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Masters Degrees (Psychological Therapy)

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This 12-month course has a strong but not exclusive emphasis on cognitive behavioural therapy and on the application of scientific methods to health care and assessment. Read more
This 12-month course has a strong but not exclusive emphasis on cognitive behavioural therapy and on the application of scientific methods to health care and assessment. On completion of the course, and following agreed and appropriate supervision and continuing professional development, graduates will be competent in the assessment and treatment of adult patients suffering from a range of common mental health disorders typically presenting in primary care settings.

Why study Psychological Therapy and Primary Care?

The growing demand for psychological interventions for adults presenting with common mental health disorders (e.g. anxiety and depression) in NHS Primary care has been identified in a variety of studies by central government and professional bodies.

Following consultation with NHS stakeholders, NHS Education for Scotland (NES) has supported the development of a new role for psychology graduates in NHS Scotland as Clinical Associates in Applied Psychology.

The Masters level training for this new role is designed to equip psychology graduates with the competence required to deliver the evidence-based psychological interventions required in circumscribed areas of practice defined by service need. The delivery of training involves a partnership, brokered by NES, between the Universities providing the academic components of the training programmes, the Universities of Stirling and Dundee, and the NHS which supports trainees in supervised clinical practice in the workplace.

Aims of the course

Specifically the course aims to:

create knowledge of the prevalence, diagnostic criteria, presentation and current psychological theories of common mental health disorders in adults.
create the ability to assess common mental health disorders by means of standardised scales, interviews techniques and observation.
foster the ability to develop clinical formulation based on information obtained from case notes, interviews, standardised scales and observation.
foster the therapeutic skills to deliver appropriate psychological treatments for common mental health disorders in Primary Care and evaluate progress and outcome of treatment.

Teaching & Assessment

This course is taught by staff from the University of Dundee and the University of Stirling. Students attend one or other of the universities for 3/4 days each month.

This course begins in January and runs until the following December.

How you will be taught

Modules will be taught via a combination of clinical workshops, seminars and distance-learning lectures delivered via the internet. NHS employers provide appropriate study facilities including computers and internet connection to allow you to carry out academic work on-site. Clinical activities and delivery of therapeutic interventions will be supervised and guided by an NHS clinical supervisor in the NHS setting, who will provide guidance on all aspects of clinical competence according to agreed guidelines. Ratings of clinical competence will be based on taped evidence of practice in the NHS setting and observations of the trainees’ clinical interaction with patients.

What you will study

The course comprises five taught modules and a sixth research module. The first three modules are University of Dundee supervised while the second three are University of Stirling supervised. All modules are core and there are no optional modules:

Assessment, Diagnosis and Formulation: This overview of the assessment process enables you to conduct clinical assessment and formulation of common mental health disorders in primary care

Professional and Ethical Issues: This module develops your understanding of the principles and practice of appropriate professional conduct in the National Health Service (NHS)

Research Project: A supervised empirical investigation, including critical literature review, conducted and reported to publishable standard

Principles and Methods of Psychological Therapy: This module helps you develop and maintain collaborative working alliances and deliver a range of psychological interventions appropriate to common mental health disorders

Common Mental health Disorders in Primary Care: This module develops understanding of use of theoretical and clinical knowledge of the presentation and evidence-based treatment interventions for common mental health disorders

Research, Evaluation and Outcome: This module equips you with the knowledge and skills to conduct clinical research

You are allocated an NHS clinical supervisor who oversees and provides guidance on your clinical activity. You are also allocated an University based supervisor from the course team (who reviews clinical performance) and a University based research supervisor.

How you will be assessed

The course will comprise 50 percent academic study and 50 percent practical clinical placement work. Academic assessment will be by case reports based on NHS clinical work, examinations and a dissertation. In addition, the successful completion of the first three modules listed above depends on the receipt of a satisfactory assessment of clinical competence from your NHS clinical supervisor.

Assessments of clinical competence are made six months and nine months into the course. At these points, any unsatisfactory clinical competence will be highlighted and a programme of remedial action provided that must be undertaken successfully by the end of the modules.

Careers

Since the inception of the course in 2005, the majority of graduates have been employed by the NHS in Scotland as CAAPs. However, the job situation for CAAPs is currently more competitive, as it is for almost all workers at the moment. Some graduates have gone into the private sector as therapists and some have been employed in other NHS posts that are related but have different job titles. Some graduates have gone on to work in England under the IAPT programme. It is impossible to make predictions about vacancies for 2014, however the requirement for all NHS Boards to provide psychological therapies within 14 weeks from referral by 2014 will require some services to consider their skill mix.

Students are funded by NHS Education for Scotland and are employed by the NHS.

Fees

Trainees’ fees and travel expenses will be covered, and salaries paid at agreed
national levels (A4C Band 6, first spine point, currently £26,041)

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This Master’s course, delivered jointly by the Universities of Stirling and Dundee, was designed by National Health Service (NHS) professionals and clinical academics to train people to deliver evidence-based psychological therapies to adults in Primary Care. Read more

Introduction

This Master’s course, delivered jointly by the Universities of Stirling and Dundee, was designed by National Health Service (NHS) professionals and clinical academics to train people to deliver evidence-based psychological therapies to adults in Primary Care.
Mental Health Services across the UK are facing a growing demand for therapeutic services for common mental health disorders. The NHS commitment to delivering evidence-based treatments means that the theoretical focus of this training is cognitive behavioural therapy. Students of this MSc will study a curriculum jointly devised by NHS clinicians and clinical academics at the University of Dundee Medical School and the University of Stirling's Division of Psychology, whilst undergoing training and clinical supervision within the NHS. The course will develop your knowledge of the prevalence, diagnostic criteria, presentation and treatment of common mental health disorders within a Cognitive Behavioural Framework.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc
- Study methods: Online, Full-time
- Start date: January
- Course Director: Dr Freda McManus (Psychology; Stirling)Dr Will Goodall (Department of Psychiatry; Dundee)

