• University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

Nottingham Trent University Featured Masters Courses
Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
Southampton Solent University Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
"production" AND "plannin…×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Production Planning)

We have 398 Masters Degrees (Production Planning)

  • "production" AND "planning" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 398
Order by 
Logistics and supply chain management bring together the business skills to manage the activities and flows of information between suppliers, manufacturers, logistics service providers, retailers and consumers. Read more

Why take this course?

Logistics and supply chain management bring together the business skills to manage the activities and flows of information between suppliers, manufacturers, logistics service providers, retailers and consumers.

This course focuses on the integration of analytical techniques for optimisation with the decision issues and technology relating to logistics and supply chain management.

This course is one of a small number selected as part of the HEFCE PEP Scholarship programme for 2014. Please visit the HEFCE PEP page to see full details of the scheme, eligibility criteria and how to apply.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Have access to ultra-modern computing facilities, and use specialist mathematical and statistical computing packages
Participate in practical sessions to solve real-life case studies using our simulation software
Develop the problem-solving, decision-making and interpersonal abilities essential to professional roles in this field

What opportunities might it lead to?

Logistics analysis is critical to success in both manufacturing and service industries. Competitive advantage will increasingly come from the supplier's ability to rapidly respond to changing customer needs, for which effective logistics are of prime importance. This means that there will be a range of companies and organisations in both the public and private sector, demanding for your skills and expertise.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Production management
Transportation management
Quality control
Distribution
Facilities planning
Supply chain management
Passenger transportation

This course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT). Students studying CILT accredited courses receive exemptions from the academic requirements for membership. Graduates of the MSc Logistics and Supply Chain Management course at the University of Portsmouth with an overall average pass mark above 50% are eligible to apply for Chartered Membership (CMILT) once they have gained the necessary experience.

Module Details

Supply chain management is a philosophy, the implementation process and the control of this process through which different entities within a supply chain aim to streamline their activities to improve the overall effectiveness and efficiency of meeting final customer requirements. A variety of different techniques will be investigated, ranging from conceptual frameworks, analytical approaches, to computer-based models.

Here are the units you will study:

Supply Chain Management: This unit enable you to develop advanced skills so that you can deal with problems of supply chain management across different products, locations, and companies. The types of problems studied in this course are encountered in industry (e.g. retail, discrete or continuous production and logistics service providers) as well as in service organisations (e.g. banks, hospitals and law firms). Managers dealing with such problems are known under various titles, including production, operations, supply (chain), inventory, purchasing, distribution or logistics managers.

Logistics Modelling: Most problems arising in the fields of logistics and supply chain management have sufficient complexity and detail that they require the use of sophisticated modelling techniques. This unit looks at two of the most commonly used methodologies for modelling and solving logistics problems: simulation and heuristic techniques. In both cases a computer package is used to assist solution. The techniques will be demonstrated with a range of case studies drawn from the field of logistics including transportation, supply chain configuration and management, warehouse design and layout, container port layout, production planning and vehicle routing.

Operations Management: This unit teaches operations management techniques that are relevant to logistics. The commonly used techniques of linear and integer programming will be taught using Microsoft Excel based methods for solution. You will look at case studies covering production planning, transportation, logistics planning and supply chain configuration. You will also be taught about locating facilities such as factories, distribution centres, cross docking centres and retail outlets. The effective scheduling of labour force and machines will be demonstrated, and current state-of-the art production planning models will be covered.

Strategic Logistics: This unit looks at the field of logistics from a strategic point of view. A number of quantitative techniques for strategic decision making such as decision analysis, multi-criteria decision analysis, data envelopment analysis and queuing theory are introduced in the context of logistics applications. The topic of strategic decisions in transportation modelling is then covered. The unit is completed by the analysis of a number of case studies relating to different applications of logistics with respect to financial, environmental, societal and economic objectives.

Project (Masters Logistics): This unit allows you to conduct research into a larger scale or challenging logistics problem. The project may be practical or theoretical and may arise either from the supervisor's research interests or from your own desire to study a particular topic or situation. Typical areas of logistics in which the project will be conducted include (but are not limited to) transportation, supply chain configuration and management, warehouse design and layout, container port layout, production planning, green logistics, facility location and vehicle routing.

Programme Assessment

Our enthusiastic team of lecturers have a wide range of industrial and research experience, ensuring that you graduate with cutting-edge knowledge. You will be taught through a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical computer-based sessions, laboratory and project work.

We assess you in a several ways, but a large portion of the assessment is based on a major project at the end of the year. Here’s how we assess your work:

Examinations
Coursework
Laboratory assignments
A dissertation

Student Destinations

Logistics and transportation are important to any firm where customer service is a strategic objective – whether its core focus is on products or services.

When you graduate from this course you could find employment in a wide range of logistics-related careers. Not only in the traditional areas of manufacturing logistics, distribution and supply chain management, but also postal and express delivery, the fire and rescue emergency operations and even the military and defence industry.

Read less
This one-year full-time and two-year part-time MSc programme is the benchmark qualification for those wishing to enter the planning profession and is fully accredited by both the RTPI and RICS. Read more
This one-year full-time and two-year part-time MSc programme is the benchmark qualification for those wishing to enter the planning profession and is fully accredited by both the RTPI and RICS.

It takes a broad approach to the “traditional” field of city and regional or town and country planning. You will learn to integrate concerns across the board, including those of economy, climate change, and social need. The emphasis is on developing a broad and flexible level of knowledge and understanding, enabling you to adapt to developing pressures during your career.

The course combines core planning education with the development of expertise in specialist areas. Our links with practitioners in both the private and public sectors ensures that the course remains at the cutting edge of practice.

Why choose this course?

It is viewed as the first choice for planning training by a range of employers including local authorities, the Environment Agency and major planning consultancies. Frequent guest lectures from industry leaders give you the chance to make important contacts for your future career.

Learn more about current developments from professionals and academics through our Planning seminar series. The department is based in the modern and well equipped Abercrombie building, part of an award-winning recent redevelopment of the campus.

Access to top-of-the-range facilities including studios, IT suites and computer programs, as well as three libraries and 24/7 online databases which contain all the academic material you require to be successful in their postgraduate studies. Study in the world-famous student city of Oxford, a particularly fascinating place for those interested in cities, transport and sustainability.

This course in detail

The course is offered at two levels: a master's degree (MSc) and a postgraduate diploma (PGDip).

The MSc course is based on the completion of the following compulsory elements, plus elective specialisations and a 15,000-word master's dissertation.

