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The graduate programs in Measurement, Evaluation, and Research Methodology emphasize diverse perspectives in these core areas. - Measurement—educational assessment, psychological measurement, construction & use of standardized tests, item response theory, cross-cultural assessment. Read more
The graduate programs in Measurement, Evaluation, and Research Methodology emphasize diverse perspectives in these core areas:
- Measurement—educational assessment, psychological measurement, construction & use of standardized tests, item response theory, cross-cultural assessment
- Evaluation—program evaluation, curriculum evaluation across the educational spectrum
- Research Methodology—quasi-experimental, hierarchical or multi-level models, analysis of growth & change, dialectics, qualitative approaches

We prepare graduate students as methodological and measurement specialists. The programs emphasize advanced research as applied to educational, psychological, health, and social contexts.

Measurement, evaluation and research methodology is an evolving field that is trans-disciplinary by nature and is at the core of many of the research activities in the Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, and Special Education, the Faculty of Education, and in many of the human and health sciences in the University. MERM classes are in high demand by students from across the Faculty of Education, including Human Kinetics, as well as Commerce, Dentistry, Forestry, Health Studies, Nursing, Psychology, and Social Work.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: Measurement, Evaluation and Research Methodology
- Subject: Education
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Education

Program Overview

The graduate program in Measurement, Evaluation, and Research Methodology (MERM) offers Ph.D., M.A., and M.Ed. degrees. The MERM area focuses on the preparation of graduate students to be methodological and measurement specialists. We strive to promote in our research, student supervision, and teaching the highest standards of measurement and research methodology in our discipline. Upon degree completion, our master's and Ph.D. students are employed as university faculty, data analysts, research scientists, test developers, directors of research in school districts or government, research consultants, assessment and testing specialists in business, industry, and education, certification and credentialing professionals, and psychometricians at research and testing organizations.

MERM students generally fit into one of three categories:
1. Students who have an applied interest in educational and psychological measurement, program evaluation, or data analysis. Although they may have some preparation in measurement and data analysis in their undergraduate studies, this is not always the case. These students are more oriented toward the use of measurement, program evaluation, or data analysis techniques in fields such as education, psychology, or health.

2. Students who have strong theoretical interests in technical problems related to areas such as test theory, item response theory, assessment, statistics, factor analysis, and multi-level modeling. Although some of these students come to the Program with some statistical and/or mathematical background, often obtained while studying in another social science discipline such as psychology or sociology, other students arrive with degrees in statistics or mathematics as well.
3. Students who find it compatible with their career goals to give equal attention to both applied and theoretical aspects of this program.

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The graduate programs in Measurement, Evaluation, and Research Methodology emphasize diverse perspectives in these core areas. - Measurement—educational assessment, psychological measurement, construction & use of standardized tests, item response theory, cross-cultural assessment. Read more
The graduate programs in Measurement, Evaluation, and Research Methodology emphasize diverse perspectives in these core areas:
- Measurement—educational assessment, psychological measurement, construction & use of standardized tests, item response theory, cross-cultural assessment
- Evaluation—program evaluation, curriculum evaluation across the educational spectrum
- Research Methodology—quasi-experimental, hierarchical or multi-level models, analysis of growth & change, dialectics, qualitative approaches

We prepare graduate students as methodological and measurement specialists. The programs emphasize advanced research as applied to educational, psychological, health, and social contexts.

Measurement, evaluation and research methodology is an evolving field that is trans-disciplinary by nature and is at the core of many of the research activities in the Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, and Special Education, the Faculty of Education, and in many of the human and health sciences in the University. MERM classes are in high demand by students from across the Faculty of Education, including Human Kinetics, as well as Commerce, Dentistry, Forestry, Health Studies, Nursing, Psychology, and Social Work.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Education
- Specialization: Measurement, Evaluation and Research Methodology
- Subject: Education
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Major Project/Essay required
- Faculty: Faculty of Education

Program Overview

The graduate program in Measurement, Evaluation, and Research Methodology (MERM) offers Ph.D., M.A., and M.Ed. degrees. The MERM area focuses on the preparation of graduate students to be methodological and measurement specialists. We strive to promote in our research, student supervision, and teaching the highest standards of measurement and research methodology in our discipline. Upon degree completion, our master's and Ph.D. students are employed as university faculty, data analysts, research scientists, test developers, directors of research in school districts or government, research consultants, assessment and testing specialists in business, industry, and education, certification and credentialing professionals, and psychometricians at research and testing organizations.

MERM students generally fit into one of three categories:
1. Students who have an applied interest in educational and psychological measurement, program evaluation, or data analysis. Although they may have some preparation in measurement and data analysis in their undergraduate studies, this is not always the case. These students are more oriented toward the use of measurement, program evaluation, or data analysis techniques in fields such as education, psychology, or health.
2. Students who have strong theoretical interests in technical problems related to areas such as test theory, item response theory, assessment, statistics, factor analysis, and multi-level modeling. Although some of these students come to the Program with some statistical and/or mathematical background, often obtained while studying in another social science discipline such as psychology or sociology, other students arrive with degrees in statistics or mathematics as well.
3. Students who find it compatible with their career goals to give equal attention to both applied and theoretical aspects of this program.

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The MA in Learning and Technology responds to the demand for qualified professionals in the field of technology-mediated learning and education and the need for management level individuals who have the knowledge, skills and ability to assume the leadership roles that are required to plan, design, develop, implement and evaluate contemporary learning environments. Read more
The MA in Learning and Technology responds to the demand for qualified professionals in the field of technology-mediated learning and education and the need for management level individuals who have the knowledge, skills and ability to assume the leadership roles that are required to plan, design, develop, implement and evaluate contemporary learning environments.

Being founded on principles of networked learning; open pedagogy and digital mindset means that students create and build on their digital presence in order to collaborate and contribute meaningfully to digital learning networks and communities in the field throughout their program. The virtual symposium at the beginning and end of the program is one of the many opportunities for students to engage in, cultivate and contribute back to these digital learning networks and communities as they learn more about facilitating in contemporary learning environments.

The program has three exit pathways; a thesis; secondary research paper or digital learning-consulting project. Graduates of the program work in the creation and evaluation of contemporary digital learning environments. They use their theoretical and practical knowledge to critically analyze learning innovations and assess their impact on organizations and society. The cross-sectoral skill set cultivated in the program enables graduates to lead and support their organizations to continually improve the learning experiences they offer.

