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Summary. The programme provides an opportunity for students to enhance their skills and knowledge in areas of applied psychology related to mental health practice and research. Read more

Summary

The programme provides an opportunity for students to enhance their skills and knowledge in areas of applied psychology related to mental health practice and research. It trains and equips students wishing to:

  • Enter further professional training in Clinical, Counselling, Educational or Forensic Psychology;
  • Become more employable for positions in the public and private sector (such as Assistant and Associate Psychologist posts, Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner posts, and Research Assistant/Analyst posts);
  • Pursue PhD research in the area of mental health.

In addition, the course has gained full AFT accreditation for Foundation Level training in Family Therapy and Systemic Practice, and full BPS accreditation for Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner training. These can be taken as routes within the MSc programme.

This course is undergoing academic revalidation during 2016/17, and course content/modules are subject to change. 

Structure and content

To complete the Masters programme, students are required to successfully complete 180 university credits. Programme Routes: There are three different ‘routes’ that students can take during their time on the programme, depending on their interest or the experience they would like to gain from their training. These routes have been designed because feedback from students suggests that some people like to maintain a broad range of skills and experience, whereas others prefer to focus on a particular area of practice. The route students choose may depend on the kind of work or further training that they want to pursue beyond the MSc course itself (note that all 3 routes include the carrying out of an MSc Research Project):

  • The ‘Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner’ route – This route incorporates training as a Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner (PWP), which is fully accredited by the British Psychological Society. PWPs work in primary care mental health services, delivering low intensity psychological interventions (with a CBT focus) for people experiencing mild to moderate emotional problems such as depression and anxiety. This is a well-established role in mental health services in England, and services in Northern Ireland are developing to include a focus on this way of working. Students taking this route will spend time on clinical placement during the course, arranged by the course team (more on this below).
  • The main course route, entitled ‘Mental Health and Psychological Therapies’ – This route offers a breadth of experience in theory and skills training, including Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Family Therapy & Systemic Practice skills modules, Advanced Research Methods, and a choice amongst key Mental Health and Professional Issues modules.
  • The ‘Mental Health with Family Therapy and Systemic Practice’ route – this incorporates elements of the main course route (e.g. CBT, Mental Health modules, research methods), as well as Foundation Level training in Family Therapy and Systemic Practice (fully accredited by the Association for Family Therapy and Systemic Practice). The training focuses on approaches implemented when supporting families, but also on how these approaches and concepts can be applied to working with individuals. Students on this route must have secured their own work in a therapeutic setting (to enable them to practice systemic therapy skills), including supervision by an accredited therapist.

Professional recognition

British Psychological Society (BPS)  

Accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) against the requirements for qualification as a Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner.

Work placement / study abroad

The programme has a number of opportunities to connect clinical placement experiences with studies on campus. The BPS-accredited Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner Training (which composes part of one of the course routes), includes a 9-month clinical placement in low-intensity psychological therapies services, arranged by the course team. The AFT-accredited Foundation Level Training in Family Therapy and Systemic Practice (which composes part of another course route), includes a module that explores and assesses students' clinical experiences in this area of practice - placement for this module is arranged by students themselves. Finally, the MSc presents a further placement opportunity for students who have completed the course, in the form of a 15-credit standalone placement module ('Clinical Placement in Applied Psychology'). A selection of clinical placements have been secured in Psychology Services in the Western Health and Social Care Trust, in specialisms including Adult Mental Health, Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Paediatric Psychology, Older Adults, Personality Disorder, and Autism Spectrum Disorder Services. This post-MSc module is only open to those students who have completed the MSc at Ulster, and students who enrol on this module will be working as the equivalent of Assistant Psychologists on a voluntary basis in these services (length of placements are typically between 6 months and one year).

Career options

Currently, our graduating students are successful in acquiring Assistant Psychologist positions, which with experience is allowing people to apply for Associate Psychologist positions. Others are successful in gaining entry onto Professional Doctorate programmes in Clinical, Counselling and Educational Psychology, or PhD scholarships in Psychology across UK and Ireland. In addition, students who undertake the accredited Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner (PWP) training strand within the course will be able to seek accreditation with the BPS for working as a PWP. Finally, students who undertake AFT Foundation Level Training will have completed Stage 1 of 3 in their training to become a qualified Systemic Psychotherapist.



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Are you interested in a career as a Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner? Would you like to develop your clinical competency in the low intensity cognitive… Read more
Are you interested in a career as a Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner? Would you like to develop your clinical competency in the low intensity cognitive behavioural therapy clinical method? Would you like to have an understanding of ways to adapt your practice to accommodate diversity and increase access to evidence-based psychological therapies? If the answer to these questions is ‘yes’ then this may be the programme for you. This programme will provide you with an outstanding opportunity to develop the competencies and knowledge associated with practice as a Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner. A strong emphasis throughout the programme is placed upon your personal and professional development. Advantages of the programme are that:

• You will study within a vibrant, stimulating and internationally-recognised research environment, where members of your teaching team have first-hand experience within the clinical setting.

• Your learning experience will be enriched by nationally-recognised, innovative, clinical teaching approaches, designed to develop you on your terms.

The PGCert aims to:

• Provide you with a thorough grounding in the Department of Health curriculum for Psychological Wellbeing Practitioners working within the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies Programme.

• Develop your understanding and clinical competency in the low intensity CBT clinical method and enable you to adapt your practice to work effectively with patients with diverse needs.

• Provide you with the foundations to establish a commitment to continuing professional development and becoming an evidence-based practitioner.

• Provide you with a high quality and stimulating learning experience in a supportive environment that is enriched by an internationally-recognised research environment, nationally-recognised innovative clinical teaching approaches and current clinical practice.

Find out more about the PGCert Psychological Therapies Practice (Low Intensity Cognitive Behavioural Therapy) programme http://cedar.exeter.ac.uk/programmes/pgcertptplicbt/.

The PGDip aims to:

• Enable you to extend your practice as a Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner to work effectively with an increasing diversity of patient populations requiring adaptations to practice, such as those with comorbid long term physical health conditions.

• Develop the knowledge and competency required to be an effective clinical supervisor, and leader.

• Develop your knowledge of appropriate research and methodological issues to inform your practice as a scientist practitioner.

• Provide you with a high quality and stimulating learning experience in a supportive environment that is enriched by an internationally recognised research environment, nationally recognised innovative clinical teaching approaches and current clinical practice.

Find out more about the PGDip Psychological Therapies Practice (Low Intensity Cognitive Behavioural Therapy) programme http://cedar.exeter.ac.uk/programmes/pgdipptplicbt/.

The MSc programme:

has been developed to enable you to extend the PGDip Evidence-based Psychological Practice (Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner) into a MSc by undertaking a piece of empirical research. The research dissertation will allow you to follow your research interests in a topic related to low intensity CBT or a project related to a service-based development need in this area. Supervision is provided by a clinical/psychological therapies researcher with provision available to support project supervision over the telephone or through internet-based software applications to improve access to the programme.

To progress to the MSc you should have completed the research module as part of your PGDip. If you have not completed this module, or cannot evidence completing a previous Masters level research module, you will be required additionally to complete the research module PYCM002 Methodological Approaches in Psychological Therapies Research (http://cedar.exeter.ac.uk/programmes/description/index.php?moduleCode=PYCM002).

In this programme we aim to help you consolidate your previous training as an effective and evidence-based practitioner in evidence-based low intensity CBT by undertaking a research dissertation in this area. We aim to provide you with a high quality and stimulating learning experience in a supportive environment that is enriched by an internationally-recognised research environment, nationally-recognised innovative clinical teaching approaches and current clinical practice.