The PGDip level of the course is based on the completion of the compulsory elements listed above, but replaces the dissertation with a 10,000-word Planning Practice Project. This is a major piece of independent study culminating in the production of a report that analyses the implementation process of a planning policy, a development programme or a major project. The postgraduate diploma can be completed in two semesters full-time or four semesters part-time, and must be combined with an approved specialist planning programme to fulfil the RTPI requirements.

See website for a complete module breakdown: http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/spatial-planning/

Professional accreditation

The MSc in Spatial Planning is fully accredited by both the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). This means that on graduation you can complete the Assessment of Professional Competence programmes of these professional bodies and become a full member.

In order to attain full accreditation for both the RTPI and RICS, graduates must combine the Postgraduate Diploma in Spatial Planning with one of our specialist master's programmes. These include: an MSc in Environmental Assessment and Management, an MSc in Historic Conservation, an MSc in Urban Planning: Developing and Transitional Regions, or the MA in Urban Design.

Careers and professional development

Not only is the MSc in Spatial Planning seen as the benchmark qualification for professional planners, it is also widely recognised as providing the transferable skills and critical knowledge necessary in many fields of work in the built and natural environment.

Local government is just one of very many career opportunities available to MSc in Spatial Planning graduates.

Today our alumni can be found in senior positions in some of the largest international planning and environmental consultancies, in government agencies, in large NGOs and campaigning organisations. They can also be found in similar positions in organisations across the globe.

Read less
About the course. Starting in September 2017, this course is ideally suited for students progressing from undergraduate study, or professionals seeking to develop their career in filmmaking. Read more

About the course

Starting in September 2017, this course is ideally suited for students progressing from undergraduate study, or professionals seeking to develop their career in filmmaking. This course gives students the opportunity to develop a portfolio of production related skills by studying at DMU in Leicester and at Creative Media Skills (CMS), an independent training provider based at Pinewood Studios in Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire

Reasons to study International Film Production at De Montfort University:

Developed in partnership with Creative Media Skills (CMS)

CMS is DMU’s partner in developing and delivering the programme. It works hand in hand with government organisations, as well as the industry, to identify skills gaps and provide high-level targeted training in many areas of the film industry. CMS bring professionals and department heads into the classroom, and provides students with access to the UK film industry’s most valuable knowledge base – its staff.

Develop a range of production management skills

At DMU, these skills include scriptwriting, lighting and cinematography, image processing, directing and post production. At CMS you will focus on pitching, budgeting, production development, and fine skills. You will also gain core business expertise, such as an understanding of research and development, and wider careers planning.

Benefit from DMU’s expertise

At DMU, you will develop your filmmaking and camera based skills, learn about the UK film industry and shoot your major production. You will benefit from our outstanding studio spaces, and the skills and expertise of established research groups such as Cinema and Television History (CATH) Research Centre and Institute Of Creative Technologies (IOCT)

Learning off campus at CMS

The second semester of your learning will take place in the Creative Media Skills centre. While there, you will manage the development of a production and receive masterclasses on a range of fine skills from the CMS team and respected professionals actively working in the film industry.

Semesters

During the first semester, you will work at DMU. This semester involves developing core skills in storytelling, screenwriting, directing, producing, image processing, sound recording and other camera based skills. You will take four, 15 credit modules during semester one: 

  • Screenwriting
  • The Production Process
  • Key Roles in the Film Industry
  • Realisation

You will be taught by DMU’s team of production experts and filmmakers in our studio space, and you will begin the process of developing a major project, and specialising in a production role. 

During the second semester, you will work in the Creative Media Skills centre. Here you will finesse your skills in a more diverse range of areas, including Production management & Coordination, Pitching, Assistant Directing, Production Management, Script Supervision, Hair, Makeup, Costume, Art Department; Working with Actors and Working in Teams. You will also enter pre-production under the guidance of our expert staff. At Creative Media Skills, you will take two, 30 credit modules, which cover these various areas: 

  • Pre-Production and Development
  • Fine skills

During this semester you will be expected to pitch film ideas to a panel of industry experts. The best will be selected as the major projects, which will become your focus in the third semester. During the third semester you will work more independently at DMU to manage and deliver your final film project, with an accompanying reflective commentary. This project will demonstrate the skills and knowledge developed on the course, and will form the basis of your professional portfolio. You also have the option of taking an academic dissertation. 

In addition to the major project, assessments take the form of practical coursework, written reports and presentations. 

To find out more

To learn more about this course and DMU, visit our website:

Postgraduate open days: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/open-evenings/postgraduate-open-days.aspx

Applying for a postgraduate course:

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/entry-criteria-and-how-to-apply/entry-criteria-and-how-to-apply.aspx

Funding for postgraduate students

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/postgraduate-funding-2017-18/postgraduate-funding-2017-18.aspx



Read less
The MA Songwriting and Production course is delivered in the context of a dynamic contemporary music and cultural scene in Wales. Read more
The MA Songwriting and Production course is delivered in the context of a dynamic contemporary music and cultural scene in Wales. You will study close to a range of music venues, recording, radio, TV and film studios, as well as many music organisations, and with access to high profile, successful musicians and other industry professionals.

This innovative degree will enable you to make connections and collaborations within the world of both professional songwriting, and the wider music culture. Designed for those interested in lyrics, music and studio production, you’ll learn a range of creative techniques, as well as the history of popular song and the world of music publishing. For your final project, you will create an original portfolio of work to be showcased at the state-of-the art ATRiuM Building, situated in Cardiff – the vibrant capital city of Wales, a thriving international hub for music and the creative industries.

On completion, graduates will have the expertise and experience to work professionally within a range of different contexts. Taught by practising songwriters, producers, and published academics, the course is also delivered through a series of master classes from industry professionals.

If you choose to study on a creative postgraduate course at the University of South Wales, you will also benefit from being part of a vibrant international student community.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1558-ma-songwriting-and-production

What you will study

Selection of Modules include:
- Songwriting 1: Skills and Strategies
- Digital Music Production
- History, Analysis, Repertoire and Theory
- Research Paradigms
- Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship
- Research and Practice in the Creative and Cultural Industries
- Songwriting 2: Creative Co-writing
- Recording
- Performance: Practice and Presentation
- Major Project Portfolio OR Research Project (Learning Through Employment)

Research methods, business practice, publishing and promotion are embedded in all modules.

Common Modules:
The Faculty understands the importance of a strong grounding in research knowledge and skills, enterprise and innovation as part of a balanced postgraduate education.