A Graduate Diploma in Learning and Technology is also offered which ladders into the MA in Learning and Technology degree. If you are considering a master’s degree but are not sure where to start, the Graduate Diploma in Learning and Technology may be a fit for you.

Who It’s For

This program is designed for individuals involved in the creation of contemporary learning environments that incorporate the best of what is known about learning and technologies. People who could benefit from the program include decision-makers responsible for learning, training or education; training managers and co-ordinators; training and development positions; facilitators, trainers, or instructors. The program attracts learners from multiple sectors including post-secondary institutions, government departments, K-12 education systems, the corporate sector, healthcare, not-for-profit agencies and small businesses.

Professional Certification

The MA in Learning and Technology program is recognized by the Institute of Performance and Learning. Graduates of the program receive credit towards the work experience requirements of the Certified Training and Development Professional (CTDP) certification. Students in the MA in Learning and Technology program are also eligible for an International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO) certificate.

Outcomes

The School of Education and Technology works with a program learning outcomes framework that informs the course learning outcomes. Program learning outcomes identify what the learner will know and be able to do by the end of the program. They are the essential and enduring knowledge, capabilities (attributes) and attitudes (values, dispositions) that constitute the integrated learning by a graduate of the MA in Learning and Technology program.

Graduates will be able to apply the principles of networked learning; open pedagogy and digital mindset as they work in the creation and evaluation of digital learning environments. They will apply theoretical and practical knowledge to critically analyze learning innovations and assess their impact on organizations and society. Graduates of the MA in Learning and Technology will have the knowledge, skills and ability to:
-Communicate and synthesize information and arguments at the graduate level.
-Critically evaluate how learning occurs in a variety of contexts.
-Design and create research-informed digital learning environments.
-Demonstrate effective collaboration skills.
-Develop and analyze support strategies to meet the needs of stakeholders in digital learning environments.
-Select appropriate assessment and evaluation strategies for digital learning environments.
-Contribute meaningfully to digital learning network(s) and communities.
-Explain the interrelationship between innovation, change and digital learning environments and their impact on organizations and society.
-Apply reflective processes to improve professional practice.
-Critically evaluate and/or produce research.

Delivery Model

Proximity to the RRU campus doesn’t have to be an issue. You can choose to do your program completely online or you can include a 2-week on-campus residency in your program. The majority of this program is experienced through online learning as both the fully online and blended programs come together in the third online course and continue online for the duration of the program. Using a combination of Web 2.0/3.0 technologies for learning, you will engage, collaborate, share, create and contribute to the learning experience from anywhere in the world. The courses are designed for flexibility of access while at the same time achieving a balance between individual work and teamwork. Regular contribution in the form of blog posts, discussions or other course activities is required.

Completion Options
The first six foundational courses are common to all students in the program. Then there are the following options for program completion.

Thesis Track
Students apply to the thesis track in their first year of the program. If the application is not successful they have the option of completing the program following the Research Paper or Digital Learning Consulting Project tracks. Students who are admitted to the 12-credit thesis track will identify a research area of focus and work 1:1 with a thesis supervisor on primary research. View recent student research titles.

Research Paper Track
Students taking this track will be engaged in additional course experiences including inquiry-based courses that require them to co-create their learning experience with the course instructor. They will then take an advanced research course in preparation for their 6-credit secondary research paper. Students who choose this track will engage in a deep investigation on a specific research question using secondary data. Previous secondary research papers have included meta-synthesis; critical literature reviews; policy analysis, etc.

Digital Learning Consulting Project
Students taking this track will be engaged in additional course experiences including inquiry-based courses that require them to co-create their learning experience with the course instructor. They will then take an advanced research course in preparation for their 6-credit digital learning consulting project. Students who choose this track will gain hands-on practical experience that will help them apply their theoretical knowledge in a real-world setting on tightly scoped project and provide the research informed justification and rationale for the design decisions made. Projects are sourced from a variety of program-industry stakeholder groups. Student proposed projects may also be considered.

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Students are able to pursue a particular area of research interest as part of their dissertation project. Fundamental issues in health professional education are addressed and a range of options in the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences and the Faculty of Education are offered. Read more

Introduction

Students are able to pursue a particular area of research interest as part of their dissertation project.

Course description, features and facilities

Fundamental issues in health professional education are addressed and a range of options in the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences and the Faculty of Education are offered.

Structure

Key to availability of units:
S1 = Semester 1; S2 = Semester 2; S3 = summer teaching period; N/A = not available in 2015;
NS = non-standard teaching period; OS = offshore teaching period; * = to be advised

All units have a value of six points unless otherwise stated.

Note: Units that are indicated as N/A may be available in 2016 or 2017.

Take unit(s) to a value 30 points from Group A and unit(s) to a value of 24 points from Group C;

or

take unit(s) to a value 24 points from Group A and unit(s) to a value of 6 points from Group B and unit(s) to a value of 24 points from Group C;

or

take unit(s) to a value of 18 points from Group A and unit(s) to a value of 12 points from Group B and unit(s) to a value of 24 points from Group C.

Take all units (18 points):

S1, S2 IMED5801 Principles of Teaching and Learning
S1 IMED5802 Principles of Assessment and Evaluation
S1, S2 IMED5803 Introduction to Research in Health Professions Education

Group A

S1, S2 IMED5804 Clinical Teaching and Supervision
S2 IMED5805 Innovation and Contemporary Issues in Health Professions Education
S2 IMED5806 Simulation and Interprofessional Learning in Health Professions Education
N/A IMED5810 Program Evaluation
S1 IMED5811 Professional Portfolio
N/A IMED5831 Advanced Simulation in Health Professional Education
N/A IMED5832 Interprofessional Education

Group B

S1 EDUC5610 Human Resource Development in Education
S2, OS EDUC5612 Leadership for Learning
S2 EDUC5618 Teaching and Learning with ICTs
NS, OS EDUC5633 Quantitative Inquiry
S2, OS EDUC5634 Qualitative Inquiry
S2, OS EDUC5678 Improving Learning and Teaching in the Curriculum
S2 MGMT5508 Organisational Behaviour and Leadership
NS PUBH5801 Economic Evaluation of Health Care
NS RMED4403 Health Program Evaluation

Group C

S1, S2 IMED5812 Dissertation (full-time) (24 points)

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This Master of Public Health course is offered by coursework and dissertation. Students can choose to pursue one of two specialisations offered - Public Health Practice, or Research Methods. Read more

Introduction

This Master of Public Health course is offered by coursework and dissertation. Students can choose to pursue one of two specialisations offered - Public Health Practice, or Research Methods.

