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Masters Degrees (Psychology Of Education)

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The Psychology of Education MSc will introduce students to key theoretical issues in the psychology of education, critically analysing psychological theory and research, and exploring its contribution to educational issues and practice. Read more
The Psychology of Education MSc will introduce students to key theoretical issues in the psychology of education, critically analysing psychological theory and research, and exploring its contribution to educational issues and practice. It is intended for people who wish to gain Graduate Basis of Certified Status so that they can proceed to professional training as an educational or other psychologist.

Degree information

This programme aims to equip students to develop understanding of the current issues in the psychology of education and provide them with an opportunity to engage in research. On successful completion of the programme students should be able to produce and communicate reasoned and informed argument, both in writing and orally. Students will also be able to critically evaluate theory and evidence in psychology.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Core Topics in the Psychology of Education
-Methodology and Statistics

Optional modules
-Cognitive Development and Learning or Personality and Social Psychology

Students choose one module from the following:
-Atypical Development
-Developmental Psychology and Psychobiology
-Issues in Educational Neuroscience
-Language Development
-Literacy Development
-Psychological Aspects of Counselling
-Reading and Spelling Difficulties
-Social Development

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, including guest speakers, student preparation of tasks and longer presentations, group work, discussion, and computer workshops giving hands-on practice. Assessment is through coursework and one unseen examination. Coursework can involve small exercices, critiques of set research articles and extended pieces of writing on set topics.

Careers

Graduates of this Master's degree are currently working as:
-PhD students
-Researchers in the public and private sectors
-Clinical and educational doctorate students.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Secondary School Head of Year, Unspecified London Borough
-Secondary School Teacher (A level Pyschology, Health and Society, Unspecified Secondary School
-Secondary School Teacher, Unspecified Catholic School and Sixth Form
-Special Educational Needs (SEN) Teaching Assistant, Unspecified Academy
-University Liaison Officer, Overseas Students Service Centre (OSSC)

Employability
This programme offers a comprehensive research training in developmental and educational psychology. It provides a good grounding for doctoral study and valuable preparation for a research career in the academic community, the public sector or in industry.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Institute of Education (IOE) is one of the world's leading centres for education and related areas of social science - students learn from cutting-edge researchers in the field. For the third year in succession the UCL Institute of Education (IOE) has been ranked as the world's leading university for Education (QS World University Rankings 2016). Our alumni include government ministers; heads of schools, other educational institutions and NGOs; and Olympians and prize-winning authors.

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This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Read more
This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology is a three-year full-time, four-year part-time taught doctoral programme leading to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health Care Professions Council (HCPC), accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society (BPS), and recognition within the UK and the EU as a chartered counselling psychologist eligible to practice.

The programme offers a sound and marketable model, combining in-depth competency in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), strong humanistic values, and psychodynamic awareness. The course was re-accredited by the HCPC and the BPS in 2012. It was commended for the depth and breadth of the modules offered; a number of our modules were described as cutting-edge and very well suited to the current zeitgeist and employment market. These modules include a first-year module devoted to working with difference and diversity, and a third-year service evaluation research exercise.

Run by a dedicated team of HCPC registered and BPS accredited chartered counselling and clinical psychologists, this course offers wide-ranging and high quality clinical and research expertise to trainees. Course team members have between one and 11 years of post-qualification clinical experience, and two thirds hold PhD or professional doctoral titles. Two thirds of the staff are academically published authors.

While student numbers are growing, the team prides itself on retaining a small cohort each year of no more than 20 students. This enables us to offer you a relatively high volume of individual attention from staff. All students are assigned a personal tutor and two research supervisors. You are offered a relatively high proportion of research supervision (10 hours in Year 1 and 20 hours each year in Years 2 and 3); safe spaces for clinical group supervision and skills practice; and an experiential and workshop style of teaching and learning. Trainees and staff develop collaborative relationships in relation to learning and personal development.

The programme has a dedicated placements coordinator, and an extensive online placement provider database, accessible prior to training commencement. We offer a comprehensive placements induction in the first week of training, and we encourage and support you to be in placement or at interview stage with placement providers by the beginning of your training.

The first year of training is the equivalent of a Master’s year. Students who exit at the end of Year 1 are eligible for an MSc in Psychological Therapies. This MSc offers eligibility to register with the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP), leading to clinical practice in either in public, private or third sector organisations. However, the course has high student retention rates, with the majority of students continuing from the MSc level into the doctoral level of training in Years 2 and 3. Student satisfaction within the programme is very high; feedback forms regularly comment on the high quality and breadth of teaching, the clinical and research expertise of the lecturers, and the dedication of the staff, both at a personal and professional level. Our students feel valued and attended to by the teaching team because the size of each cohort allows for a more tailored experience for each student.

Through postgraduate teaching and workshops across the wider applied psychology subject area, London Met counselling psychology trainees develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills in a broad range of qualitative and quantitative psychological research methods. The course emphasises criticality, epistemological critique and reflexivity across all research teaching and learning. Extensive support in the form of individual and group supervision and teaching is offered, alongside methodology learning, to support trainees in undertaking a piece of doctoral level research that will make an original contribution to the professional practice of counselling psychology, and more widely.

As trainees you will develop a wide range of intellectual and practical skills and knowledge. The training has a solid track record of trainees emerging as robust, sophisticated, and highly employable practitioners of counselling psychology. In recent years, we are proud that a number of our trainees have won BPS Division of Counselling Psychology trainee prizes for written assignments and research poster presentations.

The principle aims and achievements of the course are to produce graduates who are:
-Competent, informed, reflective, ethical and professionally sound practitioners of counselling psychology who are able to work in a range of settings and are committed to their own on-going personal and professional development
-Able to understand, develop and apply models of advanced psychological inquiry and research that enable the creation of new knowledge and which recognise the complex nature of human experience and relationships
-Able to adopt a questioning and evaluative approach to the philosophy, practice, research and theory that constitutes counselling psychology and aware of the wider social, cultural and political domains within which counselling psychology operates
-In possession of a set of skills and competencies that are transferable to a wide variety of professional contexts and which enhance employability
-Able to demonstrate the range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC)

Many students are conducting research in collaboration with National Health Service (NHS) Trusts or non-governmental organisations (NGOs). Graduates find permanent employment within a few months post-qualification, with many trainees holding part-time clinical employment whilst they are in the final year of the training because their clinical skills and knowledge are of such a high standard. Other graduates from the programme find work in academia in visiting or permanent teaching posts or as research fellows.

The course is involved in on-going in-house events and conferences such as CultureShock, and in research and clinical collaborations with five NHS trusts. The programme is also involved in research and in the training of clinical staff with the Freedom from Torture Foundation and Khulisa, both community based organisations close to the Holloway Campus. The programme is also collaborating with the School of Social Sciences and School of Social Professions to link interpreters with clinicians and to establish training inside and outside the University on working with interpreters in mental health settings.

Assessment

A wide range of assessment methods is used on the programme. In Year 1 you'll complete seven master's level assignments, including a reflective essay, case formulation, process report, examination and two short research assignments using qualitative and quantitative methodologies.

You'll also complete a 7,000-word reflexive critical literature review and a 3,000-word proposal towards the end of Year 1. Your proposal must demonstrate an adequate basis for a doctoral level research project for you to proceed into Year 2 of the programme. Year 1 is the most intensive period of assessment on the programme.

If you progress to Year 2 you'll complete an extended clinical case study, integrative process analysis and theoretical essay at the end of the year, reflecting cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic learning. At the end of Year 3 a similar assignment is completed, reflecting a trans-theoretical, pluralistic perspective. You should complete your research project by the end of Year 3, submitting a 25,000 word thesis and subsequently participating in a viva voce examination.

You'll receive research supervision to guide your research throughout the programme. Research progress is formally monitored and evaluated through the submission of annual reports to the Research and Postgraduate Office in Years 2 and 3.

You are required to complete a minimum of 450 clinical hours in a range of placements under supervision over the duration of the programme, as well as a minimum of 60 hours of your own personal therapy.

Supervisors complete six-monthly practice competency evaluations, which enable bidirectional feedback and reflection on your progress and continuing professional development in your practice placements. Your personal and professional development is individually monitored and supported throughout the programme via annual reviews and appraisals with a tutor from the programme team.