Course objectives

This National Health Service Education for Scotland (NES) funded MSc is designed to extend the knowledge of the theoretical foundations of human behaviour and psychological disorders, and to develop the necessary competences to deliver evidence-based psychological therapies to treat common mental health disorders in adults in a primary care setting.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Modules will be taught via a combination of clinical workshops and seminars and supported by material in an online learning environment. NHS employers provide appropriate study facilities including computers and internet connection to allow you to carry out academic work on-site. Clinical activities and delivery of therapeutic interventions will be supervised and guided by an NHS clinical supervisor in the NHS setting, who will provide guidance on all aspects of clinical competence according to agreed guidelines. Ratings of clinical competence will be based on taped evidence of practice in the NHS setting and observations of the trainees’ clinical interaction with patients.
The course will comprise 50 percent academic study and 50 percent practical clinical placement work. Academic assessment will be by case reports based on NHS clinical work, an essay, examinations and a dissertation. In addition, the successful completion of the first three modules listed above depends on the receipt of a satisfactory assessment of clinical competence from your NHS clinical supervisor. Assessments of clinical competence are made six months and nine months into the course. At these points, any unsatisfactory clinical competence will be highlighted and a programme of remedial action provided that must be undertaken successfully by the end of the modules. A further final assessment of clinical competence will be made at the beginning of December. A minimum rating of satisfactory is required at this point.

Modes of study

Full-time: 12 months registered with the Universities of Stirling and Dundee. Clinical skills training is conducted both in supervised NHS placements and via face-to-face skills workshops at the universities. This training is supported by material in an online learning environment. You must attend one or other of the universities for three or four days per month for nine months of the year, in addition to a two-week period during January.

Study method

Online and by attendance at the Universities in line with an annually determined timetable; Full-time

REF2014

In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Careers and employability

- Career opportunities
The course is designed to enable a graduate to work as a Clinical Associate in Applied Psychology (CAAP) in the NHS. Recent graduates have also gone on to work in other clinically related posts in both the private sector and public sector across the UK.

- Employability
This is a professional training course designed to equip graduates with both the clinical and professional skills to work safely and competently in a modern NHS. The development of the abilities to meet a range of performance targets safely, while responding constructively to clinical supervision and in accordance with professional and ethical guidelines, is essential for a successful graduate. Many of these qualities are clearly valuable wherever our graduates may eventually work.

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This course equips you with a critical understanding of cognitive behavioural models of. -Anxiety disorders. -Depression. -Psychosis. Read more
This course equips you with a critical understanding of cognitive behavioural models of:
-Anxiety disorders
-Depression
-Psychosis
-Personality difficulties

You’ll develop the skills to deliver high-quality and creative cognitive behavioural interventions across this range of problems.

How will I study?
The course includes flexible options. Every other week you attend two or three full days of teaching at the University and you may wish to stay in Brighton & Hove during these teaching days.

Some supervision will be delivered by telephone or Skype and does not require you to be at the University.

Our taught modules are assessed by a variety of methods including essays, clinical activity reports, clinical commentary and a portfolio.

Scholarships
Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

ESRC 1+3 and +3 Scholarships (2017)
-A number of ESRC-funded standalone PhD and PhD with Masters scholarships across the social sciences.
-Application deadline: 30 January 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Faculty

For clinical courses of this sort, teaching and supervision is provided in co-operation with staff affiliated with the local NHS Mental Health Trust, the Sussex Partnership Trust (SPT), who have the requisite clinical training and teaching experience.

Careers
You’ll develop the skills to apply for professional accreditation as a cognitive behavioural psychotherapist with the British Association of Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP).

Further admission requirements
Along with a core professional qualification in a mental-health field, applicants also need:
-A foundation-level knowledge of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and some experience of providing structured psychological therapies or interventions.

And either:
-A lower second-class (2.2) undergraduate honours degree or above (or equivalent).

Or:
-The ability to study successfully at postgraduate level, demonstrated through a portfolio of evidence of previous written work produced in a training or work context.

Plus:
-Ready access to suitable clients: clients with common mental-health (CMH) presentation of anxiety and depression for our Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and CMH problem pathway, clients with CMH presentations and clients with complex difficulties for our CBT and Complex Difficulties pathway, and clients with CMH presentations and children and young people (CYP) for our CYP pathway. Note that clinical placements may be available with the Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust to complete the practice element.

In order to be accepted on the course you must also pass an interview.

Applications for this course are competitive and can close early. We therefore recommend an early application - ideally by April.

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Our PGDip Psychological Intervention programme is a well-established course offering high-quality training to individuals working within psychological therapy services. Read more

Our PGDip Psychological Intervention programme is a well-established course offering high-quality training to individuals working within psychological therapy services.

The programme addresses real-world challenges with teaching on relevant service issues, clinical presentations and input from service users themselves.

Master-classes from leaders in the field of cognitive behavioural therapy form a key component of the training curriculum, and are complemented with lectures, workshops, video role-plays, debates, trainee presentations, experiential and self-reflective sessions.

After completion of the programme, students will be qualified to deliver high-quality and NICE-compliant cognitive behavioural therapy to adults with common mental health problems, including depression and anxiety disorders.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year.

The trainees will spend two days a week at the University, the remaining three days a week occur at their place of work where they undertake supervised clinical practice. Six block weeks will be provided across the year, at the start of each module.

On successful completion of the programme trainees may apply for BABCP accreditation as a practitioner.

Example module listing

Teaching approaches

The course modules are delivered across two academic semesters with attendance at the University of Surrey required on Thursday and Friday.

There are also five week-long blocks of intensive workshops during the year. In addition to regular lectures, skills-based competencies will be developed through an innovative range of learning methods including experiential workshops, debates, presentations and video role-plays.

Weekly clinical group supervision for training cases will also be provided by members of the course team. Trainees will be expected to undertake self-directed study and will have access to the University Library and online resources.

Who should apply?

To become a High Intensity CBT Trainee you will need to have had a minimum of two years’ post qualification mental health experience and a relevant Core Professional Training in applied psychology, psychiatry, nursing, counselling, psychotherapy, occupational therapy or social work. You will be registered with a professional, regulatory body.

The minimum eligibility criteria are outlined on the BABCP website.

Applicants who do not have a core profession can meet eligibility criteria through the BABCP Knowledge, Skills and Attitude (KSA) pathway. Please see the BABCP website. These applicants will be required at interview to produce a KSA portfolio to demonstrate that they meet the BABCP eligibility criteria for sufficient knowledge, skills and attitude that demonstrate equivalence to a Core Professional Training.

