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This MSc degree in environmental management, specialising in countryside and protected area management, will enable you to acquire and develop a broad understanding of the knowledge and skills needed for managing protected areas of the environment, including natural, cultural and recreational sites. Read more
This MSc degree in environmental management, specialising in countryside and protected area management, will enable you to acquire and develop a broad understanding of the knowledge and skills needed for managing protected areas of the environment, including natural, cultural and recreational sites. It will provide you with the key skills and management tools necessary for resolving conflicting pressures and demands in protected areas.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Offers opportunities for career progression for anyone working, or planning to work, in the management of local, national or international protected areas.
Flexible study pattern, with a mixture of core teaching based on occasional weekends in London and a spring residential school.
A wide range of professional training modules available, with a broad interdisciplinary focus.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Sociology at Birkbeck was ranked 13th in the UK.

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This Postgraduate Diploma in Countryside and Protected Area Management will enable you to acquire and develop a broad knowledge of, and the skills needed for, managing protected areas of the environment, including natural, cultural and recreational sites. Read more
This Postgraduate Diploma in Countryside and Protected Area Management will enable you to acquire and develop a broad knowledge of, and the skills needed for, managing protected areas of the environment, including natural, cultural and recreational sites. It will provide you with the key skills and management tools necessary for resolving conflicting pressures and demands in protected areas.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Offers opportunities for career progression for anyone working, or planning to work, in the management of local, national or international protected areas.
Flexible study pattern, with a mixture of core teaching based on occasional weekends in London and a spring residential school.
A wide range of professional training modules available, with a broad interdisciplinary focus.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Sociology at Birkbeck was ranked 13th in the UK.

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Protected areas include marine and terrestrial national parks and World Heritage Areas. The protection of these areas is dependent upon their continued management. Read more

What is protected area management?

Protected areas include marine and terrestrial national parks and World Heritage Areas. The protection of these areas is dependent upon their continued management. There are over 120,000 protected areas worldwide, and their success depends on how well they are managed.

Who is this course for?

This program provides specialist training for science graduates already working in this area (national parks and world heritage listed areas), or people wanting to work in this field.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Graduate Certificate of Science, graduates will be able to:
*Integrate and apply specialised theoretical and technical knowledge in one or more science disciplines
*Retrieve, analyse, synthesise and evaluate knowledge from a range of sources
*Plan and conduct reliable, evidence-based laboratory and/or field experiments/practices by selecting and applying methods, techniques and tools, as appropriate to one or more science disciplines
*Organise, analyse and interpret complex scientific data using mathematical, statistical and technological skills
*Communicate complex scientific ideas, arguments and conclusions clearly and coherently to a variety of audiences through advanced written and oral English language skills and a variety of media
*Identify, analyse and generate solutions to unpredictable or complex problems, especially related to tropical, rural, remote or Indigenous contexts, by applying scientific knowledge and skills with initiative and high level judgement
*Explain and apply regulatory requirements, ethical principles and, where appropriate, cultural frameworks, to work effectively, responsibly and safely in diverse contexts
*Reflect on current skills, knowledge and attitudes to manage their professional learning needs and performance, autonomously and in collaboration with others.

Award title

Graduate Certificate of Science (GCertSc)

Course articulation

Students who complete the Graduate Certificate of Science are eligible for entry to the Graduate Diploma of Science, and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under the Graduate Certificate.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University brings together a team of academic and associate staff across multiple disciplines.
*World-recognised programs and research
*state-of-the-art research and teaching facilities
*internationally-acclaimed academic teaching staff
*strong collaboration with industry and research organisations, both locally and internationally.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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Protected areas include marine and terrestrial national parks and World Heritage Areas. The protection of these areas is dependent upon their continued management. Read more

What is protected area management?

Protected areas include marine and terrestrial national parks and World Heritage Areas. The protection of these areas is dependent upon their continued management. There are over 120,000 protected areas worldwide, and their success depends on how well they are managed.

Who is this course for?

This program provides specialist training for science graduates already working in this area (national parks and world heritage listed areas), or people wanting to work in this field.

Course learning outcomes

The graduates of James Cook University are prepared and equipped to create a brighter future for life in the tropics world-wide.
JCU graduates are committed to lifelong learning, intellectual development, and to the display of exemplary personal, professional and ethical standards. They have a sense of their place in the tropics and are charged with professional, community, and environmental responsibility. JCU graduates appreciate the need to embrace and be acquainted with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples of Australia. They are committed to reconciliation, diversity and sustainability. They exhibit a willingness to lead and to contribute to the intellectual, environmental, cultural, economic and social challenges of regional, national, and international communities of the tropics.
On successful completion of the Graduate Diploma of Science, graduates will be able to:
*Integrate and apply advanced theoretical and technical knowledge in one or more science disciplines
*Retrieve, analyse, synthesise and evaluate knowledge from a range of sources
*Plan and conduct reliable, evidence-based laboratory and/or field experiments/practices by selecting and applying methods, techniques and tools, as appropriate to one or more science disciplines
*Organise, analyse and interpret complex scientific data using mathematical, statistical and technological skills
*Communicate complex scientific ideas, arguments and conclusions clearly and coherently to a variety of audiences through advanced written and oral English language skills and a variety of media
*Identify, analyse and generate solutions to unpredictable or complex problems, especially related to tropical, rural, remote or Indigenous contexts, by applying scientific knowledge and skills with initiative and high level judgement
*Explain and apply regulatory requirements, ethical principles and, where appropriate, cultural frameworks, to work effectively, responsibly and safely in diverse contexts
*Reflect on current skills, knowledge and attitudes to manage their professional learning needs and performance, autonomously and in collaboration with others.