Professional accreditation

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology leads to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advanced Research Design and Analysis for Psychology (core, 20 credits)
-Counselling Psychology Practice and Development (core, 20 credits)
-Professional and Ethical Issues (core, 20 credits)
-Psychological Knowledge and Models of Therapy (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project and Critical Skills (core, 60 credits)
-Therapeutic and Reflective Skills (core, 20 credits)
-Working with Difference and Diversity (core, 20 credits)

Year 2 modules include:
-Advanced Psychological Research (core, 160 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 1 (core, 100 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 2 (core, 100 credits)

After the course

Career opportunities for counselling psychologists include posts in a variety of areas. These include National Health Service (NHS) settings such as primary care, Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services, community mental health, drug and alcohol, rehabilitation, eating and personality disorder services, as well as the prison service, voluntary sector, private practice, academia, training, supervision, management and consultancy.

Graduates from the programme frequently go on work in one or more of these areas. Some have gone on to provide practice placements or to supervise or teach students on the programme. The range of advanced clinical and research skills and abilities gained through the course prepare graduates to undertake work in a variety of fields of activity.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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Communication for Development is an interdisciplinary field of study and practice, combining studies on culture, communication and development and integrating them with practical fieldwork. Read more
Communication for Development is an interdisciplinary field of study and practice, combining studies on culture, communication and development and integrating them with practical fieldwork. It explores the use of communication – both as a tool and as a way of articulating processes of social change – within the contexts of globalisation.

In this programme, where the form of study strives to be conducive to the course content, progression lies in the group dynamic process as well as in the coursework itself. The multidisciplinary nature of the subject means that the same content should provide in-depth knowledge for students with different backgrounds. One major point of this pedagogical approach is to bring together different experiences. The group diversity should allow students to deepen their knowledge of their own major as well as gain a sufficient overview based on the academic backgrounds and practical experiences of other students. This will allow them to be able to work both interdisciplinary and transcultural in their future professions.

This is Communication for Development

What is the relationship between development communication and the emerging, influential nexus of communication for social change, and where does social communication fit in?

Regardless of what one calls it, communication and media strategies have been utilised in development cooperation for well over sixty years. From an early emphasis on mass media in agricultural extension work, communication for development has grown to encompass a wide array of approaches and methodologies, and has gradually increased in stature to become a key driver of contemporary debates in development. Initially, communication interventions were largely oriented around the use of mass media, and existed within a principally modernising, top-down and technocratic paradigm. Among other complex forces at play, the New World Information and Communication Order (NWICO) debates in the 70s and 80s and the rise of critical and alternative approaches to development stretched the definition of the field. In addition to mass media, practitioners began to evaluate the need for richer interpersonal communication approaches that highlight the importance of power and culture in the success of development initiatives.

Dialogue, participation and the sharing of knowledge

Some of the most significant changes to global development cooperation have come about as a result of this critical field of study. As a discipline, Communication for Development embraces a broad range of functions and practices which centre around dialogue, participation and the sharing of knowledge and information, all with a view to creating empowerment and sustainable social change. Development communication is no longer an emerging discipline but one which has established itself as an integral part of development planning. Labelled part science, part craft and part art, its multidisciplinary nature draws on aspects of anthropology, sociology, psychology and the behavioural sciences, and its implementation depends on flexibility, creativity and an understanding of communication processes. An awareness of the role media and communication have to play in development cooperation and diversity management have transformed the way development is perceived, mapped and implemented, and the field has pioneered some of the most ground-breaking improvements in global development undertakings. As the recent surge in new communications technologies demonstrates, it is not the tools themselves that make good communication, but rather a rich and theoretically informed understanding of the political, social and cultural contexts in which media and communications interventions occur.

Communication for Development as a Field of Study

Despite the fact that every year vast amounts of money are donated to developing countries, the chasm between the ‘haves’ and the ‘have-nots’ continues to widen as billions of people around the world continue to live without running water, sanitation, adequate nutrition or access to basic education.

While the poor and the marginalised have always been at the centre of development, they have been the subjects rather than the objects of communication as traditional development practices overlooked a fundamental truism: that the poor, themselves, are often the best experts on their needs. Marginalised communities, historically denied access to communication tools and channels, have traditionally been passive bystanders to their so-called development as top-down, one-sided mass communication programmes delivered information without taking into account the very important specificities of context – the cultural norms and beliefs, knowledge and folklore of target populations, and how these impact the uptake of information and the potential for social change. Due to this lack of participation by target communities, most development programmes failed to achieve their goals, and a dramatic shift in paradigm was necessary to improve the efficacy and sustainability of development cooperation methods.

Social processes rooted in the communities

This shift towards participatory social processes, rooted in the customs and traditions of communities themselves, is the most fundamental premise of communication for development. Participatory processes aim to utilise cultural specificity as a tool rather than an obstacle, starting at ‘grass-roots’ level and developing methods that are grounded in, and take local and indigenous knowledge seriously. These processes comprise an interchange of knowledge and information, empowering individuals to make choices for themselves, and place communication at the forefront of the planning process while at the same time feedback and consultative processes ensure that communication is on-going and efficacy is maximised. Through the creation of ‘bottom-up’ processes, individuals become fundamental initiates in development schemes, a factor which is strongly linked to their long-term sustainability.

ComDev addresses the gap

As the divide between the ‘connected’, developed world and developing countries grows, so does the need for new, innovative methods for addressing global inequality increase, and Communication for Development is the field devoted to the study and implementation of these processes. The power of media and the potential of Information Communication Technology (ICT) to educate and to address global crises such as the spread of HIV have led to exciting and creative innovations in development cooperation, and this dynamic field continues to grow and develop. As globalisation and the development of ICTs change world markets and pose an increasing threat to developing countries and their more vulnerable communities, practitioners schooled in contemporary mass communication theories and concepts have become a vital part of development across the globe.

Why choose Malmö University?

Despite the wider acceptance of community-driven and participatory approaches to development by large multilateral and bilateral development agencies, the field continues to struggle for institutionalisation, and to be granted sufficient resources by managers and funding agencies.

Paradoxically, the role of media and communication in development cooperation has seen a strange turn after the first World Congress on Communication for Development, held in Rome in 2006 and organized by FAO, the World Bank and the Communication Initiative, in partnership with a broad strand of important organisations in the field. The summit in Rome managed to mobilize almost a thousand participants from research and practice, government and non-government. It was supposed to mark the definite break-through of the science and practice of ComDev. Instead, what happened had more the character of an implosion of the ComDev field, which only recently is gaining a new momentum. Today, we are however actually seeing a long series of new institutional initiatives, in the world of ComDev, both in practice and university curricular development. At university level, new MAs in ComDev have developed in places like Albania, South Africa, Kenya, Spain, Paraguay, the UK and Colombia. The field is finally becoming more significantly institutionalised in the world of academia, although it is still grappling with finding its identity between media and communication studies on one side, and cultural studies, political science and not least development studies on some of the other sides. The interdisciplinarity embedded in ComDev, combined with the outlined processes of globalisation, mediatisation and the proliferation of bottom-up agency are all contributing to put ComDev at a cross-roads.

Internet-based distance-learning

Malmö University was the first to pioneer the use of an Internet-based distance-learning platform to make the education available to students globally. With its mix of online collaboration and discussion, paired with webcast seminars the entire programme can be conducted over the internet. This enables students from all corners of the globe to participate, work in their own time and attain the education. The use of the Live Lecture function in seminars makes students, equipped with microphones and webcams, able to participate in lectures and discussions online, resulting in a ‘virtual classroom’. This way, students in New Zealand and South Africa can communicate and work on projects with classmates in Fiji and India, sharing ideas and working together towards the common goal of improving development practices.

ComDev fosters teamwork

As a relatively new degree, students embarking on this specialised programme have the advantage of being schooled in the latest theories and philosophies, while being given the opportunity to apply these theories and concepts to real-life projects and problems in human development through individual assignments and group projects. Geared as it is towards individuals working in the fields of journalism, media and development, ComDev fosters teamwork and facilitates the exchange of knowledge and perspectives among participants.

Final project and field-work

The final project has always been an important element of the programme. Over the past 10 years, students of ComDev have had the opportunity to apply what they have learned theoretically to a broad range of contexts and scenarios in the process of completing their projects, and field-work has been conducted in India, South Africa, Mozambique, Kenya, Croatia and Sarajevo, to name but a few. During their project work, students have the opportunity to explore a particular research area or topic of concern at a deeper level, and the accompanying written dissertation provides a fantastic opportunity to consolidate and further the knowledge and skills gained during the education. This project work also demonstrates a solid foundation in research, which will aid those students who wish to continue into doctoral level studies. In choosing the topic for their projects, students are free to ‘think outside the box’, and employ innovativeness and creativity to their field-work endeavours, and project works have included documentaries, short films, photo essays, and a wide array of dissertations presented in interesting and original ways. Students are also encouraged to join forces and collaborate on projects, as teamwork is regarded as a vital part of effective development cooperation. For a list of all the Project Works to date, see the ComDev portal, under ‘History’.