Course description, features and facilities

Both specialisations offered within this course will provide graduates with a suitable background and generalist qualification for a career in public health research or practice.

The course provides a foundation in the research discipline of epidemiology, biostatistics, qualitative research methods, health economics and health promotion, as well as the broader social context in which public health programs are planned, delivered and evaluated.

Structure

Key to availability of units:
S1 = Semester 1; S2 = Semester 2; S3 = summer teaching period; N/A = not available in 2015;
NS = non-standard teaching period; OS = offshore teaching period; * = to be advised

All units have a value of six points unless otherwise stated.

Note: Units that are indicated as N/A may be available in 2016 or 2017.

Take all units (30 points):

S1, S2 PUBH4401 Biostatistics I
S1 PUBH4403 Epidemiology I
S2 PUBH5749 Foundations of Public Health
S2 PUBH5752 Health Systems and Economics
S1 PUBH5754 Health Promotion I

Practice specialisation

Take all units (24 points):

S2 PUBH5758 Public Health Practicum (24 points)

Take unit(s) to the value of 24 points:

Group A

S1, S2 PUBH5712 Dissertation (full-time) (24 points)
S1, S2 PUBH5714 Dissertation (part-time) (24 points)

Take unit(s) to the value of 18 points:

Group B

NS AHEA5755 Aboriginal Health
S2 PAED4401 Research Conduct and Ethics
S1 PUBH5751 Disease Prevention in Population Health
NS PUBH5757 Clinical Epidemiology
NS PUBH5759 Epidemiology II
NS PUBH5761 Epidemiology and Control of Communicable Diseases
S1 PUBH5763 Leadership and Management of Health Services
S2 PUBH5769 Biostatistics II
S1 PUBH5783 Health in an Era of Environmental Change
N/A PUBH5784 Special Topics in Public Health
NS PUBH5785 Introductory Analysis of Linked Health Data
NS PUBH5801 Economic Evaluation of Health Care
NS PUBH5802 Advanced Analysis of Linked Health Data
NS PUBH5804 Food and Nutrition in Population Health
N/A PUBH5805 Qualitative Research Methods in Health
NS RMED4403 Health Program Evaluation

Research Methods specialisation

Take all units (24 points):

S2 PAED4401 Research Conduct and Ethics
NS PUBH5759 Epidemiology II
S2 PUBH5769 Biostatistics II
N/A PUBH5805 Qualitative Research Methods in Health

Take unit(s) to the value of 24 points:

Group A

S1, S2 PUBH5712 Dissertation (full-time) (24 points)
S1, S2 PUBH5714 Dissertation (part-time) (24 points)

Take unit(s) to the value of 18 points:

Group B

NS AHEA5755 Aboriginal Health
S1 PUBH5751 Disease Prevention in Population Health
NS PUBH5757 Clinical Epidemiology
NS PUBH5761 Epidemiology and Control of Communicable Diseases
S1 PUBH5763 Leadership and Management of Health Services
S1 PUBH5783 Health in an Era of Environmental Change
N/A PUBH5784 Special Topics in Public Health
NS PUBH5785 Introductory Analysis of Linked Health Data
NS PUBH5801 Economic Evaluation of Health Care
NS PUBH5802 Advanced Analysis of Linked Health Data
NS PUBH5804 Food and Nutrition in Population Health
NS RMED4403 Health Program Evaluation

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The Master of Science in Exercise and Nutrition Science prepares students to work in government, business, the sports industry and in education as practitioners on professional interdisciplinary teams. Read more
The Master of Science in Exercise and Nutrition Science prepares students to work in government, business, the sports industry and in education as practitioners on professional interdisciplinary teams. The program is for students seeking a terminal degree as well as for those seeking a strong foundation for further study and research. The program offers three entry points throughout the academic year, and courses are scheduled to allow an efficient timeline to degree completion for full-time students. Students are provided experiential learning opportunities both inside and outside of the classroom, and are prepared for both the Certified Sports Nutritionist (CISSN) and Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) examinations, the premier certifications in strength and conditioning and sports nutrition, upon graduation if they choose to pursue certification.

Visit the website http://www.ut.edu/msexercisenutrition/

High-Tech Facilities

Having published more than 100 papers and abstracts, and secured several hundred thousand dollars in funding over the last three years, the students and staff working in the UT Human Performance Research Lab have become nationally and internationally recognized. The lab is one of the most sophisticated and advanced human performance and sport nutrition laboratories in the world, allowing students the opportunity to advance their skills in human performance testing. Equipment contained in the lab includes:

- AMTI force plate for power and velocity

- Dynavision for vision training, reaction time and cognitive function

- Tendo units for movement, specifically power and velocity

- Ultrasonography to measure skeletal muscle size, locate soft tissue injuries and quantify blood flow and blood vessel diameter

- Wingate peak power bikes for anaerobic power testing

- Electromyography for neural function and skeletal muscle activation

- Metabolic carts for VO2 max and resting metabolism measures

- Dual X-ray absorbtiometry for bone mineral density, lean mass and fat mass

- Minus 80°C freezer to maintain the integrity of biological samples

- High tech motion analysis and heavy duty motorized treadmills with 40-degree incline ability

- BTR Primus isokinetic, isotonic and isometric dynomometers for measurement of force, power and velocity in virtually any plane

- Blood lactate analyzers to examine metabolic stress and lactate threshold

- A fully equiped strength and conditioning laboratory

Converging Exercise and Nutrition Sciences Like Never Before

Most university programs segregate the study of exercise and nutrition sciences. The goal of UT’s M.S. in Exercise and Nutrition Science is to examine the relationship between the two fields in regard to optimizing athletic performance. The program combines advanced concepts from exercise physiology and strength and conditioning to teach students how nutrition can impact each area. Through numerous hands-on experiences and rigorous classroom study, students gain an unparalleled awareness of the intersection of these sciences.