Award title

GRADUATE DIPLOMA OF SCIENCE (GDipSc)

Course articulation

Students who complete the Graduate Diploma of Science are eligible for entry to the Master of Science, and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under the Graduate Diploma.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University brings together a team of academic and associate staff across multiple disciplines.
*World-recognised programs and research
*state-of-the-art research and teaching facilities
*internationally-acclaimed academic teaching staff
*strong collaboration with industry and research organisations, both locally and internationally.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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Protected areas include marine and terrestrial national parks and World Heritage Areas. The protection of these areas is dependent upon their continued management. Read more

What is protected area management?

Protected areas include marine and terrestrial national parks and World Heritage Areas. The protection of these areas is dependent upon their continued management. There are over 120,000 protected areas worldwide, and their success depends on how well they are managed.

Who is this course for?

This program provides specialist training for science graduates already working in this area (national parks and world heritage listed areas), or people wanting to work in this field.

How you will study

This course is available in Townsville and Cairns. It is available part time (domestic students only) and full time.
Flexible programs are offered in which students devise their coursework component in consultation with the course coordinator to match their professional goals and interests.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion, graduates will be able to:
*Demonstrate an advanced level of scientific knowledge from with their chosen major
*Critically analyse scientific theory, models, concepts and techniques from within their chosen major
*Critically read and evaluate quantitative and qualitative research findings from within their chosen major
*Apply analytic tools and methodologies to define and describe scientific problems from within their chosen major
*Communicate effectively and persuasively, both orally and in writing.

Award title

MASTER OF SCIENCE (MSc)

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English Language Proficiency Requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University brings together a team of academic and associate staff across multiple disciplines.
*World-recognised programs and research
*state-of-the-art research and teaching facilities
*internationally-acclaimed academic teaching staff
*strong collaboration with industry and research organisations, both locally and internationally.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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Tourism is the world's largest industry and nature and wildlife tourism is the fastest growing sector of the industry. Read more
Tourism is the world's largest industry and nature and wildlife tourism is the fastest growing sector of the industry. Therefore, there is a need to ensure that nature tourism follows the principles of sustainability, by minimising impacts on natural environments, contributing to protected area management and also benefiting local people.

The MSc in Conservation and Tourism offers you a critical engagement with the subject of conservation and tourism, not only by exploring the wide range of environmental, social and economic impacts, but also through considering difficult questions that we might ask ourselves about our role as conservationists. For instance, in relation to the underlying values we might introduce into different cultures around the world as part of our ‘mission’, and what the historical roots and repercussions of these might be.

This programme is relevant to the work of NGOs, consultancy firms and contractors, tour operators, conservation managers, international agencies and donors.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/272/conservation-and-tourism

About The Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE)

DICE is Britain’s leading research and postgraduate training centre dedicated to conserving biodiversity, as well as the ecological processes that support ecosystems and people.

We focus on combining natural and social sciences to understand complex conservation issues and design effective interventions to conserve biodiversity. Our staff have outstanding international research profiles, yet integrate this with considerable on-the-ground experience working in collaboration with conservation agencies around the world. This blend of expertise ensures that our programmes deliver the skills and knowledge that are essential components of conservation implementation.

Our taught Master’s programmes cover topics in conservation management, policy, ecotourism and sustainable natural resource use. The research degree programmes (MSc by Research and PhD) encourage you to undertake original, high-quality research, which culminates in the submission of a thesis. Please visit our website (http://www.kent.ac.uk/sac/) for new programmes that may be under development that further integrate conservation policy and practice.

Course structure

The MSc consists of six months of coursework and five months of research. The optional modules allow you the flexibility to devise a pathway that suits your specific interests, with an appropriate balance between natural and social sciences.

Modules

Please note that not all modules necessarily run every year. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

DI875 - Principles and Practice of Ecotourism (15 credits)
DI876 - Research Methods for Social Science (15 credits)
DI1001 - Interdisciplinary Foundations for Conservation (15 credits)
DI884 - Research Methods for Natural Sciences (15 credits)
SE857 - Advanced Topics in Primate Behaviour (20 credits)
DI836 - Integrated Species Conservation and Management (15 credits)
DI841 - Managing Protected Areas (15 credits)
DI849 - Principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (15 credits)
DI871 - International Wildlife Trade - Achieving Sustainability (15 credits)
DI877 - Population and Evolutionary Biology (15 credits)
DI880 - Conservation and Community Development (15 credits)
DI881 - Advanced Topics in Conservation Ecology and Management (15 credits)
DI883 - Special Topics in Conservation (15 credits)
DI885 - Ecotourism and Rural Development Field Course (15 credits)
DI888 - Economics of Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI889 - Leadership Skills for Conservation Managers (15 credits)
DI892 - Current Issues in Primate Conservation (15 credits)
DI893 - Business Principles for Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI998 - Dissertation - Conservation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is carried out primarily through coursework with written examinations for some modules. The research dissertation is written up in the format of a paper for publication.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- produce postgraduates equipped to play leading roles in the field of international conservation and biodiversity management