Career opportunities

The global demand for media and communication skills continues to increase as organisations such as UNICEF have made it a policy to hire ComDev practitioners, not only for international development schemes, but for diversity management and other forms of transcultural cooperation.

The UN Inter-Agency Round Table of Communication for Development has played a big role in institutionalising the field by bringing together UN agencies and international partners to discuss and debate the broad, challenging and essential role of Development Communication has to play in worldwide development cooperation. The 12th United Nations Inter-Agency Roundtable on Communication for Development had as its theme “Advancing the Rights of Adolescent Girls through Communication for Development”. For example, UNICEF has recently revisited their C4D strategy and work, calling for a stronger linkage with the universities and building widespread capacity within their own global organisation. UNESCO equally recognises the importance of communication, and has included it as part of its mandate and vision, integrating communication in its policies, budget and hiring policy, reflecting the growing need for skilled communication professionals.

Former ComDev students end up working in a truly diverse variety of settings. Some of the UN agencies placing hiring ads seek ‘communication for development’ practitioners by name. More commonly, though, practitioners are working in positions such as information or communications officer, where their roles may include a variety of tasks, not all of which would be strictly considered ComDev. Some practitioners are able to make a living as consultants working on projects with NGOs and CSOs, bilateral aid programs (such as Sida or DFID), or with the UN and World Bank. Since skills, knowledge and aptitudes gained through an education in ComDev are relevant to a variety of job functions within the development sector, you may also find alumni working in a range of allied positions, such as conflict resolution positions or as a learning and outcomes coordinator, to name but a few.

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This MSc provides a Master's-level grounding in psychology, paying particular attention to its implications for education and other professional practice. Read more
This MSc provides a Master's-level grounding in psychology, paying particular attention to its implications for education and other professional practice. This pathway will be suitable if you already hold Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) status, or if you do not intend to work as a psychologist in the UK after graduation.

You will study alongside students on the MSc Psychology of Education BPS programme and have access to the same units. The key difference between the two programmes is that you will have more flexibility in your choice of units. You will not be required to undertake work in statistics, and can choose from a wider range of optional units. This programme of study leads to the MSc Education (Psychology of Education), but does not make you eligible for GBC.

Programme structure

Core unit:
-Introduction to Educational Inquiry

And 60 credits from:
-Brain, Mind and Education
-Cognition and Learning
-Developmental Psychology
-Social and Socio-Cultural Psychology
-The Psychology of Individual Differences

Optional units
-Students studying this programme may select 40 credits of optional units from across the school.

Dissertation
-You will also complete a 15,000-word dissertation.

Careers

We offer the academic and personal development opportunities to equip you for the intellectual, social and personal challenges that you will encounter during your career. Our overarching goal is to enable our graduates to display the following characteristics:
-Equipped to demonstrate impact, excellence and distinctiveness in their chosen field
-Visionary, imaginative, innovative, reflective and creative
-High ideals and values, including a strong sense of social justice
-Highly employable throughout the world
-Adaptable, with the potential to be a leader in work and in the community

Graduates of this route have gone on to careers in educational psychology, clinical psychology, occupational psychology, counselling psychology or neuropsychology, and doctoral level research. Read more about the careers of some of our graduates.

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Why study at Roehampton. Accredited by the British Psychology Society (BPS). Taught by Chartered Psychologists, with applied elements being delivered by HCPC registered Sport Psychologists. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • Accredited by the British Psychology Society (BPS)
  • Taught by Chartered Psychologists, with applied elements being delivered by HCPC registered Sport Psychologists
  • Covers a variety of theoretical issues in sport and exercise psychology, 100% of our psychology research has an impact on societies around the world (Research Excellence Framework 2014)
  • Roehampton is ranked best modern university in London (Sunday Times Good University Guide 2015)

Course summary

Learn how to optimise athlete performance and improve well-being and activity levels by studying the psychology behind sport at Roehampton. You will explore key factors that affect sports performance, well-being, and activity levels such as mental toughness, self-confidence, motivation, stress and anxiety, concentration, and the psychology of sport injury.

This innovative programme provides you with a thorough theoretical, conceptual and research informed grounding in the discipline of sport and exercise psychology. You will develop a strong scientific understanding of human behaviour and experience, and of the complex interactions between these. You will also enhance your understanding of relationships between the theoretical concepts and current techniques used in sport and exercise psychology assessment and support. This will include becoming familiar with the different types of approaches, assessment strategies, and psychological skills used by Applied Sport and Exercise Psychologists.

To support your professional development, this course will cover the idea of reflective practice, and codes of conduct. You will also develop an awareness and understanding of the issues, methodology and design of research within sport and exercise psychology, and gain research skills through the completion of a detailed, empirical research dissertation and benefit from the support of our staff’s wide areas of expertise.

This programme is accredited by the British Psychological Society to provide you with Stage 1 training in preparation for your professional career in Sport and Exercise Psychology. Successful completion of the course will grant access to Stage 2 training with the BPS, the next stage on the route to becoming an Applied Sport and Exercise Psychologist.

Important information:

Please note that only applicants who already hold, or are eligible for, Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society (i.e., they must have undertaken a BPS accredited undergraduate degree), OR those who plan to obtain it by subsequently completing a BPS accredited conversion course, are eligible to register for the Psychology of Sport & Exercise MSc.

To have GBC, applicants must have successfully completed a BPS accredited undergraduate degree, usually in Sport Psychology or Psychology. For more information about BPS accreditation and to check the accreditation status of a course that you have completed please click here.

If you are not currently eligible for GBC and are interested in completing a conversion course, please click here for more information.

For applicants without GBC we would normally only admit those whose first degree has a substantial psychology component (e.g., Sport Science/Sport & Exercise Science). Should you want to discuss your eligibility before applying, please email .

Please note that the BPS does not accredit overseas institutions (apart from Chinese University of Hong Kong and University of Hong Kong) therefore applicants with an overseas degree in Psychology will need to apply for individual Graduate Membership of the BPS. If you are an international applicant you can contact the BPS to discuss your eligibility for GBC based upon your previous qualifications. For further information please contact the BPS Qualifications Team, +44 (0)116 252 9933 or " target="_blank">

Content

In the module ‘Approaches to Psychological Support’ you will initially be introduced to the varied approaches within sport and exercise psychology, and undertake an in-depth review of the differences of the theories, looking at them in practice through a selection of case studies. Other modules, such as ‘Application of Psychological Support’, will allow you to link theory to practice, and students will have the opportunity to develop consultancy skills under the guidance/supervision of a BPS Chartered/HPCP registered member of staff.

Further modules will provide important knowledge with respect to sport performance as well as well-being and physical activity promotion. Within the ‘Psychology of Sport and Performance’ module you will gain a critical appreciation for various social processes and individual differences that influence performance. The ‘Psychology of Physical Activity, Health and Injury’ module will explore the determinants and outcomes of physical activity and inactivity and provide students with important insights towards preventing, treating and managing certain health conditions.

You will also gain insightful knowledge of contemporary issues concerning professional practice within sport psychology. The module ‘Professional Practice in Sport Psychology’ will explore the importance of ethics and reflection within your practice, whilst also exploring the challenges and opportunities that you may face when working with various athlete populations (e.g., team sport athletes, injured athletes, and young athletes).

Finally, you will have the opportunity to undertake research on your areas of specific interest for your dissertation project. During the year, you follow a coherent pathway of study to facilitate your future direction within the exciting discipline of sport and exercise psychology.

Modules

Here are examples of modules we currently offer:

  • MSc/MA Research Dissertation
  • Psychology of Physical Activity, Health and Injury
  • Approaches to Psychological Support
  • Research Methods
  • Application of Psychological Support
  • Professional Practice in Sport Psychology
  • Psychology of Sport and Performance

Career options

Students go on to work as sport and exercise psychologists, fitness instructors, teachers, lecturers, counsellors and coaches, as well going on to further academic study.

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The online Psychology & Neuroscience of Mental Health course aims to provide a comprehensive and integrated exploration of our current understanding of the psychological and neuroscientific basis of mental health. Read more

The online Psychology & Neuroscience of Mental Health course aims to provide a comprehensive and integrated exploration of our current understanding of the psychological and neuroscientific basis of mental health.

By drawing on the wealth of research, education and clinical expertise and experience across our world-renowned Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN), the course will appeal to those with a personal interest in the area of psychology, neuroscience and mental health, and who wish to enhance their knowledge and skills base.