Find out more about the MSc Psychological Therapies Practice and Research (Low Intensity Cognitive Behavioural Therapy) programme http://cedar.exeter.ac.uk/programmes/mscptprlicbt/.

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This course enables individuals with an interest or professional experience in the provision of psychological therapies to gain further relevant knowledge and relevant experience, and provides the possibility to continue onto a professional doctorate in counselling psychology. Read more
This course enables individuals with an interest or professional experience in the provision of psychological therapies to gain further relevant knowledge and relevant experience, and provides the possibility to continue onto a professional doctorate in counselling psychology.

More about this course

The MSc in Psychological Therapy is the equivalent of Year 1 of the professional doctorate in counselling psychology.

Students who complete all of the Year 1 modules from the doctoral programme but do not complete it fully, can take the award of MSc in Psychological Therapy.

A small number of places are usually available each year for applicants who wish just to apply for the MSc and not the full doctoral programme. This award does not confer eligibility to apply for HPC registration as a counselling psychologist or BPS chartered psychologist status.

However, it may be of interest to individuals seeking to gain experience in the field of counselling psychology or who do not intend to practice in the UK or those seeking to gain a qualification that is supportive of their professional development in a current area of related activity, e.g. assistant psychologists, mental health practitioners, psychotherapists or counsellors.

Students can also apply to complete smaller numbers of modules from Year 1 of the programme to be eligible for the interim awards of Postgraduate Diploma in Psychological therapy (120 credits) or Postgraduate Certificate in Psychological Therapy /Applied Psychology Studies (60 credits).

Applicants state on their application forms whether they wish to enrol for the masters or doctoral programme, and whether they wish study in full or part time mode.

The same initial admissions criteria (see part 2, section 3) are applied to all applicants, whether they wish to complete the full doctoral programme or just the MSc. Students can also apply to complete smaller numbers of modules from Year 1 of the programme to be eligible for the interim awards of Postgraduate Diploma in Psychological therapy (120 credits) or Postgraduate Certificate in Psychological Therapy/Applied Psychology Studies (60 credits).

Assessment on the course combines a variety of methods that reflect the range of competencies and experience that students develop on the programme. This includes:
-Case studies and process reports to assess students’ ability to effectively plan, implement, reflect on, evaluate and make recommendations regarding psychological interventions, within a recognised model of therapy and service context
-Essays and examinations to assess areas of professional knowledge and understanding
-Practice placement competency evaluations to rate the level of proficiency attained by students in their placement work
-A mid-year review and end-of-year appraisal to monitor students’ performance across the programme and their accrual of the necessary experience
-Research assignments to assess knowledge and understanding of a range psychological research methods
-A reflexive critical literature and proposal to assess students’ ability to appraise the state of knowledge in a professionally relevant topic area and design a coherent research study for the generation of new knowledge
-Attendance monitoring to ensure that students demonstrate adequate engagement with the taught curriculum

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advanced Research Design and Analysis for Psychology (core, 20 credits)
-Counselling Psychology Practice and Development (core, 20 credits)
-Professional and Ethical Issues (core, 20 credits)
-Psychological Knowledge and Models of Therapy (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project and Critical Skills (core, 60 credits)
-Therapeutic and Reflective Skills (core, 20 credits)
-Working with Difference and Diversity (core, 20 credits)

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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Why study at Roehampton. All modules are taught in the evening. Choose a specialist pathway in either Inclusive Perspectives or Psychological Perspectives. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • All modules are taught in the evening
  • Choose a specialist pathway in either Inclusive Perspectives or Psychological Perspectives
  • Tailor the programme to your own needs and interests
  • Gain the Certificate of Competency in Educational Testing accredited by the British Psychological Society (optional) as part of the programme or as a stand-alone module

Course summary

The Special Educational Needs (SEN) programme investigates issues involved in the education and development of children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities and disadvantages. Our programme is founded upon a commitment to forms of education which enable the participation, learning and development of all.

Students studying on the programme engage with aspects of theory, policy and practice relevant to international and local contexts. With its international profile, this programme brings together teachers and other professionals working directly with children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities or disadvantages, as well as policy-makers and managers in areas of SEN and Inclusive Education.

On the MA Special Educational Needs, students choose between two distinct pathways, Inclusive Perspectives or Psychological Perspectives, which reflect different theoretical traditions and approaches to practice, provision and policy within the field of special educational needs, disability and inclusion. Both pathways are relevant to mainstream and special education contexts.

The Inclusive Perspectives pathway emphasises the application of inclusive and person-centred values and critical educational analysis. Concepts and theories such as person-centred education; participation and ‘voice’; the social model of disability and difference; and human rights and equalities are used to consider educational practice, provision, policy and systems relating to pupils experiencing difficulties in educational settings.

The Psychological Perspectives pathway emphasises the use and application of psychological theories. Concepts and theories of cognition, educational testing, and social and emotional development are central in developing psychologically informed understandings of children and young people experiencing difficulties in educational settings. 

Students greatly benefit from engaging with the insights, experiences and perspectives of other course members, from a diverse range of contexts and backgrounds. The combination of their own experiences, insights gained from others on the course and the theoretical resources offered by learning within the modules, enables students to deepen their understanding of, and to be able to challenge, the barriers that hinder the learning, development and participation of children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities or disadvantages.

The teaching provided on modules is informed by active research and scholarship in the field of Inclusive Education and SEN practice and policy. All lecturers leading modules on the programme have high level specialist qualifications, teaching and leadership experience in the field of Education, SEN and Inclusive Education.

Content

All students complete a common module which takes a broad view of key perspectives and issues in SEN, it also introduces the psychological and inclusive perspectives. From here, students undertake specialist modules within the programme, depending on their chosen pathway.

Inclusive Perspectives Pathway content: Students critically explore the issues involved in children’s behaviour using sociological approaches. You will reflect on your own and society's beliefs about ‘good’ and ‘bad’ behaviour, which often relate to medical and psychological foundations of schools’ policies and practices. The social pedagogical approach is also explored as a basis for inclusive teaching and learning. A critical analysis of instrumentalist/functionalist approaches to teaching is developed with a view to enhancing holistic development and the participation of pupils as a means of addressing barriers to the inclusivity of the classroom. 

Psychological Perspectives Pathway content: On this route students engage with the idea that socially and emotionally well-adjusted students perform better at school, whilst social and emotional aspects of learning have become marginalised in a highly competitive education system. The use of psychometric testing is covered, with an exploration of its appropriate uses (students can gain a Certificate of Competency in Educational Testing, accredited by the British Psychological Society, from successfully undertaking this module). 

Optional modules are available to students on both pathways which focus on Dyslexia as a Specific Learning Difficulty and on Autism in Education. Students also have an option, instead of taking a taught optional module, to take a (non-taught) Independent Study module to learn about a specific issue relevant to their pathway and interests, which is not taught about in the programme.

The final module is an independent research-based enquiry (either a Dissertation or Practice-Based Research Project), which is founded upon the pathway perspective chosen, but is also subject to the student’s choice of topic.

