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Masters Degrees (Production Technology)

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Building on its international reputation for training in the arts and craft of film and television, The National Film and Television School proposes to introduce an MA designed for students who wish to attain the skills required to support all aspects of production technology in live and recorded environments. Read more
Building on its international reputation for training in the arts and craft of film and television, The National Film and Television School proposes to introduce an MA designed for students who wish to attain the skills required to support all aspects of production technology in live and recorded environments.

-Establish an in-depth knowledge of technologies in the industry combined with practical work experience and intensive training.
-Learn the skills to become an innovator in production and broadcast technology.
-Develop the core skills to become a broadcast engineer, production technologist or IT Director for television production.
-Opportunity to become a specialist in your chosen field.
-Access to NFTS's Masterclasses led by major creative figures from film, television and games.
-Exclusive Scholarship available for this course with BT.
-BT provides work placements in the BT TV team, to be based at the iconic BT Tower or BT Labs.
-After completing the masters, graduates will be invited to apply for a job with BT.

COURSE OVERVIEW

The course will give students a fundamental understanding of the underlying technologies and workflows in use in the industry, with the opportunity to specialise in one chosen area. It offers a rigorous curriculum that combines theoretical training in a number of production technology disciplines with industry work experience placements and intensive training, enabling students to develop their own skills and understanding to provide a strong basis for a career in a wide range of relevant areas within television production.

Across the TV and film industries emerging technologies are enabling new creative opportunities both directly through production equipment and techniques and indirectly through new distribution platforms. The need for production technologists, broadcast engineers and IT directors skilled in the latest developments is increasing, with numerous skills gaps apparent in the employment market. Moreover, some 60% of Broadcast engineers across Europe are within 10 years of retirement, according to the BBC Academy website. Specialists in a number of areas of Production Technology are in great demand from broadcasters, facilities companies, equipment manufacturers and systems integrators.

Production Technology is a very wide field covering traditional live studio and transmission support through to outside broadcasts, workflow design, media asset management and distribution systems across multiple delivery platforms – thus the potential career paths of graduates are numerous and varied.

Technology, both traditional and new, forms an essential part of the creative process and NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

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The Water Technology programme is a two year programme with a joint degree. The programme is offered jointly by Wageningen University, University Twente and University of Groningen with education being provided at the Technological Top Institute for Water technology (TTIW Wetsus), in Leeuwarden. Read more

MSc Water Technology

The Water Technology programme is a two year programme with a joint degree. The programme is offered jointly by Wageningen University, University Twente and University of Groningen with education being provided at the Technological Top Institute for Water technology (TTIW Wetsus), in Leeuwarden

Programme summary

There are a lot of new and existing global problems related to the availability and quality of water for personal, agricultural and industrial use. And these problems require sustainable solutions with a minimal impact on the environment. Water technology has unfortunately not been a focal point of most academic research and education programmes, despite its enormous importance to society. Instead, the expertise of various research groups is usually concentrated on other processes and in some cases, only later dedicated to water treatment in spin-off projects. New technologies will be necessary to develop new concepts for the treatment of waste water. And also for the production of clean water from alternative sources like salt (sea) water, waste water or humid air in order to minimise the use of precious groundwater. These challenges require academically trained experts who can think out-of-the-box and help to find practical solutions in the near future. A dedicated joint Master Water Technology programme has been created to train and educate these experts.

The MSc Water Technology is situated in Leeuwarden, the capital of water technology, and is offered jointly by three Dutch universities: Wageningen University, the University of Twente and the University of Groningen. A combined technological approach, based on state-of-the-art universities in science and technology, will search for solutions to several developments within business and society; with a worldwide impact on the demand for and use of water. One dedicated Master programme with joint degree allows for flexibility and can be adapted to the changing needs of the labour market. Wageningen University offers a strong focus on environmental sciences, the University of Twente on science and technology, and the University of Groningen on fundamental sciences. Students will be educated in the multidisciplinary laboratory of the technological top institute for water technology called Wetsus.

The MSc Water Technology programme specifically targets students interested in beta science and technology. The programme offers a unique combination of scientific insights and technological applications from the field of Biotechnology and Chemical Engineering. This combined approach for problem solving within the global framework of water problems is an asset to the programme. The programme is a valuable addition for postgraduate students with a completed bachelor degree in Environmental Engineering, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology; or in related fields with a strong knowledge of mathematics, physics, chemistry and/or biology, and with affinity of water processes. Students are challenged with examples and case studies of real (research) problems that they might encounter as water professionals.

Students apply for the MSc Water Technology programme at Wageningen University, but will be registered at the other two universities as well. They will have access to the facilities of all three universities. Upon the successful completion of the programme, students receive one joint degree MSc Water Technology issued by all participating universities.

Specialisations

There are no official specialisations within the programme Water Technology. Students specialise themselves by doing a thesis within one of the research fields. Some examples are: Priority compounds, Virus Control, Applied water physics, Desalination, Concentrates, Biofouling, Aquatic worms, Advanced waste water treatment, Algae, Separation at source, Resource recovery, Membrane processes and operation for wastewater treatment and reuse and Sensoring.

Your future career

This study domain is becoming more and more relevant due to the urgent need for new technologies to meet global water problems. Water technology for public drinking water production and sewage water treatment is a very large market. Furthermore, the largest use of fresh water is for irrigation purposes. The industrial water supply and industrial waste water treatment also represent a significant market. There is no question that businesses involved in water technology will grow tremendously. Besides this, human capital is a basic condition to guarantee the success and continuity of the development of sustainable technologies. In many EU countries, the lack of talented technological professionals is becoming an increasingly limiting factor. The programme prepares students for a professional position in the broad area of water technology. Graduates have good national and international career prospects in business and research.

Student Stefanie Stubbé.
"Wetsus gave me the opportunity to get personalized education: teachers that take the time for you and fellow students that challenge and collaborate with you at the same time. Water technology is going to be huge in the future; I already experienced that at several companies when I searched for an internship. Although it is sometimes hard work and far away from the "city-life" in the Netherlands; I've never regretted my choice to start this Master!"

Related programmes:
MSc Biotechnology
MSc Environmental Sciences

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This exciting course combines an in-depth study of leading-edge media technology with hands-on experience of film production and film-making. Read more
This exciting course combines an in-depth study of leading-edge media technology with hands-on experience of film production and film-making.

Whether you dream of being a cinematographer, studio camera operator or a film editor, this course will give you an excellent grounding in both the theory and the practice of media technology.

You will enjoy realistic opportunities to engage with the industry - during your studies you will be visiting leading post-production facilities in London in order to develop your professional network and gain first-hand experience of what life as a professional is really like.