We also recognise that each student has different requirements of their postgraduate experience.

You can choose to study one of the following three, 20 credit common modules. Each of these has a different focus, enabling you to select the module that will be most beneficial to you.

- Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship
This module aims to develop your knowledge of the methods to identify, develop and manage enterprise and innovation in the creative sector. It will then help you apply this to your own entrepreneurial project.

- Research and Practice in the Creative and Cultural Industries
The focus of this module is on the development of research knowledge and skills, while also encouraging critical engagement with approaches to creative practice. You will also explore ideas, debates and issues in the creative and cultural industries.

- Research Paradigms
This module focuses on research paradigms and their theoretical underpinnings. It also looks at key conceptual tools drawn from a wide range of subject areas relevant to postgraduate research in the creative industries.

PLEASE NOTE: Modules are subject to change.

Learning and teaching methods

The course incorporates desktop and studio-based production processes, with key business skills such as publishing, promotion, distribution and session planning.

Emphasis is on practical activities and encouraging you to find your own voice when developing material. Teaching sessions take place in a supportive environment, where students provide feedback on each others work. Practical sessions are underpinned by skills development and an understanding of theories about best practice in songwriting and production.

The course embraces singer/performer songwriters, as well as those who do not wish to perform their own material; solo and group outputs; creative collaboration; and material produced in studio/digital environments. The degree can also be studied by distance learning; UK and international students may choose to study using their own studio base and equipment.

“In an ever-changing industry where listening formats, recording processes and budgets are constantly evolving, songwriting and production are still a good way for a musician to have a long, fulfilling and successful career. It is hugely encouraging to see the University of South Wales offering [songwriting and production] to masters degree level. Creative areas can often be solitary places, so the opportunity to learn from others and share ideas in a creative environment such as the ATRiuM should prove an invaluable experience.”
Greg Haver, Record Producer – The Manic Street Preachers

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

In addition to working professionally as a songwriter or in song production, potential careers for graduates of this course could include working as facilitators in community and arts outreach activities, as educators in formal teaching settings, and as practitioners
such as performers, producers and writers.

There are also opportunities as researchers, administrators/managers of organisations, festivals and music events, or within music journalism and publishing, A & R, radio, freelance production, music promotion, or as part of other media production teams such as advertising, event management and games.

Assessment methods

Learning activities focus on the needs of individual students and are designed to accommodate students with a range of ambitions in relation to different kinds of approaches to songwriting and song production. Emphasis is placed on practical activities and on encouraging students to find their own voice when developing their material.

Teaching sessions take place in a supportive environment, where students provide feedback on each others work. Practical sessions are underpinned by skills development and an understanding of theories about/best practices in songwriting and song production.

‘I’d like to support the MA Songwriting course. It being the only course of its kind in Wales it will be a hugely valuable addition to the ATRiuM choice of courses. The teaching staff’s experience with writing and the music industry will also be a valuable asset to the course … I often meet students who study at the Atrium and the breadth of courses, and the skills they are developing and injecting back into Welsh music should be applauded. I look forward to hearing more output from this course, and the songwriters of the future coming from it onto our airwaves.’
Bethan Elfyn, DJ BBC Radio Wales

Read less
The Master of Science Programme (LM) in Safety Engineering for Transport, Logistics, and Production wants to provide students with a high level of advanced training, to enable them to operate in the areas the most qualified with reference to the various activities related to safety in transport systems, logistics, and related manufacturing. Read more

Aims and Basic Characteristics:

The Master of Science Programme (LM) in Safety Engineering for Transport, Logistics, and Production wants to provide students with a high level of advanced training, to enable them to operate in the areas the most qualified with reference to the various activities related to safety in transport systems, logistics, and related manufacturing.

The degree course aims at training a professional engineer with a thorough knowledge and understanding of the principles of systems engineering of transportation, logistics and production, in which to realize the acquired ability to conceive, plan, design and manage complex, innovative systems and processes, with particular attention to the related safety aspects.
The degree in Safety Engineering for Transport, Logistics, and Production will support the state exam for a license to practice in all the three areas of Engineering: Civil and Environmental, Industrial, and Information.

The typical professional fields for graduates in Safety Engineering for Transport, Logistics, and Production are those of the design and management of safety systems, with particular reference to the transport systems, the development of advanced innovative services, the management of logistics and production, in private and public enterprises, and public administration.

For any information, feel free to write to Prof. Nicola Sacco: safety_at_dime.unige.it

Job opportunities:

• engineering companies and/or large professional firms operating in the field of design, implementation, security management with reference of the transport systems and territorial
• public and private institutions that handle large lines infrastructure (railways, highways, ...)
• government (municipalities, provinces, regions, port authorities, ...)
• freelance
• research structures (universities, research centers, ...)

What Will You Study and Future Prospects:

The main goal is to enable M.Sc. graduates to operate in the various activities related to safety in transport systems, logistics, and production, but also of the territory where they are located.

The course provides notions about:

• the risk assessment of local systems, and in particular the planning, design and management of both safety (protection against accidental events) and security (protection than intentional events);
• the evaluation in terms of cost/benefits of different design alternatives for risk mitigation in transport, logistics, and production systems;
• the planning and management of the mobility of people and goods, through the knowledge of the fundamental elements of transport and logistic systems, as well as the criteria to define the physical characteristics of isolated infrastructures a network of infrastructures, with particular reference to the relevant functions and interdependencies;
• the design and safe management of transport, logistic, and production systems, with reference to either the systems as a whole, and to the relevant single components, such as infrastructures, facilities, vehicles, equipment;
• the development and use of advanced methods to manage and optimize the performance and safety of road, rail, air and sea infrastructure and transport services, as well as their interactions in an intermodal framework, by means of the design and implementation of monitoring, regulation, and control systems via the most advanced technologies related to their specific disciplines;
• the analysis and evaluation of the externalities of transport and logistic systems, with explicit reference to the particular safety aspect and issues characterizing each phase of the mobility of people and goods, even within the production plants connected, and their interaction with surrounding environment.

The course is articulated into two alternative curricula:

1. TRANSPORT AND LOGISTICS: This curriculum concentrates on the problems related to design and manage the complex systems that realize a safe and effective mobility of passengers and freights.

2. INDUSTRIAL LOGISTICS AND PRODUCTION: This curriculum concentrates on the problems related to design and manage the complex systems that realize a safe and effective production plant internal logistics and management.

