lifelong learning and application of the theoretical, research, assessment and therapeutic skills related to educational and developmental psychology.

You will develop advanced understanding of, and the skills associated with:

- human developmental stages and processes throughout the lifespan
- psycho-educational assessment and treatment approaches for problematic or atypical development
- advanced therapeutic counselling process and the cycle of effective intervention and change
- contemporary models of exceptionality and inclusion
- evidence-based intervention and treatment programs for psychological problems and psychopathology across the lifespan
- contemporary research and theories of abilities, personality and psychopathology
- ethical, cultural and professional issues
- administering and reporting a range of essential psycho-educational assessment instruments for assessing abilities, personality and adjustment of children through to adults

In addition you will apply theory to practice with 1000 hours of supervised professional placements in a range of settings.

In undertaking a research thesis, you will develop an evidence based approach to psychology, carrying out reviews and scientific investigations relevant to the theory and practice of educational and developmental psychology.

As a graduate, you will be qualified to register as a psychologist with the Psychology Board of Australia (PBA). You will also meet most requirements for membership of the College of Educational and Developmental Psychologists of the Australian Psychological Society.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/educational-and-developmental-psychology-d6007?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in two parts, Part A. Applied academic studies in psychology and Part B. Clinical placement in psychology.

PART A. Applied academic studies in psychology (72 points)
These studies will advance your knowledge and skill development for psychology practice. Guided by sound ethical principles, and through collaborative participation in coursework lectures and workshops, you will develop both expert knowledge of psychology across the lifespan and your critical thinking skills for professional practice.

You will also undertake research, developing as a scientist-practitioner, as you carry out reviews and scientific investigations relevant to the theory and practice of educational and developmental psychology. This will culminate in a 12 - 16 000 word research thesis, involving an independent empirical investigation of a high scientific standard.

PART B. Clinical placement in psychology (24 points)
These studies are practicum placements across a variety of settings where you have the opportunity to apply theory to practice under the supervision of experienced specialist practitioners. You will complete three supervised placements totalling 1000 recorded hours of practical experience.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/education

Faculty of Education

The Faculty of Education is committed to researching, communicating and applying knowledge about teaching and learning in ways that foster quality in education.

The Faculty of Education develops and provides innovative research and teaching that takes seriously the global-to-local demands of an excellent Australian public university. Our work focuses on advancing the discipline and practice of education through original research, development and partnership activities. We prepare and develop professionals and practitioners for a range of education settings and specialisations. We also engage policy and public debate on matters of importance to education and educators at all levels.

Our mission is to contribute to the public interest through high quality and ethical teaching, research, capacity building and community service. To this end, we create and pursue opportunities that strengthen and sustain a vibrant intellectual community, centred on the purposeful, critical and disciplined study of learning and teaching in a range of contexts.

Our vision is of:

- graduates who are capable, thoughtful, ethical citizens of the world, distinguished by their knowledge, intellectual engagement and professional skill, and by their commitment to lifelong learning, innovation and excellence

- research practice and scholarly output that is recognised internationally and locally for its originality, rigour and impartiality, and for providing advice and services that inform and lead professional practice, public debate, policy and community action

- an intellectual, social, physical and web environment that challenges, enthuses and supports all to learn and excel, and which sustains productive working relations characterised by mutual respect, accountability, contribution and recognition.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/educational-and-developmental-psychology-d6007?domestic=true#making-the-application

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The programme is jointly delivered by the School of Law and the Department of Psychology and is designed for full and part-time study. Read more
The programme is jointly delivered by the School of Law and the Department of Psychology and is designed for full and part-time study.

The contributions to the programme from academics in Psychology, Criminology and Law reflect the multidisciplinary context of applied forensic psychology and will develop your skills in integrating multidisciplinary concepts and communicating to multidisciplinary colleagues. The strong links with external practitioners in the field of forensic psychology give the programme a distinctive emphasis on detention and prisons, the assessment and treatment of the mentally disordered offender and young people in the Criminal Justice System.

