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Masters Degrees (Proteomic)

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Research profile. The central goal of the Division of Pathway Medicine (DPM) is to integrate post-genomic science with medicine in order to provide a better understanding of disease processes. Read more

Research profile

The central goal of the Division of Pathway Medicine (DPM) is to integrate post-genomic science with medicine in order to provide a better understanding of disease processes. This will provide the basis for the development of new medical innovations for the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases. To do this the DPM promotes multidisciplinary interactions between science and medicine.

The DPM has two main research themes:

  • Pathway biology of infection and immunity. This involves the study of host-pathogen interaction in immune cells and the modelling of molecular pathways that control immune cell function in health and disease. Techniques and approaches utilised in this theme are also being applied to the study of other disease processes.
  • Biochip medicine in systemic response to disease. This programme involves the development of advanced biochip techniques and platforms for translating genomic and pathway research into clinical healthcare. This is a highly disciplinary approach involving the integration of biological and physical sciences with medicine, engineering and computational science.

Training and support

The DPM offers leading-edge multidisciplinary PhD training and research in the application of postgenomic technologies and analytical methodologies for the study of disease pathways and processes.

The DPM has regular seminar speakers and hosts a yearly international conference on pathway medicine. Students attend DPM seminars and the generic skills-training programme provided by the life-sciences graduate programme. Students are invited to the annual DPM scientific workshop held at the Firbush Centre in Perthshire.

Facilities

The DPM fosters an integrative and multidisciplinary approach to disease pathway analysis. Students have access to state-of-the-art facilities for high throughput genomic and proteomic studies and biochip applications, including dedicated laboratories for the study of virus-host interactions.

The Division also houses leading bioinformatics and IT infrastructure and expertise for the integrative analysis and modelling of high throughput genomic and proteomic data. Complementing this, the DPM is also leading the development of computational approaches for the construction and modelling of disease pathways.



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Clinicians, scientists and students engaged in cancer research at Newcastle share a common purpose. to improve treatment outcomes for patients with cancer. Read more
Clinicians, scientists and students engaged in cancer research at Newcastle share a common purpose: to improve treatment outcomes for patients with cancer. Work covers a broad spectrum - understanding the biological and molecular differences between normal and malignant cells and using this knowledge to develop new anti-cancer drugs.

Our staff and postgraduate students are based in the Northern Institute for Cancer Research (NICR) or the School of Chemistry. The NICR incorporates the Newcastle Cancer Centre, a unique collaboration between Cancer Research UK and the North of England Children's Cancer Research Fund.

We are a major training base for the next generation of cancer researchers. Our Institute covers many areas of cancer research, including:
-Solid tumours and leukaemias
-Childhood and adult cancers
-Drug discovery and early phase clinical trials

We offer approximately 15 MD, PhD and integrated MRes/PhD studentships each year, including the Newcastle Cancer Centre training programme. Projects in all research areas are available to fully-funded international students.

Members of our postgraduate community come from a variety of subject backgrounds including biological and biomedical sciences, chemistry, genetics, pharmacy, medicine, dentistry and veterinary medicine.

We hold regular postgraduate seminars which you will be required to attend and where you will deliver presentations. You will also attend and present your data annually at national cancer research meetings and at least one international meeting.

Placements

Our Institute has close working relationships with companies in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology sectors.

A number of our studentships are direct collaborations with industrial partners, with opportunities to spend placements with these partners.

Facilities

Our staff and postgraduate students are based in the Northern Institute for Cancer Research (NICR) or the School of Chemistry (medicinal chemistry students).

Our laboratories contain a full range of contemporary genomic, bioinformatic, proteomic, synthetic chemistry and pharmacology equipment, and clinical research facilities.

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This programme focuses on the study of the molecular and genetic basis of human health and disease, using biotechnological methods to advance our current research. Read more
This programme focuses on the study of the molecular and genetic basis of human health and disease, using biotechnological methods to advance our current research.

The wealth of genomic and proteomic data from the Human Genome Project has broadened our understanding of the biochemical and genetic basis of several diseases. In particular, this programme will cover the rapid developments in the field of cancer and metastasis, neurodegenerative conditions, microbial pathogenesis and immune evasion science.

The MSc programmes in Biology & Biochemistry are designed for students who wish to specialise further in a particular field or wish to change direction from their first degree (in a related area).

If you already have extensive and relevant research experience and would like to specialise, you might consider an MRes programme (http://www.bath.ac.uk/science/graduate-school/taught-programmes/).

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/science/graduate-school/taught-programmes/msc-medical-biosciences/

Why study Biology and Biochemistry with us?

