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​This programme focuses on the application of the key principles of multidisciplinary public health practice to the breadth of 21st Century public health challenges. Read more

Course Overview

​This programme focuses on the application of the key principles of multidisciplinary public health practice to the breadth of 21st Century public health challenges. Our aim is to develop reflective public health practitioners capable of designing, implementing and evaluating community-focussed public health interventions – in Wales, the UK and internationally.

In this programme we will challenge your preconceptions and practice, developing your knowledge, skills and competences, helping you develop as a reflective public health practitioner. We place a strong emphasis on your own area of practice, and encourage you to base your studies on the issues and situations you face in your own field.

The programme has been designed to meet the needs of a wide range of public health practitioners, professionals, community workers and volunteers working to achieve improvements in the wider determinants of health. Our objective is to support you in further developing your public health knowledge and skills in order to improve your current and future practice, and enhance your career options.

The programme is aimed at anyone with an interest in improving the full range of social, economic and environmental determinants of health: for example, people working in education, health promotion, housing, transport, leisure, environmental health, community development, health & wellbeing partnerships, planning, social services, school nursing, and health visiting (not an exhaustive list!). We welcome applicants from all sectors: public, private and the voluntary & independent sector. The programme retains an international focus, addressing public health issues faced around the world, as well as in Wales and the UK.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/health/courses/Pages/Applied-Public-Health---MSc.aspx

​Course Content​​

The course is designed as a Masters programme but it has exit points at both postgraduate certificate & diploma level. Reflective practice is integrated into the programme: we’ll encourage you to reflect upon your learning as you progress, culminating in an assessed reflective statement demonstrating the integration and development of your learning and practice through the course of your studies. The dissertation also incorporates a reflective practice element. The programme is available on a part-time and full-time basis; you can also apply to study individual modules on a CPD basis.

For the Postgraduate Certificate, you’ll complete the following modules:
- Assessing Health, Wellbeing & Inequity (20 cred​its): Assess, evaluate and communicate information about the health and wellbeing of populations & communities

- Health Risk Perception & Communication (10 credits): Appraise the sociocultural, emotional and psychological factors that influence responses to threats to population health and wellbeing

- Public Health Policy Development (10 credits): Evaluate the political, social and economic framework within which policies influencing health & wellbeing are developed

- Applied Research Methods and Design (20 credits): Develop the qualitative and quantitative research skills necessary to undertake research and evaluate interventions and day-to-day practice.

For the Postgraduate Diploma, you’ll undertake the above modules, plus the following modules:
- Frameworks for Public Health Intervention (30 credits): Explore approaches to intervention for the protection and improvement of health and wellbeing, and integrate learning from across the programme in the development a coherent multidisciplinary intervention on an identified public health issue.

- Health Protection (20 credits): Assess, prevent and manage risks to health arising from the general environment, communicable disease and environmental health hazards.

- Reflective Public Health Practice (10 credits): Reflect on your learning, practice and experiences in order to evidence the development of your professional public health practice.

To obtain the MSc, you will also complete a Dissertation (60 credits): Design, plan and undertake a piece of independent applied research, and present the findings.

Learning & Teaching​

- ​Course Delivery
Attendance for taught modules is usually one evening per week (part time) or two evenings per week (full time). SHS7000 Applied Research Methods & Design is currently delivered as a blended learning module over four contact days, two days in the autumn term (October) and two further days in the spring term (February), supported by e-learning materials and activities. The APH7008 Health Protection module follows a similar approach, being taught via three 2-day short courses spread through the academic year (November, February, April), plus an assessment day in May.
During your dissertation studies, you will attend research project workshops and be allocated individual supervision time. These usually begin in March (of the 2nd year of study for part-time students).

- Learning & Teaching Activities
The teaching and learning strategy for the programme places a strong emphasis on application of theoretical frameworks to real problems and situations, and allows for substantial student input and discussion. During the programme you will engage with a variety of learning & teaching activities, including:

- Lectures
Lectures will be used to provide you with a framework of ideas and theory, into which you can fit material obtained from independent study and tutorials. Whilst lectures are seen as opportunities for imparting key information they are also intended to be interactive, and debate is encouraged.

- Seminars
These will provide you with the opportunity to discuss problems related to specific subjects. Group seminars will enable you to share experiences and discuss, analyse and evaluate possible solutions.

- Workshops
Tasks will be set requiring you to work together to develop problem solving strategies and to analyse issues.

- Student Symposia
Learning activities led by students will form part of the programme. You will be required to develop and present short papers and facilitate discussion relating to specific issues.

- Case Studies
These sessions will present a case for discussion based on previous events, and you’ll be expected to analyse the situation and suggest appropriate public health interventions in response. These studies will be aimed at improving your skills with respect to the analysis of problems and the synthesis and evaluation of solutions.
Preparation for such a case study may include the following:
- Presentation of available data and information about the case.
- Group discussions, tutorial and individual learning to enable you to identify the problem and synthesise possible solutions.
- Discussions and lectures with relevant professionals to understand the rationale behind the adoption of specific solutions.
- Debriefing by way of tutorials and seminars.

- Contact Time and Self-Directed Learning
The direct contact time between student and tutor varies from module to module. Generally, unless otherwise stated on the module guide, 10 credit modules will include up to 18 hours contact time and 20 credit modules will include up to 36 hours contact time. An exception to the above is APH7010 Frameworks for Public Health Intervention, which includes student-led group work supported by keynote lectures.

In addition to direct contact time you are generally expected to undertake a further 3-4 hours of self-directed learning for every 1 hour of contact time.

- Introduction to Academic Skills
Included within the introduction to the programme is an introduction to the academic skills needed to study at Masters level. This includes the provision of specific e-learning material, a formative assignment and access to a Personal Tutor.

- Moodle
You can access programme material both on and off campus via Moodle, the University’s virtual learning environment. This includes access to lecture presentations, recommended and required reading, group forums, e-portfolios and a range of other learning and teaching resources specific to the modules and programme.

- Personal Tutors & Professional Development
In addition to a general open door policy, we encourage you to meet with the Programme Director and tutors regularly throughout the programme to discuss feedback on assignments and the development of academic skills.
You’ll be an allocated a Personal Tutor at the beginning of the programme, who you can work with to develop your academic skills and consider how you can integrate your learning experiences with your own professional development needs and aspirations. Your aspirations for professional development will be discussed during the induction to the programme. Support and guidance will then be tailored throughout the programme to ensure that you are best able to fulfil your chosen professional development needs.

Assessment

To reflect the applied nature of study, the programme contains no unseen written examinations. Instead, teaching and assessment will focus on case studies, exercises & scenarios reflecting contemporary issues in public health practice, often located within your own professional experience and environment. Examples of assessment tasks include: reports, essays, briefings, oral presentations, group work, observed practice scenarios, online tests and posters.

Throughout the programme, the assessment tasks we set will encourage you to select specific topics of study that are relevant to your interests and practice. For example, in the Assessing Health, Wellbeing and Inequity module, you will be asked to assess and evaluate the health and wellbeing of a specified population (in general or focussed on a specific issue/range of issues). You’ll be free to select a population and issue of professional and/or personal interest to you.

Employability & Careers​

The promotion, protection and improvement of public health are key objectives for the Welsh Government, UK Government and at an international level, as exemplified by the WHO Commission on the Social Determinants of Health.

Our programme is closely mapped to Levels 6 & 7 of the Public Health Skills & Knowledge Framework - the recognised competence framework for public health at all levels in the UK. The programme provides the underpinning knowledge to enable you to pursue UK Public Health Practitioner registration (which requires completion of an assessed portfolio through a recognised development scheme, such as that operated by Public Health Wales – see http://www.wales.nhs.uk/sitesplus/888/page/49062 for details). We are also working on a project with Public Health Wales to develop and pilot a scheme to enable recognition of Advanced Practice (Public Health), supported by work-based learning.

If you'd like to find out more about career development opportunities in public health, we strongly recommend the PHORCAST website - http://www.phorcast.org.uk/.

Graduates from the programme have progressed to advanced positions in their chosen specialist career areas. Examples of roles our graduates have attained include:
- Project lead for Safeguarding, Public Health Wales
- Director of Business Performance for a large UK voluntary organisation
- Senior Project Co-ordinator, mental health charity
- Public Health Fellow (American India Association) and Project Manager, Tata Steel Rural Development Society
- Senior Public Health Practitioner, Public Health Wales
- Community Health Advocate
- Environmental Health Team Leader, Welsh local authority
- Program Manager, Maternal and Child Health, Pakistan non-profit organisation
- Data and Information Officer, research funding organisation
- Project Co-ordinator, community regeneration charity
- Lecturer in Health, Wellbeing and Sport, Welsh university
- Service Improvement/Change Manager at NHS Wales

Graduates have also progressed to further study on research degrees leading to MPhil and PhD qualifications.

The programme team are currently investigating opportunities for accrediting the programme with the International Union for Health Promotion and Education (http://www.iuhpe.org) and the Agency for Public Health Education Accreditation (http://www.aphea.net/). We will provide further updates on this process as it progresses.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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IN BIOFORCE. 1) Opening Sessions. Objectives. To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme. Read more

Modules Contents and Objectives

IN BIOFORCE

1) Opening Sessions

Objectives: To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme.

Contents: Bioforce presentation. Introduction of the learning programme and objectives.

2) Immersion Internship

Objectives: To facilitate group cohesiveness and participant involvement within the programme.
To make a detailed presentation of the components of the MSc in HPM.
To encourage a joint reflection about humanitarian and development issues.
Show awareness of its own strengths and limitations as a humanitarian programme manager.

Contents: Presentation, preparation and organization of the immersion internships. Discussion and group work on Humanitarian topics.

3) Framework of Humanitarian Aid

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with thorough knowledge of the humanitarian sector and issues at stake: stakeholders, systems, coordination mechanisms, legal and ethical framework, Q&A initiatives and applications relating to programme management.

Contents: Humanitarian actors, systems and challenges. International humanitarian law, ethics & principles. Quality & Accountability initiatives, methods & practical tools.

4) Managing People & Organisations

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage themselves, other people, and organisations involved in humanitarian programmes.