Entry Requirements:

Admission to the Master of Science in Safety Engineering for Transport, Logistics and Production is subject to the possession of specific curricular requirements and adequacy of personal preparation.

The access requirements are equivalent to those provided by the general educational objectives of all three-year university degree in classes of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Information Engineering, and Industrial Engineering. In fact, one of the following curricular requirements must be fulfilled:

• possession of a Bachelor, or a Master degree, or a five-year degree in classes of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Information Engineering, and Industrial Engineering, awarded by an Italian University, or equivalent qualifications;
• possession of a Bachelor, or a Master degree, or a five-year degree with at least 36 ECTS (“Base Courses”, e.g. Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Informatics) and at least 45 ECTS that pertain to the Engineering classes, awarded by an Italian University, or equivalent qualifications;

To access, a knowledge of English is required, at least equivalent at B1 European Level.

Read less
Logistics and Supply Chain Management is basically about planning and controlling the activities of a company in order to secure that the right product is delivered in the right quantities to the right customer at the right time to the right price. Read more
Logistics and Supply Chain Management is basically about planning and controlling the activities of a company in order to secure that the right product is delivered in the right quantities to the right customer at the right time to the right price.

Though at first glance, this may sound easy, it is of course a challenging task. Furthermore, it is not enough just to be a good planner, it is also important to understand how various business processes must be in place in order to support a well functioning supply chain.

The programme provides you with an in-depth knowledge about

- Methods for planning and controlling flows of goods and information in a supply chain. This includes a solid understanding of how to develop the necessary IT based tools.
- How to design a strategy for Supply Chain Management.

The courses of the programme will provide you with analytical skills that enable you to appraise, systematically structure and analyse the possible solutions to complex logistical problems. The teaching form of the programme encourages student participation and this in combination with the final thesis work will provide you with self-management and communication skills.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

Prerequisite courses
In the first semester you follow the prerequisite courses that form the methodological and academic basis for the further study programme.

In Research Methods in Logistics you are introduced to the research traditions in the field of logistics, in particular how Operations Research can and should be used.

In Advanced Excel you will get beyond basic Excel knowledge as you will also be introduced to simulation by use of Crystal Ball and to Visual Basic programming.

In Simulation: Modelling and Analysis you will be acquainted with the discrete event simulation methodology and how this can be applied for solving logistical problems.

In Optimisation Methods you acquire basic knowledge about how to model and solve optimisation problems.

In Production Planning and Control you get knowledge about the methodologies that are the foundation of the production planning modules in any ERP system.

Supply Chain Management: Strategy and Design will focus on high-level supply chain strategies and concepts but also provide you with an understanding of the role quantitative models play for doing a supply chain analysis.

Specialisation courses
In the second semester you follow the specialisation courses of the programme.

In Demand Management the students learn tools for forecasting and learn to understand the relationship between forecasts and planning within the company.

In Global Sourcing Strategic focus is on business relations between buyers and sellers on the industrial market. The students will learn to analyse this relationship and to develop well-founded possible solutions for complex problems within the subject area.

In Inventory Control the students get a solid understanding of issues about allocation and dimensioning of inventories in a supply chain.

Distribution and Transportation will be focused on how to solve practical logistical problems within the fields of transportation and Distribution Planning.

Supply Chain Performance Management deals with how decision making units in a supply chain can track their strategic focus while controlling that operations are lean and agile. Essential elements are the roles of key performance indicators (KPIs) and score card tools , as well as the links to issues in management accounting and financial performance measurement.

In Project Management with Accounting Perspectives the student will learn about the qualitative as well as the quantitative issues regarding the management of projects.

In the third semester you can choose elective courses within your areas of interest. The courses can either be taken at Aarhus BSS during the semester, at the AU Summer University or at one of our more than 200 partner universities abroad. You can also participate in internship programmes either in Denmark or abroad.

The fourth semester is devoted to the final thesis. You may choose the topic of the thesis freely and in this way get a chance to concentrate on and specialise in a specific field of interest. The thesis may be written in collaboration with another student or it may be the result of your individual effort. When the thesis has been submitted, it is defended before the academic advisor as well as an external examiner.

Read less
The Urban Development Planning MSc explores international practices in urban development policy, planning and management that address contemporary spatial, socio-economic and political transformations in cities of the Global South. Read more

The Urban Development Planning MSc explores international practices in urban development policy, planning and management that address contemporary spatial, socio-economic and political transformations in cities of the Global South.

About this degree

This MSc aims to equip participants to work effectively as development practitioners in urban contexts through a deeper understanding of the processes that generate urban change. The programme aims to enhance their diagnostic and strategic capacities to respond to such change within the framework of socially just urban governance.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), either one or two optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, three core modules (90 credits), one optional module (30 credits), full-time nine months, is offered.

Core modules

  • The City and its Relations: Context, Institutions and Actors in Urban Development Planning
  • Urban Development Policy, Planning and Management: Strategic Action in Theory and Practice
  • Practice in Urban Development Planning

Optional modules

Please note, not all optional modules may be available.

  • Adapting Cities to Climate Change in the Global South
  • An Introduction to Public Economics and Public Policy
  • Critical Urbanism Studio I - Learning from Informality: Case studies and alternatives
  • Critical Urbanism Studio II - Investigative Design Strategies for Contested Spaces
  • Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
  • Food and the City
  • Gender in Policy and Planning
  • Housing as Urbanism: Housing Policy and the Search for Scale
  • Housing Policies: Practical Dimensions and Alternative Options
  • Industrialisation and Infrastructure
  • Knowledge Systems and Sustainable Food Production
  • Managing the City Economy
  • Neo-Structuralism and the Developmental State
  • NGOs and Social Transformation
  • Participatory Processes: Building for Development
  • Post Disaster Recovery: Policies, Practices and Alternatives
  • Social Diversity, Inequality and Poverty
  • Sustainable Infrastructure and Services in Development
  • Urban Water and Sanitation, Planning and Politics
  • Transport Equity and Urban Mobility

Dissertation/report

All MSc students submit a 10,000-word report on a topic related to the main themes of the programme. The topic can be chosen to enhance career development or for its inherent interest.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, group work, workshops and field trips. Field trips so far have taken place in Egypt, Ghana, India, Thailand, and Tanzania. Student performance is assessed through essays, coursework, team project reports, written examinations, the overseas field trip and a 10,000-word dissertation.