The programme is accreditated by The British Psychological Society, so accounts for Stage 1 of the Qualification in Forensic Psychology

Embedded within the programme are a series of optional work experience opportunities that staff members promote among the cohort. Although these opportunities will not attract course credits or extend the period of student registration, staff endeavour to generate a range of relevant opportunities and work with colleagues in the careers service to ensure that necessary paperwork and insurance are in place.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/criminologyandsociology/coursefinder/mscforensicpsychology.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The contributions to the programme from academics in Psychology, Criminology and Law reflect the multidisciplinary context of applied forensic psychology and will develop your skills in integrating multidisciplinary concepts and communicating to multidisciplinary colleagues.

- The strong links with external practitioners in the field of forensic psychology give the programme a distinctive emphasis on detention and prisons, the assessment and treatment of mentally disordered offenders and young people in the Criminal Justice System.

- The assignments that we use are not only exams and traditional academic essays but also include professional reports, oral presentations and written reflections which enable you to build important skills that are critical for your future career as a forensic psychologist.

- The programme is accredited by the MSc British Psychological Society, so accounts for Stage 1 of the Qualification in Forensic Psychology.

- We deliberately limit student numbers to ensure high standards and to enable us to develop a good relationship with each of our students.

Department research and industry highlights

The programme is delivered by a team of leading academics with expertise in their fields. The core teaching staff is made up of:

- Dr Emily Glorney is a Registered Forensic Psychologist with over 15 years of experience working in forensic practice and conducting research across secure hospitals and prisons. Emily is currently working on collaborative research projects with Broadmoor Hospital, exploring the meaning of religion and sprituality in the recovery pathways of patients and developing a quantitative observation system for the alerting of aggressive and violent behaviour.

- Professor Rosie Meek is a Chartered Psychologist and prison researcher, conducting qualitative and quantitative research throughout the UK and internationally. She works closely with a range of Criminal Justice agencies, including prisons and Immigration Removal Centres, a broad range of third sector organisations that work directly with offenders, and the Ministry of Justice. Her specialisms include prison healthcare and education, the role of the voluntary sector in reducing reoffending and promoting desistance, and the evaluation of prison-based interventions and programmes. Dr Meek’s most recent book ‘Sport in Prison’ has been used by those responsible for developing physical activity policy in prisons in England and Wales.

- Dr Laura Mickes is a Cognitive Psychologist who specialises in modelling human memory. Laura was part of the team that developed a widely-used statistical method for use in eyewitness identification research. Her current research is dedicated to identifying and developing procedures that enhance eyewitness accuracy, where she works with Identification Officers at the Metropolitan Police.

- Professor Amina Memon is a Chartered Psychologist with over 25 years of experience in higher education and research. Her research in the area of psychology and law spans cognitive, social and forensic domains. Her work is firmly grounded in policy and practice, for example she studies how to maximise the accuracy, truthfulness and credibility of witness statements, has contributed to training of the police and judiciary and has served as an expert witness in family court cases and criminal trials. Professor Memon’s background in human rights had led to her extending her research to third sector organisations such as Asylum Aid, Plan UK and Freedom From Torture.

- Dr David La Rooy is a Chartered Psychologist. He is an internationally recognised memory expert, expert in investigative interviewing techniques, and conducts research that has influenced the training of child forensic interviewers, the police, lawyers and judges around the world in how best to interview victims of child abuse. He has co-edited two volumes for the 'Wiley Series in the Psychology of Crime, Policing and Law.'

Course content and structure

The programme is made up of the following six core courses (Four delivered in the Autumn term and two in the Spring term) and the dissertation which is undertaken throughout the year.

The programme confers Stage 1 of a two-stage process of professional training in forensic psychology that is assessed by the British Psychological Society (the second stage of professional training is subsequent and external to the MSc Forensic Psychology programme at Royal Holloway). International students would be welcome on the programme of study.

