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Masters Degrees (Product Life Cycle)

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The course covers a combination of the technical skills and management knowledge essential in the development of innovative solutions to complex technical business problems. Read more
The course covers a combination of the technical skills and management knowledge essential in the development of innovative solutions to complex technical business problems.

This course will provide you with a thorough understanding of:
- leading technological and engineering projects;
- managing teams, engineering functions and organisations;
- developing new products and services;
- designing and managing the supply chain; and
- the economic aspects and decision-making processes of engineering projects; and electromechanical systems.

The course will offer you the opportunity to acquire and develop the skills and tools necessary to progress to management positions within an organisation. It will also build on your existing technical knowledge, relating it to the management aspects of the course by means of case studies and projects. The course balances academic theory with practical opportunities to demonstrate engineering management capabilities, and deliver solutions to real problems through assignments and projects.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/masters-engineering-management

Modules

- Technology evaluation and commercialisation
In this module you'll deploy an algorithmic model to evaluate the business opportunity that can be created from a technology's unique advantages. You'll be guided towards identifying a technology project idea that you will evaluate for its business potential. To do this you'll conduct detailed research and analysis in order to evaluate the business potential of this technology idea. The outcomes from this will serve as the basis for implementation of the selected technology in the business sense. Through the module you'll develop the appropriate commercialisation strategy and write the business plan for your high-tech start-up company.

- Technical, research and professional skills
This module is taught to all our engineering Masters students; it provides training for the skills that are necessary for successful completion of Masters studies, as well as your professional development in the long-term future. More specifically, the module teaches how to search and gather relevant technical information, how to extract the essence from a piece of technical literature, how to carry out a critical review of a research paper, how to write a feasibility report, how to give presentations and put your thoughts across effectively, and how to manage a project in terms of time and progress in a group project environment.

- Economic aspects of engineering projects
This module focuses on economic management and viability appraisal. It develops the specific expertise that an engineering manager may need in order to construct and critically examine effective economic arguments. The module will arm you with sound economic assessment techniques and processes, as well as providing you with skills to produce effective economic appraisal documents. You'll critically evaluate the financial risks involved in engineering projects and economic decision-making processes. It will include a special focus on R&D and new technologies projects.

- Electromechanical systems and manufacturing technology
This module covers a broad range of conventional and advanced manufacturing technologies in the context of engineering management. You'll develop your understanding of the strategic significance of high value manufacturing, in terms of new and emerging technologies and the management of associated assets as contributory factors in achieving a sustainable competitive advantage. You'll appreciate the synergistic integration of mechanical engineering, electronic control and systems and understand how they are realised as mechatronics solutions to improve manufacturing processes, effectively manage time, waste and energy thus enhancing the competitive advantage of the business. The themes of globalization, concurrent engineering and related manufacturing strategies are explored through lectures, case studies and a combination of interactive workshop and laboratory sessions.

- Supply chain engineering and operations management
This module explores the concepts and strategies related to supply chain and operations management within an engineering context. It develops your understanding of the issues practising engineers can expect to encounter, so enabling you to make informed strategic decisions with respect to the management of activities associated with the creation of products and services. Whilst exploring these key themes the module will closely examine current, established and emerging procedures and processes related to the effective allocation of resources within a variety of engineering environments. A combination of lectures, workshops and case studies will be used to develop your ability to effectively apply a range of tools and methodologies associated with strategic planning, effective implementation and problem resolution.

- Energy, the environment and product life-cycle
This module is composed of three elements. The first concentrates on energy utilisation and management; the second on environmental issues; and the third on the Product Life Cycle. The module addresses the ethical, economic and socio/cultural changes in the society that will be influenced by (and have an influence on) engineering practice. This module will enhance your ability to think critically about future challenges and will also challenge you to explore alternative strategies and tools to develop new sustainable engineering solutions. This module will cover legislative issues, enabling you to work with current legislation, evaluate and possibly develop appropriate environmental legislation.

- MSc engineering project / dissertation
This module requires you to undertake a major project in an area that is relevant to your Masters course. You'll choose your project and carry it out under the guidance of your supervisor. At the end of the project, you are required to present a dissertation, which forms a major element of the assessment. The dissertation tests your ability to integrate information from various sources, to conduct an in-depth investigation, to critically analyse results and information obtained and to propose solutions. The other element of the assessment includes an oral examination (viva-voce). The Individual Project carries 60 credits and is a major part of a Masters program.