Careers

This MSc is widely recognised by international organisations and agencies (such as UN agencies and the World Bank) and bilateral aid organisations from different countries. Graduate destinations range from UK-based organisations in the public, private and community sectors to governmental, inter-governmental and non-governmental organisations which operate in a development capacity in the South. Graduates have also been employed by international NGOs and aid and development agencies. Some graduates return to their home countries and engage in the practice, teaching or research of urban development practice; other graduates have successfully sought employment in international development organisations away from their own countries.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Shelter Delegate, CARE
  • Town Planner, Lagos State Ministry of Physical Planning and Urban Development
  • Urban Governance Assistant, World Resources Institute
  • Development Manager, NAS Properties
  • Housing Development Consultant, Unspecified NGO

Employability

The programme aims to help students:

  • prepare balanced, critical and comparative analysis and argument based on theory and empirical evidence
  • undertake a comprehensive diagnosis of the problems and opportunities in urban development in specific contexts
  • formulate systematic and reasoned proposals that address the multi-dimensional complexity of various urban development situations, including organisational and institutional development
  • build presentation, advocacy and negotiation skills
  • develop research skills including interviewing, conceptual framework formulation, and the abilitiy to analyse a range of information sources
  • enhance their teamwork skills
  • operate professionally in an unfamiliar environment within the context of a developing country.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme argues that planning is key to dealing with urban problems and opportunities presented by rapid urbanisation in the Global South, but that its potential cannot be harnessed without a critical understanding of the processes that generate urban change in specific contexts.

The programme seeks to equip students with the capacity to develop critical diagnoses of urban issues, as a basis for developing propositional responses within the framework of socially, spatially and environmentally just urban governance.

The programme promotes a deeper understanding of community-led and partnership-based urban development planning. Students also benefit from the Development Planning Unit's longstanding and geographically exhaustive alumni and partner network.



Read less
Goal of the pro­gramme. Gen­eral Know­ledge and Skills. Upon completing the master’s programme in Urban Studies & Planning, you will be able to. Read more

Goal of the pro­gramme

Gen­eral Know­ledge and Skills

Upon completing the master’s programme in Urban Studies & Planning, you will be able to:

  • Understand theories and identify concepts and empirical research methods relevant to urban studies and planning from the related fields of social sciences, humanities, ecology, engineering, architecture, design and art
  • Demonstrate a working understanding of the role of urban government, policy-making and planning in urban development
  • Critically and creatively pose and answer significant research questions relevant within and across multiple fields of theory and practice
  • Gather, process and develop relevant conclusions based on information from multiple sources
  • Produce, collect and analyse cases and data relevant to urban phenomena
  • Use digital and other tools to collect, analyse and share data
  • Develop responses to urban problems using relevant tools and techniques for representing, modelling, prototyping, testing and evaluating solutions
  • Understand and develop integrated approaches within and across urban research and applied planning
  • Communicate your understanding of and responses to urban phenomena visually, graphically, orally and in writing
  • Write academic, professional and popular texts on urban themes based on relevant literature
  • Apply and develop skills for co-production of knowledge and co-design
  • Work productively and cooperatively in multidisciplinary, multiprofessional and international environments

Know­ledge and Skills Re­lated to Spe­cial­isa­tions and Pro­fes­sions

Upon completing the Master’s programme in Urban Studies & Planning, you will be able to:

  • Apply the general knowledge and skills introduced, developed and demonstrated within the courses and thesis work
  • Place urban analyses and proposals in relation to your specialisation and contextualise them in relation to others
  • Identify, differentiate and articulate relations among various theories and methods relevant to your specialisation 
  • Develop and reflect on your competence in urban studies and planning in relation to your professional role
  • Carry out independent research on urban issues in your field using relevant research methods and responsible scientific practice
  • Analyse phenomena and develop solutions through the use of digital and other tools, such as GIS and CAD
  • Fulfil specific professional degrees in accordance with the relevant professional codes and directives (such as those of architects, landscape architects, and urban planners
  • Demonstrate your competence to work as a professional and/or researcher in urban studies and planning
  • Communicate professionally and constructively with different experts, practitioners and stakeholders in the field of urban studies and planning
  • Articulate your professional identity in terms of established and emerging roles relevant to urban studies and planning

Further information about the studies on the Master's programme website.

The Master's programme in Urban Studies and Planning is offered by the University of Helsinki (Faculty of Science, Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences and Faculty of Arts) and Aalto University (School of Arts Design and Architecture and School of Engineering).



Read less
On this programme, students develop a practical and critical approach to the relationship between film production workflows, digital film technology, and creative practice. Read more
On this programme, students develop a practical and critical approach to the relationship between film production workflows, digital film technology, and creative practice. The programme seeks to develop students' creative abilities to a high professional standard, preparing them for employment in increasingly dynamic film and media sectors, and to facilitate film projects that foreground the importance of practice-based research, expertise and experimentation.

The MA route allows students to refine a critical approach to creativity in areas such as writing, directing, and producing; the MSc focuses on creative technological agendas in areas such as cinematography, editing, and VFX. To find out more about the MA/MSc in Film Production visit our blog at http://blogs.gre.ac.uk/filmproduction.

From October to April, you will attend three core courses (Cinematography 1, Production Practice, Film Research Workshop) and choose four courses from the following options: Cinematography 2, Film Screenwriting, VFX, Directing Screen Performance, Sound Design and Editing. From May to September you will undertake a final project.

You will use digital camera equipment current in the industry, including RED, Canon C300 and Arri Alexa systems. Teaching takes place in brand new film production facilities in the Stockwell Street building, which includes studios, post-production suites, and a sound studio.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/ft/filmprod

Film and Television

This subject offers students the chance to develop creatively and technically. It affords the opportunity to acquire both the latest techniques and traditional skills in working with digital media, in television and film production and post-production. This course allow for original and creative minds who want to explore specialist areas of these professions and develop their portfolio.

What you'll study

Core courses:

Film Research Workshop (30 credits)
Cinematography 1 (15 credits)
Production Practice (15 credits)
Major Project (60 credits)

Four options from:

Film Screenwriting - compulsory for MA (15 credits)
Directing Screen Performance - compulsory for MA (15 credits)
Cinematography 2 - compulsory for MSc (15 credits)
VFX - compulsory for MSc (15 credits)
Sound Design (15 credits)
Editing (15 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed on their film project work and creative portfolios.