The British Psychological Society requires that core knowledge domains are incorporated into the course so as to reflect the diversity of research and practice in forensic psychology. The unique selling point and emphasis of the programme at Royal Holloway is defined by the multidisciplinarity of the teaching (jointly by forensic psychologists and those carrying out research relevant to forensic psychology in the departments of Psychology and Law) and the research strengths of both departments.

Core course units:
- Research Based Practice in Forensic Psychology
- Young People in the Criminal Justice System
- The Legal Process
- Aspects of the Investigative Process
- Advanced Techniques in Social and Behavioural Research
- Statistics for Research
- Dissertation

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/. Read more
We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/

Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity.

During your first year you may take a range of taught modules including research design and analysis, methodology, theoretical issues, and statistics; requirements will vary depending on any postgraduate research training you have already undertaken.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

You will attend and contribute to research seminars, and through departmental and Goldsmiths-wide modules you are also encouraged to develop practical skills such as public speaking, poster preparation, scientific writing, and how to deal with the media.

You meet regularly with your supervisor at every stage, and develop a structured approach to designing, executing, analysing and writing up your research.

You will have access to the Department of Psychology's range of laboratories, testing rooms and research equipment. You have an annual allowance to contribute towards your research expenses and participation in at least one national or international conference.

What kind of research could I do?

We are able to support research in most areas of psychology. Some students have already formulated specific research ideas before they apply here, and find a supervisor in the department who is able to help them develop these into a doctoral research programme; if this applies to you, see information on the expertise of all our staff and contact any who you think may be able to help you to pursue these.

Other students are attracted by the research interests of our staff, and may decide to undertake a project which has been suggested by them and which relates to their ongoing research. To explore these or other research ideas, start by emailing the member of staff whose research interests you. Each staff member will discuss research ideas with you via email, skype or phone; and you are very welcome to visit staff at Goldsmiths to discuss your options further.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Denise Barry.

Structure

Our postgraduate students are offered a stimulating study environment in which to research their higher degree.

We have a thriving postgraduate school with some 40 current students on full-time and part-time programmes, including mature students and students from the EU and overseas.

We provide training modules in research methods in your first year, a regular report/presentation schedule, and excellent computing/research facilities.

If you are thinking of doing an MPhil at Goldsmiths, the first step is to get in touch with any members of our staff whose research is in line with your interests.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Training and support

All our MPhil students are assigned a specific research supervisor (or sometimes joint supervisors).

As well as receiving ongoing support and guidance from their allocated supervisor(s), our students undergo comprehensive training in psychological research methods (unless they already hold an MSc approved by the ESRC) in line with current ESRC training guidelines, which includes quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. This is mainly during the first year of registration (or first two years for part-time students. Our MPhil students also attend various short generic research skills and methods training (CRT) modules run by the College, also in their first year (or first two years if part-time).

Our students have full access to the Department's excellent facilities for lab and field research, and first-rate technical support is available from the Department's five-strong team of full-time technical staff.

Your progress

You may have the option to upgrade to a PhD after 12 months full-time, or 20 months part-time.

Your progress on your thesis is regularly monitored by the Department's Postgraduate Programmes Committee. The Head of Department can recommend suspension from the programme at any stage if progress is not satisfactory.

Postgraduate facilities

All full-time students have their own workplace and a networked computer with access to programmes for their research needs, plus email and internet facilities. Part-time students also have access to a networked computer, generally shared between two or three students. In addition, we have a lab solely for the use of postgraduates, and a postgraduate computing room. We also run a psychological test library for staff and students.

Seminars and presentations

Our postgraduates have regular opportunities to meet up with other students and to make contact with staff.

The Department runs a number of active visiting lecturer seminar programmes and a weekly Postgraduate Seminar Series, at which students learn about the research of their colleagues, and receive guidance on topics such as giving presentations or writing up a thesis. There are also several specialised research groups (including affective neuroscience, consciousness studies, development and social processes, occupational psychology, visual cognition) open to staff, researchers and postgraduate students which hold regular discussion sessions and talks.