Key Benefits

  • The course is delivered 100% online and there is no need to attend the campus. Students work in small, interactive classes with academic staff, and also receive additional support and guidance.
  • Cutting edge expertise: impact of the IoPPN’s work was 100% world leading or internationally excellent, and our research environment was judged as 100% world leading (Research Excellence Framework, 2014).
  • Online access to teaching materials developed from experts across Kings College London, providing a comprehensive and multidisciplinary perspective of important mental health problems.
  • Support to develop and demonstrate research and critical appraisal skills that will permit appreciation, interpretation and reporting of research evidence, as preparation for research or further education.

This course is ideal for people who are:

  • Seeking employment as a graduate research worker
  • Wishing to progress to doctoral study
  • Already working in or planning to undertake further study to work in mental health as a practitioner or policy maker.

It will also enhance the knowledge and skills base for those with a personal interest in the area of psychology, neuroscience and mental health.

Description

The Psychology & Neuroscience of Mental Health MSc/PG Dip/PG Cert provides a comprehensive and integrated exploration of our current understanding of the psychological and neuroscientific basis of mental health. It draws upon the wealth of research, education, clinical expertise and experience across the worldrenowned Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN). The online master’s course promotes an understanding of the evidence base for comprehending the biological, psychological and socio-environmental factors important in the development and maintenance of mental health, and evidence underlining= the development and efficacy of the range of treatments of mental health problems. IoPPN teaching staff are senior scientists, clinicians, and educators. Scientists will showcase cutting edge research into the causes and treatment of mental health problems; clinicians will be presenting current best practice in treatment approaches, and students will be supported by a team of educators with vast experience of designing and delivering scientific, clinical and applied education and training.

The MSc pathway requires modules totalling 180 credits to complete the programme, 60 of which will come from a dissertation of around 10,000 words. The Research Dissertation comprises four advanced modules that will provide you with the opportunity to immerse yourself in understanding the design, development and dissemination of research evidence. These modules also draw upon the knowledge and skills you have learnt during the course.

The Postgraduate Diploma pathway requires modules with a minimum total of 120 credits to complete the course, and the Postgraduate Certificate route requires modules with a total of 60 credits to complete.

If you are studying full-time, you will complete the course in two years, from September to September. If you are studying part-time, your course will take up to six years to finish.

  • You can expect to gain a solid foundation of concepts and theories underpinning our current understanding of mental health and the variety of methods used in research and treatment.
  • You will develop a clear understanding of the complementary relationship between psychological and neuroscientific approaches to the study and management of mental health problems.
  • You will develop an understanding of different levels of analysis of the causes and mechanisms of mental health problems from the molecular and cellular to the social and environmental in a range of important mental health problems.
  • You will develop an understanding of the ways in which current treatments work, both biological and psychological, and learn about new treatments that are emerging from cutting-edge research.
  • You will learn core research and critical appraisal skills that will permit appreciation, interpretation and reporting of research evidence, as preparation for research or further training.

The postgraduate certificate is an ideal starting point for people already working within mental health fields who wish to enhance their education in order to progress in their career. As a stand-alone qualification, the postgraduate certificate will enable nurses, social workers, community workers and other professionals to gain a deeper understanding of the biological, social, environmental and psychological foundations of mental health. It is also an ideal entry point for students who hold a second class undergraduate degree.

Teaching

The programme is delivered entirely online. There are video lectures, coursework including critical appraisal of published work, essays and abstracts and self-directed learning activities. Assessment will include discussion board participation, multiple choice question and short answer question examinations.

Assessment 

MSc | PG Dip | PG Cert - Two multiple choice examinations (40%) | Short essay examination (50%) | Discussion Board Particiaption (10%) 

Career prospects

At King’s you’ll enter into one of the world’s most competitive student bodies and join a legacy of graduates that are sought out by some of the leading employers in the field. 

 The Psychology & Neuroscience of Mental Health MSc will:

  • Benefit those wishing to become a graduate research worker, and will optimise opportunities for PhD training. It will also provide a stepping stone towards professional training as a mental health practitioner.
  • Enhance the career profile of those already working clinically in the field of mental health by increasing understanding and knowledge of the subject area which will help to inform clinical practice.
  • Provide transferable skills and knowledge that can benefit a number of career paths.


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Psycholinguistics, the scientific study of the psychology of language, is one of the most important areas of cognitive psychology. Read more
Psycholinguistics, the scientific study of the psychology of language, is one of the most important areas of cognitive psychology. How we produce, understand, acquire, and use language, and how these processes are affected by ageing and brain damage, are core topics in understanding human behaviour.

Why study Psychology of Language at Dundee?

In addition to its theoretical interest, psycholinguistics has several important applications, including how a second language should best be taught, how children should be taught to learn to read and write, artificial intelligence, computer-assisted communication, and the treatment of developmental and acquired language disorders. Such applications ensure that there is a wealth of professional career paths available to postgraduates in the area in addition to an academic career.

This course is affiliated with our world-leading Language Research Centre (LaRC).

The School of Psychology also has much specialised equipment, dedicated laboratories and world class research facilities. These include EEG labs, many eye tracking systems, 2D and 3D movement tracking systems, and offsite fMRI access via the Clinical Research Centre at Ninewells Teaching Hospital.

Every full-time MSc student in the department is entitled to use computer facilities available in the Psychology department and throughout the University. We provide access to all the basic software tools that you are likely to need for your MSc.

Aims of the Programme

This course will enable you to:

Pursue and develop the advanced study of research methods in Psychology and in particular to address contemporary issues of epistemology, data collection, measurement and data analysis.
Approach problems in research by critical evaluation of existing psychological paradigms and research literature and to apply this to current theoretical or applied issues in Psychology.
Develop advanced research skills which will be relevant to policy and practice in the workplace.
Develop and demonstrate advanced knowledge and skills in research design, methodology and statistical analysis
Develop and demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of current research in a specialised field of experimental or applied Psychology.
Engage in the analysis, synthesis, planning, execution and evaluation of research at an advanced level.
Make an original contribution to scientific knowledge, methodology or practice in a research project either grounded in experimental psychology or in an applied area relevant to the learner's employment.
Develop and practice dissemination and presentation skills to peers and to wider academic and professional audience
provide an advanced understanding of scientific issues in the chosen topic specialisation.

"I enjoyed all aspects of the course, especially the opportunity to conduct two independent pieces of research. Furthermore, I found the taught modules very helpful and a good basis for every researcher. Most importantly, I enjoyed the support of both staff and students in a highly collaborative environment"
MSc student, 2011

Who should study this course?

The course offers students an excellent theoretical and practical grounding in research methods in Psychology, building upon the levels of skill and knowledge attained in their first degree in Psychology (as recognised by the British Psychological Society for Graduate Membership).

The course will provide a first year of research training for students intending to continue with postgraduate research or further professional training within Psychology (e.g. health, occupational or educational psychology) or related disciplines (e.g. sociology, social anthropology, or education).

Postgraduate culture

We have a close postgraduate community with a diverse combination of nationalities. The School runs a Postgraduate seminar and a departmental seminar twice weekly throughout teaching semesters, with invited speakers to the seminars. These seminars are a great way to broaden your awareness of contemporary issues within the field of Psychology, to present your own work, and to network with other postgraduate students.

The School of Psychology also has its own Facebook group, where you can find out more about their activities.

This course is aimed at

Psychology graduates wishing to enhance their knowledge of the psychology of language and communication
Graduates considering a professional training in a language-related discipline (e.g. speech pathology)
Psychology graduates intending to progress to a PhD.

How you will be taught

Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, peer assessments of oral presentations, problem-solving assignments and feedback, and interactive computer assignments. Some of the exercises will be group-based and will be followed by presentation of the results of the analysis. Learners will be expected to be able to respond adequately to questions relating to the interpretation of the analyses.

One-on-one supervision of a research dissertation by a single tutor is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided.

What you will study

Students will take the following modules:

Core modules:

Research Foundations
Qualitative Research Methods
Advanced Quantitative Methods
Research in Practice
Research Dissertation

Two advanced modules, typically from:

Gesture, Cognition and Communication
Reading Development and Disability
Comparative Communication and Cognition
Altered States of Consciousness

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework only.

Each module is worth 20 credits apart from the Research Dissertation Module which is worth 60 credits. The total number of credits awarded is 180 for an MSc course.

Careers

Students from this course have gone on to do PhDs. The higher degree also generally improves job prospects when competing against other Psychology graduates in other fields such as education, artificial intelligence, computer-assisted communication, and the treatment of developmental and acquired language disorders.

Overseas Academic Scholarships

The School of Psychology offers three Overseas Academic Scholarships of £3,000 each to overseas (international) taught postgraduate students. These awards are competitive based on academic merit and a personal statement which details and supports the applicant's interest in their chosen taught postgraduate programme. The deadline to apply for this scholarship is 30th June 2014.