The KSA portfolio can be completed using the template sheets below:

Equal opportunities

At the University of Surrey we are committed to equality of opportunity in access to training. The University welcomes and provides support as needed for trainees with special needs.

Values

We have a values-based recruitment approach. The High Intensity IAPT training programme at Surrey promotes the NHS values which are enshrined within the NHS constitution. The programme team is dedicated to recruiting graduates whose individual values and behaviours align to those of the NHS.

Educational aims of the programme

  • Enable trainees to achieve the indicative content as laid down by the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) National Curriculum for high intensity Cognitive Behaviour Therapy course, in conjunction with the British Association of Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy requirements for Level 2 course accreditation
  • Ensure that trainees are prepared to practise safely and effectively, and in such a way that the protection of the public is assured, adhering to BABCP code of conduct
  • Enable the trainees to utilise, integrate and evaluate the evidence base available for the delivery of CBT
  • Enable trainees’ achievement of knowledge, understanding and skill acquisition as well as the development of critical thinking, problem solving and reflective capacities essential to complex professional practice
  • Enable trainees to select the relevant psychological theory and research that will be appropriate to the service contexts in which it is delivered
  • Trainees to be committed to the maintenance, development and delivery of high intensity clinical practice
  • Trainees to be committed to consultation/collaboration with service users and carers
  • Trainees to be able to function effectively, professionally and responsibly within Increasing Access to Psychological Therapy services
  • Trainees to be aware of, responsive to, and able to represent the changing needs of the Profession
  • Trainees to be sensitive and responsive to difference and diversity in clients
  • Trainees to be able to understand, and effectively communicate, with clients
  • Trainees to be able to integrate a scientist practitioner/reflective practitioner approach in their work
  • Trainees to be aware of the need to foster their own personal and professional development and to look after their own emotional and physical well-being

Professional recognition

The course is BABCP accredited and part of the Department of Health ‘Improving Access to Psychological Therapies’ programme (IAPT), which aims to improve access to evidence-based talking therapies in the NHS and any other qualified healthcare providers (AQP) through an expansion of the psychological therapy workforce and services.



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Our School of Psychology has a reputation for providing high quality IPT training to therapists who are already in practice and want to add this model to their repertoire. Read more

Our School of Psychology has a reputation for providing high quality IPT training to therapists who are already in practice and want to add this model to their repertoire.

This Psychological Therapy programme has been designed to be responsive to the needs of people who do not already have a therapy qualification. The first year of this programme will enable professionals to develop core counselling skills and IPC intervention skills to enhance their effectiveness with clients, further their psychological skills and increase their understanding of mental health issues.

Many roles in the workforce today require people to have enhanced their psychological and therapeutic skills. At present, our programme is the only one in the UK that offers the opportunity for individuals to undertake IPC training.

Successful completion of this year will enable individuals to undertake the Diploma in IPT, a full therapy qualification.

Programme structure

This one year programme can be undertaken on its own or as part of a flexible training of up to three years. Successful completion of all modules in this first Certificate year gives the option of progressing into year two, the Diploma in IPT, which confers a full therapy qualification which allows individuals to practice in the NHS or elsewhere. There is also the option to complete a third research year to obtain an MSc.

The first year comprises of four modules of 15 credits each. Each module comprises of 150 hours of learning, including student contact, private study, skills practice either on placement or in the classroom and assessment. In order to achieve the Postgraduate Certificate in Psychological Intervention: IPC (Interpersonal Counselling) students must complete all four modules and complete 60 credits at FHEQ Level 7.

Example module listing

  • Psychological Theory and the Fundamentals of Adult Mental Health
  • The Therapeutic Relationship
  • Introduction to Assessment, Intervention and Ending Skills
  • Supervision of Client Work

Teaching approaches

Specialist knowledge relevant to the subject area will be delivered using a variety of methods, including lectures, experiential workshops, micro skills teaching, audio-recording reviews, clinical supervision, group discussions, and through the interaction of the student with coursework assignments. 

Clinical practice with application of their learning to client work will be supervised closely and students will be required to keep a log of their clinical activity as well as supervisory activity and will be evaluated on their clinical competence.

The strength of this programme lies in the integration of classroom learning and clinical practice learning and development. The personal impact of working with clients presenting with distress will be explored as well as ethical issues. Students will develop their skills in applying theory and technique to real life client situations in supervision sessions at the University via discussion and micro-teaching.

The feedback process is designed to be ongoing, in that comments and reflections from these sessions will provide an escalator of personal learning for the student. At critical points there will be summative learning points to provide a marker for the student as to their progress against the benchmark standards being expected. Formative and summative feedback will be provided as appropriate to help students develop their skills in these areas of practice.

The associated research evidence bases will be integrated into all aspects of the teaching. 

Students who have access to clients in their ongoing job role whilst studying may incorporate part of this work as their practice placement, subject to agreement with their manager and the University. Otherwise students will be supported to obtain a suitable practice placement.

Educational aims of the programme

This programme will enable professionals to develop core counselling skills in IPC (Interpersonal counselling) to enhance their effectiveness with clients, further their psychological skills and increase their understanding of mental health issues without undertaking a full therapy qualification.

Interpersonal counselling is a brief intervention, based on the principles of Interpersonal Psychotherapy, for people suffering from stress or mild depression. It is designed to be delivered by individuals after a relatively brief training course, and does not require them to have previous mental health qualifications.

Programme learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

  • Have a basic understanding of psychiatric classification and of those conditions most frequently met in clinical practice
  • Understand the role of medication in the treatment of mental health problems
  • Understand the difference between the therapeutic alliance, the real relationship and the transference relationship and their contribution to the therapeutic relationship
  • Understand their own relationship to and work with difference and diversity
  • Understand the function of the therapeutic frame

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Critically assess different models of the underpinnings of psychological health

Professional practical skills

  • Select appropriate clients and plan an intervention
  • Undertake completed pieces of time-limited (short-term) interpersonal clinical interventions under supervision
  • Use the Interpersonal Counselling (IPC) model to deliver complete short therapeutic interventions
  • Manage challenges in the therapeutic relationship
  • Facilitate clients in developing and maintaining a strong therapeutic relationship
  • To use appropriate measures to evaluate the success of treatment
  • Understand and work within the professional context of psychological therapy, including ethical practice

Key / transferable skills

To reflect on their development as a psychological practitioner

Professional recognition

Recognition is being sought from IPT-UK, the organisation that accredits therapists in this particular model of therapy.