- develop new areas of teaching in response to the advance of scholarship and practice

- provide you with opportunities to gain a interdisciplinary perspective on conservation issues through collaborative exchange between DICE and the wider University

- develop your competence in applying theoretical and methodological skills to the implementation of conservation practice and biodiversity management

- develop your critical and analytical powers in relation to policy formulation and data analysis and interpretation

- provide you with the skills to adapt and respond positively to change

- develop critical, analytical problem-based learning skills and the transferable skills necessary for professional development

- enhance the development of your interpersonal skills

- assist you to develop the skills required for both autonomous practice and team-working.

Careers

DICE programmes combine academic theory with practical field experience to develop graduates who are highly employable within government, NGOs and the private sector.

Our alumni progress into a wide range of organisations across the world. Examples include: consultancy for a Darwin Initiative project in West Sumatra; Wildlife Management Officer in Kenya; Chief of the Biodiversity Unit – UN Environment Programme; Research and Analysis Programme Leader for TRAFFIC; Freshwater Programme Officer, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN); Head of the Ecosystem Assessment Programme, United Nations Environment Programme-World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC); Community Based Natural Resource Manager, WWF; Managing Partner, Althelia Climate Fund; and Programme Officer, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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DICE’s research degree programmes all carry the generic title of Biodiversity Management. We welcome students with the appropriate background for research. Read more
DICE’s research degree programmes all carry the generic title of Biodiversity Management. We welcome students with the appropriate background for research.

Because of the diversity and international nature of many field-orientated projects, the amount of time that individual research students spend at DICE varies. However local supervision is usually organised for those students spending considerable time overseas.

Overseas students who wish to spend most of their time in their home country while undertaking research may register as an external student or for a split PhD.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/276/biodiversity-management

About The Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE)

DICE is Britain’s leading research and postgraduate training centre dedicated to conserving biodiversity, as well as the ecological processes that support ecosystems and people.

We focus on combining natural and social sciences to understand complex conservation issues and design effective interventions to conserve biodiversity. Our staff have outstanding international research profiles, yet integrate this with considerable on-the-ground experience working in collaboration with conservation agencies around the world. This blend of expertise ensures that our programmes deliver the skills and knowledge that are essential components of conservation implementation.

Our taught Master’s programmes cover topics in conservation management, policy, ecotourism and sustainable natural resource use. The research degree programmes (MSc by Research and PhD) encourage you to undertake original, high-quality research, which culminates in the submission of a thesis. Please visit our website (http://www.kent.ac.uk/sac/) for new programmes that may be under development that further integrate conservation policy and practice.

Research areas

Worldwide research
Recent or current projects cover topics such as:

- understanding adaptation to climate change; ringneck parakeets in the UK

- improved management of socio-ecological landscapes in Western Ghats

- cost, benefits and trade-offs in creating large conservation areas

- monitoring population trends in tigers and their prey in Kirinci Seblat National Park, Sumatra

- chameleon trade and conservation in Madagascar

- conservation genetics of the critically endangered Seychelles paradise flycatcher

- traditional knowledge, intellectual property rights and protected area management

- the economic value of mammals in Britain

- estimating extinction dates of plants, birds and mammals.

Careers

DICE programmes combine academic theory with practical field experience to develop graduates who are highly employable within government, NGOs and the private sector.

Our alumni progress into a wide range of organisations across the world. Examples include: consultancy for a Darwin Initiative project in West Sumatra; Wildlife Management Officer in Kenya; Chief of the Biodiversity Unit – UN Environment Programme; Research and Analysis Programme Leader for TRAFFIC; Freshwater Programme Officer, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN); Head of the Ecosystem Assessment Programme, United Nations Environment Programme-World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC); Community Based Natural Resource Manager, WWF; Managing Partner, Althelia Climate Fund; and Programme Officer, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Today more than ever, quantitative skills form an essential basis for successful careers in ecology, conservation, and animal and human health. Read more
Today more than ever, quantitative skills form an essential basis for successful careers in ecology, conservation, and animal and human health. This Masters programme provides specific training in data collection, modelling and statistical analyses as well as generic research skills. It is offered by the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine (IBAHCM), a grouping of top researchers who focus on combining field data with computational and genetic approaches to solve applied problems in epidemiology and conservation.