A 5% discount on tuition fees is applicable for international applicants to the School of Psychology who pay the full amount (for the year), in advance, by a given deadline. Please visit our 5% discount webpage for full details.

Other sources of funding for postgraduate students can be found on our Scholarships webpage

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Under supervision, graduates can pursue careers in the professional practice of psychology including clinical, forensic or organisational psychology, counselling, health and community psychology, research, and other specialist areas. Read more
[[About the program
The Graduate Diploma of Psychological Science is designed to provide students with an integrated, comprehensive, and complete education in the discipline of psychology. Students undertake advanced training in a range of methodological (research methods, psychometrics, statistics) and applied areas, and develop competence in conducting research. All applied material is based on the scientist-practitioner model, and evidence-based approaches to psychological intervention are stressed.

The Graduate Diploma of Psychological Science provides students with advanced education and training in the core psychology graduate attributes, including but not limited to the following:
- Advanced theoretical and empirical knowledge in some of the core research areas of the discipline
- Knowledge of the theoretical and empirical bases underpinning the construction, implementation and interpretation of some of the most widely used cognitive and personality assessments
- Knowledge of the theoretical and empirical bases underpinning evidenced based approached to psychological intervention
- Explaining how the science and practice of psychology is influenced by social, historical, professional and cultural contexts

The Graduate Diploma of Psychological Science prepares graduates for a career in psychology. On completion of this course, graduates may apply for provisional registration as a psychologist providing they enrol in further postgraduate studies or undertake two years’ supervised training.

See the website https://bond.edu.au/program/graduate-diploma-psychological-science

- Professional recognition
This program has been granted accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC).

Further study
- Master of Psychology (Clinical)
- Master of Psychology (Forensic)

Professional outcomes

Under supervision, graduates can pursue careers in the professional practice of psychology including clinical, forensic or organisational psychology, counselling, health and community psychology, research, and other specialist areas.

Find out how to apply here https://bond.edu.au/future-students/study-bond/how-apply

Thesis overview

The most challenging aspect of 4th year studies is the research thesis. The thesis component is designed for students to demonstrate their ability to conceive, conduct, and report on, high level, original research. The research thesis is carried out under the supervision of an academic member of staff, and is assessed against a number of criteria. Briefly, these criteria relate to the student’s command of the area under investigation, from the conceptualisation of the problem, through the development of an appropriate strategy to investigate the problem, to clear interpretation and reporting on the outcomes of the research. The research thesis consists of two subjects.
- PSYC71-400 Diploma Thesis 1: Research Seminar and Ethics
- PSYC72-420 Diploma Thesis 2

The thesis subjects are to be completed in two consecutive semesters, regardless of full- or part-time enrolment status.

- Fourth Year Orientation Session
Students are expected to attend the fourth-year orientation session held during Bond Orientation Week, which is the week before classes start. During this session students are given full details of the requirements for their fourth year of studies in psychology.

Important notes for students

Upon completion of 4th year training (e.g., the Graduate Diploma or the Honours program) many students apply for provisional registration as a psychologist. Provisional registration permits the professional practice of psychology and can be achieved either through a Board approved Supervised Practice Program (two years of supervised practice), or through Postgraduate studies in Psychology. Students who intend to apply for provisional registration following their 4th Year studies should be aware of the registration requirements as administered by the Psychology Board of Australia under the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law Act 2009. Information on Psychology Board of Australia registration requirements can be obtained from http://www.psychologyboard.gov.au

Students who obtain their undergraduate qualifications outside of an ‘approved qualification’ in Australia must have them assessed as being equivalent to an accredited three year sequence of study in psychology in Australia, prior to being granted provisional registration. Undergraduate transcripts of students wishing to undertake their 4th year studies at Bond from non-Australian institutions are carefully checked by the 4th Year Coordinator to determine equivalence with an APAC accredited 3-year sequence of study in Australia. Transcripts are checked to ensure that subject matter undertaken in the undergraduate sequence matches core areas within the discipline (e.g., perception, memory, learning, motivation and emotion, psychobiology, personality, emotion, developmental psychology, social psychology, and abnormal psychology), and includes statistics and research methods. When assessing suitability for entry into 4th year programs, Bond University makes every effort to ensure that core topics covered in undergraduate degrees obtained outside of Australia are equivalent to those required in an accredited three-year sequence of study in psychology in Australia, however we do not guarantee the equivalence of these degrees.

Students who obtained their three year undergraduate qualifications outside of Australia should be aware that successful completion of the 4th year program might not be sufficient for registration as a psychologist and/or the membership requirements of the Australian Psychological Society (APS). Equivalency assessments may be required by the Psychology Board of Australia. For more information on equivalency assessments please visit http://www.psychology.org.au

See the website https://bond.edu.au/program/graduate-diploma-psychological-science

For contact information see here https://bond.edu.au/program/graduate-diploma-psychological-science

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The MSc Psychology of Education provides a Master's-level grounding in psychology, paying particular attention to its implications for education and other professional practice. Read more
The MSc Psychology of Education provides a Master's-level grounding in psychology, paying particular attention to its implications for education and other professional practice. It is available on a full-time or a part-time basis. After successfully completing the programme, you will be eligible to apply to the British Psychological Society (BPS) for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership, and for the further professional training accredited by the BPS.

Many students go on to careers in educational psychology, clinical psychology or neuropsychology, or engage in doctoral-level research. Entry to all of these is very competitive, but our MSc graduates have historically been very successful applying for EdD, DEdPsych, PhD and DClinPsy courses.

After completing the MSc programme, you will typically spend at least a year building up relevant experience, for example working with special needs pupils or with vulnerable clients, before making a successful application to a professional training programme.

Programme structure

Core units required for BPS accreditation
-Brain, Mind and Education
-Cognition and Learning
-The Psychology of Individual Differences
-Developmental Psychology
-Introduction to Educational Inquiry
-Social and Socio-Cultural Psychology
-Statistics in Education

Optional units
For students seeking BPS accreditation there is only one optional unit, which must be taken from one of the following:
-Collaboration Across Professional Contexts in Special and Inclusive Education
-Controversial Issues in Special and Inclusive Education
-Counselling Young People and Families
-Developing Thinking
-Inclusive Education and Working with Parents/Carers
-Issues in Neuroscience and Education
-Multivariate Statistical Methods in Education

Dissertation
You will also complete a 15,000-word dissertation.

Careers

We offer the academic and personal development opportunities to equip you for the intellectual, social and personal challenges that you will encounter during your career. Our overarching goal is to enable our graduates to display the following characteristics:
-Equipped to demonstrate impact, excellence and distinctiveness in their chosen field.
-Visionary, imaginative, innovative, reflective and creative.
-High ideals and values, including a strong sense of social justice.
-Highly employable throughout the world.
-Adaptable, with the potential to be a leader in work and in the community.

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The aims of this course are. Read more
The aims of this course are: to develop critical skills in the evaluation and analysis of current research, theory and practice in psychology and education; foster an ethos of independent and co-operative learning and research; and to provide eligibility for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Status from the British Psychological Society. Graduate Basis for Chartered Status is the first step towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist.

The course is intended to bring graduates from other disciplines up to the academic standard of an honours degree in psychology. It demonstrates how the core areas of psychology (developmental, social, cognitive, psychobiology, individual differences, research methods) can be applied in educational settings. It is therefore an excellent starting point for individuals wishing to pursue a career in educational psychology. However, it should be noted that the MEd does not qualify you to practice as an educational psychologist. Individuals wishing to practice as an educational psychologist also need to complete the Doctorate in Educational and Child Psychology.

Course content includes:
-Psychology of Human Development
-Neurobiology
-Cognition
-Research Issues in Psychology & Education
-Social Psychology of Education
-Current Issues in Special Educational Needs
-Applied Prevention in Education

Teaching and learning

We take a varied approach throughout the course. In terms of teaching and learning, the course units are delivered through lectures, tutorials, group-work, practicals and simulations, case-based approaches, and enquiry-based learning. We encourage both individual and co-operative learning and research and hope to foster an ethos of lifelong learning. Many students are experienced teachers and we appreciate the wealth of knowledge and practical experience you bring with you on the course. During research-based learning sessions we encourage you to use all sources of information, including each other. You will receive comprehensive training in the use of electronic databases, library resources, and statistics and qualitative analysis packages. Many other key skills will be developed during the course.