Learning by Doing

M.S.-ENS students “learn by doing” through performance-based programming, which prepares practitioners to work with a wide variety of athletes. The department’s advanced labs and technology help students prepare for the real world. UT’s relationships with numerous local athletic teams such as the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Tampa Bay Lightning allow students put their theories to test. UT faculty and students have also conducted extensive research with more than a dozen high-impact companies that are involved in exercise and nutrition/supplementation. These collaborations give students an insider’s view of the industry and provide a strong network for post-graduation jobs.

Internationally Recognized

Based on the rigor and innovation of the M.S.-ENS program, the International Society of Sports Nutrition recognized it as the first graduate program in Florida to offer approved coursework for preparation for the CISSN examination.

Outstanding Faculty

The program’s highly respected faculty has achieved national and international reputations for academic and applied success in their respective fields.

- J.C. Andersen, Ph.D. – pain and sports medicine

- Mary Martinasek, Ph.D. – mixed-method research inquiry and health program evaluation

- Jay O’Sullivan, Ph.D. – internships in exercise and nutrition science

- Ronda Sturgill, Ph.D. – kinesiology and program evaluation

- Eric Vlahov, Ph.D. – exercise physiology, nutrition and sports psychology

Flexible Program

Our highly flexible program allows students to complete the program within one year. With three entry points into the program, students are able to take classes throughout the year and take time off as needed.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ut.edu/apply

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The first in the world, and always on the cutting edge. Rapidly becoming one of psychology’s most transformative fields, positive psychology is the scientific study of the strengths that enable humans and organizations to flourish. Read more
The first in the world, and always on the cutting edge
Rapidly becoming one of psychology’s most transformative fields, positive psychology is the scientific study of the strengths that enable humans and organizations to flourish. Positive psychology differs from historical psychological approaches because of its unique emphasis on the empirical study of human flourishing. While the study of psychology has traditionally focused on improving the human condition by identifying and relieving what is negative in life, positive psychology complements this approach with a focus on strengthening what is positive.

The Master of Applied Positive Psychology (MAPP) program at the University of Pennsylvania was the first in the world to offer a degree in this rigorous field of study. Dr. Martin Seligman, founder of the discipline of positive psychology, created the MAPP program to educate and train students at the cutting edge of the field.

Designed for working professionals
The program's hybrid model allows you to explore the theory and practice of positive psychology without relocating to Philadelphia, so you can continue working full-time. The program includes nine courses, completed during one year of full-time study during consecutive fall, spring and summer semesters. The low-residency format consists of 10 required on-site visits to the University of Pennsylvania campus in Philadelphia, where students and faculty gather for intensive weekends of learning and networking.

Structured for real-world application
Whether you are a credentialed professional seeking to transform your workplace or career, or are building a foundation for further graduate study, the MAPP curriculum allows you to apply the topics most relevant to your interests and goals. You will receive a thorough grounding in the research methods and theoretical underpinnings of positive psychology, and learn to apply its theories and perspectives within individual and organizational settings. The program culminates with an individual capstone project that advances both your professional development and the field of positive psychology itself.

Renowned faculty and passionately engaged peers
Program alumni report overwhelmingly that their favorite aspect of the program is the exceptional group of people who make up our diverse, intellectually stimulating and intensely supportive community.

Each year, approximately 40 students enroll in the Master of Applied Positive Psychology program, including successful businesspeople, practicing psychologists and medical professionals, scientists, artists, life coaches, lawyers and more. They’re all gathered to study with a faculty composed of major pioneers in the field, who are also dedicated and personable teachers.

Flourishing after MAPP
Through their experiences in the Master of Applied Psychology program, students find a powerful new perspective on their workplaces, career plans and personal lives. Our students go on to incredibly diverse careers, applying what they’ve learned to transform their current workplaces or to begin new careers in consulting, teaching, business, healthcare, media and more.

We look forward to speaking with you about the exciting opportunities at MAPP and discussing how our program can help you achieve your personal and professional goals.

Courses and Curriculum

The Master of Applied Positive Psychology (MAPP) curriculum is designed to train you in the history, theory and research methods of positive psychology, as well as its application in professional settings.

The program consists of nine courses, completed during one year of full-time study during consecutive fall, spring and summer semesters.

During the fall semester, you will begin the program with courses that focus on the science, research and theoretical underpinnings of positive psychology, giving students a strong foundation to build on throughout the remainder of the program.
The spring semester courses offer content to help you learn how to apply positive psychology in various professional settings, including creating a plan for positive interventions in a real organization.
The capstone project, which is completed during the summer semester, allows you to integrate what you’ve learned throughout the program, and apply it in the professional or research domain most significant to you. It often serves as a stepping stone to the application of positive psychology in a particular professional domain or to further research in a specific area.
The curriculum includes the following eight classes, in addition to the capstone project:

Introduction to Positive Psychology
An introduction to the research, theory and intellectual history of positive psychology.

Research Methods and Evaluation
A methodology course exploring the valid and reliable assessment of positive emotions, character strengths and meaning in life.

Foundations of Positive Interventions
An investigation into the theoretical, empirical and experiential nature of positive interventions.

Approaches to the Good Life
An examination of four perspectives on human flourishing.

Applied Positive Interventions
A service-learning course in which students study the applied work of master positive psychology practitioners and create positive psychology applications for non-profit organizations.

Positive Psychology and Individuals
An exploration of positive psychology applications in coaching, clinical and other relational settings.

Positive Psychology and Organizations
An exploration of positive psychology, appreciative inquiry and positive organizational scholarship in traditional and social business settings.

Humanities and Human Flourishing
An exploration of integrating culture and science to support the deeper understanding and more effective cultivation of human flourishing.

Capstone

The capstone project is a distinguishing feature of the Master of Applied Positive Psychology program, blending academic and professional experiences and serving as the culmination of your work in the program. Through the capstone project, you will explore, in depth, the theories and practical applications you’ve learned in the program, to advance the field of positive psychology itself. Previous capstone projects have included empirical studies, literature reviews, book prospectuses, workshops and other endeavors.