All postgraduates are invited to attend an annual Research Seminar Weekend in an informal setting at Cumberland Lodge in Windsor Great Park, which is funded by the Department. Here, we have a programme of internal and external speakers.

In addition, our annual Postgraduate Poster Party gives students the opportunity to update the Department on their work.

Conferences

Besides the yearly presentation to the Department, our postgraduates are strongly encouraged to present their work, eg as a paper or poster, at external conferences and financial support is set aside for this. Some recent presentations by postgraduates include:

-Priming for depth-rotated objects depends on attention. (Vision Sciences, Sarasota)
-Imagining objects you have never seen: Imagery in individuals with profound visual impairment. (BPS Annual Conference)
-Modelling dopaminergic effects on implicit and explicit learning tasks. (Annual Summer Interdisciplinary Conference)
-Individual differences in affective modulation of the startle reflex and emotional stroop task. (BPS Conference)
-Evolution and psi: Investigating the presentiment effect as an adapted behaviour. (Society for Psychical Research 25th International Conference)
-Presence: Is your heart in it? (4th Annual International Workshop on Presence)
-The effects of state anxiety on the suggestibility and accuracy of child eyewitnesses. (11th European Conference of Psychology and Law)
-The psychosocial sequelae of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. (6th Scientific Meeting of the Stroke Association)
-The role of Electrophysiology in Human Computer Interaction. (HCI Conference)
-Categorical shape perception. Experimental Psychology Society and Belgian Psychological Society)
-Schizotypy, eye movements, and the effects of neuroticism. (10th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Individual (ISSID))
-Eye movements in siblings of schizophrenic patients. (World Congress of Biological Psychiatry, Berlin, Germany)

Assessment

Thesis and viva voce.

Department

Psychology at Goldsmiths is ranked joint 3rd in the UK for the quality of our research**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

How does music affect mood?
Why do some people believe in the paranormal?
How do people with autism think?

In the Department of Psychology we try and investigate questions like this, conducting research that’s relevant to a range of sectors and industries – from advertising to education, and from banking to the public sector.

You’ll be taught by experts in the field, who are carrying out research that’s world class. And you’ll learn in a department with excellent specialist and general-purpose research laboratories, including:

EEG and brain stimulation labs for neuroscience research
a visual perception and attention laboratory equipped with state-of-the-art eye tracking systems
an infant lab
in-house technical support staff

Skills & Careers

You will receive training in and develop wide-ranging research skills, including:

database searching and bibliographic skills
managing and analysing data
presentation and communication skills
quantitative and qualitative research methods
handling legal and ethical issues in research
research design
project management

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity, as reflected in the research interests of our staff. Please contact a member of staff in the department, before making a formal application, and establish that they would be willing to supervise you in a research area of common interest.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

An approximate timeline of training and research plans and an outline of a previous research project in which you have played a leading role (for instance, a study you conducted for your undergraduate or MSc degree). The personal statement in the Departmental form will be structured in a different way to that on the College form. Please see guidelines on the form itself. Finally, your supervisor will be required to provide a statement detailing ways in which the project fits into their overall research programme and the wider research interests and facilities of the Department. Guidance on how to structure these is given on the form. Please do not exceed the word length, and DO NOT submit additional material emanating from your previous research (e.g. copies of dissertations, published papers) as this will not be read. Note that all aspects of the application are required for an application to be considered.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MSc in Project Management in the Built Environment is designed to meet the growing demand for project managers in the construction industry who can oversee the entire life cycle of any project, including unique and specialist developments. Read more
The MSc in Project Management in the Built Environment is designed to meet the growing demand for project managers in the construction industry who can oversee the entire life cycle of any project, including unique and specialist developments. It is ideal for anyone with ambitions for project management within the construction sector.

We consult extensively with people from a wide spectrum of companies and organisations in order to make sure that the course content remains practically relevant. For example, prominent companies in the industry are represented in our Professional Liaison Group.