Contents: Strengthening organisational capacity. Change management. Quality & Accountability in people management. Creating & developing trust in diverse teams. HR processes : HR organisation, recruitment, performance management, staff development. How to lead: leadership, management & delegation. Managing team safety and security.

5) Managing Programmes & Projects

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage all stages of the project cycle in humanitarian contexts.

Contents: Programme Cycle Management (PCM):

- Assessment & analysis
- Planning & implementation
- Monitoring & evaluation

Cross-cutting issues in PCM (participation, targeting...) Quality & Accountability in programme management.

6) Managing Finance & Funding

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the critical skills and confidence required to raise funds for humanitarian programmes, and to manage financial resources accountably.

Contents: Donors & donor strategies. Quality & Accountability in finance management. Budgeting & proposal writing. Funding strategies & opportunities. Key principles & concepts of financial management. Practical aspects of financial management.

7) Training of Trainers for Capacity Building in the Sector

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the appropriate methods & tools to develop, facilitate, monitor & evaluate capacity building activities.

Contents: Designing & implementing training activities.

8) Field Exercise

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Develop, through a field scenario-based exercise, operational capacity and autonomy of the trainees.

Contents : Within an operational framework, students will have to implement capabilities developed during the training period. The exercise is based on 5 days role play scenario. Students are placed in the position of aid actors in a context of humanitarian/emergency intervention. They have to implement several programs in the field on behalf of different NGOs. They operate in a complex emergency context where multiple players are involved.

IN ESC GRENOBLE

NB : For the ESC Students it is possible to follow “English track programme” described bellow or to follow a second semester in an English spoken abroad university.
For the other students, they must follow the “English track programme”.

1) Advanced Decision Techniques

Objectives/Learning outcomes: Good knowledge of quantitative tools for decision-making.

Contents: This course presents the main quantitative modelling and simulation tools to help in decision-making.

2) Strategy, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

This course focuses on the strategic choices: the decisions that shape the future of an organization. This course will address first the strategic choices that the manager must operate in an entrepreneurship environment (opportunity, business model design), then different options for development and growth patterns (growth internal / external growth, mergers and acquisitions, alliances).

3) Corporate Governance

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, the students:

- will know how to position and use concepts and techniques in finance, accounting, management control and law learnt during the common core subjects in a more global framework of analysis,
- will have learnt the legislation covering corporate governance,
- will be aware of the present developments in practice and the principal discussions concerning corporate governance,
- will be able to establish a diagnosis on the quality of a company's corporate governance.

Contents: It is essential for every manager to understand who determines the objectives of corporations and of other organizations, how they are governed and how their managers are incentivized and monitored. The course covers the following themes: value creation, the legal rules and the practices of company management(remuneration, ethics, social responsibility, governance "codes"), the legal rights and the behaviour of shareholders, the impact of financial markets on governance (shareholders activism, takeovers, LBOs). In addition the students have the opportunity to apply the main concepts and techniques of finance, accounting and management control to the case of a listed company.

4) Geopolitics

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, students will be able to:

- acquire the basics of a geopolitical culture allowing them to develop a reading list for current geopolitical and economic affairs,
- understand the geopolitical conditions for undertaking business in certain emerging and/or risk-laden geopolitical situations.

Contents: The object of this course is to allow students to acquire knowledge about geopolitical and economic affairs in certain zones and emerging and risk-related countries in the world. During the course, the following themes will be covered:

- the globalisation of the economy and its players, notably national States, and international and non-governmental organisations,
- geopolitical and economic analysis of certain countries and zones: Brazil, Russia, China, the Mediterranean and Africa,
- the problems of Afghanistan and Pakistan will also be discussed,
- Europe will be studied through analysis of the different themes mentioned above.

5) Global Marketing and Strategy

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Students will be able to:

- critically analyse and propose well-justified solutions to key Global Marketing Strategy issues.
- develop a Strategic Marketing plan to go global.

Contents: This module takes a decision-making perspective to Marketing Strategy issues, specifically in the global context.

The course will cover:

- Globalization decision and process,
- International market selection,
- International marketing research,
- International market entry strategies and expansion,
- Standardization versus Adaptation of 4 Ps.

6) Leadership and Responsible Management

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of this course, students will:

- understand the organizational and managerial specificities of contemporary organizations,
- know about recent developments in organizational thinking relating to institutional theory, power and politics, routines, and organizational cognition,
- be able to reflect on the specific challenges to leadership and corporate social responsibility in contemporary organizations.

Contents: This course addresses key issues for understanding and managing contemporary organizations. It seeks to move beyond simple managerialist views by integrating recent developments in organizational thinking with the dual challenges of organizational leadership and corporate social responsibility. Topics covered in this course include institutionalized environments, innovation and entrepreneurship, social movements, networks and social capital, power and politics in contemporary organizations, organizational routines and decision making, sense making and cognition in organizations, and organizational change. Each topic will be introduced through case studies alongside theoretical readings, and each of the course sessions will discuss the consequences of these topics for both leadership processes and corporate social responsibility.
The course will be demanding in terms of class preparation, contribution and after-class work, and hopefully rewarding in terms of generating novel insights into contemporary organizational and managerial challenges.

Applied Research Project

During the whole training period, the students, divided into sub-groups of 2-3 students, work on a problematic related a strong issue in the humanitarian and development sector. It is an applied research which leads to a written report in English and its presentation before a jury composed by the tutor and the partner if possible and relevant. This applied research is an integral part of the training programme and it is monitored by a tutor.
The month of December will be specifically dedicated to work on this project.
During the second semester, even if students are abroad, they have to organize themselves to work on this project.
The grade given on this work will be included in the final transcript.

OBJECTIVE

To work as a team during the whole training period to sort out a humanitarian and/or development management issue.

This project will require:

- To write a report in English (20,000 – 25,000 words) which may remain confidential; it is possible to write a summary for the organisation in a foreign language if required. Students have to submit the final report to the tutor 15 days before the oral presentation. The deadline for the oral presentation is mid-november 2014 (15 November 2014);
- To write a case study-based summary;
- To prepare the oral presentation to the jury in English.

STUDENTS’ PROFILES

Students involved in this applied research are from the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management delivered by ESC Grenoble and Bioforce.

EXPECTED RESULTS

- A specific humanitarian and/or development management issue is defined.
- A bibliographical research is consolidated.
- Concrete proposals and outlooks are drawn up.
- A critical analysis is provided.
- Relevant recommendations are made.

The definition of the issue has to be validated by both Bioforce and ESC Grenoble. A specific deadline will be communicated by Bioforce.

Rigor in diagnostic, analysis and facts interpretations, as well as recommendations will be required.
This work aims to support organizations in their development and functioning. In this way, we expect students to be creative (while being realist) and to practice benchmarks. This research work is neither an operational mission nor a counseling one. The report presented is not an internship report.

EXEMPTION OF “GRAND MÉMOIRE” – FOR THE ESC STUDENTS

Usually, ESC Grenoble students have to write a “Grand mémoire” during their enrollment. As they already write a specific applied research report, they benefit from an exemption of this “Grand mémoire”.

Assignment

Students from the MSc in HPM have to realize an assignment, after their study period, during 20 weeks at least. The presentation before a jury must be done before the 15th of November 2014.
The aim of this assignment is to reinforce students’ autonomy and to further develop their skills as a humanitarian programme manager in the humanitarian and development sector.

Students are to submit to Bioforce assignment terms of reference in order to be validated. As a second step, the ESC Grenoble will give the final validation.

The ESC Grenoble is in charge of all administrative issues regarding the assignment.

The evaluation process for the assignment is the following:

- A written report including :
- a context (region, country, organisation, programme, …) presentation,
- a description and analysis of the objectives and results obtained,
- an analysis of the key challenges faced during the assignment,
- an analysis of the impact of the training period on their professional capacities as a humanitarian programme manager.

- An oral presentation before a jury.

The final mark will be a global mark including the written report and the oral presentation.

Assessment Process

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN BIOFORCE

The assessment process includes the following exams:

- An individual written exam for the “Managing people and organizations” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing programmes and projects” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing finance and funding” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN GRENOBLE ECOLE DE MANAGEMENT

It is a two-stage process:

- For each module, a continuous assessment is managed by a Grenoble Ecole de Management’s permanent professor.
- For some modules, an exam is organized.

To be successfully completed, the student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20. Each module’s responsible define the share of continuous assessment and exam.

CONDITIONS OF GRADUATION

The diploma is delivered to the students:

- Having obtained a minimum of 10 out of 20 to all exams;
- Having produced and supported the presentation of a report demonstrating analysis and synthesis skills.

Admission

To participate to the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management, the prerequisites are the following:

- Master 1 level or Bachelor’s degree (four years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying at least 1 year of professional experience as a project coordinator, administrator or logistician in international solidarity
- By special dispensation, a L3 (licence) level or Bachelor’s degree (three years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying an outstanding work experience (more than one year).
- have an English language proficiency level of B2 (according to European language levels - Self Assessment Grid).
- Have a profesional project in programme management (Programme coordinator, Logistics coordinator…)

Please note that these prerequisites provide a base for any validation of the application form. The final decision lies with the Coordinators of the training programme.”

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Occupational Therapy (OT) at Brunel is one of the largest, longest established, and most highly regarded programmes in the world. Read more

About the course

Occupational Therapy (OT) at Brunel is one of the largest, longest established, and most highly regarded programmes in the world. In fact, we are the original ‘London School of Occupational Therapy.’

The MSc Occupational Therapy (Pre-Registration) provides a Master's level route for graduates to become competent occupational therapists equipped for life-long, safe and effective practice within the global marketplace. This course is for those who are not already qualified as occupational therapists. It is a professional full-time programme, which will prepare you to become a competent occupational therapist in a variety of health and social care settings. It also allows students to be eligible to apply for:

Registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).
Membership of the British Association of Occupational Therapists/College of Occupational Therapists.

In December 2016 our programme was granted “Preaccreditation Status” by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE), which confirms that Brunel has successfully completed steps one and two in the three-step accreditation process – see more at AOTA OT Master's-Level Programs - Developing and visit our Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) information page.