Why this programme

-This programme encompasses key skills in monitoring and assessing biodiversity critical for understanding the impacts of environmental change.
-It covers quantitative analyses of ecological and epidemiological data critical for animal health and conservation.
-You will have the opportunity to base your independent research projects at the University field station on Loch Lomond (for freshwater or terrestrial-based projects); Millport field station on the Isle of Cumbria (for marine projects); or Cochno farm in Glasgow (for research based on farm animals). We will also assist you to gain research project placements in zoos or environmental consulting firms whenever possible.
-The uniqueness of the programme is the opportunity to gain core skills and knowledge across a wide range of subjects, which will enhance future career opportunities, including entrance into competitive PhD programmes. For example, there are identification based programmes offered elsewhere, but most others do not combine practical field skills with molecular techniques, advanced informatics for assessing biodiversity based on molecular markers, as well as advanced statistics and modelling. Other courses in epidemiology are rarely ecologically focused; the specialty in IBAHCM is understanding disease ecology, in the context of both animal conservation and implications for human public health.
-You will be taught by research-active staff using the latest approaches in quantitative methods, sequence analysis, and practical approaches to assessing biodiversity, and you will have opportunites to actively participate in internationally recognised research. Some examples of recent publications lead by students in the programme: Blackburn, S., Hopcraft, J. G. C., Ogutu, J. O., Matthiopoulos, J. and Frank, L. (2016), Human-wildlife conflict, benefit sharing and the survival of lions in pastoralist community-based conservancies. J Appl Ecol. doi:10.1111/1365-2664.12632. Rysava, K., McGill, R. A. R., Matthiopoulos, J., and Hopcraft, J. G. C. (2016) Re-constructing nutritional history of Serengeti wildebeest from stable isotopes in tail hair: seasonal starvation patterns in an obligate grazer. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom., 30:1461-1468. doi: 10.1002/rcm.7572. Ferguson, E.A., Hampson, K., Cleaveland, S., Consunji, R., Deray, R., Friar, J., Haydon, D. T., Jimenez, J., Pancipane, M. and Townsend, S.E., 2015. Heterogeneity in the spread and control of infectious disease; consequences for the elimination of canine rabies. Scientific Reports, 5, p. 18232. doi: 10.1038/srep18232.
-A unique strength of the University of Glasgow for many years has been the strong ties between veterinarians and ecologists, which has now been formalised in the formation of the IBAHCM. This direct linking is rare but offers unique opportunities to provide training that spans both fundamental and applied research.

Programme structure

The programme provides a strong grounding in scientific writing and communication, statistical analysis, and experimental design. It is designed for flexibility, to enable you to customise a portfolio of courses suited to your particular interests.

You can choose from a range of specialised options that encompass key skills in:
-Monitoring and assessing biodiversity – critical for understanding the impacts of environmental change
-Quantitative analyses of ecological and epidemiological data – critical for animal health and conservation
-Ethics and legislative policy – critical for promoting humane treatment of both captive and wild animals.

Core courses
-Key research skills (scientific writing, introduction to R, advanced linear models, experimental design and power analysis)
-Measuring biodiversity and abundance
-Programming in R
-Independent research project

Optional courses
-Molecular analyses for biodiversity and conservation
-Biodiversity informatics
-Molecular epidemiology and phylodynamics
-Infectious disease ecology and the dynamics of emerging disease
-Single-species population models
-Multi-species models
-Spatial and network processes in ecology & epidemiology
-Introduction to Bayesian statistics
-Freshwater sampling techniques
-Invertebrate identification
-Vertebrate identification
-Human Dimensions of Conservation
-Principles of Conservation Ecology
-Protected Area Management
-Animal welfare science
-Legislation related to animal welfare
-Enrichment of animals in captive environments
-Care of captive animals
-Biology of suffering
-Assessment of physiological state

Career prospects

You will gain core skills and knowledge across a wide range of subjects that will enhance your selection chances for competitive PhD programmes. In addition to academic options, career opportunities include roles in zoos, environmental consultancies, government agencies, ecotourism and conservation biology, and veterinary or public health epidemiology.

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The research areas are agreed between the research students, the Director of Studies and the second supervisor. Student research and study is supported by the supervisory team and Research Graduate School. Read more

About the course

The research areas are agreed between the research students, the Director of Studies and the second supervisor. Student research and study is supported by the supervisory team and Research Graduate School. Students are encouraged to undertake research philosophies and methods units from the taught postgraduate courses, as well as specialist units relevant to their specific research area.

Key features

-Independent but academically supported tourism research degrees
-Students are encouraged to present their research at external conferences and internal seminars
-International atmosphere

Career opportunities

Past tourism research degree students have gained employment in the public, private and third (NGO) sectors. Positions include government tourism and planning ministries, universities, consultancies, conservation and sustainability, and academia.

The University welcomes research degree applications in the following areas:

-Climate change and tourism
-Poverty reduction and tourism
-Sustainable tourism development
-Ecotourism
-Protected area management and tourism
-Environment ethics
-Cultural tourism, citizenship and identity
-Diaspora and tourism

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The Aberystwyth LLM in International Commercial Law and Human Rights will give you a firm academic understanding of the ever-changing realities of the current global economy and its often conflicted engagement with internationally protected human rights. Read more
The Aberystwyth LLM in International Commercial Law and Human Rights will give you a firm academic understanding of the ever-changing realities of the current global economy and its often conflicted engagement with internationally protected human rights. During your International Commercial Law and Human Rights LLM you will study subjects such as the law relating to transnational commerce, competition, business cartels, as well as engaging with the complex implications of how such law conflicts with individual or group enjoyment of human rights. You will even have the opportunity to study some of the emerging law and policy in this area.