The MSc is available as a one-year, full-time programme or as an open learning programme (a combination of distance learning with intensive on-campus study periods) which is normally taken over two years. There are two entry points: September and January.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/project-management-in-the-built-environment/

Why choose this course?

- Accreditation by the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) demonstrates professional recognition of the quality of our programme.

- Strong links with prominent companies in the sector, such as Mace, Willmott Dixon and BAM Construction who are all represented in our Professional Liaison Group (PLG), which exists to provide advice on existing and proposed courses of study, on research activities and consultancy work.

- The programme adopts a problem-based learning (PBL) approach to ensure that it is real-world focused and holistic. Not only is this more effective, it is more fun than the traditional study and examination approach.

- Students develop a whole range of management skills and knowledge including project finance, technology, law and contract by working on real-life or realistic problems as experienced by the construction industry, consultants and clients. They are also exposed to behavioural aspects of managing projects, which most project managers only experience when their careers in the construction industry are well-advanced.
- There are four intensive study weeks during the programme where full-time and open-learning students come together on campus to attend lectures, seminars and workshops and share experiences.

- Our students come from a wide range of backgrounds and locations. Many have originally studied subjects outside the realm of the built environment such as law, psychology, architecture and geography, and others have been or still are (in the case of our open-learning students) employed in project management roles. As a result, there are great opportunities to share experiences, to gain a better understanding of the industry and the range of challenges that project managers face and also to benefit from the many different approaches to problem solving that is a feature of such a diverse group of students.

- Our graduates span the globe, working in countries including Malaysia, India and USA.

- Our teaching is backed up by strong research activity. Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional or commercial consultancy work. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, approximately 80% of our research, with our colleagues in other Built Environment areas, was judged to be of ‘international’ quality, with approximately 40% rated as ‘internationally excellent’ or ‘world leading’.

- Many members of staff are part of Brookes' Oxford Institute of Sustainable Development (OISD), a leading research and promotional organisation noted for its work on sustainable technology in buildings and sustainable urban form.

Teaching and learning

Teaching, learning and assessment methods are to a considerable degree determined by the use of problem-based learning (PBL) which leads to a more challenging and industrially relevant course than the traditional lecture approach. Learning takes place through groups of students puzzling through problems, often adapted from real situations with much of the complexity and context intact, using published resources, or reference to experts who are available to offer advice.

Assessment is 100% coursework, which includes a great variety of types of work, including quizzes taken remotely on Moodle (Brookes online learning environment). Material can be downloaded from our virtual learning environment and closed discussions can take place. It also enables on-campus and open-learning students to remain in contact with each other.

In full-time mode, the delivery of new material is generally bi-weekly with intermediate tutorial or seminar sessions. The intensive study weeks and a European field trip, when students in both modes of study come together, complement this delivery pattern. Outside these periods, online learning is the primary mode of learning for distance-learning study. Communication with distance-learning students will be supplemented by email and telephone during the periods off-campus.

Field trips

A European field trip is a compulsory element of the PGCert modules. It typically takes place over a five-day period towards the end of January and is heavily subsidised by the department.

The aim of this field trip is to consolidate the knowledge gained in the early part of the course and to develop team and other relationships through exposing our students to European project management practices and to assess their ability to observe and report on the different approaches to project management in the UK and in a European country.

The field trip normally consists of visits to prominent construction/engineering projects and sites, plus architectural attractions, both en route and at the destination. You are introduced to the development and planning practices at the destination, as well as having the opportunity to visit major complex projects.

Student body

The programme attracts students from diverse backgrounds and locations.

Many of our current students already hold degrees in fields outside the realm of the built environment including law, psychology and geography, and have decided to contribute to the development of the built environment around us by effectively managing projects. They hail from as far afield as Nigeria and India, with backgrounds ranging from languages to architecture.

This diverse group of students bring with them individual responses to the PBL approach that is at the core of our course delivery.

Typically the distance-learning students are employed by a number of different organisations from the private and public sectors in different countries. They have the opportunity to share their experiences in order to gain better understanding of the industry, the range of challenges that project managers face, and therefore the breadth of skills that they need to develop in order to perform successfully.