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Why Surrey?. Our stimulating MSc in Psychological Intervention. IPT (Interpersonal Psychotherapy) offers flexible training for individuals who want to become qualified Interpersonal Psychotherapists. Read more

Why Surrey?

Our stimulating MSc in Psychological Intervention: IPT (Interpersonal Psychotherapy) offers flexible training for individuals who want to become qualified Interpersonal Psychotherapists.

Our programme will develop your theoretical understanding of mental health issues, equip you with skills in working with the IPT model, enable you to work effectively with clients, and give you the opportunity to conduct research in the theory or practice of IPT.

This is delivered through a rich range of learning experiences, including the opportunity to integrate theory with practice. This ensures that, as a graduate of this programme, you are able to provide a high quality therapy to service users.

Programme overview

Our School of Psychology has a reputation for providing high quality IPT training to therapists who are already in practice and want to add this model to their repertoire.

This Psychological Intervention MSc programme has been designed to be responsive to the needs of people who do not already have a therapy qualification who aspire to become qualified practitioner in a NICE-recommended psychological therapy.

The programme meets an identified training need for therapists in this specific approach. The National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines recommend IPT as a treatment for depression and eating disorders and IPT has also been part of the Government’s provision to increase the availability of talking therapies through the Increasing Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT provision).

At present, our programme is the only programme in the UK that offers the opportunity for appropriately experienced individuals with no previous therapy qualification to undertake IPT training.

Programme structure

This programme is studied part-time over three academic years. Students with equivalent/sufficient qualifications/credits will be able to join the programme at year two or three.

The full MSc three year (part-time) programme comprises of nine modules with a total of 180 credits.

The first year comprises of four modules of 15 credits each. Each module comprises of 150 hours of learning, including student contact, private study, skills practice either on placement or in the classroom and assessment. In order to achieve the Postgraduate Certificate in Psychological Intervention: IPC (Interpersonal Counselling) students must complete all four modules and complete 60 credits at FHEQ Level 7.

In order to achieve the Postgraduate Diploma in Psychological Intervention: IPT (Interpersonal Psychotherapy) students must complete 120 credits at FHEQ Level 7. The second year comprises of three modules, two of 15 credits each and one of 30 credits. The 30 credit module includes a substantial allocation of student learning time to placement activities.

In order to achieve the Masters in Psychological Intervention: IPT (Interpersonal Psychotherapy), students must complete 180 credits at FHEQ Level 7. The third year comprises of two modules, a 15 credit module in Research methods and a dissertation module of 45 credits.

In order for students to progress they must achieve a minimum average of 50 per cent.

Example module listing

Year one

  • Psychological Theory and the Fundamentals of Adult Mental Health
  • The Therapeutic Relationship
  • Introduction to Assessment, intervention and Ending Skills
  • Supervision of Client Work

Year two

  • IPT Theoretical and Research base: client groups; modes of delivery; adaptations
  • Clinical Practice in IPT
  • Supervision of Client Work: IPT

Year three

  • Quantitative Research methods
  • Statistics and Data Analysis
  • Research project

Teaching

Specialist knowledge relevant to the subject area will be delivered using a variety of methods, including lectures, experiential workshops, micro skills teaching, audio-recording reviews, clinical supervision, group discussions, and through the interaction of the student with coursework assignments. 

Clinical practice with application of their learning to client work will be supervised closely and students will be required to keep a log of their clinical activity as well as supervisory activity and will be evaluated on their clinical competence.

Students who have access to clients in their ongoing job role whilst studying may incorporate part of this work as their practice placement, subject to agreement with their manager and the University. Otherwise students will be supported to obtain a suitable practice placement.

The strength of this programme lies in the integration of classroom learning and clinical practice learning and development. The personal impact of working with clients presenting with distress will be explored as well as ethical issues. Students will develop their skills in applying theory and technique to real life client situations in supervision sessions at the University via discussion and micro-teaching.

The feedback process is designed to be ongoing, in that comments and reflections from these sessions will provide an escalator of personal learning for the student. At critical points there will be summative learning points to provide a marker for the student as to their progress against the benchmark standards being expected. Formative and summative feedback will be provided as appropriate to help students develop their skills in these areas of practice.

The associated research evidence bases will be integrated into all aspects of the teaching. 

In the final year, students will receive individual supervision for the research project during which they will receive one-to one support and guidance in the development of their research skills.

Educational aims of the programme

The first year of this programme will enable professionals to develop core counselling skills in IPT (IPC) to enhance their effectiveness with clients, further their psychological skills and increase their understanding of mental health issues. The second year (PGDip) leads to a full therapy qualification. The third and final year (MSc) is a research year which results in a Master’s qualification

Professional recognition

The course is designed in order to meet the accreditation requirements of a well-known professional counselling body. Because this is a new programme, the accreditation process will take place after the first cohort has completed. If successful, accreditation is awarded retrospectively thus allowing the first cohort of students to become a registered with this professional body.

Recognition is also being sought from IPT-UK, the organisation that accredits therapists in this particular model of therapy.



Read less
. Why Surrey?. Our stimulating postgraduate diploma in Psychological Intervention. IPT (Interpersonal Psychotherapy) offers flexible training for individuals who want develop core counselling skills and gain a full therapy qualification. Read more

Why Surrey?

Our stimulating postgraduate diploma in Psychological Intervention: IPT (Interpersonal Psychotherapy) offers flexible training for individuals who want develop core counselling skills and gain a full therapy qualification.

Our programme will develop your theoretical understanding of mental health issues, equip you with skills in working with the IPT model and enable you to work effectively with clients.

This is delivered through a rich range of learning experiences, including the opportunity to integrate theory with practice. This ensures that, as a graduate of this programme, you are able to provide a high quality therapy to service users.

Programme overview

Our School of Psychology has a reputation for providing high quality IPT training to therapists who are already in practice and want to add this model to their repertoire.