The programme will now proceed with step three – the on-site evaluation, scheduled for April 2017, followed by an accreditation decision by mid-2017.

Aims

This programme differs from other Master's programmes in that it is a professional programme at postgraduate level and is full-time. It is not for those who are already qualified occupational therapists. Nevertheless, this course aims to prepare you to become a competent occupational therapist equipped for lifelong, safe and effective practice in a variety of health and social care settings. We provide a high quality educational programme, which ensures that you are properly qualified, prepared and safe to practise.

Occupational therapy students typically choose this career for the following reasons:

variety of work
the challenge
personal and one-to-one contact
client/patient appreciation
its holistic approach
the desire to help disabled people
to work in health settings
job availability
the chance to be creative.

If you are considering studying Occupational Therapy at Brunel University London then you are committed to working jointly with the NHS to demonstrate the values and beliefs of the NHS Constitution.

NHS values
Patients, public and staff have helped develop this expression of values that inspire passion in the NHS and that should underpin everything it does. Individual organisations will develop and build upon these values, tailoring them to their local needs. The NHS values provide common ground for co-operation to achieve shared aspirations, at all levels of the NHS.

Course Content

Programme Structure

The MSc (pre-registration or pre-reg) occupational therapy programme benefits from being integrated with other programmes within the College of Health and Life Sciences. In their first year of study, MSc (pre-registration) occupational therapy students undertake components from a number of the current BSc modules/study blocks, as well as shared teaching with post-graduate students from the divisions of occupational therapy, physiotherapy, social work and community health and nursing studies. In their second year of study, students share modules with other post-graduate students within the division of occupational therapy. Where learning is shared with the undergraduates, the content has been integrated into master's level modules and is assessed at master's level.

The programme comprises two years full time study. Taught modules are within a three-term structure. To provide a balance between academic and practice placements and still meet the minimum of 1,000 hours of practice placements required by the World Federation of Occupational Therapists and the College of Occupational Therapists, three of the practice placement modules extend beyond the term boundaries over the summer.

Academic modules are based at Brunel University in Uxbridge and practice placement modules are provided in a range of health and social care setting and increasingly in voluntary and private organisations including non-traditional settings.

Year One: The Skilled Practitioner – the How, What and Why of Occupational Therapy
Year 1 of the programme introduces students to the "how, what and why" of occupational therapy and aims to give them the opportunity to develop, explore and critique the core occupational concepts and skills of the profession in depth. The arrangement of study blocks and the two practice placement modules (that occur prior to the commencement of academic study in year 2), allow for a reciprocal exchange of academic knowledge and professional skills that develop the student’s understanding and knowledge of the profession further. Applying and evaluating research in practice is essential for occupational therapists, who are required to adopt evidence-based practice. Therefore the students are made aware from the onset of the programme of how research impacts on practice through clinical reasoning and decision-making skills gained in study blocks and also an inter-professional module HH5609: Approaches to Research.

Year Two: Mastery of Occupational Therapy – Advancing Practice
Year 2 of the programme aims to provide students with a more advanced exploration of the occupational therapy profession. Students acquire mastery in critical knowledge and evaluation of key issues on professional practice as well as critical analysis, synthesis and evaluation of theoretical concepts central to occupational therapy. In addition, students study one optional module that enables an in-depth consideration of a specialist area of current practice. Students’ research skills are further enhanced in the second year and culminate in the students producing a research thesis, in the form of a detailed research dissertation. There are two practice placements in Year 2, one at the beginning of the year and one at the end.

Core Modules

Year 1

Introduction to Occupational Therapy Theory and Philosophy
Informing Sciences
Knowledge and Skills for Occupational Therapy 1
The Process of Occupational Therapy Practice
Preparing for the Work Place 1
Occupational Therapy Practice in Context
Knowledge and Skills for Occupational Therapy 2
Lifestyle Redesign Through Occupation
Preparation for Dissertation

Year 2

Preparing for the Work Place 2
Strategies and Visions for Professional Development
People and Communities
The Art and Science of Occupational Therapy

Optional Modules

Occupational Therapy for Children, Young People and their Families
Occupational Therapy in Mental Health
Occupational Therapy in Neurorehabilitation
Occupational Therapy for Active Ageing

Immunisation requirements for the course

Please be aware that the University does not pay for any of the vaccinations or blood tests required to undertake this course, this is the responsibility of each applicant. The University does not offer a service to provide these and therefore we recommend you go to your GP or local travel clinic and start as early as possible. Until the University has evidence that you have these immunisations we will not be able to allow you to enter the clinical environment on practice placement so it is vital that you meet these requirements, ideally before you commence study. You must obtain immunisation against the following and further information can be found on the NHS website.

Please be aware that as occupational therapy students you will be working in hospitals and therefore in contact with patients who have infections so these immunisations are required for students as outlined in the Green Book by the Department of Health.

Hepatitis B x 3 vaccinations over a 6 month period and a blood test is then taken 6-8 weeks after the third dose, to check that the vaccinations have worked. Please note that the Hep B vaccination programme from the initial first vaccination to blood test upon completion, takes 8 months.
Also required is Polio & Tetanusè Rubella, Measles or MMR x 2 è BCG è Varicella Zoster, and evidence of chicken pox or vaccination x 2, or blood test to confirm immunity.
Blood tests are required for Hepatitis B and also for Measles, Rubella and Chicken Pox if there is no evidence in the students medical records. Immunisations are compulsory and are required for clinical placements.

Teaching

The programme reflects educational developments and encourages reflection, self-reliance and deep learning in the programme - to prepare students for the challenges of employment within a changing health and social care system.

Teaching, learning and assessment are designed to ensure that successful students are able to:

Seek out, appraise critically and use appropriate sources of knowledge and expertise within their academic and practice-related studies.
Utilise intellectual, subject-specific and key transferable skills.
Reflect on their experiences and learn from these.

Students’ learning is also supported by web based resources on Blackboard Learn with all modules having lecture and tutorial material posted on this site. Other features of Blackboard Learn are also utilised, such as on-line tests, virtual blackboards, discussion groups and podcasts.

The teaching and learning approaches are founded on the belief that occupational therapy should be grounded in evidence. This is achieved through the integration of academic and practice education which encourages evidence-based activity.

Programme, study and module block descriptors delineate learning outcomes to ensure clarity and promote the active preparation of students. Placements require students to reflect on their personal strengths and weaknesses and set objectives for their learning.
Completion of student evaluation forms requires students to appraise their own learning experiences.

All study and module blocks are core to the curriculum apart from one optional module in the second year, which must be chosen from four options. All modules are compulsory. This policy was adopted to ensure the programme meets with the professional requirements of the Health and Care Professions Council and the College of Occupational Therapists.

Assessment

The assessment procedures within the programme reflect the learning outcomes of each study and module block. Assessments are carried out in assessment blocks. The University term structure allows the student to have assessments spread across the academic year to assist learning.

In order to promote independent learning, a variety of assessment modes are used such as case studies, essays, practical assessments, placement reports, presentations, written examinations, literature reviews and a research dissertation. These assessments are designed to not only reflect master’s level academic requirements, but also professional skills in preparation for practice.

At the beginning of each year the student is provided with the assessment schedule, including assessment and feedback dates. Each assessment is explained clearly to students, both verbally and in the programme handbook, giving notification of assignment block requirements early in the commencement of the relevant study or module blocks. This information is also provided via Blackboard Learn (BBL). Preparation for assessment blocks is co-ordinated by the relevant year leader and undertaken through identified sessions within study blocks.

Special Features

You will complete an integrated research dissertation as part of the Master’s.

You will have the opportunity to work and learn with international students.

You will have the opportunity to learn in a wide range of practice areas.

The programme is accredited by the College of Occupational Therapists (COT) and the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). It is recognised by the World Federation of Occupational Therapy.

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The MSc in Reservoir Evaluation and Management (REM) is a unique combination of Reservoir Geoscience and Reservoir Engineering centred around the individual reservoir rather than the wider regional geology (which is covered in our sister programme MSc Petroleum Geoscience). Read more
The MSc in Reservoir Evaluation and Management (REM) is a unique combination of Reservoir Geoscience and Reservoir Engineering centred around the individual reservoir rather than the wider regional geology (which is covered in our sister programme MSc Petroleum Geoscience). The REM masters degree focuses on equipping students with the skills and knowledge they need to develop predictive models of the reservoir.

Most development decisions in oil companies are based on the predictions of computer models of the subsurface. The Reservoir Evaluation and Management MSc teaches students the most effective ways to combine the geology, geophysics and reservoir engineering disciplines in order to develop and run computer models which provide the most robust predictions.

More information about the MSc is available in Heriot-Watt's online prospectus:
http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-reservoir-evaluation-and-management/

About the programme

The main objective of the MSc programme is to provide a thorough training in aspects of reservoir geology, geophysics and engineering related to the appraisal and development of subsurface hydrocarbon resources.

The programme is deliberately intensive, typically consisting of working a full 5 days per week of lectures and practical work, including labs or tutorial exercises designed to teach practical work, in addition to learning theory. The programme also includes two field trips to observe geology in the field for those with and without prior geological experience.

The most challenging and fulfilling aspect of the Reservoir Evaluation and Management programme is the project skills, particularly the team project, where students are tasked to propose a development plan for a real field. The project integrates all the learning in reservoir geosciences and engineering disciplines and reinforces the learning through team work.

Topics covered:
=============
• Reservoir concepts
• Reservoir sedimentology
• Rock mechanics, geomechanics and geophysics
• Formation evaluation
• Well testing and production logging
• Geological Modelling and management
• Reservoir engineering
• Reservoir simulation

For more information on the programme content, including course descriptions, please visit: http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-reservoir-evaluation-and-management/

Professional recognition

The programme is accredited by the Energy Institute.

Career opportunities

Graduates of the Reservoir Evaluation and Management MSc are highly sought after by all major oil and gas operators and service companies worldwide. They go on to work in a variety of roles, including Geoscience and Reservoir Engineering. The programme also provides an excellent springboard for graduates wishing to pursue a career in research.