Coursework and assessment

The form of the assessment varies from unit to unit. Written assessment for a course unit usually totals 3,000 words, and may be in the form of an essay, critical review, research report or research proposal. All assessments will be followed by both formative and summative feedback. The dissertation is the report of an empirical research project investigating an aspect of psychology as applied to education in its broadest sense. It is 15,000 words long.

Career opportunities

As the MEd confers eligibility for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Status from the British Psychological Society, a career pathway for our graduates is professional training as a psychologist (e.g. Doctorate in Educational and Child Psychology) and we have a good conversion rate in this regard with recent MEd graduates accepted onto doctorate-level training in educational, clinical and counselling psychology. The knowledge and skills gained by psychology graduates means that they are highly regarded by employers (Higher Education Careers Services Unit, November 2010) for work in areas such as health and social care, marketing and PR, management and human resources, education, and the public sector. Many of our graduates use the skills they have acquired to gain promotion or develop their existing careers, whilst others take the opportunity to change profession, for example, moving into teaching, research or working as assistant psychologists and in related positions (e.g. child and adolescent mental health worker). A small number of students go on to study for a doctorate by research (PhD) in educational psychology (which in itself opens a career pathway to working as a researcher or lecturer in higher education). More information about careers may be found on the BPS website http://www.bps.org.uk/ .

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The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university. Read more
The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university.

The certificate is offered as an entry qualification for the Oxford Brookes MSc Psychology, but it also meets the entry requirements for other universities' psychology conversion courses.

The course is available from September for part-time students, and from January for full-time and part-time students.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/psychology-qualifying-certificate/

Why choose this course?

- Oxford Brookes has one of the largest groups of developmental psychologists in the UK along with expertise in cognitive neuroscience and qualitative methods.

- Our professionally-accredited courses allow chartered membership of the British Psychological Society.

- Excellent opportunities for progression into courses across psychology, education and health.

- State-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab.

- Strong connections through joint research projects with partners in health, education and industry.

- A comprehensive programme of research seminars offered by the department as well as specialist seminars organised by individual research groups.

Teaching and learning

Our department has a thriving community of research-active staff and research scholars. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects. Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, seminars and practical work.

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, each involving approximately 150 hours of student effort and approximately 36 hours of staff contact.

Each course module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written work. Assessment methods may include essays, formal written examinations or in-class tests.

Specialist facilities

The Psychology Department boasts state-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab. In addition, postgraduate students have a dedicated study and social working space to facilitate group projects and provide a venue for our research seminar series.

Careers

The department offers advice on future career opportunities, including practical help with applications to future training and employment. For many of our students, their postgraduate psychology qualification is a stepping stone to professional training for careers in educational and clinical psychology. Some choose to continue their academic studies, progressing to PhD.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 95% of our research was internationally recognised and 60% of the impact of our research was rated internationally excellent.

Prof. Margaret Harris has been awarded a grant of over £315K from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) to find out whether technological advances to aid children and babies with hearing loss have had a positive effect on deaf children’s literacy.

Prof. Anna Barnett and her colleague Dr Luci Wiggs have been awarded a grant of £59K from The Waterloo Foundation to examine sleep disturbance in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). This condition is characterised by significant movement difficulty and associated psycho-social and educational problems. Previous work suggests that sleep disturbance may be a relevant factor and this project will examine sleep in DCD with extensive and objective measures in relation to child and parent functioning.

Dr Kate Wilmut has been awarded a prestigious ESRC grant of over £160k to conduct research into forward planning of movement in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder. It is hoped that furthering our understanding of the mechanisms underlying this condition may lead to the development of effective intervention programmes.

With funding from the Leverhulme Trust, Prof. Vince Connelly is leading an interdisciplinary project conducting research into the writing problems of children with language difficulties. Embracing psychology, education and linguistics, this ground-breaking project is aimed at bridging the gaps in current knowledge and will help practitioners to develop literacy strategies to help this already disadvantaged group of children.

Dr Clare Rathbone has been awarded a grant from the ESRC to examine the relationship between memory and identity across the lifespan. Memory impairments can lead to more than mere forgetfulness; they can affect our sense of self and identity. This work will explore the changes in memory that take place in both normal ageing and in dementia.

Professor Margaret Harris and Dr Mark Burgess were awarded £640k by the Technology Strategy Board, a public research council that facilitates innovative technological collaboration between businesses and researchers. They are conducting multi-method research into the critical socio-psychological factors that underpin people’s transition from traditional combustion engine cars to ultra low carbon vehicles and are feeding their results back to car manufacturers, energy companies, and the government.

Research areas and clusters

Developmental Psychology Research Group
There are three main strands to research in this group:
1. Cognitive & Social Development - this includes work on the impact of socio-cultural contexts on human cognition and identity development, children’s evaluation of other people as sources of information, children’s understanding of emotion, the nature of mother-child interactions, children’s interactions with their peers and explanations for school bullying

2. Language & Literacy - this has a focus on the development of speech, reading, spelling, writing and handwriting

3. Developmental Disorders - this includes research on children with hearing impairment, Specific Language Impairment, Dyslexia, Developmental Coordination Disorder, Autism and sleep disorders.

Some of our research focuses on the description of typical development and explanation of developmental processes in different domains. Other work is concerned with understanding the mechanisms underlying atypical development and an examination of ways to support children and their families. Several staff in this research group work with professionals from other disciplines including health and education and are concerned with the production of practical assessment tools and the evaluation of intervention approaches to help children achieve their full potential.

- Adult Cognition Research Group
Research in this group covers the exploration of basic mechanisms as well as higher order processes in normal and atypical populations. A variety of methods are employed (behavioural and psychophysical measures, eye-tracking, movement analysis, and neuropsychological instruments). Specific research interests include: memory processes in ageing, autobiographical memory and identity processes, visual and attentional processing, reading and, perception and action

- Applied Social Psychology
The work of this group involves the application of a variety of different research methods and theoretical perspectives to investigate a range of contemporary issues and social problems. Members of the group share research interests in the psychological processes that underpin significant life transitions, the self and identify, mental and physical health experiences, attitudes, autism and sex differences.

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Promoting the scientific study of health, illness and healthcare to improve health outcomes for patients and the public. Read more
Promoting the scientific study of health, illness and healthcare to improve health outcomes for patients and the public.

Who is it for?

The course is for highly motivated students who have intellectual curiosity to learn about complex problems of health and healthcare and the ambition to conduct research that may lead to a solution to these problems. The programme is especially suited to students who want to go on to do doctoral studies – either a DPsych Health Psychology (for practitioner training) or a PhD (for research training).

The Health Psychology course is also for those who have an undergraduate degree that is accredited by the British Psychological Society. If you are an international student and would like to undertake a Masters degree in this subject but do not have the BPS accreditation, we offer the MSc Psychology and Health as an alternative programme (with identical modules) for students who have not achieved the Graduate Basis for Registration with the British Psychological Society.

Objectives

Health psychology explores the psychological and behavioural processes that influence the development of illness, the promotion of health, and the delivery of healthcare through rigorous research that feeds into evidence-based practice.

Teaching at City promotes the scientist-practitioner model in which research influences how we practice, while allowing our experiences in practice to shape the research questions we ask.

We recognise that great research will not make a difference to people’s lives unless the insights feed into evidence-based practice. You will therefore learn how to make research evidence accessible to help maximise its impact. Taught by a team of leading research-active academics, who are members of the Centre for Health Services Research (CHSR), the MSc Health Psychology programme is designed to give you the foundations that will propel you to an exciting career in the discipline.

Here are some examples of the kinds of questions the course poses:
-How can we help people cope with a diagnosis?
-What are the main challenges facing individuals living with long-term conditions?
-What is psychological theory and how can this be used to understand health and illness behaviours?
-How can we make complex interventions more effective by using theory and empirical evidence?

Academic facilities

City University has recently opened the TECS Lab, a dedicated ‘smart home’, to showcase some of the exciting technologies that are being implemented around the UK to support patients with long-term conditions and complex health and social care needs.

This is a one-of-a-kind resource that is already being used for teaching and research purposes. You will visit the TECS Lab in the spring term and the resource will be available to conduct your own dissertation research on a related topic. As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

The course uses a range of teaching methods including classroom teaching, seminars and workshops. You will be assessed through a varied combination of formats throughout the programme including coursework, examination, a diary component, online discussion forums and a significant piece of empirical research.