This Psychological Intervention programme has been designed to be responsive to the needs of people who do not already have a therapy qualification who aspire to become qualified practitioner in a NICE-recommended psychological therapy.

The programme meets an identified training need for therapists in this specific approach. The National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines recommend IPT as a treatment for depression and eating disorders and IPT has also been part of the Government’s provision to increase the availability of talking therapies through the Increasing Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT provision).

At present, our programme is the only programme in the UK that offers the opportunity for appropriately experienced individuals with no previous therapy qualification to undertake IPT training.

Program structure

This programme takes place over one or two academic years, depending on the level of qualification. A third and final research year can be added to result in an MSc qualification.

The first year comprises of four modules of 15 credits each. Each module comprises of 150 hours of learning, including student contact, private study, skills practice either on placement or in the classroom and assessment. In order to achieve the Postgraduate Certificate in Psychological Intervention: IPC (Interpersonal Counselling) students must complete all four modules and complete 60 credits at FHEQ Level 7.

In order to achieve the Postgraduate Diploma in Psychological Intervention: IPT (Interpersonal Psychotherapy) students must complete 120 credits at FHEQ Level 7. The second year comprises of three modules, two of 15 credits each and one of 30 credits. The 30 credit module includes a substantial allocation of student learning time to placement activities.

In order for students to progress they must achieve a minimum average of 50 per cent.

Example module listing

Year one

  • Psychological Theory and the Fundamentals of Adult Mental Health
  • The Therapeutic Relationship
  • Introduction to Assessment, Intervention and Ending Skills
  • Supervision of Client Work

Year two

  • IPT Theoretical and Research Base: client groups; modes of delivery; adaptations
  • Clinical practice in IPT
  • Supervision of client work: IPT

Teaching approaches

Specialist knowledge relevant to the subject area will be delivered using a variety of methods, including lectures, experiential workshops, micro skills teaching, audio-recording reviews, clinical supervision, group discussions, and through the interaction of the student with coursework assignments. 

Clinical practice with application of their learning to client work will be supervised closely and students will be required to keep a log of their clinical activity as well as supervisory activity and will be evaluated on their clinical competence.

Students who have access to clients in their ongoing job role whilst studying may incorporate part of this work as their practice placement, subject to agreement with their manager and the University. Otherwise students will be supported to obtain a suitable practice placement.

The strength of this programme lies in the integration of classroom learning and clinical practice learning and development. The personal impact of working with clients presenting with distress will be explored as well as ethical issues. Students will develop their skills in applying theory and technique to real life client situations in supervision sessions at the University via discussion and micro-teaching.

The feedback process is designed to be ongoing, in that comments and reflections from these sessions will provide an escalator of personal learning for the student. At critical points there will be summative learning points to provide a marker for the student as to their progress against the benchmark standards being expected. Formative and summative feedback will be provided as appropriate to help students develop their skills in these areas of practice.

The associated research evidence bases will be integrated into all aspects of the teaching.  

Educational aims of the programme

The first year of this programme will enable professionals to develop core counselling skills in IPT (IPC) to enhance their effectiveness with clients, further their psychological skills and increase their understanding of mental health issues. The second year (PGDip) leads to a full therapy qualification.

Professional recognition

The course is designed in order to meet the accreditation requirements of a well-known professional counselling body. Because this is a new programme, the accreditation process will take place after the first cohort has completed. If successful, accreditation is awarded retrospectively thus allowing the first cohort of students to become a registered with this professional body.

Recognition is also being sought from IPT-UK, the organisation that accredits therapists in this particular model of therapy.



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CBT is an increasingly popular form of psychological therapy. Many people who have learned about the methods find that it helps them a great deal in doing their job - if their job involves helping people in distress to experience less distress (eg. Read more

CBT is an increasingly popular form of psychological therapy.

Many people who have learned about the methods find that it helps them a great deal in doing their job - if their job involves helping people in distress to experience less distress (eg. as in health care work), or perhaps helping people learn how to manage their life more effectively (eg. also health care - but also education, the prison service, etc). CBT is also recommended by NICE as a first line intervention for many psychological disorders.

This course is designed to enable students to practice CBT. The course is structured around teaching, skills practice, experiential learning, supervision support groups, and academic assignments. The academic assignments include essays, case reports, and recordings of live sessions with clients. Students will also be encouraged to discuss their own views on CBT as well as on mental health and psychological therapy in general. The core feature of the course is the facilitation of reflective practice.

Course details

There are two routes of entry to this course:

  • Route 1 - This route is for new graduates holding a Psychology BSc degree, with some voluntary experience. (This programme is now closed to applications for 2017 entry)
  • Route 2 - This route is for health and social care professionals depending on previous experiences.

The key features of the course are:

  • Structured Cognitive methods
  • Reducing fear and anxiety using CBT methods
  • Developing your use of CBT methods
  • Using CBT methods in routine service delivery

Learning and teaching

Assessment methods

A list of modules with accompanying assignments / submissions detailed below. All due dates are outlined on the timetable when you begin the course. 

Module 1:

  • 2,000-word essay

Module 2:

  • 2,000-word essay
  • 2,000-word session log

Module 3

  • 2,000-word assignment on module

Module 4-7

  • Three audio assignments
  • 2,000-word essay
  • 2,000-word case study x 3
  • 4,000-word case study

Employability

Professional accreditation

All of the tutors and clinical supervisors on this Diploma course are BABCP accredited therapists. The course is structured to meet many of the requirements of the BABCP for accreditation as a Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapist.



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Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is a current form of evidence-based psychological therapy recommended by NICE as a first line intervention for many psychological disorders. Read more
Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is a current form of evidence-based psychological therapy recommended by NICE as a first line intervention for many psychological disorders.

This MSc in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy aims to increase students’ knowledge base of theory and research in CBT, and to promote a critical approach to the subject. The course also provides practical, intensive and detailed skills training to facilitate skills development to a defined standard of competence. The course is a Level 2 course in CBT and as such “provides all the necessary training so that on graduation from Level 2 courses, individuals will have received the training required to fulfil BABCP's Minimum Training Standards”

The training aims to help students to achieve the level of theoretical knowledge, reflective abilities and clinical skills to work as psychological therapists, using evidence based cognitive behaviour therapy methods in their work.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

This course aims to train students to deliver CBT to people with depression and anxiety. Successful completion of the training equips individuals to be skilled and independent CBT practitioners. In addition to providing practical, intensive and detailed skills training to facilitate skills development to a defined standard of competence, the course aims to increase trainees’ knowledge base of theory and research in CBT, and to promote a critical approach to the subject.