Modules

Required modules for both routes

  • Perspectives in SEN and Inclusion
  • Undertaking Social and Educational Research
  • Dissertation OR 
  • Practice-based Research Project

Inclusive Perspectives

  • Behaviour, Inclusion and Exclusion in Education
  • Teaching, Learning and Social Pedagogy: working with difference, difficulty and individuality

Psychological Perspectives

  • Assessment and Intervention in Education
  • Social and Emotional Dimensions of Learning

Optional modules 

  • Behaviour, Inclusion and Exclusion in Education
  • Teaching, Learning and Social Pedagogy: working with difference, difficulty and individuality
  • Dyslexia as a Specific Learning Difficulty
  • Autism: Principles, Practices and Perspectives
  • Assessment and Intervention in Education

Career options

The Programme supports and enables:

  • Careers in professional practice and leadership: teaching, advisory work, SEN coordination, inclusion management, support assistance.
  • Careers in policy-making, implementation and development of inclusion and SEN provision.
  • Careers in research and developing the inclusion and SEN workforce in further and higher education.

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The Department of Psychology at Manchester Metropolitan University boasts research expertise of international repute. Read more
The Department of Psychology at Manchester Metropolitan University boasts research expertise of international repute. Choosing to study with us will not only provide you with an intellectually stimulating degree, but also by providing you with access to the latest research expertise and specialist equipment, we will develop your thirst for knowledge and inspire you to question, research and analyse your theories.

We are committed to ensuring that our graduates are employable professionals. It is increasingly important that your postgraduate degree programme develop the skills that employers are after and alongside the acquisition of academic knowledge, our students will develop and apply skills in:
-Assessment
-Verbal communication
-Professional report writing
-Evaluation
-Analytical thinking

A programme of study for practitioners promoting psychological wellbeing
This innovative master's programme aims to bring together psychological theory with evidence-based practice and practitioner wellbeing for existing and aspiring practitioners. The masters will expand clinical skills and knowledge across a range of specialist areas related to promoting psychological wellbeing.

This course would be of particular interest to:
-People wishing to pursue professional doctorates in clinical psychology, counselling psychology, health psychology, and/or psychological research
-Medical practitioners
-Occupational therapists and other allied health professionals in mental health services
-Mental health nurses
-Social workers
-Experienced practitioners wishing to take leadership roles within their organisation

Features and benefits of the course

This programme is based upon three fundamental values to prepare its students for their future career steps:
-Excellence in theoretical knowledge, practical skills and theory-practice links
-Practitioner wellbeing
-Interprofessional learning and knowledge exchange

The course teaching team consists of practitioner psychologists (clinical and counseling), as well as experimental and research orientated psychologists. Our students benefit from a range of guest speakers from interprofessional backgrounds and the formative feedback offered by experts-by-experience for certain assessments.

Due to the combination of the values of this programme and the interprofessional perspective to learning, students can expect to develop a range of skills that are highly relevant to a variety of healthcare or doctoral study options. Throughout the course, students can expect to:
-Develop self-awareness and reflective practice
-Enhance knowledge and skills relevant to evidence-based therapeutic techniques in clinical practice
-Develop critical awareness of issues relating to the promotion of psychological wellbeing
-Understanding of the theoretical frameworks underlying key therapeutic approaches
-Personal and professional development through experiential learning groups based on practitioner experiences
-Connecting research and practice through a service evaluation based dissertation with one of our partners

Placement options

This programme is for current and aspiring practitioners who wish to develop their knowledge and skills. In order to prioritise realistic experiences of mental health services and meaningful career progression opportunities, we do not include a placement option. Authentic theory-practice links are a key feature of this programme and our flexible approach to learning and part-time study aims to support those who wish to develop their academic and practitioner knowledge and skills in parallel. Therefore, we encourage all students of the course to either maintain or find employment or voluntary work within a relevant health and social care setting. We are also able to suggest a number of suitable services for voluntary work through our community links.

About the Course

The course will equip students with contemporary and creative knowledge of relevant theoretical and practical issues in a range of settings, where promoting psychological wellbeing is essential. Theory-practice links will be appropriate to current and aspiring practitioners in a range of settings including heath, social care and education. We aim to encouraging a dynamic perspective on person-centred care and the critical appraisal of service provisions.

The core units of the course are:
-Core Therapeutic Skills
-Brief Intervention Models
-Professional Practice Values
-Clinical Skills
-Psychological Wellbeing in Practice
-Research Principles & Methods
-Service Evaluation and Development Research Dissertation

The central ethos of the programme is that of person-centred care in promoting psychological wellbeing, shaping professional practice values. In order to graduate with the MSc qualification, students must gain 180 credits over seven core units. With the course is an embedded Postgraduate Certificate in Skills in Psychological Therapies (60 credits) and Postgraduate Diploma in Psychological Therapies (120 credits).

Learning takes the form of:
-Lectures, seminars and workshops
-Problem-based learning exercises
-Skills practice and consolidation
-Experiential learning groups based in a chosen therapeutic modality
-Self-paced online training
-Peer learning through student presentations
-Supervised and supported research activity

You will be allocated a personal academic supervisor who will support your academic and professional development as well as ensure your time on the course is productive and beneficial for your specific needs.

The majority of the course staff for this programme are academics and practitioners, which means students benefit from the latest information from both fields. Additionally, students become a part of our professional knowledge exchange community. Importantly, a number of experts by experience support course staff and students in several of the course activities, such as providing feedback on presentations and practice discussions, which further enhances the insight and perspective students can develop through the course.

Assessment details

Assessments take multiple forms to offer students the best possible chance for success. Our assessments include critical essays, presentations, case reports, reflective accounts and two exams.

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Our School of Psychology has a reputation for providing high quality IPT training to therapists who are already in practice and want to add this model to their repertoire. Read more

Our School of Psychology has a reputation for providing high quality IPT training to therapists who are already in practice and want to add this model to their repertoire.

This Psychological Therapy programme has been designed to be responsive to the needs of people who do not already have a therapy qualification. The first year of this programme will enable professionals to develop core counselling skills and IPC intervention skills to enhance their effectiveness with clients, further their psychological skills and increase their understanding of mental health issues.

Many roles in the workforce today require people to have enhanced their psychological and therapeutic skills. At present, our programme is the only one in the UK that offers the opportunity for individuals to undertake IPC training.

Successful completion of this year will enable individuals to undertake the Diploma in IPT, a full therapy qualification.

Programme structure

This one year programme can be undertaken on its own or as part of a flexible training of up to three years. Successful completion of all modules in this first Certificate year gives the option of progressing into year two, the Diploma in IPT, which confers a full therapy qualification which allows individuals to practice in the NHS or elsewhere. There is also the option to complete a third research year to obtain an MSc.

The first year comprises of four modules of 15 credits each. Each module comprises of 150 hours of learning, including student contact, private study, skills practice either on placement or in the classroom and assessment. In order to achieve the Postgraduate Certificate in Psychological Intervention: IPC (Interpersonal Counselling) students must complete all four modules and complete 60 credits at FHEQ Level 7.

Example module listing

  • Psychological Theory and the Fundamentals of Adult Mental Health
  • The Therapeutic Relationship
  • Introduction to Assessment, Intervention and Ending Skills
  • Supervision of Client Work

Teaching approaches

Specialist knowledge relevant to the subject area will be delivered using a variety of methods, including lectures, experiential workshops, micro skills teaching, audio-recording reviews, clinical supervision, group discussions, and through the interaction of the student with coursework assignments. 

Clinical practice with application of their learning to client work will be supervised closely and students will be required to keep a log of their clinical activity as well as supervisory activity and will be evaluated on their clinical competence.

The strength of this programme lies in the integration of classroom learning and clinical practice learning and development. The personal impact of working with clients presenting with distress will be explored as well as ethical issues. Students will develop their skills in applying theory and technique to real life client situations in supervision sessions at the University via discussion and micro-teaching.