Intermediate qualifications available:

• Postgraduate certificate – 60 credits at Masters level
• Postgraduate diploma – 120 credits at Masters level

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/digital-film-technologies-and-production-15month#entry

Course detail

• Study a specialist course in digital film technologies, taught by an experienced team of industry professionals including acclaimed film-makers and published scholars, which gives you the opportunity to focus on practical production and post-production techniques
• Explore production roles and the wider context of the contemporary film business through participating in media-related research seminars, events and conferences
• Develop your practical skills using our excellent media production facilities
• Gain in-depth knowledge of areas including: production roles and responsibilities; digital film production technologies; practical production techniques; insights and interviews; the film business; studio technologies and techniques; project development and practical post-production and digital effects
• Benefit from a degree that prepares you for roles in broadcasting, journalism, arts and the media, administration, governmental regulation of the media, research, marketing, sales and advertising, cinematography, editing, directing, and independent film production or allows you to continue to MPhil and PhD research degrees

Modules

• Production Roles and Responsibilities
• Digital Film Production Technologies
• Practical Production Techniques
• Insights and Interviews
• The Film Business: Current Issues and Debates
• Studio Technologies and Techniques
• Project Development
• Practical Post-Production and Digital Effects
• Digital Film Technology Project

Assessment

The core units contain both formative and summative assessments, and it is during these units that you should learn the range of competencies and knowledge necessary to succeed on the course.

For your project work you can undertake either an extended digital film technology project (working in groups or individually) or a dissertation on relevant theoretical topic. The course utilises: oral presentations of academic arguments; oral pitches of stories; essays; case study projects; self-reflective logs and a wide range of practical work.

The assessment philosophy of the MSc begins with understanding your individual starting position. Hence work will be diagnostic (often at the outset, as with proficiency in academic practice and writing), formative, summative and evaluative. The procedures used for the assessment of your achievements will correspond with the knowledge, abilities and skills developed through your degree programme.

Careers

You will be encouraged to identify your strengths, interests and development needs in relation to the practices and conventions of both the media industry and of scholarship and research.

You will also be encouraged to seek out active engagement with industry, which might lead to either freelance jobs or employment.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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Solving global water problems requires a multidisciplinary approach of knowledge and skills. That is why the Wetsus Insitute and three Dutch universities offer a joint degree in Water Technology. Read more
Solving global water problems requires a multidisciplinary approach of knowledge and skills. That is why the Wetsus Insitute and three Dutch universities offer a joint degree in Water Technology.

The master Water Technology is a two year programme offered jointly by Wageningen University, University Twente and University of Groningen with all education being provided at the Technological Top Institute for Water technology (TTIW Wetsus), in Leeuwarden.

In the field of water technology, breakthrough technological developments are required. Not only to enable the export ambitions of the water sector but also to solve global threats and challenges in society.

The main added value of the course lies in the multidisciplinary study of biotechnology and separation technology. Such a combined technological approach may offer a solution to global developments, within business and society, and have a worldwide impact on the demand for and use of water.

This program will qualify you as the expert who is able to participate in resolving world-wide water issues. It enables students to complement their Bachelor of Sciences diploma with scientific knowledge and capabilities that they need for a successful career in the dynamic international setting of business and research.

Why in Groningen?

- a multidisciplinary research program: cooperation with three Dutch universities and a Technological Top Insitute
- Water Technology is an area of expertise in which the Netherlands has gained an international reputation
- Commercial parties are involved in Wetsus and help to define and guide the research program

Job perspectives

The study domain is becoming more and more relevant due to the urgent need for new technologies to meet the global water problems. Water technology for public drinking water production and sewer water treatment is a very large market. Further, the largest use of fresh water is for irrigation purposes.

The industrial water supply and industrial waste water treatment also represent a significant market. There is no question that business involved in water technology will grow tremendously. Besides this human capital is a basic condition to guarantee the success and continuity of the development of sustainable technologies and a European know-how economy in water technology. In many EU countries the lack of talented technological professionals is becoming an increasingly limiting factor. The program prepares students for a professional position in the broad area of water technology. Graduates have good national and international career prospects in business and research.

Job examples

- Consultant or manager at a development project
- Designer of purification processes
- R&D department of companies, e.g. Arcadis or Philips
- PhD, starting a scientific career

Collaboration, Integration, and Top Level Research

As a student Water Technology you will be in the center of the multidisciplinary laboratory of Wetsus, in which 80% of the research will be carried out. Wetsus is situated in Leeuwarden, the Netherlands. By inviting all the researchers to one location, maximal cooperation and creativity is generated. The researchers are seconded by the participating EU-universities at Wetsus, but the universities carry scientific responsibility of the projects.

In this way, an enormous intellectual and creative power will be focused on water technology and at the same time knowledge capacity will be build up by all the participating universities.

The Netherlands is Europe's leading country in water process technology. The Dutch government focuses in her innovation policy on water and has appointed Leeuwarden as the focal point for water technology development. This results in a supportive government policy in the form of enabling subsidies for water research and innovation. Around the Wetsus research and education facilities, a high-tech water campus is realised to concentrate know how, entrepreneurship, talent and venture capital. This attracts starting companies as well as research centers of large companies.

Wetsus is part of the Dutch Innovation Program on Water Technology. The innovation program aims for the development of sustainable water treatment technology with a strong focus on export. Wetsus, operating as as Technological Top Institute, takes care of the pre-competitive technology development within this program. Wetsus focuses on the research and development of entirely new concepts and on breakthrough improvements of existing technology.

In both cases, an entirely new approach has been chosen whereby the basic principle is always the integration of various knowledge disciplines. In addition to collaboration between industry and universities, there is also unique scientific collaboration within Wetsus. Many scientific chairs cooperate in the program. Leading researchers from various universities and other research institutes can physically work side-by-side in the Wetsus laboratory. This unique collaboration brings synergy and new creativity to the search for new sustainable water treatment technology.

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Wageningen University is one of the leading centres in Food Science and Technology in Europe and the world. The history of the Food Technology programme at Wageningen University goes back more than 50 years; it is considered to be one of the best and most innovative programmes in its field in Europe. Read more

MSc Food Technology

Wageningen University is one of the leading centres in Food Science and Technology in Europe and the world. The history of the Food Technology programme at Wageningen University goes back more than 50 years; it is considered to be one of the best and most innovative programmes in its field in Europe. The programme focuses on aspects of production, composition and design of food products.

Programme summary

The Food Technology programme at Wageningen University has been in place for more than 50 years and is considered one of the best and most innovative programmes in its field in Europe. Wageningen University offers high-level courses and research in all areas of food science; ranging from advanced technical fields, such as Process Engineering or Chemistry, to fields with a more economic or sociological focus, such as Marketing and Gastronomy.

The Wageningen Food Science faculty is larger than that of any other European university. It includes professors and lecturers from a wide range of departments: Food Chemistry, Food Physics, Food Microbiology, Food Quality and Design, and Food Process Engineering. Food Technology covers nearly all aspects of food science and technology. As a result of being a very broad field, students are required to choose one of the specialisations offered.

Specialisations

Within the programme Food Technology you can choose your own specialisation that meets your personal interests.