Career options

This programme is aimed at students preparing to make the transition from education to employment in the film industry. The film sector needs graduates with specialist expertise, but also creative thinkers who are deadline-driven and project-minded; capable of managing digital workflows in an enterprising manner, and taking initiative. This is the kind of approach we encourage and help our students to develop.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

Read less
The MSc Urban Planning programme offers a unique combination of specialist study in urban planning, complemented by a range of optional modules in property development and design, drawing upon a range of expertise across the University of Liverpool in Urban Planning and Architecture. Read more
The MSc Urban Planning programme offers a unique combination of specialist study in urban planning, complemented by a range of optional modules in property development and design, drawing upon a range of expertise across the University of Liverpool in Urban Planning and Architecture. We can offer you a unique degree of flexibility. You can focus on the topic(s) of most interest to you, specialising in property development and/or urban design, and on graduation, you will have completed modules that cover urban planning in theory and in practice, and a choice of urban design, architecture or property development.

This flexible approach, drawing on expertise across multiple disciplines will stand you well in your planning career.

Internationally recognised as a centre for industries related to property development and architecture, London provides an ideal test bed for your studies; it is arguably the ideal city within which to study the production of the built environment from both an aesthetic and a commercial perspective.

Programme Structure

Semester 1
•Urban and Planning Theory (15 credits)
•Presenting Research Design (15 credits)
•Design Project 1* (30 credits)
•Design Appreciation 1* (15 credits)
•Property Development 1: Valuation Methods and Investment Appraisal* (15 credits)

Semester 2
•Urban Planning Practice (15 credits)
•Research Methodology (15 credits)
•Design Project 2* (30 credits)
•Design Appreciation 2* (15 credits)
•Property Development 2: From Design to Delivery* (15 credits)


Semester 3

1 module from:
•Thesis: Dissertation (60 credits)
•Thesis: Research by Design (60 credits)
•Thesis: Design (60 credits)

*Optional Module


Careers

Students who successfully complete are expected to go on to interesting and rewarding careers in property development, urban planning, the wider construction industry, conservation and many other specialisms to be found in the built environment and the arts.

Read less
The UK has a mature and highly successful TV industry with exports of programmes and formats worth over £1.3 billion annually. Broadcasting is still an expanding industry in many parts of the world, and is a crucial driver for the creative and cultural industries more generally. Read more
The UK has a mature and highly successful TV industry with exports of programmes and formats worth over £1.3 billion annually. Broadcasting is still an expanding industry in many parts of the world, and is a crucial driver for the creative and cultural industries more generally. This course provides the wide perspectives and specific skills that are essential for success in the broadcasting industry.

This innovative course examines the different ways in which broadcasting is organised around the world. It has a particular emphasis on the production techniques of British television, approaching them through a comparative international lens. Students study a major BBC drama series in depth (currently the Saturday evening series Casualty) from conception, through to scripting and production organisation. The course includes visits to the production base in Cardiff as well as crucial skills training in the industry-standard MovieMagic budget and schedule software.

Each student takes creative control of their own television or radio production to complete the course. The Media Arts department’s extensive range of industry-standard equipment, our TV production studio, state-of-the-art Mac Labs and location store (all of which has recently benefited from a £100,000 investment), is available to all students and training is provided in using it as part of the course.

Located near London, the course provides students with a privileged insight into the production practices of the UK television industry. You will have guest lecturers from both production and management in the broadcasting industry. The wide range of past guest lecturers include:

- Alex Graham (CEO of Wall to Wall TV, executive producer of Who Do You Think You Are),
- Karen Mullins (Project Manager for Channel 4 Racing, London Olympics, Rugby World Cup)
- James Quinn (Executive Producer My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding)
- Pip Clothier (Producer of undercover documentaries including BBC’s Panorama: Cash for Questions).

What you will study:
- The nature of television as a medium: scheduling, genres, formats
- How to produce your own short television or radio programme, using industry-standard equipment
- The changing ways in which digital programming is being produced and delivered
- The ways in which formats and programming are traded globally
- The organisation and regulation of broadcasting around the world
- The differing industrial structures of TV
- The crucial skills of scheduling and budgeting, including training on the industry standard Movie Magic software.
- TV series narrative arcs and character development
- The TV production process, planning and execution, (including lectures by the producers of BBC’s Casualty

You will be taught by world-leading scholars including:
- Professor John Ellis (author of Visible Fictions, Seeing Things; independent TV producer; formerly deputy chair of PACT, the UK independent producers’ trade organisation)

- Dr George Guo (graduate of Westminster University and Communication University of China who publishes on TV drama in China)

- Dr James Bennett (author of Television as Digital Media, Television Personalities)

- Mike Dormer (producer of The Whale (2013), Blue Murder (2007-9) New Tricks (2003-5))
a team that combines an international perspective, substantial experience in the TV industry, and innovative theoretical thinking.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/mainternationaltelevisionindustries.aspx

Why choose this course?

- You will develop an international outlook on broadcasting, equipping you to pursue a career in the broadcasting industry, both in the UK or abroad

- You'll be taught by renowned scholars and experienced practitioners

- The MA is taught in a department devoted to TV and film production and its study

- There is an in-depth focus on the UK and its excellence in broadcast production

- You will be trained and develop advanced skills in the use of our industry-standard equipment, which includes Final Cut Studio 2 editing systems, Sony HVR-V1E cameras, Sennheiser radio microphone kits and a selection of professional quality sound recording and lighting equipment.

Department research and industry highlights

The Media Arts department at Royal Holloway has a vibrant production culture. Most staff members have substantial production experience in TV and cinema. Around 300 undergraduate and 60 postgraduate students every year are engaged in making their own productions, including MA International Television Industries students.

Staff include the feature film director John Roberts (War of the Buttons, Day of the Flowers), award-winning documentary maker Marc Isaacs (All White in Barking, The Road), former controller of BBC1 and head of BBC Drama, Jonathan Powell.

You will be taught by leading independent producers Professor John Ellis (Brazil: Beyond Citizen Kane, Cinema in China) and Mike Dormer (The Whale, New Tricks, The Bill).