English language requirements

If your first language is not English, or your first degree was not taught in English, we’ll need to see evidence of your English language ability. The minimum requirement for English language is IELTS 6.5 or equivalent.

We offer a range of English language courses: http://www.hw.ac.uk/study/english.htm

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This intensive one-year programme provides a flexible and attractive set of units to those interested in applied research. Read more
This intensive one-year programme provides a flexible and attractive set of units to those interested in applied research. Exit degrees, based on optional units taken, provide a distinct choice of academic route for those who are interested in a research career, as well as those who want further training at postgraduate level but do not intend to become academic researchers.

The School of Economics, Finance and Management has an international reputation for research excellence. Faculty members in the school regularly publish in top international journals and the school is expanding following substantial recent success in research funding applications.

Programme structure

Core units - The programme starts with four compulsory units in the first term:
-Microeconomics
-Macroeconomics
-Econometrics
-Applied Economics

Optional units - Four units are taken in the second term. This is where you shape your exit degree based on choices from the 11 available units. The four available exit degree titles are:
-MSc Economics
-MSc Economics (Macroeconomics)
-MSc Economics (Microeconomics)
-MSc Economics (Economic Policy)

Each exit degree has a unique structure as follows:
-MSc Economics
You can choose any of the option units from the listing.
-MSc Economics (Macroeconomics)
You must take Further Macroeconomics plus three units from: Further Econometrics, Banking, Derivatives, Behavioural Finance.
-MSc Economics (Microeconomics)
You can take four units from: Labour Economics, Health Economics, Education Economics, Development Economics, Further Econometrics, Banking.
-MSc Economics (Economic Policy)
You must take Programme Evaluation and Policy Experiments plus two units from: Labour Economics, Health Economics, Economics of Education, Development Economics.

The full list of units:
-Banking
-Behavioural Finance
-Derivatives
-Development Economics
-Economics of Education
-Further Econometrics
-Further Macroeconomics
-Health Economics
-Labour Economics
-Policy Experiments
-Programme Evaluation

Unit availability is subject to staffing and timetable constraints. Please note: the number of available places on some units may be capped.

Dissertation
There will be a dissertation element for all of the above programmes. You will apply appropriate technical, methodological and intellectual skills that have been developed over the programme to a piece of applied research devised in consultation with a supervisor.

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Pathways. - Professional Graduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) PCET. - Professional Certificate of Education (PCE) PCET.​. Read more

Course Overview

Pathways:
- Professional Graduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) PCET
- Professional Certificate of Education (PCE) PCET.​

The PGCE PCET is aimed at graduates who want to teach in their degree subject or graduates with a further qualification in the subject area in which they aim to teach. They will also be teaching or actively seeking teaching in the post-compulsory sector of education and training. Students do not need GCSE Maths or English to apply for this course.

The PCE PCET is aimed at students with a Level 3 qualification (NVQ3, OCN 3, A Level equivalence) preferably in the subject they are teaching or want to teach. The programme is for students who have experience in their subject areas and who wish to further their experience by teaching in the PCET or lifelong learning sector. Students do not need GCSE Maths or English to apply for this course.

Graduate and non-graduate entrants will follow the same learning pattern but, in compliance with the requirements of QAA, be taught at the differentiated levels for undergraduate study in Year 2.

- Prepare to Teach
The Preparing to teach 10 week taster course is for students with a Level 3 qualification who do not wish to undertake a two-year programme of study but who want to teach. This is an equivalence of Module 1 of the PGCE or PCE. Students would then be exempt from this module should they decide to apply for the PGCE or PCE at a later date.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/education/courses/Pages/Post-Compulsory-Education-and-Training-(PCET)-PGCE-PCE.aspx

Course Content

The Post Compulsory Education and Training (PCET) sector is an area of growing importance in a world of rapidly evolving economic and social change. As individuals face the need to upgrade their skills in order to meet the requires on the world of work, educators in the Post 16 sector have a key role to play in helping them to achieve their learning goals

The Cardiff Met PCET programmes have been devised to introduce you to teaching in the post compulsory education and training (PCET) sector including tertiary, further and higher education, adult and community education, vocational and 14- 19 education as well as training in the private sector or work-based learning environments. These two-year part time programmes will engage you in both academic and practical assignments.

The ethos of the programme is predicated upon student-centred learning which includes the interchange ability of staff/student roles, the pooling of intellectual resources and experiences and the structured opportunities for skills-sharing.

The general aim of the programmes is to produce teachers or trainers who can demonstrate competence across the range of roles and tasks related to the design, delivery, management and evaluation of learning. Students will leave the programme equipped with the necessary skills and knowledge that underpin the performance of those tasks expected of the professional educator or trainer in the post-compulsory sector.

The programme aims to provide a high quality and professionally appropriate experience that offers the opportunity for students to develop their abilities to plan and undertake projects related to practice; further to link their practice to theory in a critical and evaluative way. It aims to equip students with the skills to engage with the concept of reflective practice and to select areas of professional relevance for their study.

The overall aim is to create 'reflective practitioners'.
Modules:
Year 1
- Level 4 Preparing to Teach
- Level 5 Delivering Learning and Teaching
- Level 5 Reflective Practice 1

Year 2
The following modules are delivered on both programmes - the PCE PCET are delivered at Level 5 and the PGCE PCET at Level 6
- Context of PCET
- Professional Development in PCET
- Teaching and Learning Strategies in PCET
- Curriculum Planning and Design in PCET
- Subject Pedagogy and Reflective Practice 2

The Course Team reserve the right to amend the programme to ensure compliance with professional standards.

Learning & Teaching

The programme team recognises that adult learners bring with them experiences which can be used as a resource for learning. Consequently formal lectures are not a feature of this programme. We expect all sessions to involve students actively participating in their learning.

The overall emphasis will be on working together and effectively utilising the experiences and skills that the individual learners bring to the group. This student-centred approach allows students to take responsibility for their own learning. Tutors are seen as facilitators of learning, providing resources, supporting, stimulating and challenging where appropriate.

To this end the teaching methods on the programme will include:

Input from tutors. These can be useful in providing new or up-to-date information to larger groups provided there is an ongoing opportunity for questioning and participation. They will be used sparingly on the programme to generate interest in new subjects and provide information for future discussion, analysis and evaluation.

Small group work. This will be one of the key strategies utilised. The major aim of these activities will be to develop skills relating to thinking, discussion and the presentation of information. Students will be able to practise their communication skills, listen to other group members, support weaker peers and observe group dynamics in action. They will have extensive opportunities to develop their presentation skills in a safe environment and learn how to give encouraging and constructive feedback to their colleagues. Methods utilised will include:
- Ice-breaking exercises
- Team-building exercises
- Workshops
- Buzz groups and brainstorming
- Simulations
- Case-studies
- Role plays

Seminars. These will be led by programme members and will allow them to further develop their presentation and delivery skills. They will be designed to allow group members to explore issues relating to their own institutional settings or their academic specialisms.

Individualised learning periods. Directed self-study allowing programme members to learn at their own pace outside the framework of class activities. The number of hours of self-study varies for each student and it would be worth discussing this with your personal tutor at the start of the year.

Tutorials. Group members will meet with their individual tutors at regular intervals to reflect on their learning experiences, share concerns and problems and set learning targets.

Moodle is Cardiff Met’s virtual learning environment and you will be able to use this to access materials/information relating to the programme from a networked PC. Moodle will also be used for academic and social online discussion forum, blog discussions and for online learning resources.

Assessment

You may be assessed by a combination of assessment methods appropriate to the PGCE and PCE programme levels and may include:
- Written assessments (WRIT) such as reports, self-reflections, analytical documents, case studies, online blogs, peer assessments, essays;

- Presentations (PRES) and Microteaching sessions which may be individual and/or group; seminar; (non)-interactive; with audience;

- Practicals (PRAC) such as individual and/or group; coaching; mentoring;; performance;

- Portfolio (PORT) that includes a collection of evidence, frequently including a contextual statement; poster; website;

- Placements (PLAC) such as a fieldwork placement; school placement; experiencing the world of work.

The programme is continually assessed through module assignments and two hundred hours of supervised teaching experience to include 130 hours of direct teaching over the two years.

Students will undertake four observed teaching hours in Year 1 and four in Year 2. Each of these will require written preparation and also a self-evaluation report following the observation.

Employability & Careers

The PGCE and PCE PCET will qualify you to teach in Further and Higher Education, youth, adult and community education, 14- 19 sector, work-based education, training in HMForces, prison, industry and commercial training departments.

Students who have completed this course have gone on to part or full-time teaching in the post compulsory sector of education and training, usually teaching their subject and other subject related areas. All graduates leaving the course are signposted to Cardiff County Council and Cardiff Met’s Widening Access department as potential adult education tutors for outreach and summer school activities. .Some students are offered teaching opportunities by their mentor once they have graduated.

​Progression Routes:
Non-graduates successfully completing the PCE (PCET) will gain 120 credits at levels 4 and 5. Students would be able to progress on to a degree programme in their specific subject discipline.

Graduates completing the PGCE (PCET) will gain 120 credits at levels 4, 5 and 6. Students can then progress onto Masters programmes within their particular subject area.

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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This programme is intended for those who wish to enhance their understanding of the role of microorganisms in animal health and disease, and provides an excellent grounding in molecular biology, immunology, epidemiology and microbiology. Read more

This programme is intended for those who wish to enhance their understanding of the role of microorganisms in animal health and disease, and provides an excellent grounding in molecular biology, immunology, epidemiology and microbiology.

This grounding leads into the study of the complex mechanisms of host/microbe interactions that are involved in the pathogenesis of specific animal diseases, and provides insights into diagnosis and interventions, such as vaccines, essential for disease control.

You will enhance your critical and analytical skills and gain hands-on experience in the diagnosis of veterinary diseases, such that you may identify problems, formulate hypotheses, design experiments, acquire and interpret data, and draw conclusions.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Who is the programme for?

This is a full or part-time programme, intended mainly for graduates, those already working in veterinary diagnostic/research laboratories and staff from other laboratories who want to enhance their understanding of the role of microorganisms in animal health and disease.