The capstone is completed during the summer semester and has no on-site course requirements. You will conduct this project work independently, with your advisor’s ongoing guidance, in a setting that is significant to you and most relevant to your future professional goals.

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The Master Program in Internet and Multimedia Engineering provides advanced education on signal, image, and video processing, networking and telematics, mobile and fixed communications systems, and applied electromagnetics. Read more

The Program in a Nutshell

The Master Program in Internet and Multimedia Engineering provides advanced education on signal, image, and video processing, networking and telematics, mobile and fixed communications systems, and applied electromagnetics.

We build high-level ICT professionals in Internet, Multimedia, and Telecommunication Engineering, with vision and knowledge on the current technology evolution, and ready to face the challenges of the Internet-of-Things, Big Data, Smart Systems and Machine Learning era.

Our program has a strong characterization toward Internet engineering on one side, and toward signal processing and multimedia systems, either networked or stand-alone, on the other side.
Students learn how to address the design, management, and operation of distributed communication and processing architectures and multimedia applications, in mobility and over heterogeneous networks, with diverse levels of smartness and interactivity.

The program has 2-year duration, includes 120 ECTS, and finishes with the defense of a master thesis. Classes start in the second half of September.

The University of Genoa offers scholarships and accommodation to its students through the ALFA Liguria regional authority. Dedicated grants for the students of this program may be provided in each academic year.
Visit our website to learn more about the scholarships and the services that the University of Genoa can provide: http://www.ime.politecnica.unige.it

For Your Job and Career

Graduates’ professional opportunities include all companies needing ICT expertise for development, deployment, production, and management. The high-level scientific and technological background we offer also allows graduates to be strong candidates in Ph.D. and 2nd-level master applications.

Owing to the extensive research activity of the faculty people involved in the program, the courses are always up to date with the latest scientific and technological achievements. Professors and Research Staff are strongly involved in research projects funded by the European Commission, the European Space Agency, the Italian Space Agency, universities around the world, and many other institutions and private companies.

How to apply?

If you have a Bachelor (or equivalent) degree in ICT and wish to pursue your studies, you are very welcome.

For all foreign students: you are strongly advised to upload your curriculum, titles, and qualifications to the program website (http://www.ime.politecnica.unige.it) for a pre-evaluation, and contact the program coordinator, , asap.
Visas are generally required for non-EU students. No visa is necessary for EU students.

For students coming from outside EU: you MUST also pre-enroll to this program at the Italian embassy/consulate in your country. This step is MANDATORY for non-EU students.
DEADLINE FOR PRE-ENROLLMENT IS EXPECTED BETWEEN MAY AND JULY 2017.
Consular and visa procedures may be time-consuming, and acting ahead is strongly advisable.

Learn more on

http://www.ime.politecnica.unige.it

Contacts

Prof. Franco Davoli, , Master Program Coordinator
Management Office:
Admin Foreign Students Office of the University of Genoa:

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A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional and educational goals as applied to the program. Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form. Read more
• A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional and educational goals as applied to the program.
• Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• Résumé or curriculum vitae.
• Submission of a copy of current teaching certificate within the first 15 credit hours completed in the program.
• Six credit hours of undergraduate study in literacy education focusing on teaching methods.

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

The Literacy Educator program addresses the interests of candidates who seek greater understanding of literacy and literacy education, but do not intend to pursue careers as Literacy Specialists. Graduates of this program will satisfy the academic requirements for Professional certification in their current certification area but will not be eligible for additional certification as a Literacy Specialist. Program courses also available at Watertown JCC campus. Program Start Date: Fall (Preferred), Spring, Summer

Required Program Courses
Minimum of 33 credit hours:

GRDG 600, Foundations of Literacy ...................................3 credits
GRDG 605, Literacy Assessment and Evaluation .....................3 credits
GRDG 640, Literature Based Literacy Instruction ...................3 credits
GRDG 681, Literacy Educatory Portfolio ..............................3 credits

GRDG 655, Literacy Intervention Strategies, B-6 ....................3 credits
or
GRDG 656, Literacy Intervention Strategies, B-12 ..................3 credits

Two Controlled Electives: 6 credit hours

Four Content or Content-Linking Courses: 12 credit hours

The following initial certification areas may use this program to satisfy requirements for Professional Certification: Early Childhood B-2, Childhood 1-6, Generalist 5-9, English 5-9, Mathematics 5-9, Social Studies 5-9, English 7-12, Mathematics 7-12, Social Studies 7-12, Special Education Birth-2, Special Education 1-6, Special Education Generalist 5-9, Special Education English 5-9, Special Education Math 5-9, Special Education Social Studies 5-9, Special Education English 7-12, Special Education Math 7-12, Special Education, Social Studies 7-12.

The GRE Exam (or equivalent) is required for all teacher preparation program candidates who are seeking certification (for applicants seeking admission for Fall 2015 forward). All other graduate programs, including non-certification options, do not require this exam. More information on the GRE exam can be found by visiting http://www.gre.org. SUNY Potsdam’s code for sending score reports is 2545.

Uniqueness of Program

The program is designed so that full-time candidates who begin their study on campus in the Fall or Summer semesters may complete their program in one calendar year. Most, but not all, degree requirements for the Literacy Educator program may also be completed in Watertown, NY, on the Jefferson Community College campus. There is no practicum requirement for the Literacy Educator program, however, field components are integrated throughout the program.

Testimonial

“I chose to obtain my MSED in Literacy (B-6) because I strongly believe that literacy is the basis of all learning. In my teaching experiences, I have seen many students who struggle with reading, which leads to difficulty learning other subjects. I feel that the program better prepares me to provide students with the most effective reading skills, as reading has become the foundation of education.” —Beth Woods ’14

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The master of science degree in materials science and engineering, offered jointly by the College of Science and the Kate Gleason College of Engineering, is designed with a variety of options to satisfy individual and industry needs in the rapidly growing field of materials. Read more
The master of science degree in materials science and engineering, offered jointly by the College of Science and the Kate Gleason College of Engineering, is designed with a variety of options to satisfy individual and industry needs in the rapidly growing field of materials.

The objectives of the program are threefold:

- With the advent of new classes of materials and instruments, the traditional practice of empiricism in the search for and selection of materials is rapidly becoming obsolete. Therefore, the program offers a serious interdisciplinary learning experience in materials studies, crossing over the traditional boundaries of such classical disciplines as chemistry, physics, and electrical, mechanical, and microelectronic engineering.