Methods of assessment

Assessment is through examinations and also practical work and assignments using case studies, group work, research projects and presentations.

Development of practical skills

You'll develop your practical engineering skills through work carried out in laboratories and workshops; in industry through supervised work experience; in individual and group project work; in design work; and in the development and use of computer software in design, analysis and control. Evidence of group working and of participation in a major project is expected.

Overview course structure

The course is based on two semesters per academic year with three modules being delivered and assessed in each semester on the full-time mode. The part-time curriculum consists of the same modules, set out over two years.

Employability

The Master in Engineering Management develops those areas of management that you'll require to progress in a management career, but firmly anchored in an engineering context.

Graduates will possess a unique set of technical and management skills which should make them very attractive to prospective employers, especially in technology or engineering led companies.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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MSc International Business focuses on the links between major business functions and their role in international business and commerce. Read more
MSc International Business focuses on the links between major business functions and their role in international business and commerce. You will develop knowledge of the special requirements for conducting business activities across national boundaries, relevant theories and their application in business. You will also have the opportunity to study at one of our European partner institutions and visit international companies through our integrated Study Abroad programme.

You will develop expertise in core areas of international business, strategic management and business economics. The wide range of elective modules will enable you to develop skills in a specific business function linked to international business (finance, marketing or operations management) or pursue related areas such as entrepreneurship and business sustainability.

Subject guide and modules

Core Modules:
-International Business
-Advanced Topics in International Business
-Strategic Management
-Economic Environment of Business
-Professional Development Programme
-Ethics in Academic Practice

Optional Modules - Choose four modules from the following list, subject to pre-requisites and restrictions on some modules and combinations:
-Intellectual Property Strategy & Management
-Business Finance
-International Finance
-Accounting for Non-Financial Managers
-Strategic Business Sustainability
-People & World Organisations
-Marketing Management
-International Marketing Management
-International Operations
-Strategic Global Outsourcing and Offshoring
-Operations Management
-CSR, Sustainable Development & Public Policy
-Entrepreneurial Strategies
-International Business strategy
-Entrepreneurial & Innovation in Emerging Economies

The programme then concludes with a dissertation project.

In addition to your Aston degree, you will have the opportunity to participate in our international study exchange programme. Studying with one of our partner institutions, the programme will enhance your international experience and communication skills, preparing you for a career in the international business environment.

Learning, teaching and assessment

The taught modules are assessed through a mixture of examinations and coursework. The taught element of the programme is complemented by a substantial piece of research leading to the completion of a dissertation.

Career opportunities

This degree will prepare you for a wide range of careers in businesses and organisations engaged in international activities, including consultancy, business analysis, marketing, business development, sales management, finance and purchasing. Recent graduate positions include:
-Assistant Advisor – Ernst & Young (Zimbabwe)
-Marketing Specialist – Bosch (China)
-Relationship Marketing Professional – IBM (India)
-Senior Analyst – Deutsche Bank (UK)
-Trainee Buyer – Tesco (UK)

Our international alumni ambassadors share their experiences of studying at Aston Business School with students all over the world who consider applying for a course at Aston.

Personal development

You will acquire skills in the following areas:
-Giving presentations
-Team working
-Report writing
-Negotiation
-IT skills

Core modules taught on this MSc will enable you to develop a wide range of business and transferable skills and knowledge demanded by graduate employers. These include:
-Interpreting financial statements covering income, balances and cash flow
-Budgetary control and analysing business costs using Cost Volume Profit and contribution analysis
-Econometric modelling of stochastic trends and performance forecasting
-International HRM including: cross-cultural communication; diversity management; and HR issues in expatriation/repatriation, acquisitions, mergers and joint ventures
-Developing marketing and pricing strategies, plans and marketing mix policies; international promotion strategies and distribution channels
-Internationalisation of production and trade, including: the international product life cycle; forms of international business activity; national competitive strategies; and economic integration
-International sectors, emerging and transition economies, cultural differences, international business strategies and strategic alliances
-Operational planning and management including: product, service and process design; choice of layout and technology; statistical stock control and MRPI
-Strategy processes and techniques including: value chain analysis, ‘make or buy’ decisions; implementing and managing strategic change in an international environment
-Innovation processes, innovation-based strategies and creating competitive advantage through innovation
-Multi-cultural teamwork and presentation skills developed through group-work
-Analytical skills developed through research dissertation

The wide range of elective modules available on this programme enables you to develop skills across a range of business functions including: marketing; HR; finance, investment and business law; operations; and international markets and investments.