Ingredient Functionality
This specialisation focuses on the composition of food, especially, on the role of various components, ingredients or structures in the quality and functionality of the final product. It deals with sensory, nutritive and textural aspects of foods in relation to their components. You major in Food Chemistry or Food Physics.

Product Design
While many new products are launched, not all succeed. This specialisation deals with the design and development of new or improved products. The focus is on the processes used in Food Technology, the design of new products from a consumer perspective and on modelling new product concepts/processes and predictive quality control. You major in Food Process Engineering or Food Quality and Design.

Food Innovation and Management
This specialisation combines courses in Food Technology with courses in Management Studies. It is intended for students who wish to work on product development in small businesses or who plan to start their own business. You will do a thesis in Management Studies and an internship in one of the Food Technology groups.

Food Biotechnology and Biorefining
This specialisation focuses on using micro-organisms or enzymes in food production. During this specialisation, you will learn about processes that can be used for biorefinery or agricultural raw materials. The focus is on biotechnological food production. You major in Food Microbiology, Food Chemistry, Food Process Engineering.

Dairy Science and Technology
This specialisation focuses on the dairy production chain. Its core programme consists of dairy-related courses and several additional courses, such as Food Components and Health, Advanced Fermentation Science and Predicting Food Quality. During the second year, you complete a dairy-related thesis research project and internship.

Sustainable Food Process Engineering
This specialisation focuses on the development of processes that are more efficient in their use of resources. Thesis can be carried out under the supervision of one of the following groups: Food Process Engineering; Operations Research and Logistics; Biobased Chemistry and Technology; or Food Quality and Design.

European Masters Degree in Food Studies
This international specialisation is developed in cooperation with the universities of Cork (Ireland), Lund (Sweden) and Agro-Paris Tech (Paris, France) as well as with ten large industrial partners. For more information see: http://www.eurmscfood.nl.

Gastronomy
This specialisation focuses on the molecular science behind products and dishes used in small scale settings. Scientific insights are used to develop improved food preparation techniques. The cultural aspects of food will also receive attention. You major in Food Chemistry, Food Physics or Rural Sociology.

Sensory Science
This specialisation combines Food Technology with Nutrition and Health. You will work with products and humans in different contexts and study how sensory systems function, how this relates to products and how to analyse these aspects.

Your future career

Graduates find jobs with relative ease, especially in the Netherlands and Western Europe. Recent graduates found positions in the private sector (from small- and medium-sized companies to large multinationals), at Wageningen University or other universities as PhD students, and at research institutes domestically and abroad. Graduates also work in the field of process technology at innovation centres, innovative food companies or government agencies. Most achieve management positions.

Student Harmke Klunder
“It is rich in proteins, unsaturated fats, vitamins and is available in large quantities all over the world. You may conclude, ‘The ideal food ingredient.’ However, would you still think it was ideal if you knew it was made from insects? With three other students, we added insects to a third world food product, thereby winning an international competition from the IFT (Institute of Food Technologists). Malnutrition in Africa could be fought by enriching their daily porridge, sorghumpap, with protein-enhanced termites. As food ingredients technologist, it is possible to look beyond the products found on the shelves of the local supermarkets.”

Related programmes:
MSc Food Quality Management
MSc Food Safety
MSc Biotechnology
MSc Nutrition and Health

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Students in Humber’s Post-Production graduate certificate program will develop technological skills, creative and critical abilities combined with a thorough knowledge of industry practice and workflows. Read more
Students in Humber’s Post-Production graduate certificate program will develop technological skills, creative and critical abilities combined with a thorough knowledge of industry practice and workflows. You will learn the fundamentals of digital media and technologies, both through hands-on and lecture-based work and have the opportunity to specialize and target very specific post-production skills. With technology as the major focus of the program, you will be given extensive practical training with industry-standard post-production software, hardware, gear, encoding methods and distribution platforms.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:

• Prepare detailed post-production budgets using Movie Magic Budgeting programs.
• Evaluate documentaries, narrative films, TV series and music videos for creative features and technical aspects.
• Prepare and integrate 2-D and 3-D graphic and animation footage using post-production applications.
• Manage the editing process using an Edit Decision List.
• Complete picture editing projects using non-linear editing suites within specified time frames and budgets.
• Complete audio editing projects using non-linear editing suites within specified time frames and budgets.
• Design and build a network system for post-production applications.
• Manage post-production teams.
• Manage post-production projects.
• Distribute interactive content produced through the Web and DVD.
• Compile a portfolio of creative work for presentations to funding agencies and post-production facilities in order to secure employment.

Modules

Semester 1
• PPFT 5000: Digital Media Foundation
• PPFT 5001: Post-Production Technologies
• PPFT 5002: Production Foundation
• PPFT 5003: Business of Post-Production

Semester 2
• PPFT 5050: Digital Media Foundation 2
• PPFT 5051: Post-Production Supervision 1
• PPFT 5052: Post-Production Mastery 1
• PPFT 5053: Audio and Video Techologies for the Web

Semester 3
• PPFT 5552: Post-Production Mastery 2
• PPFT 5555: Field Placement

Work Placement

There is a 150-hour work placement in semester three of the program. We work with you to find a suitable placement in your chosen field of specialization, allowing you to apply the skills you’ve learned in a professional environment. Placements will take place in post-production houses and media companies in Toronto. Work placements are typically unpaid but provide you with the opportunity to further your knowledge in your chosen field and begin to build your resumé and network of professional contacts.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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Music Technology is a rapidly evolving field of study with a diverse and expanding range of possibilities. Read more

Aims

Music Technology is a rapidly evolving field of study with a diverse and expanding range of possibilities.

The MSc in Audio Technology is designed to go beyond the simple provision of training, and to instead enable you to engage with current debates and actively participate in some of the most vibrant areas of contemporary research.

Throughout the course you will be encouraged to demonstrate self-direction and autonomy as you critically explore and define your position within the wider field. One overarching aim is that you should leave the course as not only an adept user of various hardware and software technologies, but as someone able to actively shape and develop their own, responding as necessary to future developments.

Thus, in addition to developing your theoretical and methodological understanding, the MSc in Audio Technology features a strong emphasis on practical work in a number of different (but related) areas. For example, you will study modules in Advanced Studio Practice, Sound on Screen, Music Computing and Musical Human-Computer Interaction. These are supported by a technology-orientated Research and Development module that provides robust foundation for the final Audio Technology Project.

Acting as summary of all that you have learned and a portfolio going forward, the Audio Technology Project provides an opportunity to plan and execute a substantial project in an area of personal specialism or interest. Innovative projects are encouraged, and there exists the potential for interdisciplinary and/or collaboration with practitioners in other fields.

Fees and finance

2015/6 Home/EU International
Full time £5,750 £11,960
Part time £2,875

These fees are applicable for new entrants in 2015/6. Fees are for the academic year only, any subsequent years may be subject to an annual increase, usually in line with inflation.