The feedback process is designed to be ongoing, in that comments and reflections from these sessions will provide an escalator of personal learning for the student. At critical points there will be summative learning points to provide a marker for the student as to their progress against the benchmark standards being expected. Formative and summative feedback will be provided as appropriate to help students develop their skills in these areas of practice.

The associated research evidence bases will be integrated into all aspects of the teaching. 

Students who have access to clients in their ongoing job role whilst studying may incorporate part of this work as their practice placement, subject to agreement with their manager and the University. Otherwise students will be supported to obtain a suitable practice placement.

Educational aims of the programme

This programme will enable professionals to develop core counselling skills in IPC (Interpersonal counselling) to enhance their effectiveness with clients, further their psychological skills and increase their understanding of mental health issues without undertaking a full therapy qualification.

Interpersonal counselling is a brief intervention, based on the principles of Interpersonal Psychotherapy, for people suffering from stress or mild depression. It is designed to be delivered by individuals after a relatively brief training course, and does not require them to have previous mental health qualifications.

Programme learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

  • Have a basic understanding of psychiatric classification and of those conditions most frequently met in clinical practice
  • Understand the role of medication in the treatment of mental health problems
  • Understand the difference between the therapeutic alliance, the real relationship and the transference relationship and their contribution to the therapeutic relationship
  • Understand their own relationship to and work with difference and diversity
  • Understand the function of the therapeutic frame

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Critically assess different models of the underpinnings of psychological health

Professional practical skills

  • Select appropriate clients and plan an intervention
  • Undertake completed pieces of time-limited (short-term) interpersonal clinical interventions under supervision
  • Use the Interpersonal Counselling (IPC) model to deliver complete short therapeutic interventions
  • Manage challenges in the therapeutic relationship
  • Facilitate clients in developing and maintaining a strong therapeutic relationship
  • To use appropriate measures to evaluate the success of treatment
  • Understand and work within the professional context of psychological therapy, including ethical practice

Key / transferable skills

To reflect on their development as a psychological practitioner

Professional recognition

Recognition is being sought from IPT-UK, the organisation that accredits therapists in this particular model of therapy.



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Interested in a research-orientated career in psychology? Gain confidence in the acquisition, analysis and use of research information on our psychological research methods programme. Read more
Interested in a research-orientated career in psychology? Gain confidence in the acquisition, analysis and use of research information on our psychological research methods programme. Develop a sophisticated understanding of psychological research, from the creation of questions you’ll need to ask, through to the meaningful organisation of results. Be primed for a research role across a range of sectors, including consultancy and government agencies, and have the foundation for future PhD work.

Key features

-Designed to provide you with the understanding and skills to help you develop academic or commercial careers based on psychological research.
-Choose to study full time over one year, or take the flexible two year part-time pathway to fit in with your career plans or caring commitments.
-Be confident studying with us – this programme is provided by the School of Psychology, which was recognised in the latest Research Assessment Exercise with 85 per cent of activity judged to be of international standard, placing it in the top third of departments nationally.
-Benefit from a programme recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as providing the research training within the 1+3 framework.
-Receive thorough training in research methodology and design, as well as the philosophical issues that underpin your research decisions.
-Learn to analyse a problem, select the appropriate methodology and understand the implications of your choice.
-Gain the skills and knowledge to conduct research in a rigorous, appropriate and ethical manner, using a range of techniques (qualitative and quantitative) in a range of settings (experimental, observational, fieldwork, and focus groups).
-Hone your ability to communicate your research findings effectively to different audiences, both orally and in writing.
-Equip yourself, as part of the masters programme, with the skills and experience to design and conduct a major psychological research project.
-Learn from a teaching team with the in-depth knowledge of many areas of psychology and experience of publishing both fundamental and applied research in the best scientific journals. Their expertise, spanning from ethics to research design and statistics, offers you the ideal environment to develop your research skills.
-Immerse yourself in our school’s newly refurbished laboratory and teaching space, including electrophysiology (ERP), Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS), virtual reality and eye-tracking laboratories.
-Benefit from our school’s research expertise. The Centre for Brain, Behaviour and Cognition attracts substantial external funding from UK research councils, the EU, charities and industry.
-Acquire skills that are highly prized by a wide range of employers, and be ready to join previous students employed in academia, consultancy, government agencies and non-governmental bodies.
-Contemplating a PhD in the future? This programme will provide you with the essential pre-requisites for research at this level, including a thorough grounding in research methodology, design and analysis as well as the philosophical issues that underpin research decisions.

Course details

You’ll cover the whole spectrum of psychological research skills and most research methods used by psychologists, and have the opportunity to study methods that are particularly relevant to you. We aim to equip you with high-level research skills and give you the opportunity to apply these skills in original psychological research. Early in the programme, you’ll begin a substantial independent piece of research and continue this throughout the year. Special emphasis is placed on practical research skills and communication - these are integrated in project work to achieve professional standards of psychological research. If you study full time the programme lasts one year starting in late September and involves attendance for at least two days a week over two 12-week teaching periods. Successful completion of the taught modules leads to the postgraduate diploma award. If you want to study part time please discuss your requirements with the Programme Director.

Core modules
-PSY558 Evaluating Complex Interventions
-PSY556 Statistical Methods for Experimental and Clinical Research
-PSY561 Skills and Techniques in Psychological Research 1
-PSY557 Quantitative Analysis of Complex Clinical and Behavourial Data
-PSY555 Communication of Research for Psychology
-PSY562 Skills and Techniques in Psychological Research 2
-PSY572 Project
-PSY559 Experimental Research Design
-PSY560 Qualitative Research Methods for Psychology
-PSY571 Project Planning and Literature Search

Optional modules
-PSY567 Designing for Behaviour Change
-PSY566 Issues in Behaviour Change
-PSY568 Issues in Clinical Psychology
-PSY569 The Brain and its Disorders
-PSY564 Understanding Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
-PSY570 Issues in Cognitive and Brain Science
-PSY577 Foundations in Clinical Psychology: Children and Families
-PSY563 Understanding Risky Behaviour

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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Under supervision, graduates can pursue careers in the professional practice of psychology including clinical, forensic or organisational psychology, counselling, health and community psychology, research, and other specialist areas. Read more
[[About the program
The Graduate Diploma of Psychological Science is designed to provide students with an integrated, comprehensive, and complete education in the discipline of psychology. Students undertake advanced training in a range of methodological (research methods, psychometrics, statistics) and applied areas, and develop competence in conducting research. All applied material is based on the scientist-practitioner model, and evidence-based approaches to psychological intervention are stressed.

The Graduate Diploma of Psychological Science provides students with advanced education and training in the core psychology graduate attributes, including but not limited to the following:
- Advanced theoretical and empirical knowledge in some of the core research areas of the discipline
- Knowledge of the theoretical and empirical bases underpinning the construction, implementation and interpretation of some of the most widely used cognitive and personality assessments
- Knowledge of the theoretical and empirical bases underpinning evidenced based approached to psychological intervention
- Explaining how the science and practice of psychology is influenced by social, historical, professional and cultural contexts

The Graduate Diploma of Psychological Science prepares graduates for a career in psychology. On completion of this course, graduates may apply for provisional registration as a psychologist providing they enrol in further postgraduate studies or undertake two years’ supervised training.

See the website https://bond.edu.au/program/graduate-diploma-psychological-science

- Professional recognition
This program has been granted accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC).

Further study
- Master of Psychology (Clinical)
- Master of Psychology (Forensic)

Professional outcomes

Under supervision, graduates can pursue careers in the professional practice of psychology including clinical, forensic or organisational psychology, counselling, health and community psychology, research, and other specialist areas.