You will benefit from the knowledge and experience of members of Aberystwyth University's Law and Criminology Department. You will also benefit from having your course materials augmented by lawyers from other academic institutions and private practice in the United Kingdom. By undertaking this course, you will strengthen your rigorous analytical skills, your abilities in argument formation and your capacity for independent thought.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/international-commercial-law-human-rights-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you want to study an area of law with urgent contemporary significance and practical relevance
- If you would enjoy studying the legal interaction between two significant areas of human experience
- If you wish to develop a critical appreciation of legal responses to human rights and business issues
- If you wish to nurture a legal career within government, non-governmental or corporate structures

Course detail

The LLM in International Commercial Law and Human Rights will challenge you to master these two fascinating and complex subjects as they compete, cooperate and conflict on an international level. You will get to grips with balancing the rival demands of protecting human rights and promoting business interest through law provision. You will also complete an advanced and in-depth study of subjects including competition law to control monopoly and aggressive business practices to ensure the protection of human rights.

An important part of the course is the writing of a detailed dissertation within the specialism of your choice. This is your opportunity to select a project topic which may have a direct bearing on your professional life. Previous LLM students at Aberystwyth have found this opportunity to be invaluable in establishing a successful career.

The course will be particularly attractive to those seeking a career in government departments, transnational corporations, corporate and rights lobby groups, international law firms and a range of non-governmental organisations.

The Department of Law and Criminology recently participated in the Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 96.5% of publications submitted were of of an internationally recognised standard and that 98% of research activity in the department was rated as internationally recognised.

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of; research proposals including a related bibliographic element, case studies, oral assessments and essays. Each student will complete a Master’s dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words which deals with an area of chosen study in the third semester.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. Your LLM will place you in the jobs market as a rigorous legal professional armed with impressive expertise in the latest developments in lawmaking for the turbulent global economy and internationally protected human rights. In addition, this course will help you to master key skills that are required in almost every postgraduate workplace. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation so that you can tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence.

Key Skills and Competencies:

- Study Skills:
You will learn to quickly assemble, assimilate and interpret a wealth of legal information and you will refine your professional practices by engagement with multiple case studies. You will learn how to deploy your knowledge to assert your expertise and build your legal argument. These skills in analysis and discourse, supported by your improved academic rigour, will stand you in good stead throughout your course and beyond into employment.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at LLM level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

- Transferable Skills:
The LLM programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that apply in many employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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Life and plant science undergraduates, and professionals in commercial horticulture and agriculture looking to develop their career, from the UK and overseas, will benefit from a broad, research-led syllabus. Read more
Life and plant science undergraduates, and professionals in commercial horticulture and agriculture looking to develop their career, from the UK and overseas, will benefit from a broad, research-led syllabus. Taught content will equip the graduate with the expertise needed to work independently in a range of areas of current commercial plant science, at supervisory or management level, or in applied research. As well as ensuring a thorough grounding in basic science and horticultural technology, the modern molecular biology content is particularly relevant, since new technologies are rapidly entering the commercial arena. The independent research project will be set in a research institution or appropriate local industry, and will be designed around the student's interests and expertise.

The MSc focuses on methods used in the evaluation and improvement of conventional crops that feed the growing world population, but also alternative protected crops and ornamentals along with postharvest management, business and environmental concerns, and plant stress and disease in a changing climate.

Experts in this increasingly important area are needed in businesses nationally and internationally, in research and innovation, and at government and agency level where the ability to understand and follow current developments is required to guide and direct global sustainable solutions to population change.

The aims of the programme are:
• To provide knowledge of the science of plant biology and its application in the commercial and research arena
• To introduce the practicalities of horticulture and agriculture technologies including consideration of sustainability
• To examine the commercial aspects of this business area, including the planning, execution and evaluation of trials to exploit and develop novel approaches, practices, and crops
• To allow the student to synthesise, evaluate and critically judge which technologies and research findings are of value and appropriate to their current or future employment environment in a UK or international setting.

Visit the website http://www.gre.ac.uk/pg/engsci/aps

Food and Agricultural Sciences

The Natural Resources Institute (NRI) has an internationally-recognised academic reputation and provides taught postgraduate courses in a wonderful environment for students.

NRI provide research, consultancy, training and advisory services to underpin sustainable development, economic growth and poverty reduction. The majority of our activities focus on the harnessing of natural and human capital for the benefit of developing countries, though much of our expertise has proved to be of growing relevance to industrialised nations.

What you'll study

• Molecular and plant biology principles for plant improvement
• Research methods in plant science
• Independent research project
• Plant growth and cropping technology

Options:
• Agroforestry
• Agronomy and crop physiology
• Applications and aspects of commercial crop science
• Food and markets
• Planning for personal and professional development
• Plant disease management

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Examinations, coursework, research project dissertation.

Specialist equipment/facilities

Molecular biology laboratories, horticultural and agricultural facilities

Career options

Production managers - management of plant/crop production (protected and non-protected crops) and postharvest facilities.