The University also offers a postgraduate loyalty discount: If you have completed an undergraduate degree at the University of Wolverhampton, you may be eligible for a 20% discount on the first year of a taught postgraduate programme.

Employability

The course will actively equip both graduates and those already in industry with a diverse range of skills to enhance their career prospects. It will also develop a range of opportunities for experience and employment in areas such as studio recording, media production and content creation, video game and software development, education (FE/HE), research assistantships/studentships, and employment in HE institutions.

In addition to subject-specific practical skills, you will also acquire a range of transferable skills relevant for pursuing a research degree. These include critical, analytical, project management and research skills from the study of a broad spectrum of literature, research, and external projects.

Outcomes

- Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of a variety of issues in the expanded field of contemporary music technology, taking an independent and rounded perspective.
- Apply theoretical discourse relating to aspects such as technologised production and performance, reactive/interactive/non-linear media, and computational creativity (etc.) to practice through a systematic understanding of historical, contextual, philosophical, technical and scientific theory.
- Select, interpret, develop and apply a variety of research methodologies appropriate for their work.
- Critically evaluate and use a wide variety of hardware and software technologies, and, where appropriate, develop their own.
- Exercise personal autonomy in learning through effective self-organisation and management of workload in both individual and group scenarios.
- Understand the possibilities afforded by the contemporary, expanded field of music technology (including its gaps and trends), and be able to position their own work, interests and aspirations within this wider context.

Why Wolverhampton?

The course offers an explicit and concerted move away from the notion of “training” in how to use specific software and/or other music technologies in favour of a more balanced synthesis of theory and practice.

The proposal for the Audio Technology Project is developed in the Research and Development module, providing time and opportunity to consider the project’s direction thoroughly, and to explore possibilities for collaborative/interdisciplinary working.

Course staff specialise in both traditional/well-established areas of music technology (studio production, film sound, audio synthesis and processing) and flourishing areas of contemporary research (musical interaction, generative music).

A wide range of career routes are open to graduates of the course. These are largely dependent upon the nature of the work the student chooses to produce, but may include: studio production, sound for games and film/video/animation, interactive media, interaction design, creative software development, design for music technology, post-compulsory and higher education.

The University of Wolverhampton continues to develop state of the art facilities to greatly enhance your learning experience. The Performance Hub, opened in 2011, has a diverse range of fully equipped music teaching, performance and practice rooms (accommodating single person to large band / ensemble), two high-end professional recording studios, and two bespoke technology suites boasting sixty Apple iMacs running industry standard software including Pro Tools, Logic Pro, Max, Pure Data and SuperCollider.

Our two recording studios offer the perfect blend of digital and analogue technologies giving students the opportunity to combine classic analogue recording technique with the flexibility and reliability digital technology provides. As well as a dedicated live room each for recording, for increased flexibility and choice of room acoustic, any of the music rehearsal rooms surrounding each studio can also be patched into the studio's control room.

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The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/. Read more
The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/

The established and exciting degree is designed to help you understand digital transformations in media, culture and society and apply this understanding in practice, in the media and creative industries and in further research. You will be equipped with skills that can be applied to current and future developments in digital media, social media, computing and other aspects of technology.

The MA in Digital Media educates aspiring media practitioners and academics as well as early and mid-career professionals who seek to reflect on their roles in a structured and stimulating learning environment designed to give all students up-to-the-minute knowledge of digital media and the skills to apply that knowledge to future developments.

The MA offers two pathways:

-Pathway 1 is a theory programme where you learn about developments in digital media and technology from a wide range of perspectives

-Pathway 2 is a theory and practice programme where you improve your skills, understanding and experience in one of the following areas:

Documentary
Image making
Journalism
Writing

Acclaimed academics and practitioners

Benefit from the experience and expertise of one of the world’s leading media and communications departments. You'll be taught by theorists and practitioners of international standing: Sarah Kember, Joanna Zylinska, Graham Young, Tony Dowmunt, Angela Phillips, Julian Henriques and David Morley.

Work placements and internships

The MA in Digital Media regularly attracts offers of work placements and internships. Recently these have come from Google, The Science Museum and N1creative.com.

Facilities

Our students have access to state-of-the-art facilities including well-equipped lecture and seminar rooms, exhibition spaces, computer facilities and digital media suites.

The department is also currently host to the renowned philosopher of media and technology, Bernard Stiegler and students will have access to his modulein Media Philosophy as well as priority access to the innovative and popular option After New Media. Designed to complement the MA in Digital Media, this course provides a framework for thinking about the current media environment as well as future forms of human and computer interaction.

An established record

The MA in Digital Media has been redefining media theory and practice since 2004. Our students become proficient in:

the history, sociology and philosophy of digital media
the application of critical conceptual skills to specialist areas and future forms of media
multimedia skills in image making (photography, video, animation, graphic art) script writing, journalism and documentary
MA Digital Media students have access the pioneering option ‘After New Media’, a non-assessed online module which explores the themes of self mediation, ethical mediation and intelligent mediation, and develops a framework for thinking about 'life' after new media. As befits a course of this kind we will be combining media, and exploring their pedagogic potential – uniting digital-online technologies with more traditional teaching formats, such as reading groups, seminars and an end of year symposium.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Sarah Kember.

Modules & Structure

The programme consists of:

Two compulsory core modules
Pathway 1 - between two and four option modules (worth 60 credits) OR
Pathway 2 - a two-term practice block (worth 30 credits) and either one or two option modules (worth 30 credits)
The dissertation or the practice/theory project

Assessment

Seen take-home paper; essays; dissertation or practice/theory project and other production work in the area of documentary, image-making, journalism or fiction.

Programme overview

This is an exciting programme which offers a critical, contextual and practical approach to digital media and technology. It problematises approaches to the 'new' media in academic and professional debate, especially those which overemphasise the potential for radical social change led by a homogenised technology itself.

The programme is defined by its resistance to technological determinism and its insistence on the importance of addressing the social and historical contexts within which a range of media technologies are employed. In order to provide a contextual framework and facilitate the conceptualisation of digital media and technologies as fully cultural forms and processes, the programme will draw on a range of disciplines including: media and cultural studies, sociology, anthropology and philosophy. However, the programme will remain focused on key contemporary concerns about the potential role of digital media in society and on refiguring the contours of the 'new' media debate.

The programme offers two pathways. Pathway 1 addresses central theoretical and conceptual concerns relating to digital media. Pathway 2 combines theoretical analysis and practical work, offering students the opportunity to explore new media theories and concepts in practice. Pathway 2 is primarily aimed at students who already have some experience in one of the areas on offer: documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism; writing. It is meant to appeal to media industry professionals who are keen to reflect critically on their practice within a structured learning environment, graduates of practice-based courses but also those who have gained their practical experience in documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism or writing in informal settings.

Programme structure

The first compulsory core course is Digital Media - critical perspectives and this is taught in a small workshop format in the Autumn term. This course functions as a foundation for the second core course and offers students a map of the key debates in digital media. The course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions and is supported by the provision of one-to-one tutorials.