Find out how to apply here https://bond.edu.au/future-students/study-bond/how-apply

Thesis overview

The most challenging aspect of 4th year studies is the research thesis. The thesis component is designed for students to demonstrate their ability to conceive, conduct, and report on, high level, original research. The research thesis is carried out under the supervision of an academic member of staff, and is assessed against a number of criteria. Briefly, these criteria relate to the student’s command of the area under investigation, from the conceptualisation of the problem, through the development of an appropriate strategy to investigate the problem, to clear interpretation and reporting on the outcomes of the research. The research thesis consists of two subjects.
- PSYC71-400 Diploma Thesis 1: Research Seminar and Ethics
- PSYC72-420 Diploma Thesis 2

The thesis subjects are to be completed in two consecutive semesters, regardless of full- or part-time enrolment status.

- Fourth Year Orientation Session
Students are expected to attend the fourth-year orientation session held during Bond Orientation Week, which is the week before classes start. During this session students are given full details of the requirements for their fourth year of studies in psychology.

Important notes for students

Upon completion of 4th year training (e.g., the Graduate Diploma or the Honours program) many students apply for provisional registration as a psychologist. Provisional registration permits the professional practice of psychology and can be achieved either through a Board approved Supervised Practice Program (two years of supervised practice), or through Postgraduate studies in Psychology. Students who intend to apply for provisional registration following their 4th Year studies should be aware of the registration requirements as administered by the Psychology Board of Australia under the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law Act 2009. Information on Psychology Board of Australia registration requirements can be obtained from http://www.psychologyboard.gov.au

Students who obtain their undergraduate qualifications outside of an ‘approved qualification’ in Australia must have them assessed as being equivalent to an accredited three year sequence of study in psychology in Australia, prior to being granted provisional registration. Undergraduate transcripts of students wishing to undertake their 4th year studies at Bond from non-Australian institutions are carefully checked by the 4th Year Coordinator to determine equivalence with an APAC accredited 3-year sequence of study in Australia. Transcripts are checked to ensure that subject matter undertaken in the undergraduate sequence matches core areas within the discipline (e.g., perception, memory, learning, motivation and emotion, psychobiology, personality, emotion, developmental psychology, social psychology, and abnormal psychology), and includes statistics and research methods. When assessing suitability for entry into 4th year programs, Bond University makes every effort to ensure that core topics covered in undergraduate degrees obtained outside of Australia are equivalent to those required in an accredited three-year sequence of study in psychology in Australia, however we do not guarantee the equivalence of these degrees.

Students who obtained their three year undergraduate qualifications outside of Australia should be aware that successful completion of the 4th year program might not be sufficient for registration as a psychologist and/or the membership requirements of the Australian Psychological Society (APS). Equivalency assessments may be required by the Psychology Board of Australia. For more information on equivalency assessments please visit http://www.psychology.org.au

See the website https://bond.edu.au/program/graduate-diploma-psychological-science

For contact information see here https://bond.edu.au/program/graduate-diploma-psychological-science

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Why Surrey?. Our stimulating MSc in Psychological Intervention. IPT (Interpersonal Psychotherapy) offers flexible training for individuals who want to become qualified Interpersonal Psychotherapists. Read more

Why Surrey?

Our stimulating MSc in Psychological Intervention: IPT (Interpersonal Psychotherapy) offers flexible training for individuals who want to become qualified Interpersonal Psychotherapists.

Our programme will develop your theoretical understanding of mental health issues, equip you with skills in working with the IPT model, enable you to work effectively with clients, and give you the opportunity to conduct research in the theory or practice of IPT.

This is delivered through a rich range of learning experiences, including the opportunity to integrate theory with practice. This ensures that, as a graduate of this programme, you are able to provide a high quality therapy to service users.

Programme overview

Our School of Psychology has a reputation for providing high quality IPT training to therapists who are already in practice and want to add this model to their repertoire.

This Psychological Intervention MSc programme has been designed to be responsive to the needs of people who do not already have a therapy qualification who aspire to become qualified practitioner in a NICE-recommended psychological therapy.

The programme meets an identified training need for therapists in this specific approach. The National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines recommend IPT as a treatment for depression and eating disorders and IPT has also been part of the Government’s provision to increase the availability of talking therapies through the Increasing Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT provision).

At present, our programme is the only programme in the UK that offers the opportunity for appropriately experienced individuals with no previous therapy qualification to undertake IPT training.

Programme structure

This programme is studied part-time over three academic years. Students with equivalent/sufficient qualifications/credits will be able to join the programme at year two or three.

The full MSc three year (part-time) programme comprises of nine modules with a total of 180 credits.

The first year comprises of four modules of 15 credits each. Each module comprises of 150 hours of learning, including student contact, private study, skills practice either on placement or in the classroom and assessment. In order to achieve the Postgraduate Certificate in Psychological Intervention: IPC (Interpersonal Counselling) students must complete all four modules and complete 60 credits at FHEQ Level 7.

In order to achieve the Postgraduate Diploma in Psychological Intervention: IPT (Interpersonal Psychotherapy) students must complete 120 credits at FHEQ Level 7. The second year comprises of three modules, two of 15 credits each and one of 30 credits. The 30 credit module includes a substantial allocation of student learning time to placement activities.

In order to achieve the Masters in Psychological Intervention: IPT (Interpersonal Psychotherapy), students must complete 180 credits at FHEQ Level 7. The third year comprises of two modules, a 15 credit module in Research methods and a dissertation module of 45 credits.

In order for students to progress they must achieve a minimum average of 50 per cent.

Example module listing

Year one

  • Psychological Theory and the Fundamentals of Adult Mental Health
  • The Therapeutic Relationship
  • Introduction to Assessment, intervention and Ending Skills
  • Supervision of Client Work

Year two

  • IPT Theoretical and Research base: client groups; modes of delivery; adaptations
  • Clinical Practice in IPT
  • Supervision of Client Work: IPT

Year three

  • Quantitative Research methods
  • Statistics and Data Analysis
  • Research project

Teaching

Specialist knowledge relevant to the subject area will be delivered using a variety of methods, including lectures, experiential workshops, micro skills teaching, audio-recording reviews, clinical supervision, group discussions, and through the interaction of the student with coursework assignments. 

Clinical practice with application of their learning to client work will be supervised closely and students will be required to keep a log of their clinical activity as well as supervisory activity and will be evaluated on their clinical competence.

Students who have access to clients in their ongoing job role whilst studying may incorporate part of this work as their practice placement, subject to agreement with their manager and the University. Otherwise students will be supported to obtain a suitable practice placement.

The strength of this programme lies in the integration of classroom learning and clinical practice learning and development. The personal impact of working with clients presenting with distress will be explored as well as ethical issues. Students will develop their skills in applying theory and technique to real life client situations in supervision sessions at the University via discussion and micro-teaching.

The feedback process is designed to be ongoing, in that comments and reflections from these sessions will provide an escalator of personal learning for the student. At critical points there will be summative learning points to provide a marker for the student as to their progress against the benchmark standards being expected. Formative and summative feedback will be provided as appropriate to help students develop their skills in these areas of practice.

The associated research evidence bases will be integrated into all aspects of the teaching. 

In the final year, students will receive individual supervision for the research project during which they will receive one-to one support and guidance in the development of their research skills.