- Biology & Biochemistry ranked 2nd in the Sunday Times University Guide 2013
- 90% of our research judged to be internationally recognised, excellent or world-leading
- Our current research funding portfolio stands at £14 million, supporting internationally excellent research in the biosciences

What will I learn?

The aim of each of our MSc programmes in Biology and Biochemistry is to provide professional-level training that will develop highly skilled bioscientists with strong theoretical, research and transferable skills, all of which are necessary to work at the forefront of modern biosciences.

For further information please visit our department pages (http://www.bath.ac.uk/bio-sci/)

Career opportunities

Since graduating, our students have gone on to employment or further research at institutions in the US, Europe, Australia, Asia and Africa.

Recent employers include:

Morvus-Technology Ltd
Janssen-Cilag
Royal United Hospital, Bath
Ministry of Defence
State Intellectual Property Office, Beijing
Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Oxford University
AbCam
Salisbury Foundation Trust Hospital
BBSRC
Lonza

Find out more about the department here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/bio-sci/

Find out how to apply here- http://www.bath.ac.uk/science/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/

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The Bioinformatics MSc combines foundational skills in bioinformatics with specialist skills in computing programming, molecular biology and research methods. Read more
The Bioinformatics MSc combines foundational skills in bioinformatics with specialist skills in computing programming, molecular biology and research methods. Our unique, interdisciplinary course draws together highly-rated teaching and research expertise from across the University, equipping you for a successful career in the bioinformatics industry or academia.

This interdisciplinary course is based in the School of Computing Science and taught jointly with the School of Biology, School of Mathematics and Statistics, Institute of Cell and Molecular Biosciences and the Institute of Genetic Medicine. It is designed for students from both biological science and computational backgrounds. Prior experience with computer programming is not required and we welcome applications from students with mathematical, engineering or other scientific backgrounds.

Our graduates have an excellent record of finding employment (around 90%). Recent examples have included:
-Bioinformatician at the Medical Research Council
-Technical consultant at Accenture
-Bioinformatics technician at Barcelona Supercomputing Centre

Our course structure is highly flexible and you can tailor it to your own skills and interests. Half of the course is taught and the remainder is dedicated to a research project.

As research is a large component of this course, our emphasis is on delivering the research training you will need to meet the demands of industry and academia now and in the future. Our research in bioinformatics, life sciences, computing and mathematics is internationally recognised. We have an active research community, comprising several research groups and three research centres.

You will be taught by academics who are successful researchers in their field and publish regularly in highly-ranked bioinformatics journals. Our experienced and helpful staff will be happy to offer support with all aspects of your course from admissions to graduation and developing your career.

The course is part of a suite of related programmes that include:
-Synthetic Biology MSc
-Computational Neuroscience and Neuroinformatics MSc
-Computational Systems Biology MSc

All four courses share core modules. This creates a tight-knit cohort that has encouraged collaborations on projects undertaking interdisciplinary research.

Delivery

Semester one combines bioinformatics theory and application with the computational and modelling skills necessary to undertake more specialist modules in semester two. We provide training in mathematics and statistics and, for those without a biological first degree, we will also provide molecular biology training. Some of these modules are examined in January at the end of semester one.

Semester two begins with two modules that focus heavily on introducing subject-specific research skills. These two modules run sequentially, in a short but intensive mode that allows you time to focus on a single topic in depth. In the first of the second semester modules you learn how to analyse data arising from post-genomic studies such as microarray analysis, proteomic analysis and RNAseq. All of the semester two modules are examined by in-course assessment - there are no formal examinations in these modules.

Project work

Your five month project gives you an opportunity to develop your knowledge and skills in depth, and to work in a research or development team. You will have one-to-one supervision from an experienced member of staff, supported with supervision from industry partners as required.

The project can be carried out:
-With a research group at Newcastle University
-With an industrial sponsor
-With a research institute
-At your place of work

Accreditation

We have a policy of seeking British Computer Society (BCS) accreditation for all of our degrees, so you can be assured that you will graduate with a degree that meets the standards set out by the IT industry. Studying a BCS-accredited degree provides the foundation for professional membership of the BCS on graduation and is the first step to becoming a chartered IT professional.

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

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The MSc Advanced Food Safety programme at QUB is tailored towards students who aim to or currently work within the agri-food sector. Read more
The MSc Advanced Food Safety programme at QUB is tailored towards students who aim to or currently work within the agri-food sector. It will offer the opportunity to obtain a unique qualification in the field of food safety delivered by research-active scientists within the Institute for Global Food Security.