Development specialists - selection, development and evaluation of existing and novel plants and crops.

Retailing produce - food and crop technologists, retailing food and non-food derived crops and products, including fresh produce and postharvest technologists.

Institutes, NGOs and governmental bodies - governance and policy linked to application of horticultural/agricultural technologies.

Applied research scientist - application of plant science into practice.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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The Environmental Social Science programmes are interdepartmental and benefit from expertise found across the Faculty of Social Sciences. Read more
The Environmental Social Science programmes are interdepartmental and benefit from expertise found across the Faculty of Social Sciences.

Social science perspectives are crucial to understanding and solving environmental problems. Human behaviour produces many elements of the ‘natural’ environment, fromlandscapes to floods and famines. Local and national policies and international agreements regulate the environmental practices of corporations, governments and households. The social sciences have a great deal to contribute to understanding what have become defined as environmental issues, and what measures can most effectively tackle them.

The multidisciplinary Environmental Social Science programmes draw on the contributions of Anthropology, Conservation and Ecology, Law, Social Policy and Sociology. In each of these disciplines, Kent is very active in research, and the majority of research outputs were rated “internationally excellent” or better in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise. The programmes therefore build upon a strong base.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/14/environmental-social-science

Study support

Research programmes involve writing a thesis on a particular topic with specialist supervision. You are given research training, which is tailored to the particular needs of your research and takes into account any training you have previously received. You also have opportunities to attend modules on relevant subjects on a non-assessed basis to fill any gaps in your background.

We offer research supervision across a broad range of topics. We are especially interested in applications that include proposals to investigate the social dimensions of environmental issues in the countries in which we have area expertise, and topics in environmental politics and environmental movements.

Postgraduate resources
Our postgraduate students have access to dedicated office space within the Department and are able to take advantage of excellent library and computing facilities. Where appropriate, research students are encouraged to expand their experience by teaching part-time in the School.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Environmental Politics; Global Environmental Change; Human Organization; Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute; and Sociology of Health and Illness.

Researcher Development Programme
Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Research areas

We offer research supervision across a broad range of topics. We are especially interested in applications that include proposals to investigate the social dimensions of environmental issues in the countries in which we have area expertise, and topics in environmental politics and environmental movements.

Staff research interests

Kent’s world-class academics provide research students with excellent supervision. The academic staff in this school and their research interests are shown below. You are strongly encouraged to contact the school to discuss your proposed research and potential supervision prior to making an application. Please note, it is possible for students to be supervised by a member of academic staff from any of Kent’s schools, providing their expertise matches your research interests.

Full details of staff research interests can be found on the School's website (http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/staff/).

- Professor Adam Burgess:

Professor of Sociology
Communications; mass media; risk.

- Professor William Howarth:

Professor of Environmental Law
Environmental law; conservation of aquatic environment and ecosystems.

- Dr Jeremy Kendall:

Senior Lecturer in Social Policy
NGOs, charities, voluntary organisations and civil society.

- Dr Rajindra K Puri:

Senior Lecturer in Environmental Anthropology
Historical ecology; knowledge transmission; adaptation to climate change; wildlife trade; protected areas; South-east Asia; Borneo.

- Professor Christopher Rootes:

Professor of Environmental Politics and Political Sociology
Environmental politics; protest, social and political movements; environmental citizenship; politics of climate change.

- Dr Joy Zhang:

Lecturer in Sociology
Sociology of science, medicine, the environment and globalisation, especially in China.

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of Environmental Social Science is a particularly flexible and valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Recent graduates have gone on to pursue careers in environmental law, community projects, research, education, advocacy and social policy at both local and central government levels.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The Law Conversion Course - Legal Studies Common Professional Exam (CPE) is an accredited conversion course for non-law graduates aiming for a professional career in law. Read more
The Law Conversion Course - Legal Studies Common Professional Exam (CPE) is an accredited conversion course for non-law graduates aiming for a professional career in law. It satisfies all the requirements of the professional bodies including the Bar Standards Board and Solicitors Regulation Authority.

Transform your career

With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students. Study law in the heart of the capital - connected and convenient, with excellent transport options and a short walk from the Royal Courts of Justice.

Steps to becoming a solicitor or barrister

On successfully completing the CPE you are eligible to enter the Legal Practice Course (for intending solicitors) or the Bar Professional Training Course (for intending barristers), which has some additional entry requirements including an aptitude test and English language proficiency.

Experienced tutors

The course is taught by an experienced team of tutors most of whom are solicitors or barristers which provides you with invaluable insight into the details of legal principals and real case examples.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/law-conversion-legal-pgdip-cpe

Modules

You'll study seven modules required by the professional bodies for students intending to apply for the Legal Practice Course (LPC) or Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC):

- Introduction to the English legal system
You'll be introduced to the basic structure of the English Legal System and the essential aspects of civil and criminal litigation. You'll explore sources of law and key skills such as statutory interpretation, reading of law reports and the concept of judicial precedent. This introductory course will assist you in the study of the core modules, where legal skills will be developed further.