The second compulsory core course is Technology and Cultural Form - debates, models, dialogues and this develops questions of technology, power, politics and subjectivity which were introduced in the first core course. The first part of this course highlights the key conceptual concerns of a contextualised approach to digital media plus the relevant debates and models formulated by key figures in the field. The second part of this course aims to generate a dialogue between theoreticians and practitioners around some of the most intellectually stimulating, contentious and contemporary ideas in the field without necessarily seeking a resolution. This course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions during the Spring term and is supported by the weekly provision of one-to-one tutorials.

Students are required to take options from the lists provided by the Media and Communications, Anthropology, Comparative Literature and Sociology Departments as well as the Centre for Cultural Studies. Examples might include: After New Media, Nature and Culture, Cultural Theory, Globalisation, Risk and Control, Embodiment and Experience, Political Communications. Options are taught primarily through lectures and seminars and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

Each student's option profile is discussed with the programme convenor in order to ensure that the balance of subject-specific topics is appropriate for the individual concerned. Option courses are taught primarily through lectures, seminars and tutorials and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

All students are required to produce either a 12,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor or a practice/theory project in the area of documentary, photography and image making, journalism or fiction. The length of the practical element is dependent on the media and the form used and will be agreed in advance with the supervisor. It will, however, be comparable with practical projects undertaken in practice MA programmes in the relevant field. Students undertaking the practice/theory project will also be expected to submit a 3-4000 word analysis of their practice which locates it within the theoretical debates explored in the MA as a whole. This essay may be presented as a separate document or as an integral part of the project depending on the nature of the project and by a agreement with both theory and practice supervisors.

Programme outcomes

The programme's subject specific learning outcomes require students to analyse and contextualise developments in digital media and technology with reference to key debates in the history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of the media. Students who opt for the practice/theory pathway will also be required to produce material of publishable or broadcast standard and to evaluate the ways in which theoretical and practical insights intersect. All students will develop a wide range of transferable qualities and skills necessary for employment in related or unrelated areas. These are described by the Quality Assurance Agency as: 'the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility, decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations, and the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development'.

By the end of the programme students will be able to:

-Map and critically evaluate key debates in the field of new media
-Analyse and contextualise current and future developments in digital media and technology
-Evaluate and articulate key historical, sociological, anthropological and philosophical approaches to the study of digital media and technology
-Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of at least four differing areas of inquiry
-Demonstrate an advanced level of conceptual knowledge and (where relevant) practical skill appropriate for a sustained piece of work in the field
-Prepare and deliver clearly argued and informed work
-Locate, retrieve and present relevant information for a specific project
-Manage a complex array of competing demands and work effectively to a deadline
-Work resourcefully and independently
-Think critically and/or work practically within a given context

Skills

We provide graduates with skills that are cutting edge: in the critical analysis and/or creative production of digital media; in the disciplinary knowledge and conceptual frameworks necessary for current and future forms of media and technology; in the awareness of how digital media and technologies are re-shaping society from the ways we communicate (through social media and web 2.0) to the increasingly ‘smart’ environments in which we live.

Careers

Our programme provides a theory and practice pathway and prepares students for work in the following areas:

-media and creative industries; advertising, marketing and PR (graduates of the MA Digital Media have found work with Virgin Media, Google, the BBC and other leading organisations worldwide)
-research and academia (graduates from this programme have gone on to study for PhD degrees in higher education institutions around the world and also here with us)
-media production and new media art (graduates have exhibited, published and produced work in photography, journalism, TV, documentary, film and multimedia)

Graduate Ekaterina discusses her career:

"I work for a company, called Visual DNA, which already sounds like life happening After New Media. The company is the largest data provider in Europe and is totally multinational. We actually try to analyse human visual DNA, you memories, feelings, thoughts about the future, anticipations, etc by creating personality quizzes where instead of verbal answers we tend to use images.

My role is as Creative Developer. It involves working with images from concept to finding/shooting and post-production. My qualifications perfectly matched what they’ve been looking for, Digital Media rocks!

My tip for the new-to-be-graduates is this: physically go to places and companies and talk to people. It really opens up loads of possibilities, and when I tell someone where I’ve graduated from they look impressed, and there is some sort of respect coming from them."

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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*New for 2017, subject to final approval. Develop your own signature sound and production style, through this forward-thinking, cutting edge music composition and production course. Read more
*New for 2017, subject to final approval.

Develop your own signature sound and production style, through this forward-thinking, cutting edge music composition and production course. The MA Sound Production programme is tailored towards individuals who are keen to hone their composition and production skills inside an intertextual and cross-disciplinary framework that pushes at the stylistic boundaries of genre.

The content will cover aesthetic considerations as well as technology and techniques utilised in modern music making. The award is deliberately unbounded by genre and there are opportunities to take an interdisciplinary approach to sound production, including contemporary electronic music, studio and field recording, experimental music and sound design for composition.

COURSE STRUCTURE

The programme encourages interdisciplinary and collaborative working methods with students from the wider music community at Bath Spa, as well as visual media and other departments within the University. While the programme has a music production focus, it also covers key areas of practice such as:

• Sound design
• Electronic music composition
• Soundscape and field recording
• Traditional studio practices
• Sound engineering
• Spatial audio and sound design
• Composition for visual media

You won’t be expected to cover all of these areas. You’ll be able to use the course to develop an individually-tailored portfolio of skills, experience and top-level work across them.

The course is part of a suite of courses available across music and sound, operating alongside ‘sister’ pathways in Sound Design and Sound Arts, which allow further specialism in these areas.

For more information on the 'sister' pathways please refer to the website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-sound-production/

MODULES

In trimester one, you'll gain the skills you’ll need to fulfil the rest of the course. The Skills Portfolio module is built on the idea that you’ll already have technical skills in this area. It therefore allows you to choose a handful of skills projects from a large number of options – these cover skills right across the Sound Arts, Sound Design and Sound Production pathways and include (optional) elements of multimedia.

The Research Methodology and Context module develops skills in postgraduate-level research and writing. It is designed to give you the tools for an onward journey in academia, but not to be, in the colloquial sense, ‘academic’.

In trimester two, you’ll advance the knowledge gained in the the first trimester and begin exploring the intertextual possibilities of music composition. In addition, you’ll develop a creative project that will further extend the work undertaken on the trimester 1 Skills Portfolio module.

The module Intertextuality In Sound Production aims to capture and contextualise emerging trends and innovation at the forefront of sound production and composition, and develop composition skills that extend beyond the limits of genre.

Alongside the Sound Production modules there are additional optional modules that you can study from the other pathways. From the Sound Arts pathway, the Visual Music module explores the idea that musical thinking can be extended to the visual, and encourages students to develop multimedia projects that explore this idea. From the Sound Design pathway the Post Production module explores an industry-level workflow for audio post production for picture.