Educational aims of the programme

The first year of this programme will enable professionals to develop core counselling skills in IPT (IPC) to enhance their effectiveness with clients, further their psychological skills and increase their understanding of mental health issues. The second year (PGDip) leads to a full therapy qualification. The third and final year (MSc) is a research year which results in a Master’s qualification

Professional recognition

The course is designed in order to meet the accreditation requirements of a well-known professional counselling body. Because this is a new programme, the accreditation process will take place after the first cohort has completed. If successful, accreditation is awarded retrospectively thus allowing the first cohort of students to become a registered with this professional body.

Recognition is also being sought from IPT-UK, the organisation that accredits therapists in this particular model of therapy.



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About the program. The Graduate Diploma of Psychological Science is designed to provide students with an integrated, comprehensive, and complete education in the discipline of psychology. Read more

About the program

The Graduate Diploma of Psychological Science is designed to provide students with an integrated, comprehensive, and complete education in the discipline of psychology. Students undertake advanced training in a range of methodological (research methods, psychometrics, statistics) and applied areas, and develop competence in conducting research. All applied material is based on the scientist-practitioner model, and evidence-based approaches to psychological intervention are stressed. The Graduate Diploma of Psychological Science provides students with advanced education and training in the core psychology graduate attributes, including but not limited to the following: Advanced theoretical and empirical knowledge in some of the core research areas of the discipline Knowledge of the theoretical and empirical bases underpinning the construction, implementation and interpretation of some of the most widely used cognitive and personality assessments Knowledge of the theoretical and empirical bases underpinning evidenced based approached to psychological intervention Explaining how the science and practice of psychology is influenced by social, historical, professional and cultural contexts. The Graduate Diploma of Psychological Science prepares graduates for a career in psychology. On completion of this course, graduates may apply for provisional registration as a psychologist providing they enrol in further postgraduate studies or undertake two years’ supervised training. 

Professional outcomes

Under supervision, graduates can pursue careers in the professional practice of psychology including clinical, forensic or organisational psychology, counselling, health and community psychology, research, and other specialist areas.

Professional recognition

This program has been granted accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC).

Structure and subjects

View the Graduate Diploma of Psychological Science - Program Structure and Sequencing

The Graduate Diploma of Psychological Science comprises seven (7) subjects, as follows:

Foundation subjects (5)

Electives (2)

And any two (2) of the following psychology subjects:

International students

To fulfil your student visa requirements, you will need to enrol in 40 credit points per semester.

Domestic students

Full time study is 40 credit points per semester. Students enrolling part-time can undertake the degree over four semesters. Part-time students should complete the coursework aspects in the first two semesters of their enrolment and undertake the thesis in the third and fourth semesters of enrolment.



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Gain the specialist training to boost your health-related skills and professional development. You will further your understanding and practice of contemporary theories in psychological therapies along with analysing key issues and debates in counselling and psychotherapy. Read more
Gain the specialist training to boost your health-related skills and professional development. You will further your understanding and practice of contemporary theories in psychological therapies along with analysing key issues and debates in counselling and psychotherapy. You will explore cognitive behavioural therapy approaches to therapeutic practice, as well as social psychological theory and research of group therapy.

As well as improving your professional growth, your course will allow you to specialise in your chosen area of interest. Some of the diverse modules may have an experiential component, others may require purely academic study, and some may be useful for psychologists undertaking an independent route to the British Psychological Society's Counselling Psychology Chartership.

Whatever your motivation, your course will enhance your progression in psychological therapies as you work towards an MA at your own pace.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: 40% of our research in the Psychology unit was judged to be world leading or internationally excellent.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/psychologicaltherapies_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

Further training and development in this area is increasingly valued by employers. Our course can count towards on-going professional development in related fields such as nursing, social work or life coaching. As a counsellor or psychotherapist you can fulfil the professional development requirements of the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy and the United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy in order to maintain accreditation.

- Psychologist
- Mental Health Worker
- Counsellor

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

The modular design of our course allows you to build on previous learning and experience. Plus, you'll have the unique opportunity to investigate areas outside of your normal area of work, and study the topics that most people are unable to follow at diploma level.

Our dissertation module allows you to undertake an in-depth study of an area of particular interest whilst contributing to the wider profession.

Core Modules

Practical Foundations of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
Gain a critical understanding of the foundations of cognitive and cognitive behavioural approaches, as well as a reflexive understanding of a range of the theories and skills in practice.

Foundations of the Theory and Practice of Coaching
You will be introduced to coaching as an approach to working with people, and will develop a critical understanding of coaching theory and how coaching tools and techniques can be used in your area.

Existential, Humanistic and Psychodynamic Theories of Therapy
Explore the philosophical, cultural, and historical development of existential, humanistic, transpersonal, and psychodynamic theories of therapy.

Issues and Debates in Counselling and Psychotherapy
Increase your knowledge of and critically evaluate a range of contemporary issues from a therapeutic context.

Understanding and Evaluating the Evidence, or
Your opportunity to explore different types of information about health and social care and critically evaluate research material from a range of study designs.

Understanding Social Research and Evaluation
Gain a theoretical, methodological and practical foundation for social research, allowing you to act as a social researcher to resolve practice-based problems.

Research in Practice
Produce a substantial research project on a self-selected topic of interest to demonstrate your developmental learning in breadth and depth.

Option Modules

Work-based study
Develop specialist knowledge on a topic negotiated with your tutor which is directly relevant to service needs within your area of practice.

Spirituality and Religion in Psychological Therapies
Explore the psychological nature of religion and spirituality, psychological research, cults and sects, and the psychological foundations of religion, with particular reference to Freud, Jung and the Transpersonal theorists.

Supervision in Practice
A chance to underpin reflective and informed practice of psychological therapies and allied professions, and support best practice in a way that is beneficial to practitioners and service users/ patients.

Group Therapies and Group Work
Critically evaluate theoretical approaches to group work, and increase your self awareness and beliefs about group experience with an opportunity to lead a group session.

Spiritual Care
Drawing upon the major religions, you'll look at understandings of care and responsibility and the use of such concepts in professional practice, and explore the relationship of spirituality to a number of issues you may encounter.

Working With Depression and Anxiety in Practice
You will be introduced to to current research, theory and guidance for working with people with depression and anxiety.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Clinical Skills Suite
The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Do our categories of behaviour – normal and abnormal – translate across cultures?. Why do ethnic minorities have different experiences of mental health?. Read more

About the course

Do our categories of behaviour – normal and abnormal – translate across cultures?
Why do ethnic minorities have different experiences of mental health?
Is there a ‘human nature’ underneath all the cultural differences?

Anyone interested in psychological processes, feeling and expression, memory and trauma, culture and personality, will have asked themselves questions of this kind. However, they are less likely to have asked themselves how (or if) we can recognise and analyse different emotions in other cultural settings.

In this new MSc degree, the first of its kind anywhere in Europe, we tackle these and other issues from an anthropological perspective, looking at the social and cultural dimensions of human experience.

By engaging with debates on these important topics and through the examination of world ethnography (including the UK), participants will learn about selfhood, emotion, madness and identity in cultural context.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

This MSc gives candidates a solid grounding in key topics in psychological and psychiatric anthropology.

Through detailed consideration of cases from Britain and around the world, we explore the ways in which person, emotion, and subjectivity are shaped through cultural practices.

Candidates from backgrounds in health, therapy, social work and psychology will be able to challenge the categories and assumptions inherent in standard approaches to psychological and behavioural issues.