The programme is delivered by experienced and accredited lecturer/practitioners in Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapy. The award provides an excellent foundation for achieving accreditation with the British Association of Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP) as a Cognitive Behavioural Therapist.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

On the course you will learn how to:
-Construct maintenance and developmental CBT conceptualisations for depression and anxiety disorders
-Develop CBT-specific treatment plans
-Practise CBT with depression and anxiety disorders systematically, creatively and with good clinical outcomes
-Deal with complex issues arising in CBT practice
-Demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving therapeutic problems
-Practise as ‘scientist practitioners’, advancing your knowledge and understanding and develop new skills to a high level
-Demonstrate a systematic knowledge of the principles of CBT and the evidence base for the application of CBT techniques
-Demonstrate a systematic knowledge of CBT for depression and anxiety disorders
-Demonstrate a critical understanding of the theoretical and research evidence for cognitive behavioural models and an ability to evaluate the evidence
-Demonstrate an ability to adapt CBT sensitively, and to ensure equitable access for people from diverse cultures and with different values
-Display competence in research methodology and data analysis

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

Adequate access to a choice of effective psychological therapies is a key Government priority. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) has a continually evolving evidence base with emphasis on therapy outcomes and robust, universally applicable treatment methods.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is the most effective of available treatments across a range of psychological problems, specifically depression, anxiety, PTSD, OCD and phobia. As such, CBT is the basis of much mental health practice. It has become Government policy for NHS Trusts to provide patients/clients with access to CBT.

Achieving this award would provide students with the opportunity to seek roles within the psychological therapies field and broaden their career prospects.

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Summary. The programme provides an opportunity for students to enhance their skills and knowledge in areas of applied psychology related to mental health practice and research. Read more

Summary

The programme provides an opportunity for students to enhance their skills and knowledge in areas of applied psychology related to mental health practice and research. It trains and equips students wishing to:

  • Enter further professional training in Clinical, Counselling, Educational or Forensic Psychology;
  • Become more employable for positions in the public and private sector (such as Assistant and Associate Psychologist posts, Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner posts, and Research Assistant/Analyst posts);
  • Pursue PhD research in the area of mental health.

In addition, the course has gained full AFT accreditation for Foundation Level training in Family Therapy and Systemic Practice, and full BPS accreditation for Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner training. These can be taken as routes within the MSc programme.

This course is undergoing academic revalidation during 2016/17, and course content/modules are subject to change. 

Structure and content

To complete the Masters programme, students are required to successfully complete 180 university credits. Programme Routes: There are three different ‘routes’ that students can take during their time on the programme, depending on their interest or the experience they would like to gain from their training. These routes have been designed because feedback from students suggests that some people like to maintain a broad range of skills and experience, whereas others prefer to focus on a particular area of practice. The route students choose may depend on the kind of work or further training that they want to pursue beyond the MSc course itself (note that all 3 routes include the carrying out of an MSc Research Project):

  • The ‘Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner’ route – This route incorporates training as a Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner (PWP), which is fully accredited by the British Psychological Society. PWPs work in primary care mental health services, delivering low intensity psychological interventions (with a CBT focus) for people experiencing mild to moderate emotional problems such as depression and anxiety. This is a well-established role in mental health services in England, and services in Northern Ireland are developing to include a focus on this way of working. Students taking this route will spend time on clinical placement during the course, arranged by the course team (more on this below).
  • The main course route, entitled ‘Mental Health and Psychological Therapies’ – This route offers a breadth of experience in theory and skills training, including Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Family Therapy & Systemic Practice skills modules, Advanced Research Methods, and a choice amongst key Mental Health and Professional Issues modules.
  • The ‘Mental Health with Family Therapy and Systemic Practice’ route – this incorporates elements of the main course route (e.g. CBT, Mental Health modules, research methods), as well as Foundation Level training in Family Therapy and Systemic Practice (fully accredited by the Association for Family Therapy and Systemic Practice). The training focuses on approaches implemented when supporting families, but also on how these approaches and concepts can be applied to working with individuals. Students on this route must have secured their own work in a therapeutic setting (to enable them to practice systemic therapy skills), including supervision by an accredited therapist.

Professional recognition

British Psychological Society (BPS)  

Accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) against the requirements for qualification as a Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner.

Work placement / study abroad

The programme has a number of opportunities to connect clinical placement experiences with studies on campus. The BPS-accredited Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner Training (which composes part of one of the course routes), includes a 9-month clinical placement in low-intensity psychological therapies services, arranged by the course team. The AFT-accredited Foundation Level Training in Family Therapy and Systemic Practice (which composes part of another course route), includes a module that explores and assesses students' clinical experiences in this area of practice - placement for this module is arranged by students themselves. Finally, the MSc presents a further placement opportunity for students who have completed the course, in the form of a 15-credit standalone placement module ('Clinical Placement in Applied Psychology'). A selection of clinical placements have been secured in Psychology Services in the Western Health and Social Care Trust, in specialisms including Adult Mental Health, Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Paediatric Psychology, Older Adults, Personality Disorder, and Autism Spectrum Disorder Services. This post-MSc module is only open to those students who have completed the MSc at Ulster, and students who enrol on this module will be working as the equivalent of Assistant Psychologists on a voluntary basis in these services (length of placements are typically between 6 months and one year).

Career options

Currently, our graduating students are successful in acquiring Assistant Psychologist positions, which with experience is allowing people to apply for Associate Psychologist positions. Others are successful in gaining entry onto Professional Doctorate programmes in Clinical, Counselling and Educational Psychology, or PhD scholarships in Psychology across UK and Ireland. In addition, students who undertake the accredited Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner (PWP) training strand within the course will be able to seek accreditation with the BPS for working as a PWP. Finally, students who undertake AFT Foundation Level Training will have completed Stage 1 of 3 in their training to become a qualified Systemic Psychotherapist.