On completion of the programme graduates will have:

- a thorough understanding of the world broadcasting market and its organisation
- a thorough understanding of the main issues in broadcasting culture
- a deep knowledge of the main genres and forms of broadcast programming
- a detailed understanding of the nature of British TV series drama and the production processes that are involved in realising a TV drama series
- an invaluable experience of production to a broadcast standard
- a critical self-knowledge gained from analysing the process of producing their own work

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including:
- seminar presentations
- written essays
- research portfolios
- project work
- self-assessment documents

Employability & career opportunities

On graduation, you will have a range of knowledge and a portfolio of written and media work which will be invaluable in finding employment in the broadcasting industry, particularly in those territories where the business is expanding rapidly.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

Read less
This unique diploma course delivered in partnership with IMG, the world’s largest independent sports producers, will equip students with the editorial skills required to produce state-of-the-art sports and live events coverage, highlights content and other material. Read more
This unique diploma course delivered in partnership with IMG, the world’s largest independent sports producers, will equip students with the editorial skills required to produce state-of-the-art sports and live events coverage, highlights content and other material.
Unique course.

-Job at IMG for one student on graduation.
-Intensely practical and hands on.
-Four week work placement at IMG .
-Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.

We welcome EU/EEA Students. Course fees charged at UK rate.

COURSE OVERVIEW

IMG is the world's largest independent producer. It has major relationships with broadcasters including the BBC for the Football League show, snooker and darts, Channel Four for its exclusive horse racing coverage, and ESPN in the US for the Open Championship. It also enjoys a string of other important client relationships, most notably with Wimbledon, the R&A for the Open Golf Championship, the BCCI for IPL Cricket, FIFA, UEFA and the New York Road Runners (NY Marathon).

IMG produces Sport 24, the first ever-live global premium 24-hour sports channel for the airline and cruise industries, as well as other in-flight programming for over 50 airlines, and is also a partner with Associated Press for the sports news agency SNTV, and with the European Tour for European Tour Productions, the world's most prolific producer of golf programming.

The diploma course is 12 months full-time and is delivered at the NFTS and at IMGs' state-of-the-art facility IMG Studios.

Specifically students will learn about:
-Outside broadcast production
-Studio production
-Highlights production
-Planning and pre-production
-Storytelling in sports
-Chasing stories and ideas
-Shooting and editing effective pieces
-Scripting and Running Orders
-Logging and IPD Director
-Basic self-shooting and editing
-Casting and working with Talent
-Leading production teams
-Budgets & Scheduling
-Rights and Distribution

Students graduate with:
-The know-how to produce live and pre-recorded sports content
-A practical working knowledge of current television and digital production methods
-The ability to generate sports programme ideas and formats
-The confidence and know-how to pitch those ideas to commissioning editors and/or rights holders
-Work experience on high profile sports content
-Brilliant Industry contacts

Read less
Our course provides a wide, cross-scale and integral understanding of energy in cities. You'll focus on the UK policy environment within the context of international energy challenges. Read more

Our course provides a wide, cross-scale and integral understanding of energy in cities. You'll focus on the UK policy environment within the context of international energy challenges. The course builds on the latest professional practice, making it ideal for a career in urban energy infrastructure.

Our course allows graduates to retrain and become energy specialists. It will suit those with a background in:

-Engineering

-Planning

-Architecture

-Science

-Relevant business management.

Specialist pathways

Our three specialist pathways allow you to tailor the course to your individual needs. You are able to select a pathway that suits your background and career aspirations:

-Planning focuses on planning and law

-Architecture has an emphasis on buildings

-Engineering is from the technical/technological perspective

On completing the course you'll have detailed knowledge and understanding of:

-Relevant facts, concepts, principles and theories

-Qualitative, quantitative or creative practice methods and processes

-Relevant IT applications

-Conceptual and detailed design of artefacts

-Management principles and business practices

-Professional and ethical responsibilities

-The role and constraints of energy specialists in society

-Production practice and the regulatory and legislative framework.

Research

You will also develop a knowledge of the tools required to carry out a research project. The research project is set within an industrial context. You will develop an understanding of the environment in which you'll operate. Additionally, you will develop an appreciation of research techniques, including:

-Specialised tools and methods

-Analysing and defining project objectives

-Designing and planning projects according to rational methodologies

-Employing practicable and efficient procedures

-Analysing and interpreting results and presenting them in a meaningful manner

-Project management.

Careers

You'll be prepared for careers in:

-Energy consultancy

-Engineering firms

-Architectural firms

-Energy companies

-Public sector (eg local authorities)

High-profile roles in urban energy infrastructure include:

-Planning

-Design

-Management

-Policy making.

Delivery

The programme is structured around projects that explore key issues in urban energy. These projects are underpinned by theoretical and practical lectures, seminars and workshops. You will learn through a combination of:

-Lectures

-Tutorials

-Coursework

-Case studies

-Presentations

-Research.

Facilities

The School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape has a large postgraduate community and a strong postgraduate culture.

We have excellent studio teaching facilities and an unrivalled postgraduate research suite. This provides designated space and equipment for postgraduate researchers.

All postgraduate students benefit from our excellent student support facilities.



Read less
The factors affecting the wider environment are constantly increasing and range from agriculture and forestry to recreation, urban development and population growth. Read more
The factors affecting the wider environment are constantly increasing and range from agriculture and forestry to recreation, urban development and population growth. These in turn have knock-on effects such as climate change, water and food shortages, habitat and species loss and the impact of non-native species.

One of the areas where these factors come together is in the field of countryside management where the public use of the countryside interacts with professional land managers and can result in conflict.

In the context of this programme and the degree programme from which it has developed the term countryside management encompasses a broad range of topics and land uses ranging from conservation management to rural land use planning and interpretation to land use history.

Students are expected to have a broad knowledge of how the countryside that we see around us has developed in a historical context and how this relates to factors such as climate, ecology and soils. This in turn helps to determine current land use practice whether it be for agriculture or forestry, conservation management or recreation.

Inevitably these land uses are interlinked in complex ways and the countryside manager is expected to be able to identify the potential conflicts and to arrive at appropriate management options.

Of course there is rarely a simple answer in such situations and the resulting decisions have to be based on an understanding of the competing claims and an awareness of how to work with individuals, interest groups and communities to ensure that stakeholders' views have been taken into account.

Course Content

There are eight taught modules providing for the development of a range of technical, practical and professional skills. Residential study weekends are also used as a vital tool in delivering some of the practical aspects of the course.
In the modules an element of student choice is often built in through the use of essay and other course work topics that cover areas of potential interest. The modules will be of value individually to those in employment who are looking for Continuing Professional Development.

Taught modules are:

Planning and the Legal Framework

This module will provide a background to the legislation and policy framework within which the countryside is managed. This will include planning, biodiversity and landscape and will focus on the role of EIA and SEA. The planning system is prone to conflicts between interest groups and students will look at case studies that highlight some of the main issues that arise.