- The program provides extensive experimental courses in diverse areas of materials-related studies.

- The program explores avenues for introducing greater harmony between industrial expansion and academic training.

Plan of study

A minimum of 30 semester credit hours is required for the completion of the program. This includes five required core courses, graduate electives, and either a thesis or project. The core courses are specially designed to establish a common base of materials-oriented knowledge for students with baccalaureate degrees in chemistry, chemical engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, physics, and related disciplines, providing a new intellectual identity to those involved in the study of materials.

The program has an emphasis on experimental techniques, with one required experimental course as part of the core. Additional experimental courses are available for students who wish to pursue course work in this area. These courses are organized into appropriate units covering many aspects of the analysis of materials. This aspect of the program enhances a student’s confidence when dealing with materials-related problems.

- Electives

Elective courses may be selected from advanced courses offered by the School of Chemistry and Materials Science or, upon approval, from courses offered by other RIT graduate programs. Elective courses are scheduled on a periodic basis. Transfer credit may be awarded based on academic background beyond the bachelor’s degree or by examination, based on experience.

- Thesis/Project

Students may choose to complete a thesis or a project as the conclusion to their program. Students who pursue the thesis option take two graduate electives, complete nine semester credit hours of research, and produce a thesis paper. The project option includes four graduate electives and a 3 credit hour project.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS program in materials science and engineering, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree in chemistry, physics, chemical engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, or a related field from an accredited college or university,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) from all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work,

- Submit two letters of recommendation, and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the Test of Written English (TWE). A minimum TOEFL score of 575 (paper-based) or 88-89 (Internet-based) is required. A 4.0 is required on the TWE. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores are accepted in place of the TOEFL exam. Minimum scores will vary; however, the absolute minimum score required for unconditional acceptance is 6.5. For additional information about the IELTS, please visit http://www.ielts.org. In addition, upon arrival at RIT, international students are required to take the English language exams, administered by the English Language Center. Individuals scoring below an established minimum will be referred to the center for further evaluation and assistance. These students are required to follow the center’s recommendations regarding language course work. It is important to note that this additional course work may require additional time and financial resources to complete the degree requirements. Successful completion of this course work is a requirement for the program.

Candidates not meeting the general requirements may petition for admission to the program. In such cases, it may be suggested that the necessary background courses be taken at the undergraduate level. However, undergraduate credits that make up deficiencies may not be counted toward the master’s degree.

Any student who wishes to study at the graduate level must first be admitted to the program. However, an applicant may be permitted to take graduate courses as a nonmatriculated student if they meet the general requirements mentioned above.

Additional information

- Part-time study

The program offers courses in the late afternoon and evenings to encourage practicing scientists and engineers to pursue the degree program without interrupting their employment. (This may not apply to courses offered off campus at selected industrial sites.) Students employed full time are normally limited to a maximum of two courses, or 6 semester credit hours, each semester. A student who wishes to register for more than 6 semester credit hours must obtain the permission of his or her adviser.

- Maximum limit on time

University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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The Graduate Diploma (GD) in Disaster and Emergency Management program is a one-year interdisciplinary degree dedicated to educating both aspiring and existing disaster and emergency management professionals. Read more
The Graduate Diploma (GD) in Disaster and Emergency Management program is a one-year interdisciplinary degree dedicated to educating both aspiring and existing disaster and emergency management professionals. The program explores the theoretical foundations of disaster and emergency management as a growing field of practice and study. The program emphasizes an integrated and holistic approach to disaster and emergency management built on the understanding that disasters are more than hazards, and are products of the inter-relationship and mutual construction of the environmental, social, economic, and political spheres. This approach supports the notion that disaster and emergency management processes and practices can and should contribute to risk reduction, community resilience and sustainable communities.

Delivery Model

Online Learning
The majority of this program is experienced through online learning. Online courses enable you to meet the demands of work and family while studying. Using our web-based learning platform, you will access your reading materials, complete individual and group assignments, and engage with the rest of your classmates and instructors; online from anywhere. Each online course will be nine weeks in length, with a two-week break between courses.

Residency
During the course of your one-year program, you will attend one, two-week on-campus residency. Here you’ll get to interact face-to-face with your instructors, cohort and team. You’ll have set class hours as well as homework and meetings outside of class hours, making this an intensive and rewarding time.

Learning Outcomes

Royal Roads University works with an outcomes-based learning model. Learning outcomes are clear, plain language descriptors of knowledge and performance tasks that students demonstrate in order to successfully complete a program.

Within the GD in Disaster and Emergency Management, there are five key learning outcome domains:
-Critical Thinking
-Communication
-Research
-Knowledge
-Professional Skills & Practice

Using learning outcomes helps to clarify a program’s focus, helps students connect their program to their workplace, provides a focus for assessment/evaluation, and helps employers understand the benefits of the program.

Who It’s For

This degree is designed for existing and aspiring disaster management and emergency services professionals. Many students come from the fields of government, emergency management, healthcare, education, NGOs, military, police, fire and community planning.

Applicants who do not have the formal academic education to qualify for admission may be assessed on the basis of both their formal education and their informal learning, in accordance with the Flexible Admission Policy. Applications are assessed on a case-by-case basis.

Upon satisfactory completion of the courses and related assignments, students will be granted a Graduate Diploma in Disaster & Emergency Management.

Laddering Options

Students who wish to continue their studies towards completion of the Master of Arts in Disaster and Emergency Management may do so through the laddering process.

Current students may apply to transfer to the MA program while still in the diploma program. Space may be limited, so the ability to transfer is not guaranteed, and in these cases, only the master’s degree will be awarded upon completion of the MA, not the diploma.

Graduates of the diploma program must formally apply to the MA program.

Flexible Admission

Normally 10 years of work experience, with a minimum of two years of relevant professional experience in a leadership or management position, or an equivalent combination of education and experience. All flexible admission applicants will normally be required to take "Academic Writing and Critical Thinking" and obtain a minimum B+ (77%).