The major focus of the programme will be on new and emerging issues within the diverse field of food safety and it will concentrate on developments in analytical approaches used to monitor and regulate food safety with the view to protect human health.

Key topics covered will include: food fraud and traceability and the analytical methods used to detect fraud and ensure food safety and authenticity; the links between environmental chemical contaminants and biological hazards present in animal feed and human food - highlighting new emerging technologies that enable rapid and early detection of food safety incidents and diagnosis of animal diseases.

QUB MSc Advanced Food Safety Video: https://youtu.be/TFxBDS9mb-k

Content

Advanced Food Bioanalysis
Bio-entrepreneurship and Advanced Skills
Agri-food Traceability and Fraud
Food Safety, Health and Disease
Foundations for Research in the Biosciences
Literature Review
Research Project (triple module)

Assessment

Continuous assessment of coursework, examinations, and assessment of modules based solely on submitted work related to private individual study. A MSc will be awarded with Distinction to students who achieve a dissertation and average mark both exceeding 70 per cent, and with Commendation for marks over 60 per cent.

Opportunities for Careers

Excellent opportunities exist within agri-food companies, diagnostic research companies and regulatory testing laboratories. Graduates will also be in a position to progress to further PhD level research study.

Special Features

A major component will include the completion of a laboratory-based, food safety related research project within the Institute for Global Food Security, offering the opportunity to gain practical experience in the use of conventional and emerging bioanalytical technology platforms.

Facilities and capabilities include:
Biosensor instrumentation
Cell culture and microbiological suites
GC, HPLC and UPLC systems
Proteomic and metabolomic profiling
ICP, GC, qToF and QqQ mass spectrometers
Spectroscopic analysis
Real time PCR and surface plasmon resonance biosensor technology

Additional information for International students

http://www.qub.ac.uk/home/StudyatQueens/InternationalStudents/

Applicants who are non-EEA nationals must satisfy the UK Border Agency (UKBA) immigration requirements for English language for visa purposes, by providing evidence of an IELTS* score of 6.0, with not less than 5.5 in any component, or an equivalent qualification acceptable to the University.

*Taken within the last 2 yrs.

Please see http://go.qub.ac.uk/EnglishLanguageReqs for more information on English Language requirements for EEA and non-EEA nationals.


Up to date information on course fees can be found at: http://www.qub.ac.uk/directorates/sgc/finance/TuitionFees/

The University provides information on possible sources of awards which is available at: http://www.qub.ac.uk/sites/PostgraduateCentre/PostgraduateFunding/

Information on the Institute for Global Food Security at Queen’s University Belfast can be found at: http://www.qub.ac.uk/Research/GRI/TheInstituteforGlobalFoodSecurity/


Visit the MSc Advanced Food Safety page on the Queen’s University Belfast web site for more details! (http://www.qub.ac.uk/Study/Course-Finder/PCF1718/PTCF1718/Course/AdvancedFoodSafety.html)

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The Biomedical Engineering (BME) program seeks to prepare graduate engineers to face 21st-century challenges by advancing student understanding of prevention, diagnosis and treatment of human injury, disease and the health complications associated with aging as they work to improve human health through advances in healthcare and medicine. Read more
The Biomedical Engineering (BME) program seeks to prepare graduate engineers to face 21st-century challenges by advancing student understanding of prevention, diagnosis and treatment of human injury, disease and the health complications associated with aging as they work to improve human health through advances in healthcare and medicine.

The master's degree program prepares students for careers in the biotechnology industry and medical/healthcare centers or providers of medical/healthcare technology.

Doctoral students will also develop a detailed understanding of the operation of the health care industry, preparing them for academic or industry careers related to medical technology, as well as the background necessary to pursue an entrepreneurial role in medical/healthcare technology. To assist students in pursuing new ventures, incubator space and technology transfer mechanisms are available.

In 2014, the first two doctoral graduates of this program went on to postdoctoral work at Pennsylvania State University, and a permanent position at American Systems in Washington D.C.