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UCLan’s. Advanced Certificate in Counselling for Depression. offers professional development for counsellors who are already trained in Person-centred or Humanistic approaches and who have significant clinical experience. Read more

UCLan’s Advanced Certificate in Counselling for Depression offers professional development for counsellors who are already trained in Person-centred or Humanistic approaches and who have significant clinical experience. Hence Counselling for Depression (CfD) training intends to both build upon existing knowledge and, more particularly, to align counsellors’ practice with a competence framework which has strong links to research evidence and follows the Curriculum for Counselling for Depression produced by the National IAPT Team. In sum, this course provides you with a thorough grounding in the theory, evidence base and practice of CfD, allowing you to develop your knowledge and competence in psychological clinical assessment and CfD interventions in accordance with national guidelines.

COURSE OUTLINE

CfD is a manualised form of psychological therapy as recommended by NICE (NICE, 20094) for the treatment of depression. It is a form of psychological therapy derived from the Skills for Health humanistic competence framework devised by Roth, Hill and Pilling (2009), which provided the basis for the National Occupational Standards (NOS) for psychological therapists. This modality targets the emotional problems underlying depression along with the intrapersonal processes, such as low self-esteem and excessive self-criticism, which often maintain depressed mood. The therapy aims to help patients contact underlying feelings, make sense of them and reflect on the new meanings which emerge. This, in turn, provides a basis for psychological and behavioural change. You will attend for 7 taught days at the university, complete 80 hours supervised clinical practice, and attend for a minimum of 6 hours of clinical supervision.

ACADEMIC EXPERTISE

We are committed to delivering academic learning of the highest quality, helping you to stretch your mind and fulfil your university ambitions.

LEARNING OUTCOME & AIMS

We aim to create the perfect blend of knowledge, practical experience and relevance to equip UCLan graduates with the confidence and skills they need to get ahead in the world of work.

WORK EXPERIENCE AND INTERNATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

At UCLan we work with a range of businesses and organisations, many of which provide work experience opportunities and project briefs to enable to you gain real work experience whilst you undertake your postgraduate programme. Your course tutor will advise on opportunities available within your course and the UCLan Careers Team can provide help, advice and guidance on how to apply for them and how to make the most of these opportunities.

GRADUATE CAREERS

The UCLan Careers Team offer ongoing supportive careers advice and guidance throughout your course and after graduation, along with a range of modules, work experience opportunities and events to help you acquire the skills to make you stand out to potential employers in today’s competitive market.



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The PG Dip programme equips students with a critical understanding of psychological models of psychosis and the skills to deliver high quality and creative cognitive behavioural interventions. Read more

The PG Dip programme equips students with a critical understanding of psychological models of psychosis and the skills to deliver high quality and creative cognitive behavioural interventions. The shorter PG Cert programmes focus on clinical skills, for clinicians, or on theoretical background for researchers, academics and non-practitioners.

Key benefits

  • The Internationally renowned centre for the development and evaluation of cognitive behavioural interventions for people with psychosis, offers unrivalled access to current innovations in practice and research.
  • Close supervision with expert practitioners develops students' ability to become skilled and creative independent practitioners of CBT for Psychosis.
  • Develops students' skills in training and supervising other professionals and thus improves the provision of CBT for Psychosis in students' own work settings.

Description

The courses have been developed with the South London & Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust (SLaM) and designed in accordance with the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence Schizophrenia Guideline psychological therapy recommendations (NICE, 2003, 2014).

The purpose of the courses is to improve the delivery of cognitive behavioural interventions for people with psychosis. CBTp is a complex therapeutic intervention and requires of independent practitioners an advanced theoretical understanding of cognitive models of psychosis and specialist post-qualification skills in relationship building, assessment, formulation and intervention. Our courses train students in each of these requirements, enabling them to develop competence then mastery in therapy delivery, and to provide consultancy, training and supervision to others.

The courses are modular, following a credit framework. Two clinical skills modules build from early therapy activities (Engagement, Assessment & Formulation – Module 1) through to intervention and specialised applications (Intervention & Supervised Practice; Module 2). Two academic modules develop students’ critical appraisal of the theory underlying psychological models of psychosis (Theoretical background I: Psychological Models, Module 3) and the evidence base for interventions (Theoretical Background II: Interventions, efficacy & future directions, Module 4). Diploma students complete all four modules; clinical skills certificate students complete Module 1 and Module 2 only; theoretical background certificate students complete Modules 3 and Module 4 only. 

Case supervision is strongly emphasised on the clinical programmes. Weekly morning supervision sessions take place in small groups (four to five) on the teaching day with all supervision carried out by the programme team. Additional close supervision (listening to audiorecordings of therapy sessions) is a course requirement.

Course purpose

The programmes deliver the clinical skills and theoretical background to work creatively and effectively with people with a schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis.

The Postgraduate Diploma in CBT for psychosis (CBTp) is designed for qualified mental health practitioners and covers both the clinical skills and theoretical background required to become an innovative and successful practitioner of CBTp. We recommend completion of the programme on a part-time basis, over two years. A fast-track one year full time option is available for students with previous experience of relevant clinical work and masters level study.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Therapy Skills emphasises the clinical skills component of the programme, for mental health practitioners who are primarily concerned with clinical practice, rather than academic development. The Postgraduate Certificate in Theoretical Background is designed for people without a mental health qualification, for researchers or academics, or as an introduction to CBTp. Students attend seminars and workshop teaching in order to acquire a detailed understanding of psychological models and interventions, together with their evidence base, but clinical supervision is not usually provided. Certificate programmes are offered on a part-time basis over a calendar year. 

Course format and assessment

The course begins with three introductory intensive one-day workshops, which aim to provide students with an overview of the model, therapeutic style and content of initial sessions. This is usually a refresher for more experienced students and sets the scene for identifying students' individual learning targets and goals. Teaching modules are examined by assignments – audio recordings, case reports and practice portfolios for the clinical modules; essays and research presentations for the academic modules. Clinical students will be required to work with at least four clients for at least 16 sessions from assessment to completion or termination of therapy over the duration of the programme.

You will be assessed through a combination of coursework and examinations.