- Law of the European Union
Law of the European Union reflects the importance of EU law in the English Legal system. It is important to the management of the UK economy and relevant to the financial practitioners in the City. Business leader's decisions are influenced by EU competition law. It is important to migrants and practitioners of immigration law, to consumers and trading standards officials, to all employees through employment law and to all of us in relation to the environment.

- Obligations 1 (law of contract)
This module covers the principles of English contract law, sources, development, application in context and reform and includes reference to European developments. Contract is treated from formation to discharge and remedies with underlying concepts, rationales and influences and its relation to other forms of liability. Through the subject treatment, particularly examination of judicial reasoning and legislative technique, knowledge and skills are taught and/or developed. Skills include problem-solving, critical evaluation, reasoned argument and communication.

- Obligations 2 (law of tort)
You'll learn about civil liability in tort, focusing on an in-depth analysis of negligence, employers' liability for accidents at work, occupiers' liability for dangerous premises, manufacturers' liability for dangerous products, defences and vicarious liability. You'll develop your legal skills by reading and critically analysing cases and will apply your knowledge to complex, yet everyday, problem scenarios. You'll be encouraged to become critical and independent thinkers, and to communicate your ideas and awareness of the role of policy and the need for reform in the law of tort. In addition to its importance as an area of academic interest, tort is of practical significance to the intending practitioner, featuring heavily in the case scenarios of Legal Practice and Bar Professional Courses, as well as in everyday legal practice.

- Public law
You'll study the fundamental laws, practices and principles of Public law which define and influence the relationship between the individual and the state as characterised by various governmental institutions in the UK. Detailed consideration is given to the fundamental mechanisms by which human rights are protected and government is subject to legal and political accountability. Various skills are developed including those of analysis, critical evaluation and problem solving.

- Land law
Land law is a study of relationships. You'll study the relationship between the land and the rights which can exist in or over it, the relationship between the various persons who own an estate or interest over the land or want to defeat the competing interests in or over the land. You'll look at the rights and duties of each party to that relationship, how these relationships co-exit and what happens when the relationships come into conflict. Land Law governs the relative priorities enjoyed by two or more interests concerning the same piece of land. Land Law creates clear rules and formalities as to how the owner of an interest in land can acquire, transfer or extinguish that interest in land. You'll study the interests over land which Land Law is prepared to recognise and how these interests must be protected to ensure enforceability against third parties.

- Criminal law
This module aims to develop your ability to analyse and critically evaluate problems in Criminal Law so that you become independent and reflective legal practitioners able to contribute to public debate on legal issues. The main areas taught are: murder, manslaughter, non-fatal offences against the person including sexual offences and a variety of property offences including theft and fraud, accomplice liability and inchoate offences. You'll have additional support by way of on-line quizzes and narrated summaries.

- Equity and trusts
Principles of Equity are vital in the administration of justice. The 'trust' is a legal doctrine developed from those principles of equity which is fundamental to the commercial, business and employment worlds (pensions) and to individuals in the gifting of their property (personal trusts; wills).

- Project module
The project module satisfies the requirement of the academic stage of legal education that one other area of legal study must be successfully undertaken in addition to the seven modules which constitute the "Foundations of Legal Knowledge." It comprises the completion of a 4000 word extended essay, under the supervision of a member of the academic staff, based on the analysis of legal literature which takes differing interpretations over an issue related to law or its underlying theories. Its aim is to foster the development of the key elements of legal reasoning and legal method, research methods used in the conduct of autonomous research in law or law related topics as well as the development of skills in relation to the review and evaluation of journal articles, advanced texts and other secondary legal material.
Dissertation for the award of LLM

- Dissertation (LLM only)
This is an optional module as it is not required to complete the academic stage of legal education and so is not required to obtain the postgraduate diploma in legal studies and the common professional examination. Its successful completion is required to obtain the LLM. A prerequisite to undertake this module is the successful completion and award of the postgraduate diploma in legal studies and the common professional examination. It comprises the completion of a 15,000 word Master's level dissertation under the supervision of an appropriate academic member of staff. It requires the student to independently conceive, plan and execute an appropriate piece of research based on firm academic and theoretical foundations. The module builds upon the research skills already acquired in the successful completion of the postgraduate diploma in legal studies and common professional examination.

Assessment

Most modules are assessed by exams, exams plus coursework or presentations.

Award
X8 modules = PgDip + CPE
X8 modules and dissertation = LLM

Employability

- Solicitor or Barrister
This course can lead to one of many careers in law from a professional qualification as solicitor or barrister to a wide variety of careers in both public and private sectors.

While our graduates may go on to join professional courses leading to qualification as a solicitor or barrister, the Diploma is also useful for numerous jobs that value skills in analysis, clear communication, efficient organisation and reasoned persuasion.

- BSB and SRA
This course is fully recognised by the Bar Standards Board and Solicitors Regulation Authority and constitutes completion of the Academic Stage of Training for the purposes of further study on either the Legal Practice Course (for intending solicitors) or the Bar Professional Training Course for intending barristers (with additional entry requirements including an aptitude test and English language proficiency).

LLM Progression

Unlike a Graduate Diploma in Law our PgDip Legal Studies plus CPE is a postgraduate level qualification. After successfully completing the course you'll accumulate sufficient postgraduate credits to be eligible to submit for the further award of LLM by dissertation.