In trimester three, you'll complete the course with a independent research project. While most Masters level courses consist of a substantial written dissertation component, the MA Sound Production programme focuses more on high-level practical work and the concept of ‘practice as research’ through the creation of a large-scale practical project.

The project will fulfil the same function as the traditional dissertation; you’ll develop individual and original research, but through the creation of a portfolio of works, rather than through the written word.

For more information on modules and course structure please visit the course webpage: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-sound-production/

TEACHING METHODS

Most modules are taught through small-group seminars and workshops, where you’ll benefit from close interaction with tutors and peers. The Major Project and parts of the other modules are taught through individual tutorials where the focus will be entirely on your own practice.

ASSESSMENT

You’ll be assessed entirely on coursework. The majority of this will be practical and creative work, including the dissertation-equivalent Major Project. Some practical projects are accompanied by short informal written assignments, and the for the Research Methodology and Context module you’ll produce a more substantial paper.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

You can use the course to develop an individually-tailored portfolio of skills. This will equip you for the current employment landscape, where a combination of traditional music roles are required alongside broader practice in sound and other media.The course also provides the breadth necessary for FE and HE teaching in the field, and provides the basis required for PhD research and beyond.

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Got a passion for filmmaking? Want to improve your professional showreel and boost your employability? Southampton Solent’s MA Film Production programme is ideally suited to students who want to learn advanced filmmaking techniques, working in professional studios and collaborating with expert tutors on a range of projects. Read more

Overview

Got a passion for filmmaking? Want to improve your professional showreel and boost your employability? Southampton Solent’s MA Film Production programme is ideally suited to students who want to learn advanced filmmaking techniques, working in professional studios and collaborating with expert tutors on a range of projects.

- Students study both fiction and non-fiction filmmaking techniques, developing their own unique style of cinematography.
- Southampton Solent’s media academy offers a comprehensive media loans scheme, giving students free access to a range of modern film-making equipment including high-definition (HD) video cameras and DSLR full-frame cameras. Students are also able to access a wide range of top-quality lenses and lighting kits.
- Students will work with Solent TV and Solent Productions, our on-campus production houses, to create work for their professional showreels.
- Investment into 4K technology has already begun, giving students access to the latest professional standards.
- Solent's media academy is home to three green screen studios, a large visual recording studio with capacity for 200 seated audience members and a range of industry standard post-production facilities.
- Southampton Solent University was voted for by students as one of the UK's top creative universities (Which? University student survey, 2014).
- Solent Creatives, our on-campus creative marketing agency, provides students with the opportunity to pitch for work on professional projects.
- Students will end the course by completing a master’s project, demonstrating the range of skills that they have learnt throughout the year.

The industry -

The UK film industry as a whole continues to go from strength to strength, with the number of companies involved in the film industry growing by 32% since 2009. As online video content becomes more and more popular, video production skills have become increasingly sought after by employers.

Many past students are running their own production businesses, working as in-house practitioners or securing budgets for creative projects through crowd-funding. This course will help students prepare for careers in video production, post-production, directing, producing and cinematography.

The programme -

This exciting course focuses on independent film-making and current practices in the film industry. Students will experiment with creative ideas from the outset, taking advantage of our industry-standard facilities, training and equipment.

Along the way students will be challenged to develop their own personal style of filmmaking, exploring new ideas and collaborating with other postgraduate students. Up-to-the-minute teaching and instruction help students to build on these skills and work towards their chosen career.

Students studying in the School of Media Arts and Technology benefit from a schedule of high calibre guest speakers and visiting fellows. Recent talks have been given by Anne V. Coates (Oscar winning editor), Paul Franklin (Oscar winner for visual effects on Inception), Brian Tufano (cinematographer on Trainspotting, Quadrophenia and Billy Elliot) and Sir Alan Parker (director of Fame, Evita, Bugsy Malone, The Commitments and Mississippi Burning).

Course Content

Programme specification document - http://mycourse.solent.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=6152

Teaching, learning and assessment -

The course is taught through workshops, individual tutorials, seminars and research sessions.

Work experience -

You’ll have the opportunity to gain work experience through our two production houses: Solent Productions and Solent Creatives, which work with a wide variety of clients and media organisations.

You could be involved in writing, researching and producing work, as well as in practical film production in the studio and on location.

Assessment -

Assessment is through practical production projects, group and individual research, pitches and portfolio work.

Our facilities -

Our facilities and equipment are cutting-edge. They include:

- Three fully equipped digital studios, including a full HD studio (with 200 seats)
- Extensive Final Cut Pro HD editing stations
- Fully equipped multi-track sound studios
- HD cameras.

Study abroad -

Field trips may involve visits to film festivals in Rotterdam, New York, Berlin, London and Sheffield, and to the British Film Institute.

Web-based learning -

Solent’s virtual learning environment provides quick online access to assignments, lecture notes, suggested reading and other course information.

Why Solent?

What do we offer?

From a vibrant city centre campus to our first class facilities, this is where you can find out why you should choose Solent.

Facilities - http://www.solent.ac.uk/about/facilities/facilities.aspx

City living - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/southampton/living-in-southampton.aspx

Accommodation - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/accommodation/accommodation.aspx

Career Potential

Our graduates pursue a wide range of careers. Suitable roles for graduates include:

- Production
- Publishing
- Journalism
- Marketing
- Teaching.

Links with industry -

We have well-established industry links with ITV, the BBC, Talent TV, Glastonbury and Creamfields, giving our students access to industry professionals and up-to-the-minute experience.
Past students have worked on projects for B&Q, Fat Face, Ikea, Glastonbury, Cowes Week and Camp Bestival.

We also welcome regular guest lecturers from industry. Previous speakers have included directors Michael Apted and Alan Parker, producers Claire Lewis (7 Up) and Nik Powell (The Crying Game), cinematographer Brian Tufano (Trainspotting), editors Alex Mackie (CSI and Downton Abbey) and David Gamble (Shakespeare in Love) and television and radio presenter Zoë Ball.
We host key events for Southampton Film Week, which gives students the chance to meet and network with other industry professionals.

Transferable skills -

During the course you’ll develop a range of skills, encompassing research, creative thinking and problem-solving, along with experience in teamwork and working individually.

Tuition fees

The tuition fees for the 2016/2017 academic year are:

UK and EU full-time fees: £6,695

International full-time fees: £11,260

UK and EU part-time fees: £3,350 per year

International part-time fees: £5,630 per year

Other Costs -

Film Production- £300

Graduation costs -

Graduation is the ceremony to celebrate the achievements of your studies. For graduates in 2015, there is no charge to attend graduation, but you will be required to pay for the rental of your academic gown (approximately £42 per graduate, depending on your award). You may also wish to purchase official photography packages, which range in price from £15 to £200+. Graduation is not compulsory, so if you prefer to have your award sent to you, there is no cost.
For more details, please visit: http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/graduation/home.aspx

Next steps

Think you’ve got what it takes to craft a career in film? With professional facilities, expert teachings teams and a strong focus on employability, Southampton Solent University’s MA Film Production programme could be the perfect next step towards your dream career.