The assessment for the Doctorate includes:
-A reflective report (3,000 words) detailing how supervised practice has enabled you to fulfil the generic professional competence.
-A report (1,000 words) summarising the involvement of service users and/or carers in your training.
-Log of experiences that enabled you to gain competence in each component of all core units over the equivalent of two years’ full-time supervised practice (this should include a record of your attendance at core CPD workshops)
-A case study (3,000 words excluding appendices) with supporting evidence in appendices.
-A contract and working agreement conditions document (3,000 words, excluding appendices) with supporting evidence in appendices.
-Two teaching and training case studies (1 x 1,000 & 1 x 2,000 words, excluding appendices) with supporting evidence in appendices. One of the populations must be health care professionals and an observer’s report (500 words)
-A case study describing the process of conducting a psychological intervention that has been implemented through face-to-face work with an individual client (3000 words, excluding appendices) with supporting evidence in appendices.
-A case study (2,000 words, excluding appendices) describing the process of conducting a psychological intervention that has been delivered through a medium other than face-to-face with an individual client with a reflective report on delivering this intervention included in the appendices.
-A research thesis (approximately 15,000 words, excluding appendices) to be written to a standard acceptable for publication in peer-reviewed academic journals.
-A systematic review (6,000 words excluding appendices) to be written to a standard acceptable for publication in peer-reviewed academic journals.

You will also be able to learn from our on-site TECS lab. This is a dedicated smart home equipped with tele-health and tele-care applications and an adjacent monitoring system.

The purpose of the TECS lab is to enable researchers to monitor long-term conditions, and use technology to track an individual’s health in real time. For example seat and bed occupancy sensors enable health psychologists to monitor physical movement and intervene when routine behaviours are disrupted.

Modules

The programme consists of eight compulsory modules and all the teaching takes place in the first two terms. In term one you will be introduced to behavioural medicine, lifestyle, gender and culture, theoretical foundations of health psychology and research design and statistics. In the second term you study understanding and managing long term conditions, developing complex interventions, professional practice and contextual issues in health psychology and advanced research design and statistics. The third term is dedicated to the dissertation.

You may have the opportunity to interact directly with patients or healthcare professionals at the dissertation stage of this Masters degree. You will be conducting your own independent research and this may, for example, involve interviewing patients or professionals about a particular subject, or delivering behaviour change interventions.

To become a qualified researcher and practitioner, you will need to be able to understand and critique published research and to understand practitioner issues, so you can conduct your own research from scratch. At City we will encourage you to conduct research on the front line working on projects that require ethical approval, where you are engaging with real people so you can have a direct impact on their lives.

Core modules
-Theoretical foundations of health psychology (15 credits)
-Behavioural medicine (15 credits)
-Understanding and managing long-term conditions (15 credits)
-Lifespan, gender & culture (15 credits)
-Developing complex interventions (15 credits)
-Professional and contextual Issues in health psychology (15 credits)
-Introduction to research design & statistics (15 credits)
-Advanced research design & statistics (15 credits)
-Dissertation (60 credits)

Career prospects

Health psychologists work in academia as researchers and within the NHS and the wider healthcare sector. The nature of the work means you will be trying to influence public health policy in terms of the way that health care is practised. You will also be evaluating how health care professionals do their work while adhering to the best clinical standards.

As a UK student, because the Health Psychology MSc is accredited, it is known as Stage 1 of the standard training in healthcare psychology. By successfully completing this course you will be able to move on to Stage 2 training (a doctoral level qualification in health psychology). This leads to becoming a fully recognised health psychologist whereby you can apply for Chartered Membership of the British Psychological Society (BPS) and apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

Full membership of the Division of Health Psychology means you will also be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a Chartered Health Psychologist. You can only use the protected title ‘Health Psychologist’ by registering with the HCPC, the statutory regulator.

Graduates of the MSc in Health Psychology and MSc in Psychology & Health take a variety of career paths across the NHS and wider public sector. Here are some examples of the kinds of roles our graduates go on to do:
-A PhD student studying a Professional Doctorate in Health Psychology.
-A research assistant in higher education, NHS or the private sector.
-An assistant psychologist in an applied setting.
-An NHS or third sector healthcare professional, such as a smoking cessation officer, or a public health and health promotion practitioner.

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Programme description. The University of Edinburgh is recognised globally for its research, development and innovation, and has been providing students with a world-class education for more than 425 years. Read more

Programme description

The University of Edinburgh is recognised globally for its research, development and innovation, and has been providing students with a world-class education for more than 425 years. The suite of pain management programmes offered by the Department of Anaesthesia, Critical care and Pain Medicine, continues this tradition by integrating current clinical research with high-level academic and professional input.

As a multidimensional phenomenon, it is essential that pain is managed through planned multidisciplinary initiatives and inputs that aim to ease patient suffering and improve quality of life. Through a solid, theoretical understanding of the biological, psychological and social concepts that drive, develop and maintain pain, students will explore the multifaceted nature of pain and its effects. Students will gain an advanced understanding of the specialist area of pain management and will develop the core skills and knowledge required of an advanced pain practitioner.

Each course of the programme is divided into a set of themed sections in which material is presented in a blend of short online lectures, practical case studies, directed readings, podcasts and webinars. This is supplemented by discussion boards that provide directed assessment tasks while input from expert guest lecturers and tutors offer students opportunity for collaborative critical discourse and debate of current issues.

This part-time, fully online programme attracts an international and multi-professional student cohort and offers a unique opportunity to have direct contact with others working in pain management across the world. Within this context, students will gain the knowledge, understanding and evaluative skills to provide advanced clinical care so as to improve outcomes for people living in pain.

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Health Academy.

Online learning

By studying at the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine at the University of Edinburgh, students will join a rich tradition of education – one of the oldest institutions in the UK - but also one of the most progressive and dynamic.

The University of Edinburgh has a growing portfolio of established and highly regarded online distance learning postgraduate programmes, with thousands of students currently taking advantage of this mode of education. As a postgraduate student at the University of Edinburgh, you will become part of a supportive online community, able to take advantage of the University’s strong academic tradition, while studying together students and tutors from across the world.

The University of Edinburgh offers a number of outcome awards from its suite of pain management programmes. For those wishing to complete a short option, there are continuing professional development (CME/CPD) courses and for others, who may wish to pursue a longer programme option, there are University awards of Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert), Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) and Master of Science (MSc) – all delivered online using methods that are fully supported by the University’s award-winning online learning environments.

The key differences between the University awards are the number of credits needed to achieve each award:

  • Postgraduate Certificate: this is 60 successfully completed credits of study
  • Postgraduate Diploma: this is 120 successfully completed credits of study
  • Master of Science: this is 180 successfully completed credits of study

Postgraduate Certificate - Level 1 (60 credits)

The Postgraduate Certificate level courses allow students to gain a solid, theoretical understanding of the biological, psychological and social concepts that drive, develop and maintain pain.

Through six core courses covering, assessment and measurement of pain, mechanisms of pain, and the pharmacological and non-pharmacological management of pain, students will explore pain's multifaceted and dynamic nature. In the final core course, students will examine selected conditions seen in clinical practice.

Postgraduate Diploma - Level 2 (60 credits)

(not all Level 2 courses will be offered every year) On successful completion of the Postgraduate Certificate courses, the 60 credits at Postgraduate Diploma level allow students to select courses that focus on areas of pain management that are congruent with students' career goals and clinical or personal interests.

Through a number of course options, including, but not limited to, courses in cancer pain, medical pain, acute pain, neuropathic pain and pain in ageing populations, students will gain an advanced understanding of key areas in pain management. At this level, students may opt to begin to take courses in the areas of either headache management or veterinary medicine to gain a named PGDip or MSc award.

Master of Science - Level 3 (60 credits)

On the successful completion of 120 credits, students are able to proceed to the Master of Science level of the programme. There are a number of options at this level:

  • Fully taught option – successfully complete 60 credits from the Level 2 courses, or,
  • Successfully complete a written dissertation (60 credits), or,
  • Successfully complete a project (60 credits)

Degree Awards with a Headache or Veterinary Designation?

We also offer Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) and Master of Science (MSc) awards in the focussed clinical areas of headache management and veterinary medicine.

Alongside the core pain programme content, students have the option to take a number of courses in specific clinical areas to gain the award of PGDip/MSc Clinical Management of Pain (Headache) or PGDip/MSc Clinical Management of Pain (Veterinary). To gain a named award (i.e. a Headache or Veterinary designation), students must complete at least one third of the credits of the award in the focussed area.

Postgraduate Professional Development (PPD)

Postgraduate Professional Development is aimed at working professionals who want to advance their knowledge through a postgraduate-level course, without the time - or financial - commitment of a full Masters degree, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate. We offer short, focussed, academic credit-bearing courses that provide education on key subjects in pain management.

You may take a maximum of 50 credits worth of courses through our Postgraduate Professional Development (PPD) scheme. These credits are recognised in their own right as postgraduate-level credit, or may be put towards gaining a higher award, such as a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or MSc at the University of Edinburgh or another academic institution.