Examination (50%) | Coursework (30%) | Practical (20%)

Extra information

Regulating body

King’s College is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England

Sign up for more information. Email now

Have a question about applying to King’s? Email now



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Our Cognitive Behavioural Therapy PGDip produces psychological therapists who are competent in the practice of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for patients affected by psychological disorders. Read more
Our Cognitive Behavioural Therapy PGDip produces psychological therapists who are competent in the practice of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for patients affected by psychological disorders. It focuses predominantly on the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders.

The course offers CBT practitioner level training designed for healthcare and related professionals who have already completed introductory and/or intermediate CBT training (or equivalent) and have some supervised experience of providing CBT.

You will gain:
-Practical, intensive and detailed training to facilitate the development of competent CBT skills, to a defined standard
-The necessary knowledge and attitudes to be an open-minded, informed and reflective CBT practitioner
-A critical approach to the subject through engagement with relevant theory, models and evidence

These skills equip you to become a creative independent CBT practitioner, in accordance with British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP) guidelines for good practice, and to contribute to the further development of CBT. As a graduate of this course you are eligible for practitioner accreditation with BABCP through Standard or Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) curriculum routes.

The course enables you to develop competency in CBT for anxiety disorders and become a skilled practitioner in this therapeutic approach. The focus is on treating patients with diagnosable anxiety disorders such as Social Phobia, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD), etc. The emphasis is on high-intensity, individual CBT rather than guided self-help, psycho-education or lower intensity anxiety management.

Underpinning the course is a student centred learning approach to developing as a CBT therapist. You are required to conduct CBT therapy with anxiety-disordered patients in their host services. These patients will have moderate-severe anxiety symptoms appropriate for high-intensity psychological therapy.

The Diploma extends into the psychological treatment of major depression and specialist CBT applications. You will work with depressed patients who are more likely to have complex and recurrent difficulties. Your work on supervised cases will cover a broad range of disorders and complex conditions.

Facilities

The School of Psychology is based on the University campus in the Ridley Building. You will benefit from seminar rooms and meeting spaces, as well as excellent practical facilities for carrying out experiments.

Additional facilities for psychological research are available in:
-The Institute of Neuroscience for comparative and neuroscience approaches
-The Institute of Health and Society for health psychology, and development and disability
-Culture Lab for human–computer interaction
-The School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences for disorders of language

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In 2008 the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies project began in order to improve the capacity of psychological therapy services for people with common mental health problems (depression and anxiety) in the UK. Read more

In 2008 the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies project began in order to improve the capacity of psychological therapy services for people with common mental health problems (depression and anxiety) in the UK. The psychological wellbeing practitioner role was created as part of this project in order to support the delivery of psychological therapies within a stepped care system.

Course details

The stepped care system is promoted by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) which works on the principle of offering the least intrusive and most effective treatment (low intensity interventions) in the first instance and increasing the intensity of treatment as required.

This programme provides education and training that meets the requirements of the Department of Health (2011) curriculum for psychological well-being practitioners by:

  • providing you with a substantial knowledge base appropriate to master's level study
  • facilitating the acquisition of core therapeutic and technical skills that underpin low intensity psychological interventions
  • enabling you to develop a positive attitude and commitment towards lifelong learning and personal and development planning
  • ensuring you are prepared to meet the challenges of current and future contemporary mental health services.

What you study

There are eight core themes that run through the award via three modules. They help you to make clear links between theory and practice and include:

  • clinical supervision
  • caseload management
  • information gathering
  • information giving
  • shared decision-making
  • low intensity interventions
  • values, policy, culture and diversity
  • personal development planning.

Course structure

Core modules

  • Advancing Engagement and Assessment Skills for Common Mental Health Problems
  • Advancing Low Intensity Intervention Skills for Common Mental Health Problems
  • Advancing Reflective, Non-Discriminatory Practice

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

Where you study

Teesside University campus. There is also a practical element to the programme and so you must have a clinical placement with access to a practice supervisor qualified and experienced to deliver low intensity interventions underpinned by cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Assistance will be given to find a suitable placement.

How you learn

Learning is through a combination of presentations, group discussion and role-play activities as well as self-directed study and supervised practice in the workplace.

How you are assessed

Assessment is through role-play and real patient activities, an examination and practice competencies. All written academic work is marked at master’s level.

Employability

This award prepares you for your role as a psychological wellbeing practitioner. You are eligible to apply for accreditation with the British Psychological Society.



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Our Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Anxiety Disorders PGCert produces psychological therapists who are competent in the practice of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for patients affected by psychological disorders. Read more
Our Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Anxiety Disorders PGCert produces psychological therapists who are competent in the practice of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for patients affected by psychological disorders. Its main focus is on the treatment of anxiety disorders.

This course offers CBT practitioner level training designed for healthcare and related professionals who have already completed introductory and/or intermediate CBT training (or equivalent) and have some supervised experience of providing CBT.

You gain:
-Practical, intensive and detailed training to facilitate the development of competent CBT skills, to a defined standard
-The necessary knowledge and attitudes to be an open-minded, informed and reflective CBT practitioner
-A critical approach to the subject through engagement with relevant theory, models and evidence

These skills equip you to become a creative independent CBT practitioner, in accordance with British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP) guidelines for good practice, and to contribute to the further development of CBT.

The course enables you to develop competency in CBT for anxiety disorders and become a skilled practitioner in this therapeutic approach. The focus is on treating patients with diagnosable anxiety disorders such as Social Phobia, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD), etc. The emphasis is on high-intensity, individual CBT rather than guided self-help, psycho-education or lower intensity anxiety management.

Underpinning the course is a student centred learning approach to developing as a CBT therapist. You are required to conduct CBT therapy with anxiety-disordered patients in their host services. These patients will have moderate-severe anxiety symptoms appropriate for high-intensity psychological therapy.

Facilities

The School of Psychology is based on the University campus in the Ridley Building. You will benefit from seminar rooms and meeting spaces, as well as excellent practical facilities for carrying out experiments.

Additional facilities for psychological research are available in:
-The Institute of Neuroscience for comparative and neuroscience approaches
-The Institute of Health and Society for health psychology, and development and disability
-Culture Lab for human–computer interaction
-The School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences for disorders of language

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