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The two year MSc programme Biosystems Engineering is for students with an (agricultural) engineering background on bachelor level that are interested to pursue a MSc degree in a field where the interaction between technology and biology plays an important role. Read more

MSc Biosystems Engineering

The two year MSc programme Biosystems Engineering is for students with an (agricultural) engineering background on bachelor level that are interested to pursue a MSc degree in a field where the interaction between technology and biology plays an important role.

Programme summary

During the master Biosystems Engineering, students are educated in finding innovative solutions. The programme combines knowledge of technology, living systems, natural and social sciences with integrated thinking using a systems approach. Solutions can be applied to either the field of food or nonfood agricultural production. During the programme, you develop independence and creativity while acquiring skills that enable you to analyse problems and work as part of an interdisciplinary team. Biosystems Engineering is a tailor-made, thesis oriented programme based on the specific interests and competencies of the student.

Thesis tracks

Farm Technology
This topic consists of four main themes, namely automation for bioproduction, greenhouse technology, livestock technology and soil technology. All these topics have the shared goal of designing systems in which technology is applied to the demands of plants, animals, humans and the environment. Examples of such applications include precision agriculture, conservation tillage, fully automated greenhouses and environmentally friendly animal husbandry systems that also promote animal welfare.

Systems and Control
Production processes and various kinds of machinery have to be optimised to run as efficiently as possible; and with the least amount of possible environmental impact. To achieve this, computer models and simulations are developed and improved. Examples include designing control systems for a solar-powered greenhouse to include a closed water cycle and designing a tomato-harvesting robot.

Information Technology
Information and communication play a vital role in our society. It is necessary to acquire, use and store data and information to optimise production processes and quality in production chains. This requires the design and management of business information systems, software engineering, designing databases and modelling and simulation.

Environmental Technology
Environmental technology revolves around closing cycles and reusing waste products and by-products. Processes have to be designed in such a way that they either reuse waste or separate it into distinct and reusable components. Examples include the production of compost, the generation of green energy or the design of environmentally friendly animal husbandry systems and greenhouses.

AgroLogistics
The goals of agrologistics are to get the right product in the right quantity and quality at the right time and to the right place as efficiently as possible while fulfilling the requirements of the stakeholders (such as government legislation and regulations). This requires the design of effective, innovative logistics concepts in agrifood chains and networks. Examples are the design of greenhouses developed for optimal logistics or designing a dairy production process with minimal storage costs.

Biobased Technology
The importance of biobased economy is increasing. Energy savings and the use of renewable energy are directions for achieving an environmentally sustainable industrial society. Biomass of plants, organisms and biomass available can be turned into a spectrum of marketable products and energy. In this track, you learn more about process engineering, biological recycling technology, biorefinery and how to abstract a real system into a physical model and analyse the physical model using dedicated software.

Your future career

Most graduates are employed in the agrofood sector, or related sectors of industry and trade, from local to international companies. They are project leaders, product managers, technical experts, sales specialists or managers at many kinds of companies including designers of agricultural buildings (animal husbandry systems, greenhouses) and bioenergy production systems. Others find jobs with IT companies (climate control computers, automated information systems) or firms in the agro-food chain that produce, store, process, distribute and market agricultural products. In the service sector or at governments, graduates enter careers as consultants, information officers or policymakers in the fields of technology and sustainable agricultural production, while others enter research careers at institutes or universities.

Alumnus Patrick Honcoop.
"I am working as a product manager at 365 FarmNet in Germany. 365FarmNet supports farmers to manage their whole agrarian holding with just one software application. I am responsible for the content of the software. I am the link between the farmers, the agrarian holdings and the software developers. I really enjoy these dynamics and variety within my function. Just like during my studies, when we visited farmers, companies and fairs during courses and excursions organised by the study association."

Related programmes:
MSc Animal Sciences
MSc Plant Sciences
MSc Geo-information Science
MSc Geographical Information Management and Applications
MSc Organic Agriculture

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Our MA in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice. Read more
Our MA in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice.

Course summary

This new programme (which replaces the Production pathway of the Music MA) provides practical, theoretical and analytical study of the creation, perception and reception of audio productions. An interdisciplinary approach is adopted which examines how creative studio practice is informed by perspectives provided by science and engineering (acoustics, psychoacoustics, electroacoustics, signal processing) as well as composition, performance and musicology. Professional competences in various aspects of sound recording practice are developed and assessed, along with the underlying transferable knowledge. This is in addition to a cultural and historical perspective which encourages the understanding of production, with its own notions of style and genre, as an evolving and integral part of music making.

Aims

The MA in Music Production degree is aimed at students wishing to explore the practice and theory of Music Production. This combines a very broad view of the techniques and applications of production for audio media with the subsequent development of more tightly focussed individual skills and scholarship. Music Production might involve anything ranging from the creation of entirely synthetic material using computer-based techniques to the successful capture of acoustic performances, as well as the restoration and reconstruction of existing audio heritage. There are also important philosophies and technologies underlying this discipline that are constantly evolving.

Whether you are an electronic/computer-based composer or an early music specialist who wants to make the very best recordings, this course will provide you with the intellectual and practical skills to realise your goals. This is not a training course in specific pieces of software or hardware. It is a year-long exposure to thinking about and working in Music Production in its many forms. It is an opportunity to develop your own ideas, styles and career in this exciting discipline.

Structure and Ethos

The use of technology for the creation and capture of music is a core part of the Department of Music’s activities. The Department is home to the Music Research Centre: one of the finest facilities for listening to and recording sound in the UK. There is a large-scale neutral listening and performing space built to extremely low noise specifications (PNC15), a linked studio suite containing a dedicated performance space with configurable acoustics and two mix down/control rooms. The department’s main concert hall has a dedicated studio control room along with a suite of editing and programming rooms. This remarkable set of facilities is populated with a wide range of microphones and recording hardware/software. There are extensive computing facilities for practical work and research. Surround sound work is very well supported by multiple sets of 5.1 and full periphonic (i.e. with height) ambisonic reproduction systems.

Throughout the course MA Music Production students are expected to use these facilities to make recordings and other audio artefacts. Running alongside this practical activity are taught modules which provide an understanding and fluency in audio signals and systems and the production chain, listening and analytical skills. In the final six months students produce a self-directed portfolio as well as undertaking a large research project.

Industry and Employment Relevance

The role of producer is widely recognised within the music industry, across all styles and in many different areas of activity. This course will provide you with a versatile skill-set which will be of value for entrepreneurs or for candidates seeking professional appointments, be it with a small independent production house or a broadcaster with global reach. The department is home to professional sound recordists, producers, performers, composers and technology developers and so offers a unique combination of expertise in this field. Rather than a narrow set of competencies which will quickly date, you will graduate with a set of robust skills which will transfer to many different scenarios along with a breadth and depth of understanding of Music Production which will allow you to create meaningful and significant audio content, as well as critically analyse the work of other producers. A significant proportion of our graduates go on to do further research at PhD level.