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The Graduate Diploma (GD) in Human Security and Peacebuilding program is a one-year, interdisciplinary graduate program that responds to the increasing demand for leadership in humanitarian assistance, social reconstruction, conflict management and peacebuilding in international contexts. Read more
The Graduate Diploma (GD) in Human Security and Peacebuilding program is a one-year, interdisciplinary graduate program that responds to the increasing demand for leadership in humanitarian assistance, social reconstruction, conflict management and peacebuilding in international contexts. Peacebuilding is viewed as a broad concept which emphasises social transformation integrating short-term (development) initiatives into long-term, sustainable peace processes. The program provides working professionals, or those aspiring to work in the field, with the theoretical and practical skills necessary to help restore peace and civil society in post-conflict contexts.

Delivery Model

Online Learning
The majority of this program is experienced through online learning. Online courses enable you to meet the demands of work and family while studying. Using our web-based learning platform, you will access your reading materials, complete individual and group assignments, and engage with the rest of your classmates and instructors; online from anywhere. Each online course will be nine weeks in length, with a two-week break between courses.

Residency
During the course of your one-year program, you will attend one, two-week on-campus residency. Here you’ll get to interact face-to-face with your instructors, cohort and team. You’ll have set class hours as well as homework and meetings outside of class hours, making this an intensive and rewarding time.

Learning Outcomes

Royal Roads University works with an outcomes-based learning model. Learning outcomes are clear, plain language descriptors of knowledge and performance tasks that students demonstrate in order to successfully complete a program.

Within the GD in Human Security and Peacebuilding, there are five key learning outcome domains:
-Critical Thinking
-Communication
-Research
-Knowledge
-Professional Skills & Practice

Using learning outcomes helps to clarify a program’s focus, helps students connect their program to their workplace, provides a focus for assessment/evaluation, and helps employers understand the benefits of the program.

Who It’s For

Many of our students have experience in complex emergency environments, working in either domestic or international settings within NGOs, government and military, as well as First Nation or indigenous populations. These professionals have experience in human security and peacebuilding, and are now looking to further develop their understanding of the complex interrelationship between economic, political, and social development, and human security. This program will enable them to advance their professional practice in complex conflict-related contexts.

Laddering Options

Students who wish to continue their studies towards completion of the Master of Arts in Human Security and Peacebuilding may do so through the laddering process. Students may apply to transfer to the MA stream while still in the diploma program. Space may be limited, so the ability to transfer is not guaranteed, and in these cases, only the masters degree will be awarded upon completion of the MA, not the diploma. Graduates of the diploma program must formally apply to the MA program.

Flexible Admission

Normally 10 years of work experience, with a minimum of two years of relevant professional experience in a leadership or management position, or an equivalent combination of education and experience. All flexible admission applicants will normally be required to take "Academic Writing and Critical Thinking" and obtain a minimum B+ (77%).

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The Bridging to University Nursing – Flexible program is a three-semester graduate certificate undertaking that gives registered practical nurses (RPNs) the opportunity to bridge to a degree in nursing. Read more
The Bridging to University Nursing – Flexible program is a three-semester graduate certificate undertaking that gives registered practical nurses (RPNs) the opportunity to bridge to a degree in nursing.

While this Bridging to University Nursing – Flexible program features the same curriculum as the full-time Bridging to University Nursing program, it offers a fall and winter intake. The fall intake, however, does not run during the summer. The winter intake runs three consecutive semesters.

This program's curriculum focuses on ethics and professional practice, health assessment, skill mastery and caring for clients with acute and chronic illness. It aims to provide a solid foundation for nursing practice as it is based on the College of Nurses' of Ontario Standards of Practice for Nursing and Entry to Practice Competencies for Ontario Registered Nurses.

While the program has many unique aspects, a particularly exciting and vital element is its focus on caring for individuals, groups and communities in acute care, and mental health and community settings.

This School of Community and Health Studies program includes opportunities for you to apply theoretical knowledge in clinical settings under the direction, facilitation and guidance of faculty, to ensure that you are job-ready upon graduation.

Career Opportunities

Program Highlights
-Faculty members are knowledgeable, experienced and caring. They also understand and support the needs of adult and English-as-a-second-language students.
-Incorporated into the delivery of the program are evidence-based practices.
-In the Bridging to University Nursing – Flexible program you come to understand nursing knowledge acquisition, and how research is utilized and applied to complex client care situations.
-At Centennial College's nursing lab you are able to conduct independent and self-directed practice to develop advanced-level communication and leadership skills.
-Individual clinical feedback and evaluation will give employers valuable evidence of current and safe clinical practice.
-Clinical placement allows you to apply your skills to the real world and develop an employment network.
-The certificate that is earned will provide evidence of reflective practice, employment and continuing education opportunities.

Upon completion of the Bridging to University Nursing – Flexible program, you will be able to:
-Apply generic skills that will facilitate the practice of nursing, ongoing learning and self development, including effective communication and interpersonal skills
-Demonstrate scholarly writing
-Apply decision-making models that reflect critical thinking and self-reflection
-Assess knowledge appropriately and use research outcomes
-Acquire basic technological literacy skills
-Understand self, society, and its institutions in order to assume a role as a responsible citizen
-Practice from a primary health care perspective with a multi-cultural client population including individuals, families, groups and communities
-Provide nursing care to clients in complex healthcare situations
-Provide safe, effective and ethical nursing care that meets the current College of Nurses of Ontario professional standards for registered nurses

Educational Partners
Upon successful completion of all program requirements, eligible students may apply to the post-diploma nursing degree program at Ryerson University, offered by the Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing and the Chang School of Continuing Education.

Career Outlook
-Registered nurse
-Public health nurse
-Community nurse
-Critical care nurse
-Coronary care nurse
-Intensive care nurse
-Trauma nurse

Areas of Employment
Graduates of the Bridging to University Nursing program in conjunction with Ryerson University will be prepared to work in a variety of settings inclusive of, but not limited to:
-Acute care hospital settings
-Public health
-Pediatrics
-Community settings

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The Bridging to University Nursing - IEN program is a two-semester program for internationally educated nurses who must fill theoretical/practical gaps identified by the College of Nurses of Ontario (CNO). Read more
The Bridging to University Nursing - IEN program is a two-semester program for internationally educated nurses who must fill theoretical/practical gaps identified by the College of Nurses of Ontario (CNO). This program is also accessible to domestic graduates who require an updated education or practice to reinstate their registration as a nurse with the CNO. It results in a graduate certificate.