Pharmaceutical research personnel, policymakers, veterinarians, public health personnel and environmental biologists will also benefit.

Part-time and short course study

Most modules are offered as standalone short courses. The fee structure for short courses is different to that for registered students, and details may be obtained via admissions enquiries, please refer to the contact details on this page.

The option to study the MSc on a part-time basis is only available following successful completion of three modules as stand-alone/CPD. Please contact the for further information.

Programme partners

This Masters programme is delivered by a consortium comprising the University of Surrey and two world class veterinary microbiology institutions: the BBSRC funded Pirbright Institute (PI), and the Government sponsored Animal & Plant Health Agency (APHA).

The Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) and Public Health England (PHE) also contribute to the programme.

Visits

You will have the unique opportunity to gain hands-on experience in the diagnosis of important veterinary diseases within the world reference laboratories of the APHA and Pirbright Institute (PI).

There will also be an opportunity to visit Public Health England (PHE) to gain a detailed knowledge of how zoonotic diseases outbreaks are investigated, and to visit the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD), a livestock abattoir and an intensive livestock farm.

Colleagues from the CEFAS laboratory will also contribute to the programme, and further research training will be provided during your practical research project.

Educational aims of the programme

This is a one year full-time programme aimed at preparing graduates to work in a range of fields in which a detailed understanding of veterinary microbiology is a valuable asset.

These fields include research, commerce, government and policy, reference laboratory and diagnostic work, epidemiology and disease mapping, veterinary science, farming especially animal production, wild and zoo animal conservation and education.

As such, it is intended that graduates will achieve the highest levels of professional understanding of veterinary microbiology within a range of contexts.

The programme combines the study of the theoretical foundations of, and scholarly approaches to, understanding the application and various practices of veterinary microbiology within the contexts described above along with the development of practical and research skills.

The main aims are to enable students to:

  • Acquire sound knowledge of the major principles of veterinary microbiology
  • Develop the skills to perform relevant interpretation and evaluation of data
  • Apply those acquired skills in practice through research
  • To utilise acquired knowledge and evaluative skills to communicate successfully with stakeholders

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas.

The learning outcomes have been aligned with the descriptor for qualification at level 7 given in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) produced by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) for Higher Education.

Knowledge and understanding

Following completion of the programme, students should display knowledge of:

  • The main principles of current veterinary microbiology
  • The methods and approaches used for the molecular characterisation, and diagnosis of disease agents
  • The main principles of infectious diseases epidemiology
  • The analysis of disease and disease carriage that impact on the development and application of control measures to combat diseases
  • Modes of control of infectious diseases
  • Modes of transmission
  • The various aspects of host pathology and immune responses to disease agents
  • Analytical skills to allow interpretation of data and formulation of conclusions

Intellectual/cognitive skills

Following completion of the programme, students should be able to:

  • Critically appraise scholarly and professional writing on a wide range of subjects pertaining to the various aspects of veterinary microbiology
  • Critically analyse experimental data to enable the formulation of hypotheses
  • Design relevant experiments to test formulated hypotheses
  • Efficiently analyse new developments in technology and critically assess their utilisation to answer existing and new problems

Professional practical skills

Following completion of the programme, students should be able to:

  • Plan and execute an experiment/investigation, act autonomously and demonstrate originality
  • Analyse numerical data using appropriate computer tools including specialist computer packages
  • Communicate experiments at a project level, including report writing
  • Perform specific specialised experimental skills

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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We offer three pathways in the Advanced Professional Practice Programme. - Clinical Pharmacy for General Practice for pharmacists to develop the skills required for working in General Practice. Read more

Overview

We offer three pathways in the Advanced Professional Practice Programme:
- Clinical Pharmacy for General Practice for pharmacists to develop the skills required for working in General Practice.

- Advanced Professional Practice (Pharmacy) incorporating the Royal Pharmaceutical Society’s Advanced Pharmacy Framework

- Advanced Professional Practice (Open Learn) allows health professionals to choose from our range of modules to create their own pathway

Clinical Pharmacy for General Practice:
NHS England has recently announced their intention to invest £15 million pounds to pilot patient facing roles for clinical pharmacists in GP practices. This is a clear sign of that pharmacists are recognised as health professionals who are able to support patients in the management of long term conditions e.g. by optimising medicines. These roles offer exciting opportunities for pharmacists to develop in this area of practice. . If you wish to work in general practice, it is likely that you will need to be working towards or hold a postgraduate pharmacy qualification that includes Independent Prescribing.
Our new postgraduate pathway 'Clinical Pharmacy for General Practice' allows you to combine your choice of modules from across our Community Pharmacy, Advanced Professional Practice and Prescribing Studies programmes (including the Independent Prescribing course) to meet your own personal learning needs whilst working towards a Postgraduate Certificate, Diploma or Masters award.

Advanced Professional Practice (Pharmacy):
The Pharmacy pathway is compatible with the emerging agenda for Advanced and Specialist Practice within the Pharmacy profession and supports the Royal Pharmaceutical Society’s Faculty Professional Recognition Scheme. Pharmacists who follow this pathway will incorporate the Advanced Pharmacy Framework (APF) (http://www.rpharms.com/faculty-resources/advanced-pharmacy-framework.asp) within their Advanced Professional Practice award and be able to demonstrate competency in all six competency clusters of the framework, ie:
- Expert Professional Practice
- Collaborative Working Relationships
- Leadership
- Management
- Education, Training and Development
- Research and Evaluation

Advanced Professional Practice (Open Learn):
Increasing numbers of pharmacists and other health professionals have a career portfolio that crosses the traditional boundaries of community practice, primary care and secondary care and need a programme of continuing professional development that can meet their specific personal professional development needs.
The Open learn pathway of the APP programme is designed to allow pharmacists and other health professionals, particularly medical and non-medical prescribers working in primary care, choice and flexibility in their progression to Certificate, Diploma and Masters awards to meet their specific professional development needs and advance their professional practice. Pharmacists can choose modules from across the Department of Medicines Management/School of Pharmacy postgraduate programmes’ portfolio, including Community Pharmacy and Clinical (Hospital) Pharmacy.
Pharmacists, medical and nonmedical prescribers can choose modules from the Prescribing Studies programme, including the Independent Prescribing Preparatory Course for Pharmacists, and also modules provided by other Schools within the Faculty of Health, and other Faculties within the University, subject to meeting the specific entry criteria required for individual modules.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/advancedprofessionalpracticepharmacy/

Course Aims

Keele's Pg Advanced Professional Practice Programme aims to:
- Equip you with the clinical and professional knowledge base and skills that you have identified as necessary to fulfil and advance your professional practice

- Provide you with a learning programme that meets your personal professional development needs and that will help you apply your knowledge and skills in daily practice

- Encourage you to develop the self-discipline of private study, self-directed learning and reflective practice that will be continued beyond Keele's Programme in your Continuing Professional Development (CPD).

In addition, you will develop valuable practical skills including written and oral communication, and the ability to design a project, collect, analyse and interpret data.

Course Content

MSc in Advanced Professional Practice (Clinical Pharmacy for General Practice):
For the ‘Clinical Pharmacy for General Practice’ pathway you may combine modules from our Prescribing Studies programme, Community Pharmacy programme and Advanced Professional Practice programme to meet your learning needs. A total of 60 credits is required to achieve the Certificate award, 120 credits for the Diploma and 180 credits for the MSc. The Independent Prescribing Preparatory Course for Pharmacists module (60 credits) from the Prescribing Studies programme may only be used towards a Diploma award.

Achievement of the Master’s award requires you to complete the Professional MSc year. The professional MSc year consists of three compulsory modules: Advanced Practice Development (15 credits), Researching and Evaluating your Practice (15 credits) and the Independent Learning Project (30 credits).

MSc in Advanced Professional Practice (Pharmacy):
This pathway links to all the clusters of the Advanced Pharmacy Framework (APF) (http://www.rpharms.com/faculty-resources/advanced-pharmacy-framework.asp) You will study modules to allow you to develop in all six clusters of the APF: Expert Professional Practice; Collaborative Working Relationships; Leadership; Management; Education, Training and Development; and Research and Evaluation.

The modules you will study are as follows (more detail about individual modules can be found in the Postgraduate Modules pages):

Year 1 (Certificate Year)
- Advanced Practice Development (30) 30 credits (Continuous module during Years 1 and 2)
- Competency Frameworks for the Advanced Practitioner 15 credits
- Building Working Relationships for the Advanced Practitioner (30) 30 credits

Year 2 (Diploma Year)
- Researching and Evaluating Your Practice 15 credits
- Education Theory and Practice for Health Professionals 15 credits
- Business and Financial Management 15 credits

Year 3 (Master’s year)
- Advanced Practice Development 15 credits
- Independent Learning Project 45 credits

MSc in Advanced Professional Practice (Open Learn)
For the ‘Open Learn’ pathway, a total of 60 credits is required to achieve the Certificate award, 120 credits for the Diploma and 180 credits for the MSc. The 15 credit Advanced Practice Development module is compulsory, after that you may chose modules from across our programmes to meet your individual learning needs. A maximum of 30 credits per level of award is permitted from any one programme source for Certificate and Diploma awards. The Independent Prescribing Preparatory Course for Pharmacists module (60 credits) from the Prescribing Studies programme may only be used towards a Diploma award.

Our Postgraduate Modules pages will provide you with more information about the modules you can choose from.

Achievement of the Master’s award requires you to complete the Professional MSc year. The professional MSc year consists of three compulsory modules: Advanced Practice Development (15 credits), Researching and Evaluating your Practice (15 credits) and the Independent Learning Project (30 credits).

Teaching & Assessment

The Advanced Professional Practice Programme is designed principally for distance-learning. We provide mainly online distance-learning materials so that you can study where and when it is most convenient for you. Our methods of delivery allow us to revise and update the course quickly to meet your changing needs as a pharmacist.

Students on the 'Pharmacy' Pathway will be required to attend Keele for occasional face to face study days. Students on the 'Open Learn' pathway maybe required to attend Keele, depending on their module choices.