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The Department of Education will not be recruiting to the MA in Science Education for the academic year 2018/19, as we are undertaking a review of our provision. Read more

The Department of Education will not be recruiting to the MA in Science Education for the academic year 2018/19, as we are undertaking a review of our provision. The text below is for information only.

The Department of Education offers a one-year (12 month) taught full time MA in Science Education. This programme will be attractive to all those who have an interest in science education, whether as teachers, researchers or policy makers. Applications are welcomed from both home and international students.

Applicants are strongly advised to ensure that they submit applications no later than 1st September if they wish to begin a course of study beginning in the same year. No guarantee can be offered that applications received after this date will be processed for a September start date.

The Department also welcomes applications from people interested in studying for a PhD in science education in its areas of expertise (see below).

Why come to York?

The University of York Science Education Group (UYSEG) has an outstanding international reputation for the excellence of its work in research and curriculum development in science education. Our school science programmes such as Science: the Salters Approach, Salters Advanced Chemistry, Salters Horners Advanced Physics and, most recently, Salters Nuffield Advanced Biology and 21st Century Science are widely used in this country, and have received international acclaim. Science: the Salters Approach and Salters Advanced Chemistry have been adapted for use in many other countries, including Belgium, Hong Kong, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Russia, South Africa, Spain, Swaziland and the USA. If you come to York, you will have the opportunity to work with one of the leading groups in science education.

As members of the University of York Science Education Group, the science education staff in the Department of Education have made a significant contribution to the high profile of science education at York. Science specialist staff currently in the Department include Professor Robin Millar, Professor Judith Bennett, Martin Braund and Fred Lubben. All hold major grants for research and development in science education.

Areas of expertise include assessment, attitudes to science, the use of context-based approaches to the teaching of science, curriculum development (including international collaboration on projects), evaluation of curriculum interventions, gender issues in science education, practical work in science, scientific literacy, systematic reviews of research literature, and the transition from primary to secondary school. Current international work includes involvement in the PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) project and a number of initiatives in Southern Africa.

The reputation of the University of York Science Education Group was a major contributory factor in York being chosen as the home of the new National Science Learning Centre, which opened in September 2005 and offers a programme of professional development courses for science teachers.

Programme Aims

The programme offers specialist tuition within an established framework for MA provision in the Department. The aims of the programme are:

-To enhance knowledge and understanding in science education

-To develop educational research capabilities and skills in the fields of education and science education

-To contribute, where appropriate, to professional development by enhancing capacity to investigate aspects of one or more of educational theory, policy and practice

Programme Content

Term 1

-Science, Education and Society (20 credits)

-Research methods in education (20 credits)

One option module from a list of about 10 (20 credits). Options are likely to include:

-Bilingualism

-Citizenship education

-Cross-linguistic influences in second language acquisition

-Discourse Analysis

-Education and social justice

-Evaluating ESOL classroom practice

-Intercultural communication in education

-Learning and teaching second/foreign language reading

-Motivation in education

-Teaching and assessing speaking skills

-Teaching and assessing writing skills

-Teaching and learning in schools

-Teaching World English

-Topics in second language acquisition

Term 2

-Recent research and innovation in science education (20 credits)

One option module from a list of about 10 (20 credits). Options are likely to include:

-Approaches to English teaching

-Contemporary issues in teaching

-Cross-cultural perspectives on language and discourse

-Developmental Psycholinguistics

-Learning and teaching grammar in a second language

-Pragmatics: language, meaning and communication

-Psychology of language and language learning

-Qualitative and quantitative data analysis

-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education

-Teaching English for academic purposes

-The practice of English language teaching

-Testing and assessment in English language teaching

Term 3

Planning and Communicating Research (20 credits). Classes are spread over Terms 2 and 3.

The third term and the summer is also devoted to writing a dissertation (60 credits) based on a small-scale research study to be submitted by early September.

Students will also be able to attend the department series of research seminars for Masters students which includes talks by visiting speakers.

Assessment

Students will complete:

-Four assessed coursework essay assignments (each 4,000 to 5,000 words in length)

-An exam in Research Methods in Education

-An assessed presentation + dissertation outline + ethics audit

-A dissertation of 12,000 words in length

Careers

Our graduates find employment in a wide range of sectors within education, but also in journalism, information management, human resources and other careers.

Our postgraduate courses can be used to complement teacher training/development programmes and voluntary or paid roles which focus on the more practical elements of teaching. However, other than our PGCE, our courses are not teacher training programmes in themselves.



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Educational and developmental psychologists focus on how people develop and learn throughout their lifetime. They work with individuals, families, groups and organisations in a range of settings and have varying roles such as school psychologist, guidance officer, and child and adolescent counsellor. Read more
Educational and developmental psychologists focus on how people develop and learn throughout their lifetime. They work with individuals, families, groups and organisations in a range of settings and have varying roles such as school psychologist, guidance officer, and child and adolescent counsellor. They conduct psychological and educational assessments and instructional planning for exceptional children, adolescents and adults.The Master of Educational and Developmental Psychology is an Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC) accredited fifth and sixth-year sequence in psychology and prepares graduates to practise as educational and developmental psychologists in settings including schools, health and welfare services, care facilities, and within business environments.

The course develops you as an independent specialist with a professional commitment to lifelong learning and application of the theoretical, research, assessment and therapeutic skills related to educational and developmental psychology.

You will develop advanced understanding of, and the skills associated with:

- human developmental stages and processes throughout the lifespan
- psycho-educational assessment and treatment approaches for problematic or atypical development
- advanced therapeutic counselling process and the cycle of effective intervention and change
- contemporary models of exceptionality and inclusion
- evidence-based intervention and treatment programs for psychological problems and psychopathology across the lifespan
- contemporary research and theories of abilities, personality and psychopathology
- ethical, cultural and professional issues
- administering and reporting a range of essential psycho-educational assessment instruments for assessing abilities, personality and adjustment of children through to adults

In addition you will apply theory to practice with 1000 hours of supervised professional placements in a range of settings.

In undertaking a research thesis, you will develop an evidence based approach to psychology, carrying out reviews and scientific investigations relevant to the theory and practice of educational and developmental psychology.

As a graduate, you will be qualified to register as a psychologist with the Psychology Board of Australia (PBA). You will also meet most requirements for membership of the College of Educational and Developmental Psychologists of the Australian Psychological Society.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/educational-and-developmental-psychology-d6007?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in two parts, Part A. Applied academic studies in psychology and Part B. Clinical placement in psychology.

PART A. Applied academic studies in psychology (72 points)
These studies will advance your knowledge and skill development for psychology practice. Guided by sound ethical principles, and through collaborative participation in coursework lectures and workshops, you will develop both expert knowledge of psychology across the lifespan and your critical thinking skills for professional practice.

You will also undertake research, developing as a scientist-practitioner, as you carry out reviews and scientific investigations relevant to the theory and practice of educational and developmental psychology. This will culminate in a 12 - 16 000 word research thesis, involving an independent empirical investigation of a high scientific standard.

PART B. Clinical placement in psychology (24 points)
These studies are practicum placements across a variety of settings where you have the opportunity to apply theory to practice under the supervision of experienced specialist practitioners. You will complete three supervised placements totalling 1000 recorded hours of practical experience.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/education

Faculty of Education

The Faculty of Education is committed to researching, communicating and applying knowledge about teaching and learning in ways that foster quality in education.

The Faculty of Education develops and provides innovative research and teaching that takes seriously the global-to-local demands of an excellent Australian public university. Our work focuses on advancing the discipline and practice of education through original research, development and partnership activities. We prepare and develop professionals and practitioners for a range of education settings and specialisations. We also engage policy and public debate on matters of importance to education and educators at all levels.

Our mission is to contribute to the public interest through high quality and ethical teaching, research, capacity building and community service. To this end, we create and pursue opportunities that strengthen and sustain a vibrant intellectual community, centred on the purposeful, critical and disciplined study of learning and teaching in a range of contexts.

Our vision is of:

- graduates who are capable, thoughtful, ethical citizens of the world, distinguished by their knowledge, intellectual engagement and professional skill, and by their commitment to lifelong learning, innovation and excellence

- research practice and scholarly output that is recognised internationally and locally for its originality, rigour and impartiality, and for providing advice and services that inform and lead professional practice, public debate, policy and community action

- an intellectual, social, physical and web environment that challenges, enthuses and supports all to learn and excel, and which sustains productive working relations characterised by mutual respect, accountability, contribution and recognition.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/educational-and-developmental-psychology-d6007?domestic=true#making-the-application

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