Habitat and Species Management

Habitats and species have been the subject of management for centuries but only comparatively recently has there been a focus on their management for conservation reasons. In practice species management relies on appropriate habitat management although there are times when more specific prescriptions are appropriate. This module will look at management through a number of case studies which will be examined in detail. The case studies will include both desk studies and field visits and students will be encouraged to research appropriate examples in their own areas.

Visitor Management

Visitor management is a crucial part of countryside management and should be integrated into area and site management plans. An understanding of visitor management and the opportunities for education, interpretation and marketing, is a requirement for senior countryside managers. Students will look at the full range of visitor management issues from visitor profiles and motivations to site design and the impacts on wildlife and the wider environment.

Species Identification and Familiarity

The ability to accurately identify a range of species is crucial to aid in species conservation and to properly evaluate an area for its biodiversity. Central to species identification is the use of field keys and identification guides. This course will be based around a week long, intensive series of practical and laboratory based sessions to provide participants with the necessary skills to implement habitat and species survey techniques. Training in computer recording packages will also be provided to ensure best practice in species recording is maintained

Project Management for Countryside Professionals

Countryside Managers need to be able to effectively manage their own as well as the work of others. The skills of project planning/reporting/acquisition of funding and the proper upkeep of work related files and paperwork is fundamental to effective management. A strong component of this module will also involve the development of team management skills as well as health and safety awareness.

Integrated Planning Management

Multifunctional land use is a well recognised term. It is part of the planning system at differing scales and with multi-partnership and stakeholder involvement. The module will define both the industry organisations commonly involved in multifunctional land use planning and the other likely stakeholders. The land use changes proposed will take account of the historical and cultural aspects of the landscape.

Integrated planning management is undertaken at different scales ranging from individual project management plans and environmental statements to strategic planning at regional, national or European level. The module will look at how the production of these plans and strategies might be expected to integrate with other planning policy and legislation. Integrated management systems are collective.

Methods and Delivery

This course is studied part time through on-line distance learning. This allows those in continuing employment or with family commitments to participate. With the exception of several weekend schools and a short study tour, the learning is carried out in the student's home or work place.

The PgDip is a high level learning course taught at university post-graduate level. Students are required to complete all taught modules detailed above. Typically a student will study 4 modules per year and complete the PgDip in two years. This would normally take an average of 12 to 15 hours study time a week.

The study weekends and short study tour are an integral part of teaching delivery and students are strongly recommended to attend these if they are to succeed in this course.

Read less
This course provides an environment in which directors can find their individual style and their own distinctive voice. Supported by the David Lean Foundation, this is the UK’s premier MA course in directing. Read more
This course provides an environment in which directors can find their individual style and their own distinctive voice. Supported by the David Lean Foundation, this is the UK’s premier MA course in directing.

-Unique specialist course.
-Students of all key film-making disciplines work together on productions.
-Purpose-built film and television studios.
-Industry standard post- production facilities.
-The MA Course in Directing Fiction is supported by the David Lean Foundation.
-Flare Studio scholarship available. More info here: https://www.flare.studio/foundation-projects/nfts-scholarship-award
-Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.

We welcome EU/EEA Students. Those accepted onto courses starting in 2018 will have their fees guaranteed at the UK rate for both years of the course. Postgraduate students can apply for a loan to help with their studies via the Student Loans Company Loans. A £ 10,000 loan is available to contribute to course and living costs. The Post Graduate Loan is only open to EU/EEA and UK Students who normally live in England. It is not currently available to Scottish, Welsh or Northern Ireland Students. Find out more here: https://nfts.co.uk/fees-funding/funding-guide

COURSE OVERVIEW

This course commences in January each year. The MA course at the NFTS provides two years in which directing students will be adding depth and understanding to their abilities whilst regularly producing work. This is an environment where they will be both challenged and supported by staff and fellow students. The tutor to student ratio is high, thus allowing the teaching to be specific to the needs of the individual director. One great advantage of having different departments within the school is not only that students gain from the practical experience of working with the other specialisations but that their thinking is informed by the various collaborative engagements that together convey an idea to the screen.

The essence of the course is the practical experience of film-making, combined with a wide-ranging series of work-shops emphasising performance, mise-en-scène and an examination of how narrative works in cinema and in television. Engagement with students of other disciplines at the NFTS is a crucial aspect of the course. The curriculum of each specialisation is designed to link with the others throughout the course, so that students work together on projects of varying scale and complexity, increasing their understanding of the various specialist roles involved in film and television programme-making. The course includes weekly sessions on film and television culture, both contemporary and historical, and opportunities to learn from the work of more established directors through masterclasses and set visits. It also involves interaction with other disciplines, ranging from visual art, literature and architecture to installation and performance art.

CURRICULUM

In the first year, Directing Fiction students take part in a series of workshops exploring all aspects of directing, acquiring a solid understanding of current practices and technology across related specialist crafts. The workshops are supported by seminars on screen language and history, as well as individual tutorial sessions; which can guide students in self-motivated research to supplement their particular learning needs. Besides the weekly Screen Arts programme of screenings and seminars, the Directing Fiction department has regular sessions of screenings, scene by scene analysis and discussion led by tutors and students.

The Directing Fiction department workshops focus on isolating and building on skills used in collaboration with other departments. Each series of workshops culminates in a practical production exercise. Production experience is considered essential because the ability to maintain clarity of ideas and their expression within the conflicting demands of script, cast, crew and practical parameters – it is the test of the learning that has come before.

The first year work is aimed not only at developing skills, but at exposing weak areas of understanding and concept. In the final term of the first year, the directors collaborate with a team to make the First Year Film. This is a project which, apart from temporal and budgetary restrictions, gives the students considerable freedom and which encourages them to take responsibility for their work. During the first year, the student will have begun work on developing second year projects and their dissertation.

The second year of the Directing Fiction course provides more of an opportunity for the self- motivated student to develop his or her own voice through two different types of production experience. The dissertation allows for examining a particular area in depth and should be complementing and informing further work. Longer form storytelling is developed through the digital production. The primary collaboration on this production is focused on director/cinematographer/actor.

Short form storytelling and collaboration with a larger crew is developed through a film production called The Summer Fiction. Both it and the Digital Film are heavily supported by individual tutorials.

The productions also include scheduled workshops/seminars/tutorial support for casting, rehearsals, shot planning, set procedures and working with the A.D., as well as intensive and continuous viewings and critiques of rushes and edits. Editing, Sound and Music tutors also provide tutorials during post-production.

Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X