The Advanced Professional Practice Programme is fully supported by a team of experienced, friendly, and approachable academic, administrative and technical staff based at Keele. You’re not on your own! And, don’t forget the network of other pharmacists on the course whom you can contact.

You will require the equivalent of 1-2 days (approximately 10-15 hours) each week to complete your course. Remember that the online nature of our course materials, and the fact that a good proportion of the assessed work focuses on your daily practice, means that you can integrate study and work.

Assessment is entirely by coursework for the Certificate, Diploma and MSc courses. A variety of assessment methods are used such as Practice-Based Assignments that will assess your knowledge, problem-solving skills, and data interpretation skills in relation to application of knowledge to practice, patient care and medicines management. Case Presentations assess your ability to critically appraise the literature and relate published theory to everyday practice. An Audit Project, Practice-Based Assignments, Project Protocol Development and the Independent Study Project Report assess ‘thinking’ and practical skills, and your ability to plan, conduct and report on an investigation. They also assess your ability to critically appraise the literature and relate published theory to everyday practice. Your Reflective Portfolio also assesses your ability to relate theory to practice, and self evaluation of, and reflection on, your own performance and CPD needs.

The nature of the assessments develops your written and oral communication skills. Practical skills and key life/transferable skills are assessed within the methods described above. Each method of assessment is supported by clear criteria for marking; these are explained in the relevant Course Handbooks. The minimum pass mark is 50%.

The summative assessment is supported by a variety of formative assessment activities that include online discussions, formative feedback on elements of the reflective portfolio, contributions to study days and feedback on draft proposals.

Additional Costs

For all programmes you will need regular access to a computer, email and the internet. However apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for our postgraduate programmes, with the exception of those listed below.

Some modules may require that you attend a Webinar. You may find it beneficial to purchase a headset to participate in webinars, however this is not essential if your computer has a built in microphone and speakers.

Some modules may require that you travel to Keele for a study day. There will be additional travel and accommodation costs (if required) to attend any face to face study days.

Study Days

Students on the Pharmacy Pathway will be required to attend Keele for some face to face study days. For further information please contact Bev Oakden.

Students who incorporate the Independent Prescribing Preparatory Course into the ‘Clinical Pharmacy for General Practice’ award will be required to attend Keele for some study days. For further information please refer to the ‘Independent Prescribing’ section of our website.

Whilst the majority of our modules are delivered at a distance, a small number may require attendance at Keele. Please contact Bev Oakden or Amanda Salt to discuss your choice of modules and any attendance requirements.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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This course is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and, upon completion, provides students with eligibility to apply to the register to practice as Forensic Psychologists in the UK. Read more

Course Overview

This course is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and, upon completion, provides students with eligibility to apply to the register to practice as Forensic Psychologists in the UK.

The course is designed to be placement based, with various workshops for students as well as clinical and academic supervision. Workshops are usually delivered in block teaching sessions and students are expected to be in Cardiff for around 15 days over the course of their study. We have students from all over the UK so we aim to make access to workshops as straightforward as possible for those students who have to travel long distances to attend.

Each student will be allocated both a clinical supervisor and an academic supervisor – at least one of these supervisors will be an appropriately qualified and experienced Forensic Psychologist. Students should consider the availability of a forensic psychologist who is willing and able to offer supervision in their workplace or placement site for the duration of their studies.

Next intake April 2016 - applications open 1st December 2015 to 29th January 2016

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/health/courses/Pages/Forensic-Psychology-(Practitioner-Programme)---PgD-.aspx

Course Content​​

There are 5 modules to the programme:
- Professional Portfolio in Forensic Psychology (80 credits, Level 8)
This is the largest assessed piece of work and it provides credits towards a Professional Doctorate qualification that students may wish to undertake following this programme or at a later stage in their career. The portfolio is a collection of exemplars of work students have undertaken to demonstrate competence in the application of forensic psychology to assessment and intervention work with service users. It will include exemplars of clinical practice (assessments, interventions, evaluation and recommendations) reflective evaluations, practice logs (detailing a minimum of 360 days of professional practice), supervision logs and a variety of placement checklists.

- Consultancy (10 credits, level 8)
This module explores the experience students have in demonstrating the application of psychology in the context of consultancy, developing policy and evaluating service provision.

- Teaching and Training (10 credits, level 8)
This module explores the experience students have in demonstrating the application of psychology in the context of teaching and training.

- Ethical and Professional Practice (10 credits, level 8)
This module explores the experience students have in demonstrating the application of psychology within the appropriate ethical and professional boundaries that are required by the Regulatory Body (Health and Care Professions Council, HCPC), by appropriate professional bodies (British Psychological Society, BPS) and by the relevant placement organisations.

- Functional Assessment and Formulation (10 credits, level 8)
This module explores the experience students have in demonstrating the application of psychology in applying psychological models of assessment, particularly functional assessment and case formulation.

Learning & Teaching​

​Our students are placement based and the programme follows an apprenticeship model, where students work under the supervision of a qualified forensic psychologist and aim to demonstrate their developing competency in the areas identified as relevant to the role (HCPC Standards of Proficiency). So, the primary mode of learning on this programme will be through supervised practice.

To support the learning of students we also offer workshops. Some of the workshops are compulsory and mean that students need to attend Cardiff for around 15 days over the course of their study with us.

We make no apology when stating that this course is challenging and will require a great deal of investment from students in order to complete it. Our students on placement (not employed by placement provider) we expect to be in placement 4 days a week and spend an additional day in study. It is very much a full time programme of study and whilst there are part time options, the commitment is something we urge applicants to consider.

Students are provided with a supervisory team which is comprised of a work placement supervisor (we refer to this supervisor as the clinical supervisor) and a supervisor from the University (we refer to this supervisor as an academic supervisor). Both of these supervisors will be forensic psychologists, except in exceptional circumstances where the course leader has approved a different arrangement. Both supervisors will provide support to the student and will encourage their development and provide pastoral support. Additional support is provided through the Peer Mentors, other students who are a step further along the process.

Assessment

Students are assessed for competency and professionalism, these issues are reviewed in tri-partite supervision sessions every quarter for full time students. In addition to this there are 5 modules that students will complete. The largest of these is the Portfolio where students will gather exemplars of their work with forensic psychology service users following the processes of assessment, intervention, evaluation and recommendation. Additionally, students will complete four reflective report modules on aspects of their practice; Functional Assessment and Formulation, Ethical and Professional Practice, Teaching and Training and Consultancy.

Employability & Careers​

The purpose of the PG Dip in Practitioner Forensic Psychology is to allow students to progress on from Masters level study towards Practitioner status, thereby boosting their employability. At the end of the programme successful students can apply to the HCPC to be registered as Forensic Psychologists. This course is essentially for students who wish to progress on to clinical work within forensic settings or more widely with forensic clients. The programme is placement based and provides supervised support towards developing the competencies required to be an autonomous practitioner.

100% of the graduates from this programme are employed as Forensic Psychologists and so working in professional roles within a variety of organisations in the UK. Some of our graduates may consider returning to complete the Doctorate in Forensic Psychology (Top-Up) once they have decided which area they would like to specialise in.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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Global Health and Development. tropEd is a route through the Global Health and Development MSc, which combines UCL modules with modules taken at tropEd network institutions in the UK, Europe and around the world. Read more

Global Health and Development: tropEd is a route through the Global Health and Development MSc, which combines UCL modules with modules taken at tropEd network institutions in the UK, Europe and around the world. This route maximises professional and educational networking opportunities and international experiences that enhance employability.

About this degree

The programme challenges students to understand the complex forces that shape health worldwide, by developing their understanding of the principles underlying research, policy and practice in global health, and their ability to critically evaluate the issues that are important for today's developing countries and common to the whole world.

MSc students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core UCL modules (60 credits), optional modules taken at UCL and partner trop-Ed institutions (60 credits), and the research dissertation completed at UCL (60 credits). All UCL taught modules are 15 credits. To gain the tropEd MSc you should take at least 15 credits of optional modules outside UCL in a partner tropEd institution.

UCL core modules

  • Concepts and Controversies in Global Health
  • Research Methods and Evidence for Global Health
  • Power and Politics in Global Health
  • Health Systems in a Global Context

Optional modules

The Institute for Global Health (IGH) reserves the right not to run modules with less than 10 students registered. It may not be possible to take your chosen optional modules because of timetabling and capacity constraints. If in doubt, consult the programme administrator.

  • There are more than 150 modules available that have been approved and accredited by tropEd.
  • For further details visit: http://www.troped.org
  • UCL optional modules may include the following:
  • Anthropological Perspectives on Global Health
  • Climate Change and Health
  • Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health
  • Collecting and Using Data: Essentials of Quantitative Survey Research
  • Disability and Development
  • Economic Evaluation in Health Care
  • Essentials of International Child Health
  • Evaluating Interventions
  • Global Health Promotion
  • Health Management: Planning and Programme Design
  • Infectious Diseases Epidemiology and Global Health Policy
  • Key Principles of Health Economics
  • Law and Governance of Global Health
  • Nutrition and Public Health
  • Perinatal Epidemiology and Maternal Health
  • Research in Action: The Qualitative Approach
  • Urban Health

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an individual research project on a topic relevant to future work in global health and development which includes a presentation and culminates in a dissertation of 7,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is taught with an emphasis on collaborative and co-operative learning. This is to ensure that students enter the workforce capable of joining projects and programmes with a supportive network of peers. Assessment is through written assignments, unseen written examinations, projects, oral presentations, group work and the written dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Global Health and Development: tropEd programme MSc

Careers

The programme equips students with knowledge and transferable skills they will need in their future careers in global health. Career routes include research, programme management, policy advice and advocacy, at national and international levels, and in public, private and not-for-profit sectors.

Employability

This wide-ranging programme strives to create students who will be able to look at health problems from different angles and think analytically and critically – all key transferable skills in the job market. The diversity of approaches to global health taken by this programme helps expand students' employment horizons and options.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Education at the UCL Institute for Global Health is cross-disciplinary, with teaching led by experts drawn from health policy, economics, philosophy, political science, anthropology, epidemiology and medicine.