Our full-time students benefit from contact with the open-learning students engaged in project management roles in a variety of built environment projects across many countries.

Careers

Graduates of the Department of Real Estate and Construction have an outstanding employment record. Local and national construction companies, developers, project managers, house builders, surveyors and housing associations regularly recruit our graduates.

Many of these companies visit the department annually to meet students for graduate positions. Our graduates are recognised as having an excellent level of communication, presentation and problem-solving skills.

All of our open-learning students are employed full-time by prominent companies in the sector.

Full-time students find similar employment shortly after graduation. They typically hold (Assistant) Project Manager positions. However, the breadth of knowledge that our students gain gives them the flexibility to function effectively in a number of different roles.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Our teaching is backed by strong research activity. Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional/commercial consultancy work.

Areas of interest include:
- sustainability, adaptation and resilience to climate change
- collaborative supply networks for procurement and delivery of project
- building economics
- forecasting techniques
- risk management
- social networks in project environments
- managing complex projects
- management of knowledge and innovation as a source of competitive advantage/li>
- adaptive re-use of existing buildings
- facilities management
- health and safety.

Many members of staff are part of the Oxford Institute of Sustainable Development (OISD). This research and promotional organisation is noted for its work on sustainable technology in buildings and sustainable urban form among many on-going projects.

A recent HEFCE report into sustainable development in higher education in England suggests that the OISD is one of the key players in sustainable development research.

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This route is intended for applicants who have a background or strong interest in education, have undertaken some previous study of developmental and/or educational psychology, perhaps within their first degree, and now wish to develop their knowledge in this area further. Read more
This route is intended for applicants who have a background or strong interest in education, have undertaken some previous study of developmental and/or educational psychology, perhaps within their first degree, and now wish to develop their knowledge in this area further. The route offers a well-rounded introduction to areas of psychology relevant to the study of children's development, learning and education, together with more advanced routes examining psychological approaches to particular topics within education. At the end of the route, participants are required to devise and carry out their own research projects on topics in which they have brought or developed a particular interest.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/ededmeepy

Course detail

Five introductory level core topic modules are offered: developmental psychology, cognitive psychology; biological psychology; social psychology and individual differences. These are followed by two advanced modules: quantitative and other research methods in psychology; and a series of contemporary psychological explanations and research applications in a broad range of educational contexts. The route is accredited by the British Psychological Society, so that applicants who have the equivalent of six months' study of psychology at undergraduate level will be eligible for BPS Graduate membership and the Graduate Basis for Registration. This enables successful candidates to proceed onto routes offering professional training as a Chartered Psychologist (in, for example, educational or clinical psychology).

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of research techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature applicable to their specific educational domain;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The course is composed of two key elements: (i) the research methods training course and (ii) the 'Psychology and Education' thematic route. Teaching time is split between the two elements, with 32 hours of teaching being given to research methods and 64 hours being given to the subject specific content. The course is taught through a mixture of lectures, smaller group seminars and individual supervisions.

Written feedback is provided on the thesis by two independent assessors. Informally, feedback will also be provided through regular supervisions. Supervisors are required to provide a report on student progress which can be viewed by the student through CGSRS.

Assessment

Thesis: Up to 20,000 words.

Students following the two year MEd programme are required to submit the following in Year 1:
Essay 1: 6,000-6,500 words.
Essay 2: 6,000-6,500 words.

Continuing

Students wishing to continue from the Master of Education to PhD or Ed D are required to achieve:

1) an average of 70 across both sections with the thesis counting as double-weighted (eg: (Essay 1 + Essay 2 + thesis + thesis) divided by 4 = 70 or above.
Or
2) a straight mark of 70 or higher for the thesis.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Faculty is pleased to say that, in general, education students are successful in most of the funding competitions, and, in a typical year, will host students who have been awarded funding from all of the major funding bodies.