The curriculum of this Bridging to University Nursing - IEN program is based on the CNO Standards of Practice for Nursing and Entry to Practice Competencies for Ontario Registered Nurses. It not only provides a solid foundation for nursing practice but also focuses on ethics and professional practice, health assessment, skill mastery as well as caring for clients with acute and chronic illness.

There is a special focus on caring for individuals, groups and communities in acute care, mental health and community settings, which is a standout element of the offering.

This School of Community and Health Studies program ensures you are prepared for the field by providing you with opportunities to apply theoretical knowledge in clinical settings under the direction, facilitation and guidance of faculty.

Career Opportunities

Program Highlights
-Delivery of the Bridging to University - IEN program includes evidence-based practices.
-You gain an understanding of nursing knowledge, and how research is utilized and applied to complex client care situations.
-At the School of Community and Health's well-equipped nursing lab, you have the opportunity to complete independent and self-directed practice.
-Labs and a clinical element allow for the application of communication and leadership skills at an advanced level.
-Clinical placement presents networking opportunities.
-The individual clinical feedback and evaluation you receive gives employers valuable evidence of current and safe clinical practice.
-Faculty members in this School of Community and Health Studies program are knowledgeable, experienced and caring professionals.
-If you are an adult or English-as-a-second-language student, your needs are supported.
-The resulting certificate serves as evidence of reflective practice, employment and continuing education opportunities.

Upon completion of this Bridging to University Nursing program, you will be able to:
-Apply generic skills that will facilitate the practice of nursing, ongoing learning and self-development, including effective communication and interpersonal skills
-Demonstrate scholarly writing and basic technological literacy skills
-Apply decision-making models that reflect critical thinking and self-reflection
-Assess knowledge appropriately and use research outcomes
-Practice from a primary health care perspective with multicultural client populations, including individuals, families, groups and communities
-Provide nursing care to clients in complex health care situations
-Provide safe, effective and ethical nursing care that meets the current College of Nurses of Ontario professional standards for registered nurses
-Understand self, society and its institutions to assume a role as a responsible citizen

Educational Partners
Upon successful completion of all program requirements, students requiring a baccalaureate degree may be eligible to apply to the post-diploma nursing degree program at Ryerson University, offered by the Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing.

Career Outlook
-Registered nurse
-Public health nurse
-Community nurse
-Critical care nurse
-Coronary care nurse
-Intensive care nurse
-Trauma nurse

Areas of Employment
As a graduate of the Bridging to University Nursing program in conjunction with Ryerson University, you will be prepared to work in a variety of settings inclusive of, but not limited to:
-Acute care hospital settings
-Public health
-Pediatrics
-Community settings

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Developers of computing systems and practitioners in all computing disciplines need an understanding of the critical importance of building security and survivability into the hardware and software of computing systems they design, rather than trying to add it on once these systems have been designed, developed, and installed. Read more

Program overview

Developers of computing systems and practitioners in all computing disciplines need an understanding of the critical importance of building security and survivability into the hardware and software of computing systems they design, rather than trying to add it on once these systems have been designed, developed, and installed.

The MS in computing security gives students an understanding of the technological and ethical roles of computing security in today's society and its importance across the breadth of computing disciplines. Students can develop a specialization in one of several security-related areas by selecting technical electives under the guidance of a faculty adviser. The program enables students to develop a strong theoretical and practical foundation in secure computing, preparing them for leadership positions in both the private and public sectors of the computing security industry, for academic or research careers in computing security, or to pursue a more advanced degree in a computing discipline.

Plan of study

The program is designed for students who have an undergraduate computing degree in an area such as computing security, computer science, information technology, networking, or software engineering, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as computer or electrical engineering. The curriculum consists of three required core courses, up to 6 technical electives (depending on the capstone option chosen), and a capstone thesis, project, or capstone course for a total of 30 semester credit hours.

Electives

Students are required to choose up to six technical electives, from:
-Advanced Computer Forensics
-Web Server and Application Security Audits
-Mobile Device Forensics
-Information Security Risk Management
-Sensor and SCADA Security
-Computer System Security
-Computer Viruses and Malicious Software
-Network Security
-Covert Communications
-Information Security Policy and Law
-Information Assurance Fundamentals
-Secure Data Management
-Secure Coding
-Foundations of Cryptography
-Foundations of Security Measurement and Evaluation
-Foundations of Intelligent Security Systems
-Advanced Cryptography
-Hardware and Software Design for Cryptographic Applications

Curriculum

Thesis/project/capstone course options differ in course sequence, see the website for a particular course's module information.

Other admission requirements

-Have a minimum grade point average equivalent to a 3.0/4.0.
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit a minimum of two recommendations from individuals who are well-qualified to assess the applicant's potential for success, and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required. Applicants who have completed undergraduate study at foreign universities must submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores. GRE scores are also recommended for applicants whose undergraduate GPA is below 3.0.
-Applicants must satisfy prerequisite requirements in mathematics (integral calculus, discrete mathematics), statistics, natural sciences (physics, chemistry, etc.), and computing (programming, computer networking theory and practice, and systems administration theory and practice).

Bridge program

Students whose undergraduate preparation or employment experience does not satisfy the prerequisites required for the program may make up deficiencies through additional study. Bridge course work, designed to close gaps in a student's preparation, can be completed either before or after enrolling in the program as advised by the graduate program director. Generally, formal acceptance into the program is deferred until the applicant has made significant progress through this additional preparation.

If completed through academic study, bridge courses must be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or better. Courses with lower grades must be repeated. Bridge courses are not counted toward the 30 credit hours required for the master's degree. However, grades earned from bridge courses taken at RIT are included in a student's graduate grade point average. A bridge program can be designed in different ways. Courses may be substituted based upon availability, and courses at other colleges may be applied. All bridge course work must be approved in advance by the graduate program director.

Additional information

Study options:
Students may pursue the degree on a full-time basis, on-campus only.

Faculty:
The program faculty are actively engaged in consulting and research in various areas of secure computing and information assurance, such as cryptography, databases, networking, secure software development, and critical infrastructure security. There are opportunities for students to participate in research activities towards capstone completion or as independent study work.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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