The tropEd MSc consists of core and optional modules and a dissertation. The tropEd degree allows for optional modules to be selected from tropEd network affiliated institutions around the world that the Global Health and Development MSc does not.

The tropEd degree provides networking opportunities and international experiences which enhance tropEd graduate employability. Mobility across leading international institutions prepares students for effective work in multicultural and multidisciplinary environments. Students also experience diverse learning styles and perspectives on global health problems.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute for Global Health

81% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Read more
This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology is a three-year full-time, four-year part-time taught doctoral programme leading to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health Care Professions Council (HCPC), accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society (BPS), and recognition within the UK and the EU as a chartered counselling psychologist eligible to practice.

The programme offers a sound and marketable model, combining in-depth competency in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), strong humanistic values, and psychodynamic awareness. The course was re-accredited by the HCPC and the BPS in 2012. It was commended for the depth and breadth of the modules offered; a number of our modules were described as cutting-edge and very well suited to the current zeitgeist and employment market. These modules include a first-year module devoted to working with difference and diversity, and a third-year service evaluation research exercise.

Run by a dedicated team of HCPC registered and BPS accredited chartered counselling and clinical psychologists, this course offers wide-ranging and high quality clinical and research expertise to trainees. Course team members have between one and 11 years of post-qualification clinical experience, and two thirds hold PhD or professional doctoral titles. Two thirds of the staff are academically published authors.

While student numbers are growing, the team prides itself on retaining a small cohort each year of no more than 20 students. This enables us to offer you a relatively high volume of individual attention from staff. All students are assigned a personal tutor and two research supervisors. You are offered a relatively high proportion of research supervision (10 hours in Year 1 and 20 hours each year in Years 2 and 3); safe spaces for clinical group supervision and skills practice; and an experiential and workshop style of teaching and learning. Trainees and staff develop collaborative relationships in relation to learning and personal development.

The programme has a dedicated placements coordinator, and an extensive online placement provider database, accessible prior to training commencement. We offer a comprehensive placements induction in the first week of training, and we encourage and support you to be in placement or at interview stage with placement providers by the beginning of your training.

The first year of training is the equivalent of a Master’s year. Students who exit at the end of Year 1 are eligible for an MSc in Psychological Therapies. This MSc offers eligibility to register with the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP), leading to clinical practice in either in public, private or third sector organisations. However, the course has high student retention rates, with the majority of students continuing from the MSc level into the doctoral level of training in Years 2 and 3. Student satisfaction within the programme is very high; feedback forms regularly comment on the high quality and breadth of teaching, the clinical and research expertise of the lecturers, and the dedication of the staff, both at a personal and professional level. Our students feel valued and attended to by the teaching team because the size of each cohort allows for a more tailored experience for each student.

Through postgraduate teaching and workshops across the wider applied psychology subject area, London Met counselling psychology trainees develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills in a broad range of qualitative and quantitative psychological research methods. The course emphasises criticality, epistemological critique and reflexivity across all research teaching and learning. Extensive support in the form of individual and group supervision and teaching is offered, alongside methodology learning, to support trainees in undertaking a piece of doctoral level research that will make an original contribution to the professional practice of counselling psychology, and more widely.

As trainees you will develop a wide range of intellectual and practical skills and knowledge. The training has a solid track record of trainees emerging as robust, sophisticated, and highly employable practitioners of counselling psychology. In recent years, we are proud that a number of our trainees have won BPS Division of Counselling Psychology trainee prizes for written assignments and research poster presentations.

The principle aims and achievements of the course are to produce graduates who are:
-Competent, informed, reflective, ethical and professionally sound practitioners of counselling psychology who are able to work in a range of settings and are committed to their own on-going personal and professional development
-Able to understand, develop and apply models of advanced psychological inquiry and research that enable the creation of new knowledge and which recognise the complex nature of human experience and relationships
-Able to adopt a questioning and evaluative approach to the philosophy, practice, research and theory that constitutes counselling psychology and aware of the wider social, cultural and political domains within which counselling psychology operates
-In possession of a set of skills and competencies that are transferable to a wide variety of professional contexts and which enhance employability
-Able to demonstrate the range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC)

Many students are conducting research in collaboration with National Health Service (NHS) Trusts or non-governmental organisations (NGOs). Graduates find permanent employment within a few months post-qualification, with many trainees holding part-time clinical employment whilst they are in the final year of the training because their clinical skills and knowledge are of such a high standard. Other graduates from the programme find work in academia in visiting or permanent teaching posts or as research fellows.

The course is involved in on-going in-house events and conferences such as CultureShock, and in research and clinical collaborations with five NHS trusts. The programme is also involved in research and in the training of clinical staff with the Freedom from Torture Foundation and Khulisa, both community based organisations close to the Holloway Campus. The programme is also collaborating with the School of Social Sciences and School of Social Professions to link interpreters with clinicians and to establish training inside and outside the University on working with interpreters in mental health settings.

Assessment

A wide range of assessment methods is used on the programme. In Year 1 you'll complete seven master's level assignments, including a reflective essay, case formulation, process report, examination and two short research assignments using qualitative and quantitative methodologies.

You'll also complete a 7,000-word reflexive critical literature review and a 3,000-word proposal towards the end of Year 1. Your proposal must demonstrate an adequate basis for a doctoral level research project for you to proceed into Year 2 of the programme. Year 1 is the most intensive period of assessment on the programme.

If you progress to Year 2 you'll complete an extended clinical case study, integrative process analysis and theoretical essay at the end of the year, reflecting cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic learning. At the end of Year 3 a similar assignment is completed, reflecting a trans-theoretical, pluralistic perspective. You should complete your research project by the end of Year 3, submitting a 25,000 word thesis and subsequently participating in a viva voce examination.

You'll receive research supervision to guide your research throughout the programme. Research progress is formally monitored and evaluated through the submission of annual reports to the Research and Postgraduate Office in Years 2 and 3.

You are required to complete a minimum of 450 clinical hours in a range of placements under supervision over the duration of the programme, as well as a minimum of 60 hours of your own personal therapy.

Supervisors complete six-monthly practice competency evaluations, which enable bidirectional feedback and reflection on your progress and continuing professional development in your practice placements. Your personal and professional development is individually monitored and supported throughout the programme via annual reviews and appraisals with a tutor from the programme team.

Professional accreditation

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology leads to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advanced Research Design and Analysis for Psychology (core, 20 credits)
-Counselling Psychology Practice and Development (core, 20 credits)
-Professional and Ethical Issues (core, 20 credits)
-Psychological Knowledge and Models of Therapy (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project and Critical Skills (core, 60 credits)
-Therapeutic and Reflective Skills (core, 20 credits)
-Working with Difference and Diversity (core, 20 credits)

Year 2 modules include:
-Advanced Psychological Research (core, 160 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 1 (core, 100 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 2 (core, 100 credits)

After the course

Career opportunities for counselling psychologists include posts in a variety of areas. These include National Health Service (NHS) settings such as primary care, Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services, community mental health, drug and alcohol, rehabilitation, eating and personality disorder services, as well as the prison service, voluntary sector, private practice, academia, training, supervision, management and consultancy.

Graduates from the programme frequently go on work in one or more of these areas. Some have gone on to provide practice placements or to supervise or teach students on the programme. The range of advanced clinical and research skills and abilities gained through the course prepare graduates to undertake work in a variety of fields of activity.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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-The opportunity to learn how to plan and deliver a professional evaluation in the context of the three pillars of sustainable development. Read more

Key features of this course:

-The opportunity to learn how to plan and deliver a professional evaluation in the context of the three pillars of sustainable development
- Increased understanding of what constitutes best practice in evaluation
- Valuable professional evaluation experience, demonstrable to prospective employers
- The chance to make a difference through a real world, team evaluation project
- Contact with experienced and effective evaluation and sustainable development practitioners

The Bulmer Foundation’s postgraduate courses are delivered in partnership between the University of Worcester and the Bulmer - Foundation and the PG Cert in Evaluation for a Sustainable Future may be taken over one or two years. Students are also welcome to take individual modules for personal or professional development.

Throughout the course each student is supported by a small team of academic staff and the input of expert practitioners. Students are also able to access a wide range of support and services through the University of Worcester.

Expertise in evaluation theory and practice is increasingly important today where social, environmental and economic impacts are of paramount importance in ensuring a sustainable future for generations to come.

The introduction of the Social Value Act (2012) means there is a greater emphasis on measurement and monetisation of outcomes and impacts for work commissioned by the public sector.

Third sector organisations and businesses are now required to provide robust evidence of the impacts of their work in order to secure and retain contracts.

In the business world, corporate social responsibility means that there is pressure on all companies to demonstrate their ethical and responsible practices.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Evaluation for a Sustainable future aims to provide a sound foundation in evaluation theory at the same time as allowing students to develop their professional skills through research and real-world projects.

Graduates of the programme are expected to go on to pursue or develop successful careers in a wide range of organisations, supporting them to be more economically, socially and environmentally sustainable and will be well positioned to play a key role in the move to a more sustainable future.

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The College of Social Sciences welcomes all postgraduates to the recently redesigned MA in Social Research programme which continues to enjoy full RT (research training) recognition by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). Read more
The College of Social Sciences welcomes all postgraduates to the recently redesigned MA in Social Research programme which continues to enjoy full RT (research training) recognition by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This programme aims to provide students with a sound background in social research design and the most up-to-date training in methods of data collection and analysis. The combination of core modules and short courses on more advanced topics provides maximum flexibility for taught postgraduate and research students throughout their study.

The core elements of the programme are delivered by staff across the entire College, many of whom are engaged in cutting-edge research in their own fields. Students will benefit by undertaking the modules with others from different departments within the School of Government and Society, eg, Political Science and International Studies; the Centre for Russian and East European Studies; the Institute for Applied Social Studies; and within the wider College. Students will also receive training on more discipline-specific research elements, as well as dissertation supervision, provided by individual departments. On completion of this MA, many students continue their PhD studies or pursue a career in research in the public, private or voluntary sector.