In addition, a number of Colleges have their own scholarships/bursaries, but these will be restricted to College members. Finally, it is important to note that deadlines for scholarships and bursaries are early, so applicants are strongly encouraged to explore funding opportunities as soon as possible - at least a year in advance of the start of the course.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The Master of Professional Psychology is a one year course designed to meet the requirements of the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC) and the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA) for a generalist fifth year in psychology. Read more
The Master of Professional Psychology is a one year course designed to meet the requirements of the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC) and the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA) for a generalist fifth year in psychology.

The course prepares selected psychology graduates in advanced psychotherapeutic skills required for general registration as a psychologist. It develops your professional capability to apply the theoretical, research, assessment and therapeutic skills involved in psychology. Following graduation, you will be eligible to undertake one year of supervised generalist practice – you will then progress to full registration as a psychologist.

You will develop expertise in applying counselling theories and practices through your understanding of a range of evidence-based psychotherapies. You will learn core skills and theoretical concepts underpinning the therapeutic process and extend your practical knowledge in counselling interventions as you develop therapeutic relationships with a range of client groups. You will acquire the skills to administer, score, interpret and report on a comprehensive range of psychological tests and assessments.

You will engage with the Australian Psychological Society (APS) code of ethics and explore ethical dilemmas to support your ethical practice in undertaking research, educational or professional roles in different workplaces.

You will be exposed to a range of techniques associated with promotion of wellbeing, symptom reduction and behavioural change. In addition, you will learn how to employ culturally sensitive interventions that have been shown to facilitate positive outcomes in a variety of contexts. You will learn how to utilise research in guiding your choice of therapeutic interventions and how to evaluate the outcomes of your intervention in practice.
You will gain professional experience through 300 hours of supervised professional experience activities through a mix of activities in the Faculty's onsite clinic and off-campus clinical placement activities.

On completion of the course, graduates will have acquired the necessary skills to prepare for a final year of supervised practice in the field for general registration under the '5+1 internship model' for registration. Graduates of the program arrange a Psychology Board of Australia (PsyBA) approved 1-year internship in settings of their choice.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/professional-psychology-d6008?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in two parts, Part A. Applied academic studies in psychology and Part B. Clinical placement in psychology.

PART A. Applied academic studies in psychology (48 points)
These studies will advance your knowledge and skill development for psychology practice. Guided by sound ethical principles, and through collaborative participation in coursework lectures and workshops, you develop both expert knowledge of psychology across the lifespan and advance your critical thinking skills for professional practice.

PART B. Clinical placement in psychology (0 points)
These studies involve 300 hours of clinical placements where you have the opportunity to develop your practice under supervision. This experience will occur partly through clinical activities in the Faculty's onsite clinic. Some off-campus clinical placement activities may also be required.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/education

Faculty of Education

The Faculty of Education is committed to researching, communicating and applying knowledge about teaching and learning in ways that foster quality in education.

The Faculty of Education develops and provides innovative research and teaching that takes seriously the global-to-local demands of an excellent Australian public university. Our work focuses on advancing the discipline and practice of education through original research, development and partnership activities. We prepare and develop professionals and practitioners for a range of education settings and specialisations. We also engage policy and public debate on matters of importance to education and educators at all levels.

Our mission is to contribute to the public interest through high quality and ethical teaching, research, capacity building and community service. To this end, we create and pursue opportunities that strengthen and sustain a vibrant intellectual community, centred on the purposeful, critical and disciplined study of learning and teaching in a range of contexts.

Our vision is of:

- graduates who are capable, thoughtful, ethical citizens of the world, distinguished by their knowledge, intellectual engagement and professional skill, and by their commitment to lifelong learning, innovation and excellence

- research practice and scholarly output that is recognised internationally and locally for its originality, rigour and impartiality, and for providing advice and services that inform and lead professional practice, public debate, policy and community action

- an intellectual, social, physical and web environment that challenges, enthuses and supports all to learn and excel, and which sustains productive working relations characterised by mutual respect, accountability, contribution and recognition.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/professional-psychology-d6008?domestic=true#making-the-application

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