Educational Objectives

The goal of biomedical engineers is to improve human health through advances in healthcare and medicine. This includes advancing our understanding of prevention, diagnosis and treatment of human injury, disease and the health complications associated with physiologic and sociologic factors such as aging, environment and diet. In this regard, we are living in an exciting time. In the last two decades or so we have witnessed, among numerous achievements, the decoding of the entire human genome, the birth of proteomic methods, the maturation of computerized tomography, dramatic advances in imaging and sensing technologies, the culture of stem cells, and advances in biomaterials that may eventually enable us to engineer tissues and even organs. Altogether, these achievements have dramatically augmented our potential for improving health care. However, addressing how to use these basic science research advances for improved health care represents a major challenge for biomedical engineers of the coming generation.
Chronic illness is now a dominant issue in health care, consuming vast sums of healthcare dollars, personnel and facilities usage. This situation will only be exacerbated over the coming decades with the aging of the population. As a result, improvements in our ability to prevent, diagnose, and treat chronic illness, and to do so at reasonable cost, has become a focus of the national healthcare agenda. Accordingly, the goal of the biomedical engineering program at Binghamton University is to prepare graduate engineers to face not only these new 21st century challenges, but also to advance new technologies for better healthcare.

MS and PhD applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university which you attended
- Two letters of recommendation
- Personal statement of no longer than one page describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

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A higher degree by research involves training in research methods and a laboratory based high level scientific investigation. The nature of the work and the time it takes to finish the research means a research degree is demanding and needs great commitment. Read more

A higher degree by research involves training in research methods and a laboratory based high level scientific investigation. The nature of the work and the time it takes to finish the research means a research degree is demanding and needs great commitment.

Your research takes place with the Biomolecular Sciences Research Centre (BMRC). The BMRC has been established for over 15 years. We have over 40 postgraduate students enrolled on MPhil/PhD programmes, as well as a number of postdoctoral research assistants. This provides an active and stimulating research environment.

Whilst studying, postgraduate students are encouraged and supported to present their latest research findings at national and international conferences as part of the BMRC. You must present your results in a thesis, explain the methods used in your research and defend them in a viva voce examination.

To get an MPhil you must critically investigate and evaluate an approved topic and display an understanding of suitable research methods.

BMRC staff work in collaboration with UK and international scientists as well as clinical colleagues at a number of UK hospitals.

We have a broad range of facilities including

  • Q-TOF-MS with electrospray and imaging MALDI options along with LC and associated equipment for proteomic analysis
  • synaption mobility mass spectrometer
  • single cell recording electrophysiology laboratory
  • real time PCR
  • flow cytometer with cell sorter
  • cell culture facilities for bacterial and mammalian cells
  • confocal microscopy suite
  • DNA microarray scanner
  • biacore facility
  • NMR

In the 2008 RAE Assessment, the BMRC was submitted under Unit of Assessment 12 - Allied Health Professions and Studies - which included 21 staff from BMRC and eight from the Centre for Health and Social Care. 65 per cent of the research in the joint submission was considered to be internationally recognised. When measured by the quality of its research and weighted by the number of staff submitted in this unit of assessment, Sheffield Hallam University was rated 16th out of the 42 post-92 universities who submitted (figure obtained from Research Professional). In terms of the publications submitted for consideration by the RAE panel, 75 per cent of these were of an international standard.

Evidence of the growth in research activity in the BMRC between RAE 2001 and RAE 2008 is the doubling of the number of staff returned in 2008 compared with 2001 and a three-fold increase in income. We currently have six postdoctoral researchers and 40 PhD students in BMRC, with 30 successful PhD awards being made during the period 2008-13.

Split MPhil option for international students

A split MPhil is a research degree programme for international students wishing to study from their home country university. You register for a Sheffield Hallam University MPhil degree and spend some time studying in Sheffield but are substantially based in your home country.

The balance of study between Sheffield Hallam and the overseas university is agreed between you and your supervisors, depending on the needs of your research programme, but will not exceed three months per annum in UK.

The benefits for students studying on the split scheme include

  • you can complete fieldwork or laboratory work in your home country, in an area directly linked to your professional or career development interests
  • access to local facilities and supervisory support in your home country combined with the expert supervisory guidance of our academic staff
  • short, intensive periods of face-to-face working with a dedicated supervisory team in Sheffield, while enjoying the educational, social and cultural benefits of studying in the UK

Course structure

Research training

When you begin your research, we allocate you a director of studies and a supervisor. Regular meetings between you and your supervisors are scheduled, with targets set for written and oral presentation of research progress.

The research courses include:

University student induction

We designed this to give you the information you need to successfully begin your research at the University.

Research methods module

This module develops generic research skills including:

  • critical analysis and evaluation of technical written material
  • information retrieval and storage
  • research presentation, report writing and refereeing
  • quantitative methods and appropriate IT skills
  • project planning and management
  • research ethics, including online epigeum training

Bioscience Forum

You have to attend relevant seminars from the Bioscience Forum series.

Assessment

Thesis followed by viva voce examination.

Employability

Research degrees are a vital qualification for most academic careers, and for professional specialisation and development in an existing or planned career.



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