Course Content

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time

Compulsory modules:

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Dissertation in Psychological and Psychiatric Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
Themes in Psychiatric Anthropology
Themes in Psychological Anthropology

Optional modules:

Anthropology of the Body
Anthropology of the Person
Kinship, Sex and Gender
The Anthropology of Childhood
The Anthropology of Youth
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the arena of Global Health
Anthropology of Education
Anthropology of Learning
Ethnicity, Identity and Culture
Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings

Part-time

Year 1

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Themes in Psychiatric Anthropology
Themes in Psychological Anthropology

Year 2

Dissertation in Psychological and Psychiatric Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
and optional modules

Assessment

Assessment is by essay, practical assignment (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise), and dissertation. There are no examinations.

Special Features

This degree looks at psychological and psychiatric topics from an anthropological perspective. There is an overlap with psychology and psychiatry in the things we look at (identity, consciousness, cognition, mental health, etc), but the approach is quite different; indeed, the findings can be startlingly different.

In all cases, we explore the point of view and experience of the insider, the ‘native’, in a range of cultures, we analyse this inside view in relation to the social and cultural environment. What we seek is a dynamic conception of human nature that is true to experience as well as illuminating broader social processes of which the individual may be only partly aware.
 
This degree challenges standard assumptions about normality and deviance, social and personal identity, the boundaries of the self, and the constituents of experience.

For those employed in the health, social and educational sectors, it will enhance professional practice and broaden understanding. But for every student it will open up new avenues.

The programme is run by experts in their field, who have worked in countries across the globe including Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, sub-Saharan Africa, Melanesia, India and Sri Lanka, as well as Britain.

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to an up to 15,000 word dissertation.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

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This 12-month course has a strong but not exclusive emphasis on cognitive behavioural therapy and on the application of scientific methods to health care and assessment. Read more
This 12-month course has a strong but not exclusive emphasis on cognitive behavioural therapy and on the application of scientific methods to health care and assessment. On completion of the course, and following agreed and appropriate supervision and continuing professional development, graduates will be competent in the assessment and treatment of adult patients suffering from a range of common mental health disorders typically presenting in primary care settings.

Why study Psychological Therapy and Primary Care?

The growing demand for psychological interventions for adults presenting with common mental health disorders (e.g. anxiety and depression) in NHS Primary care has been identified in a variety of studies by central government and professional bodies.

Following consultation with NHS stakeholders, NHS Education for Scotland (NES) has supported the development of a new role for psychology graduates in NHS Scotland as Clinical Associates in Applied Psychology.

The Masters level training for this new role is designed to equip psychology graduates with the competence required to deliver the evidence-based psychological interventions required in circumscribed areas of practice defined by service need. The delivery of training involves a partnership, brokered by NES, between the Universities providing the academic components of the training programmes, the Universities of Stirling and Dundee, and the NHS which supports trainees in supervised clinical practice in the workplace.

Aims of the course

Specifically the course aims to:

create knowledge of the prevalence, diagnostic criteria, presentation and current psychological theories of common mental health disorders in adults.
create the ability to assess common mental health disorders by means of standardised scales, interviews techniques and observation.
foster the ability to develop clinical formulation based on information obtained from case notes, interviews, standardised scales and observation.
foster the therapeutic skills to deliver appropriate psychological treatments for common mental health disorders in Primary Care and evaluate progress and outcome of treatment.

Teaching & Assessment

This course is taught by staff from the University of Dundee and the University of Stirling. Students attend one or other of the universities for 3/4 days each month.

This course begins in January and runs until the following December.

How you will be taught

Modules will be taught via a combination of clinical workshops, seminars and distance-learning lectures delivered via the internet. NHS employers provide appropriate study facilities including computers and internet connection to allow you to carry out academic work on-site. Clinical activities and delivery of therapeutic interventions will be supervised and guided by an NHS clinical supervisor in the NHS setting, who will provide guidance on all aspects of clinical competence according to agreed guidelines. Ratings of clinical competence will be based on taped evidence of practice in the NHS setting and observations of the trainees’ clinical interaction with patients.

What you will study

The course comprises five taught modules and a sixth research module. The first three modules are University of Dundee supervised while the second three are University of Stirling supervised. All modules are core and there are no optional modules:

Assessment, Diagnosis and Formulation: This overview of the assessment process enables you to conduct clinical assessment and formulation of common mental health disorders in primary care

Professional and Ethical Issues: This module develops your understanding of the principles and practice of appropriate professional conduct in the National Health Service (NHS)

Research Project: A supervised empirical investigation, including critical literature review, conducted and reported to publishable standard

Principles and Methods of Psychological Therapy: This module helps you develop and maintain collaborative working alliances and deliver a range of psychological interventions appropriate to common mental health disorders

Common Mental health Disorders in Primary Care: This module develops understanding of use of theoretical and clinical knowledge of the presentation and evidence-based treatment interventions for common mental health disorders

Research, Evaluation and Outcome: This module equips you with the knowledge and skills to conduct clinical research

You are allocated an NHS clinical supervisor who oversees and provides guidance on your clinical activity. You are also allocated an University based supervisor from the course team (who reviews clinical performance) and a University based research supervisor.

How you will be assessed

The course will comprise 50 percent academic study and 50 percent practical clinical placement work. Academic assessment will be by case reports based on NHS clinical work, examinations and a dissertation. In addition, the successful completion of the first three modules listed above depends on the receipt of a satisfactory assessment of clinical competence from your NHS clinical supervisor.

Assessments of clinical competence are made six months and nine months into the course. At these points, any unsatisfactory clinical competence will be highlighted and a programme of remedial action provided that must be undertaken successfully by the end of the modules.

Careers

Since the inception of the course in 2005, the majority of graduates have been employed by the NHS in Scotland as CAAPs. However, the job situation for CAAPs is currently more competitive, as it is for almost all workers at the moment. Some graduates have gone into the private sector as therapists and some have been employed in other NHS posts that are related but have different job titles. Some graduates have gone on to work in England under the IAPT programme. It is impossible to make predictions about vacancies for 2014, however the requirement for all NHS Boards to provide psychological therapies within 14 weeks from referral by 2014 will require some services to consider their skill mix.

Students are funded by NHS Education for Scotland and are employed by the NHS.

Fees

Trainees’ fees and travel expenses will be covered, and salaries paid at agreed
national levels (A4C Band 6, first spine point, currently £26,041)

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The MSc Psychological Sciences conversion course provides a post-graduate qualification enabling students from a range of backgrounds to gain Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership in Psychology of the British Psychological Society (BPS). Read more

About the course

The MSc Psychological Sciences conversion course provides a post-graduate qualification enabling students from a range of backgrounds to gain Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership in Psychology of the British Psychological Society (BPS).

Moreover, the conversion course provides a sound knowledge of the diverse approaches to the study of behaviour encompassed within the core areas of psychology. Finally, the course emphasises the development of transferable knowledge, analytic expertise and research skills, which will be useful across the diverse areas of employment that attract psychology graduates and as a basis for further advanced study within the discipline (e.g. PhD, ClinPsyD, DEdPsy).

Aims

Psychology is defined as the study of mind and behaviour. Psychology is simultaneously a biological science and a social science, providing an exceptionally broad range of conceptual perspectives and empirical skills that will enable students to compete effectively in the workforce upon graduation.

The programme aims to provide students with:

Coverage of all of the requirements for Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership in Psychology within the British Psychological Society (BPS).

A comprehensive understanding, and critical awareness, of how the theories, methods, and research findings of psychology draw upon and contribute to the natural sciences and the social sciences alike.

A comprehensive and systematic understanding of knowledge, and a critical awareness of current issues relating to important concepts, theoretical issues, research findings, historical issues, recent advances, and research methods in psychology.