Programme content
Term 1:

Introduction to Social Research (20)
Research Design (20)
Thesis-related preparation
Information Skills for Social Sciences
University Programme of Skills Training (as necessary)
Dissertation-related preparation
Term 2:

Social Research Methods I (20)
Social Research Methods II (20)
Thesis-related preparation
Summer Term:

Four Short courses (10)
Dissertation (60)
All students registered on the MA in Social Research will take:

1) Four core modules:

Introduction to Social Science Research (20 credits)
Research Design (20 credits)
Social Research Methods I (20 credits)
Social Research Methods II (20 credits)


2) Four elective modules (10 credits each) from the short course programme below
3) A 14,000 word dissertation (60 credits)

Short courses
All short courses run as 2-day intensive workshops from 10–4pm with breaks. This list is updated regularly as new courses are approved so do check this website from time to time to see what is on offer.

These short courses are open to all research students in the College (and some departments in other Colleges, such as Geography, subject to the discretion of the Programme Team). However, places on each course are limited and priority will be given to MA Social Research students.

These short courses are also open to all staff in the University who may wish to attend without completing the assessments. However, all doctoral researchers and staff who wish to to so will be placed on a waiting list. Confirmation will be sent a week before the course dates.

Short course programmes
From Multiple linear to Logistic regression
Narrative Research
Analyzing Hierarchical and Panel Data
Visual Research Methods
Linguistic Ethnography
Documentary Research in Education, History and the Social Sciences
Researching Disability
Approaches to Research on Discourse
Policy Evaluation
Advanced Qualitative Data Analysis (using NVivo)
Secondary Research Data Analysis in Social Research
Applications of Geographic Information Systems in Social Science
Overseas Research
Q Methodology – A Systematic Approach for Interpretive Research Design
Activity Theory and its research applications
Some courses have pre-requisites, eg, to register on Multiple Linear and Logistic Regression, Factor Analysis and Narrative Research; you will need to have passed Data Analysis (20 credits module) or equivalent. For the latter, you will need to provide evidence that you have passed a similar course on quantitative/qualitative data analysis where appropriate.

Please be aware that some of these courses run on the same dates. Make sure you have not picked courses that clash with each other. For further details or to sign up for these short courses, please email the course names, your name, student ID and your programme to |.

Skills and attributes gained
Students will have acquired a solid foundation of a broad range of research methods that are widely used in the social sciences and will have developed:

A sound understanding of the methodological debates
An overview of the philosophy of social science and how this informs research design, methods chosen of data collection and analysis
An ability to use a range of research techniques appropriate to their subject area
Competence in the representation and presentation of information and data
An ability to communicate research findings effectively to a wider range of audiences
An appreciation of the potential use and impact of their research within and beyond academia
An ability to engage with relevant users at all points in the research process, from devising and shaping research questions through to enhancing practice
Learning and teaching
Students are expected to engage in high-level discussion during all sessions. Teaching will be delivered by a combination of lectures, seminars and computer workshops. Some fieldwork involving primary data collection is required where appropriate.

Careers
Many students go on to do a PhD after completing this MA. Others have followed a career in local authorities, government departments, health authorities, management consultancy, media, the voluntary sector and so on.

Assessment
All core modules are assessed by a 4000-word essay or report. On most short courses, a 3000-report is usually required. The dissertation length is 14,000 words and students are expected to utilise the knowledge and skills they learned from the taught elements in this programme.

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at one of our on-campus open days (Friday 13 November 2015 and Friday 4 March 2016). Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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There is global recognition that the events sector needs trained professionals if it is to continue to thrive and develop. The MSc International Events Management programme offers you an engaging environment in which to explore the challenges faced by events professionals. Read more

There is global recognition that the events sector needs trained professionals if it is to continue to thrive and develop.

The MSc International Events Management programme offers you an engaging environment in which to explore the challenges faced by events professionals.

A balanced set of modules will provide you with an advanced understanding of the international events industry and the core areas of business and management generally.

A series of challenging, creative, real-world assessments will teach you how to design, plan, stage and evaluate different events. Central to the learning experience is the requirement to run a live event yourself.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

Events play a vital role in society, providing not only culture and entertainment for millions but also enabling cities and destinations to promote and regenerate themselves. Every facet of our society is involved in events, from business meetings and conferences to music festivals and sport.

Across this global industry, it is recognised that the events sector needs trained professionals if it is to continue to thrive and develop. This programme provides students with both the education and training to become a professional event manager, capable of organising both small and large scale events.

Through a balanced set of modules, students will gain advanced understanding in how the event industry works and develop expertise in planning and managing different events.

The programme aims to provide a high quality vocational education, which is intellectually rigorous and up-to- date, as well as relevant to the needs of future managers, executives and professionals in the service sector industries covered by the programme.

The programme has a business management orientation related to service industries and draws on a range of cognate areas of study to explain and analyse the particular sector.

An integrated approach is taken so as to provide a coherent view that explores the interrelationships between the various components of the programme. At the same time by way of elective modules the programme permits students to pursue an element of specialisation relevant to their backgrounds, interests and/or career aspirations.

Where appropriate it is international in scope and coverage. The programme draws on the stimulus of the School’s recent research activities.

The programme provides the students with the basis for developing their own approach to learning and personal development.

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

  • Demonstrate a systematic in-depth understanding of the development, characteristics, issues and influences relevant to international events management
  • Demonstrate a high level of theoretical and applied knowledge of the management, operation, organization and provision of international events
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the research process
  • Evaluate independently critical approaches and techniques relevant to international events management
  • Evaluate outcomes and accurately assess/report on own/others work with justification and relate them to existing knowledge structures and methodologies
  • Demonstrate high level learning and problem solving abilities in the range of modules studied identify modifications to existing knowledge structures and theoretical frameworks and therefore to propose new areas for investigation, new problems, new or alternative applications or methodological approaches
  • Conduct research and produce a high quality dissertation: this includes the ability to select, define and focus upon an issue at an appropriate level; to develop and apply relevant and sound methodologies; to analyze the issue; to develop recommendations and logical conclusions; to be aware of the limitations of the research work

Knowledge and understanding

Upon completing the programme, students will be able to demonstrate:

  • A systematic in-depth understanding of the development, characteristics, issues and influences relevant to international events management
  • A high level of theoretical and applied knowledge of the management, operation, organization and provision of international events
  • An understanding of the research process.

Application and evaluation

Students will be able to:

  • Evaluate independently critical approaches and techniques relevant to international events management
  • Evaluate outcomes and accurately assess/report on own/others work with justification and relate them to existing knowledge structures and methodologies
  • Demonstrate high level learning and problem solving abilities in the range of modules studied

Synthesis and creativity

Students will have the ability to:

  • Identify modifications to existing knowledge structures and theoretical frameworks and therefore to propose new areas for investigation, new problems, new or alternative applications or methodological approaches
  • Conduct research and produce a high quality dissertation: this includes the ability to select, define and focus upon an issue at an appropriate level; to develop and apply relevant and sound methodologies; to analyze the issue; to develop recommendations and logical conclusions; to be aware of the limitations of the research work

Ethical understanding

Students will be able to evaluate the ethical dilemmas likely to arise in research and professional practice and formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, clients, mentors and others.

Professional practical skills

Students will have:

  • An awareness of key, contemporary issues facing the events industry with regard to development
  • Gained insight into issues of strategic development and will develop the skills required to identify, analyse, critique and provide solutions to these issues

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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The EdD is a research degree for experienced professionals from education and related fields who would like to extend their professional understanding and develop skills in research, evaluation and high-level reflection on practice. Read more
The EdD is a research degree for experienced professionals from education and related fields who would like to extend their professional understanding and develop skills in research, evaluation and high-level reflection on practice. The student cohort provides an important element of the programme.

The EdD programme aims to foster professional development through research as well as meeting the requirements of rigour and originality expected of a doctorate. From the start you will work with a specialist supervisor to begin to develop research in a field of your choice related to your professional interests. This programme has a UK focus; we also offer an internationally focused EdD programme. See http://www.ioe.ac.uk/study/RED9_EDUINT.html for details.

Programme of study and assessment
The programme has three components:
Taught element
The taught element consists of the courses listed below. It is assessed through a portfolio of three assignments of 5,000 words each and a reflective statement. Foundations of professionalism in education This course explores models of professionalism and the different expectations of key stakeholders in education. You will think about the meaning of professionalism and the character of professional life, and reflect on your own conception of professionalism and how to develop your professional practice.

Methods of enquiry 1
This course explores the politics and purposes of different types of research and evaluation, and considers theoretical, methodological and ethical issues in the design and conduct of research. You will examine what is meant by ‘data’ in the
context of educational research, and address the relationship between research and practice.

Methods of enquiry 2
This course offers training in a variety of methods of data collection and analysis used in educational research. It will enable you to formulate researchable questions and appropriate research designs, and to select and use appropriate methods.

The institution-focused study (IFS)
The IFS is unique to our EdD programme. It enables you to study an organisation concerned with educational provision, organisation and support with which you are professionally connected. Most EdD students locate their study in their own
employing institution.

While you are preparing for your IFS, you will attend workshops which include input from specialists. You will present the study as a report of about 20,000 words, demonstrating how it has extended your understanding and supported
your professional development. You will normally present the IFS at the end of Year 2.

The thesis
Your thesis, in your chosen specialist area, should be about 45,000 words in length, and should usually be related to your IFS and the taught element of the EdD. It must make a distinct contribution to the knowledge of the field of study and afford evidence of originality and a capacity for autonomous research. At the start of the programme, we will appoint your supervisor from within one of our academic departments, who will provide you with support for your specialist studies. You will normally present your thesis at the end of Year 4. A viva voce held at the end of the programme examines both your thesis and your understanding of the integration of all the elements of your programme.

Length of programme and teaching arrangements
The programme is designed to be completed in four years of part-time study; the maximum period of registration is seven years. The entry date is October each year. The taught part of the programme normally involves attendance at three Friday and Saturday blocks per term. IFS and thesis workshops will support the research component. Your supervisor will meet with you at least once a term during the taught part of the programme, and at least three times a term during the research stage.

For more information and to apply, visit http://www.ioe.ac.uk/study/RED9_EDU999.html

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