The LLM is an optional qualification additional to your Postgraduate Diploma in Legal Studies. To obtain the LLM you must successfully complete a supervised 15,000 word dissertation for which preparation has already been undertaken by your successful completion of the project module forming part of the programme leading to the PgDip Legal Studies plus CPE. The Masters dissertation is usually submitted in the semester following completion of the PgDip Legal Studies plus CPE. You'll not be required to attend classes when researching and writing your dissertation and you'll therefore be able to enrol on the Legal Practice Course or Bar Professional Training Course in the September following the successful completion of the PgDip in Legal Studies.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Teaching and learning

The primary aims of the course are to ensure that you achieve a sound understanding of English law covered in the seven foundation subjects, which provides a solid grasp of the structure and operation of the English legal system.

Classes consist of a mixture of lectures and smaller group meetings where exam technique and problem solving approaches are practiced. The course is well supported by online materials and search resources, which can be accessed off-campus.

You'll have free access to OUP Law TROVE to access books for all foundation subjects.

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Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, this course offers you an exciting opportunity to train in the discipline of wildlife forensics, in which the University of Chester is a pioneer. Read more
Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, this course offers you an exciting opportunity to train in the discipline of wildlife forensics, in which the University of Chester is a pioneer. Wildlife conservation is increasingly urgent in today’s world. With this comes a growing demand for people with specialist academic and practical skills to apply to this problem - something that this course looks to address.

Why Study Applied Wildlife Forensics with us?

We offer this novel area of wildlife conservation in a short course to update or further develop your existing skills. This will be done through the sharing of our expertise in field and lab-based research.

Our staff are passionately involved in pioneering projects, and have helped to lead the development of Wildlife Forensics as an academic subject area, having held the first international conference in October 2010. You will have the opportunity to work closely with staff in this exciting area.

What will I learn?

You will study Wildlife Crime, supported by Conservation Genetics – two disciplines in which the Department has been a pioneer. You will also have the key opportunity to deepen your analytical techniques through the Biodiversity Informatics offering.

How will I be taught?

Teaching is delivered through Moodle, internet discussion boards, and residential school. Residential school includes lectures, lab sessions, field trips and tutorials. Your learning will include tutor-led, self-directed and peer-based learning.

Sessions are typically delivered over a 10-week period; however, some modules are delivered through week-long workshop/lab sessions or field trips.

Modules typically require 200 hours of study time, including:
- 21 hours of lectures, seminars, group discussions and laboratory/ field activities
- 10 hours of tutorial support
- 169 hours of directed self-study.

How will I be assessed?

Assessment is via continuous assessment ­ – e.g. lab/essay assignments; critical assessments/reviews; reports; in-class individual/group oral presentations; portfolios and preparation and presentation of posters. There are no examinations.

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please go to: https://www1.chester.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-visit-opportunities

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus at: http://prospectus.chester.ac.uk/form.php

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Exploring the principles of marine ecology and management, the dynamics of marine ecosystems and how human activity affects the marine environment. Read more
Exploring the principles of marine ecology and management, the dynamics of marine ecosystems and how human activity affects the marine environment.

Overview

The relationships between coastal and marine ecosystems and human activity make for fascinating study.

With a worldwide consensus that the marine environment needs better management there is a growing demand for people who have been trained in marine resource management. This MSc will equip you to work for a wide range of marine environmental organisations or to progress to a PhD.

Course Content

Our MSc in Marine Environmental Management provides exceptional teaching across a range of marine management modules. You'll be introduced to different marine ecosystems, key species and the impact of humans, now and in the past.

You'll get a chance to examine contemporary marine issues, including:
-Problems associated with fishing including: over-fishing, bycatch, habitat destruction and illegal fishing
-Aquaculture
-How a multitude of human activities affect marine ecosystems
-Marine protected areas.

You'll undertake two research dissertations: one based in York, the other with an external organization.

Modules
For the Masters you will need to take a 80 credits of taught modules as well as 50 credits for your dissertation and 50 credits for your summer placement. There are two core modules, giving 30 of your 80 required taught credits:
-Fisheries Ecology and Management (10 credits)
-Research Skills and Statistical Methods (20 credits)

You'll also choose 50 credits from a range of optional modules:
-Marine Ecosystems (10 credits)
-Ocean and Coastal Science (10 credits)
-Spatial Analysis (10 credits)
-Maldives (10 credits) - requires at least 12 students to run and incurs additional cost
-Current Research in Marine Conservation (10 credits)
-Environmental Impact Assessment (10 credits)
-Ecotoxicology (10 credits)
-Biodiversity Conservation and Protected Areas (10 credits)
-Environmental Governance (10 credits)

Your 5,000 word dissertation is chance to explore in depth a research project in an area that interests you. You can design your own dissertation in consultation with potential supervisors or you can chose from a list compiled by the department.

Before you submit your dissertation you'll give a presentation that summarises your work and allows you to get some feedback on your progress.

Careers

This course is for people who want to work in marine conservation or marine resource management. Potential employers will value the experience you'll get on your placement. The MSc is also an ideal basis for progression to a PhD.

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