Comprehensive knowledge and systematic understanding of relevant concepts, theoretical issues, research findings, recent advances, and research methods in biological psychology, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, individual differences, and social psychology that are critical for research in psychology.

The opportunity to acquire comprehensive knowledge and systematic understanding of a particular topic in psychology and to conduct an original empirical research project in that area.

The opportunity to acquire important transferable, advanced research skills (e.g. research design, data analysis, report preparation).

Course Content

Compulsory modules:

Conceptual and Historical Issues in Psychology
Developmental Psychology
Individual Differences
Social Psychology
Statistics in Psychology
Dissertation
Biological Psychology
Cognitive Psychology
Research Methods in Psychology
Psychology Research Methods in Practice
Research Methods
Biological and Cognitive Psychology

Typical Dissertations

The dissertation is an empirical report (maximum 12,000 words) that enables students to:
Integrate elements of their learning from different parts of the programme
Demonstrate their accumulated knowledge and systematic understanding of a topic
Show an ability to interpret primary source material
Develop an innovative approach to the subject
Work independently of others, consistent with BPS guidelines.

Teaching

Lectures and seminars provide students with in-depth knowledge of historical and contemporary perspectives in psychology.

Formative and summative essays provide reflection on historical and contemporary perspectives in psychology.

Statistics assignments, written research methods tests and laboratory reports will ensure proficiency in analytical skills - required to design research and interpret results.

Statistics assignment and lab reports will provide critical evaluation of the results of empirical research in psychology.

Formative summative essays, exams, and the dissertation will develop effective and critical written communication skills.

Individual meetings between students and dissertation supervisors will enable students to:

(a) Acquire knowledge concerning major theories and results of empirical studies that are relevant to the dissertation topic (including an understanding of the larger, real-world context within which the dissertation topic can be located); and

(b) Develop, analyse, and interpret theory-derived, testable hypotheses (and, perhaps, research questions) concerning links among the constructs to be studied in the dissertation.

Effective and critical written communication will be achieved via formative summative essays, exams, and the dissertation.

Assessment

Coursework essays – demonstration of systematic understanding, critical analysis, and written communication skills.

Examinations – demonstration of comprehensive understanding and written communication skills.

Quantitative reports – ability to analyse and interpret empirical evidence.

Oral presentations – demonstration of knowledge and understanding, critical analysis and oral communication skills.

Dissertation – ability to plan, critically review, execute and communicate an advanced piece of research.

Deadlines are distributed through the year, allowing time for constructive feedback.

Special Features

The MSc Psychological Sciences conversion course will provide a Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) in Psychology, as conferred by the British Psychological Society (BPS). This is an entry requirement for all postgraduate training programmes leading to chartered status and the vast majority of postgraduate programmes accredited by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) for registration as a practitioner psychologist.

There is a focus during the programme on developing students' sound knowledge of research methods and statistics - highly desirable skills in many areas of potential employment and so fundamental to the value added by the degree.

A wide range of options are available for students to pursue their own particular research interests (culminating in the dissertation) within the discipline.

Accreditation

BSc Psychology courses accredited by The British Psychological Society
The BSc Psychological Sciences programme at Brunel is accredited by The British Psychological Society.

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. Why Surrey?. Our stimulating postgraduate diploma in Psychological Intervention. IPT (Interpersonal Psychotherapy) offers flexible training for individuals who want develop core counselling skills and gain a full therapy qualification. Read more

Why Surrey?

Our stimulating postgraduate diploma in Psychological Intervention: IPT (Interpersonal Psychotherapy) offers flexible training for individuals who want develop core counselling skills and gain a full therapy qualification.

Our programme will develop your theoretical understanding of mental health issues, equip you with skills in working with the IPT model and enable you to work effectively with clients.

This is delivered through a rich range of learning experiences, including the opportunity to integrate theory with practice. This ensures that, as a graduate of this programme, you are able to provide a high quality therapy to service users.

Programme overview

Our School of Psychology has a reputation for providing high quality IPT training to therapists who are already in practice and want to add this model to their repertoire.

This Psychological Intervention programme has been designed to be responsive to the needs of people who do not already have a therapy qualification who aspire to become qualified practitioner in a NICE-recommended psychological therapy.

The programme meets an identified training need for therapists in this specific approach. The National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines recommend IPT as a treatment for depression and eating disorders and IPT has also been part of the Government’s provision to increase the availability of talking therapies through the Increasing Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT provision).

At present, our programme is the only programme in the UK that offers the opportunity for appropriately experienced individuals with no previous therapy qualification to undertake IPT training.

Program structure

This programme takes place over one or two academic years, depending on the level of qualification. A third and final research year can be added to result in an MSc qualification.

The first year comprises of four modules of 15 credits each. Each module comprises of 150 hours of learning, including student contact, private study, skills practice either on placement or in the classroom and assessment. In order to achieve the Postgraduate Certificate in Psychological Intervention: IPC (Interpersonal Counselling) students must complete all four modules and complete 60 credits at FHEQ Level 7.

In order to achieve the Postgraduate Diploma in Psychological Intervention: IPT (Interpersonal Psychotherapy) students must complete 120 credits at FHEQ Level 7. The second year comprises of three modules, two of 15 credits each and one of 30 credits. The 30 credit module includes a substantial allocation of student learning time to placement activities.

In order for students to progress they must achieve a minimum average of 50 per cent.

Example module listing

Year one

  • Psychological Theory and the Fundamentals of Adult Mental Health
  • The Therapeutic Relationship
  • Introduction to Assessment, Intervention and Ending Skills
  • Supervision of Client Work

Year two

  • IPT Theoretical and Research Base: client groups; modes of delivery; adaptations
  • Clinical practice in IPT
  • Supervision of client work: IPT

Teaching approaches

Specialist knowledge relevant to the subject area will be delivered using a variety of methods, including lectures, experiential workshops, micro skills teaching, audio-recording reviews, clinical supervision, group discussions, and through the interaction of the student with coursework assignments. 

Clinical practice with application of their learning to client work will be supervised closely and students will be required to keep a log of their clinical activity as well as supervisory activity and will be evaluated on their clinical competence.

Students who have access to clients in their ongoing job role whilst studying may incorporate part of this work as their practice placement, subject to agreement with their manager and the University. Otherwise students will be supported to obtain a suitable practice placement.

The strength of this programme lies in the integration of classroom learning and clinical practice learning and development. The personal impact of working with clients presenting with distress will be explored as well as ethical issues. Students will develop their skills in applying theory and technique to real life client situations in supervision sessions at the University via discussion and micro-teaching.

The feedback process is designed to be ongoing, in that comments and reflections from these sessions will provide an escalator of personal learning for the student. At critical points there will be summative learning points to provide a marker for the student as to their progress against the benchmark standards being expected. Formative and summative feedback will be provided as appropriate to help students develop their skills in these areas of practice.

The associated research evidence bases will be integrated into all aspects of the teaching.  

Educational aims of the programme

The first year of this programme will enable professionals to develop core counselling skills in IPT (IPC) to enhance their effectiveness with clients, further their psychological skills and increase their understanding of mental health issues. The second year (PGDip) leads to a full therapy qualification.

Professional recognition

The course is designed in order to meet the accreditation requirements of a well-known professional counselling body. Because this is a new programme, the accreditation process will take place after the first cohort has completed. If successful, accreditation is awarded retrospectively thus allowing the first cohort of students to become a registered with this professional body.

Recognition is also being sought from IPT-UK, the organisation that accredits therapists in this particular model of therapy.



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