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Our PGCert in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice. Read more
Our PGCert in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice.

Course summary

This new programme (which replaces the Production pathway of the Music MA) provides practical, theoretical and analytical study of the creation, perception and reception of audio productions. An interdisciplinary approach is adopted which examines how creative studio practice is informed by perspectives provided by science and engineering (acoustics, psychoacoustics, electroacoustics, signal processing) as well as composition, performance and musicology. Professional competences in various aspects of sound recording practice are developed and assessed, along with the underlying transferable knowledge. This is in addition to a cultural and historical perspective which encourages the understanding of production, with its own notions of style and genre, as an evolving and integral part of music making.

Aims

The PGCert in Music Production degree is aimed at students wishing to explore the practice and theory of Music Production. This combines a very broad view of the techniques and applications of production for audio media with the subsequent development of more tightly focussed individual skills and scholarship. Music Production might involve anything ranging from the creation of entirely synthetic material using computer-based techniques to the successful capture of acoustic performances, as well as the restoration and reconstruction of existing audio heritage. There are also important philosophies and technologies underlying this discipline that are constantly evolving.

Whether you are an electronic/computer-based composer or an early music specialist who wants to make the very best recordings, this course will provide you with the intellectual and practical skills to realise your goals. This is not a training course in specific pieces of software or hardware. It is a year-long exposure to thinking about and working in Music Production in its many forms. It is an opportunity to develop your own ideas, styles and career in this exciting discipline.

Structure and Ethos

The use of technology for the creation and capture of music is a core part of the Department of Music’s activities. The Department is home to the Music Research Centre: one of the finest facilities for listening to and recording sound in the UK. There is a large-scale neutral listening and performing space built to extremely low noise specifications (PNC15), a linked studio suite containing a dedicated performance space with configurable acoustics and two mix down/control rooms. The department’s main concert hall has a dedicated studio control room along with a suite of editing and programming rooms. This remarkable set of facilities is populated with a wide range of microphones and recording hardware/software. There are extensive computing facilities for practical work and research. Surround sound work is very well supported by multiple sets of 5.1 and full periphonic (i.e. with height) ambisonic reproduction systems.

Throughout the course Music Production students are expected to use these facilities to make recordings and other audio artefacts. Running alongside this practical activity are taught modules which provide an understanding and fluency in audio signals and systems and the production chain, listening and analytical skills. In the final six months students produce a self-directed portfolio as well as undertaking a large research project.

Industry and Employment Relevance

The role of producer is widely recognised within the music industry, across all styles and in many different areas of activity. This course will provide you with a versatile skill-set which will be of value for entrepreneurs or for candidates seeking professional appointments, be it with a small independent production house or a broadcaster with global reach. The department is home to professional sound recordists, producers, performers, composers and technology developers and so offers a unique combination of expertise in this field. Rather than a narrow set of competencies which will quickly date, you will graduate with a set of robust skills which will transfer to many different scenarios along with a breadth and depth of understanding of Music Production which will allow you to create meaningful and significant audio content, as well as critically analyse the work of other producers. A significant proportion of our graduates go on to do further research at PhD level.

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How can you design an electronic toll collection system? How can a production plant minimize production costs without compromising on quality and safety? How can you design a complex consumer product?. Read more
How can you design an electronic toll collection system? How can a production plant minimize production costs without compromising on quality and safety? How can you design a complex consumer product?

These are typical questions that a graduate of the Master's programme Industrial Engineering and Management (IEM) can address. In a progressively technological society, IEM engineers will increasingly become leaders of technological innovation and design.

A Student of the Master's degree programme Industrial Engineering and Management (IEM) learns how to deal with practical problems in businesses. A focus lies on how to find solutions to problems while taking on a technical and scientific design perspective. The general aim of the IEM Master's programme is to train engineers to acquire a thorough overview of all primary and secondary business processes, especially with respect to the design of a technological product or process.

More than its nearest competitors, the IEM Master's degree programme of the University of Groningen focuses on technology. About 65% of the curriculum is dedicated to engineering and technology, and about 35% focuses on management and business. You can choose between two specialisations:

* PTL: Production Technology and Logistics

* PPT: Product and Process Technology

Why in Groningen?

- Integration of technology and management
- Strongly embedded in a specific technology of your choice

Job perspectives

Career opportunities are abundant for Industrial Engineering and Management(IEM)engineers. Career-market analyses consistently show that there is a strong need for professionals with a combined technical and managerial background.

- IEM engineers with a Production Technology and Logistics (PTL) specialization
IEM engineers with a PTL specialization can start a career as a product manager, involved in the development of new innovative products within the tight boundaries of technical, market and product-related constraints.

-Product and Process Technology (PPT) specialized IEM engineers
PPT-specialized IEM engineers can become members of product and process design teams or for example begin a career as a production manager in industrial companies.

Job examples

- Product manager
- Product developer
- Production manager
- Process designer

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In the future, agricultural and horticultural production will demand new intellectual and technological understanding and skills. Read more
In the future, agricultural and horticultural production will demand new intellectual and technological understanding and skills. The new technologies of sensors, computing, data analysis, remote sensing, robotics, drones and systems of data analysis and interpretation will allow new and sophisticated ways of managing both productive and natural environments.

The course will explore and study the high level of technical innovation currently being applied to agricultural and horticultural production, as will business management and the entrepreneurial skills that will be of fundamental importance to those entering this dynamic, technical based sector. Students will gain skills in data capture, processing, infographics, and the application of such technologies to all aspects of production and for the management of natural environments.

This course will be of relevance to those wishing to start a career in this emerging industry, join an established company, or looking to develop the skills needed to start their own enterprise.

Structure

The course may be studied full-time over 12 months. You will study six modules over the autumn and spring terms, followed by a Research Project, which is carried out over the summer to be submitted the following September. This may include a viva voce examination.

You will have the opportunity to engage with real-world problems, to find solutions to current issues and experience the working world of new technologies in animal and crop production, and the natural environment.

Modules are assessed primarily by coursework. Some modules have an examination as part of the assessment.

Modules

• 4230 Production Resource Management
• 4231 Research Project in Agricultural Technology and Innovation
• 4232 Business Development
• 4233 Computing and Information Technology in Precision Agriculture
• 4234 Livestock Production Technology
• 4235 Environmental Technology
• 4236 Crop Production Technology

Career prospects

Graduates are highly likely to go on to pursue a career within:

• The high-tech agricultural and environmental sectors
• Industries allied to crop and animal production
• Technical consultancy
• Government and international agencies
• The development of new companies through entrepreneurial initiatives

Potential job opportunities

• Agricultural and horticultural engineering
• Information technology
• Resource appraisal
• Agronomy
• Farm management

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.rau.ac.uk/STUDY/POSTGRADUATE/HOW-APPLY

Funding

For information on funding, please view the following page: https://www.rau.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/funding

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