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MA Performance Product Design is a highly creative degree that addresses the advancement of fashion and fashion product design through both design, innovation and technology. Read more

About this course

MA Performance Product Design is a highly creative degree that addresses the advancement of fashion and fashion product design through both design, innovation and technology. You will have the opportunity to make innovative and progressive design contributions to the fields of performance/sportswear, intimate and swim apparel, accessories, lifestyle and health and wellbeing products. It aims to provide you with the knowledge and expertise necessary in developing world-class designers with a global understanding of technological developments in materials and processes and how these will energize the next phase of performance garment and product design.

You will explore the factors which best describe and help interpret human-centred needs to inspire the creation of designs with sustainable social and commercial value. The Fashion subject division aims to develop this programme as a distinct link to our materials research hub P3i, based in London.

MA Performance Product Design supports the development of live and speculative projects, deepened and broadened by investigation of research principles and reflective practice. It aims to combine studio based professional practice with design research, including material resources, the application of new and existing technologies, product life cycle and disposal. It will consider the future of the product and designer within the global economy, through issues of materiality, experience and representation as part of a wider context of systems and organisations.

See the website https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/performance-product-design-ma-ft-dtfped6/

Who would this Course suit?

This course would suit those graduates who come from a fashion design or industrial/product design background wishing to extend their potential as a design practitioner. You’ll be original, independent and a critical thinker interested in wanting to make innovative and progressive design contributions to the fields of performance/sportswear, intimate and swim apparel, accessories, lifestyle and health and wellbeing product.

MA Performance Product Design is ideal for graduates who wish to pursue a self-directed topic and use design practice as a way of research.

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Within the product life cycle, design is the first step. Then comes production and customer's supply. The final step includes warranty and product replacement. Read more
Within the product life cycle, design is the first step. Then comes production and customer's supply. The final step includes warranty and product replacement. The Master's programme in Technology and Operations Management teaches you how to organize all phases. You will learn to ensure high levels of customer satisfaction and cost efficiency. You will be trained to gain competitive advantage for companies.

In this one-year programme, you will focus on core aspects such as operations management concepts, facility design and planning. You will learn to define, diagnose and analyse problems and develop and evaluate solutions and technological innovations. In addition, you will be trained to design new planning and control concepts. You will also assess the impact of product and process innovations on the employers and organization of a business.

Newcastle University and the University of Groningen also offer a double degree programme in Operations Management. You will start the first semester in Newcastle. The entire programme is compulsory and takes 16 months. You will receive a Master's degree from both universities.

Why in Groningen?

The entire life cycle of products and services is the focus of the programme: you learn to plan and control operations during this life cycle and learn to introduce technological innovations for organisations. You learn to define, diagnose and analyse operations management problems in technology intensive industries. It's an internationally accredited programme, ensuring a high quality education that meets both the AACSB and EQUIS standards, which only 1% of universities reach worldwide.

Job perspectives

You will be prepared for a career as an operations manager in a production, distribution or service environment. You may also pursue a career as a consultant, project manager, or quality manager in the field of innovation and technology of products and processes. It is possible to work in the industry, or the government. Alternatively, you may opt for an academic career and start as a PhD student at a university.

Because all our programmes are EQUIS and AACSB accredited, a standard which only one percent of universities reach worldwide, your degree will be highly valued on the labour market.

Linking education to research and career preparation

Our education is strongly rooted in business practice and society. Also right from the start of your degree programme attention is paid to academic research and preprofessional development. Since an analytical and critical mind and problem-solving capabilities are important qualities in any career our students aspire.

In collaboration with external partners we conduct research projects on e.g banking, local government, customer insights, leadership, energy, healthy ageing and lean operations.

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Evolution never stops and customer expectations on products continue to grow. At the same time, resource consumption for both development and production are expected to decrease to ensure profitable business and a sustainable society. Read more

Programme aim

Evolution never stops and customer expectations on products continue to grow. At the same time, resource consumption for both development and production are expected to decrease to ensure profitable business and a sustainable society.

Specifically, individual companies want to increase their competitive advantage by offering products that stand out from the competition. Moreover, modern development work is typically characterised by multi-disciplinary, international teamwork, as well as efforts to simultaneously consider several issues related to the product and its life cycle.

Product development is a core industrial activity that addresses all of these aspects – it is a multidisciplinary process of identifying and envisaging the needs of the user, company and society, and bringing those needs to life.

Who should apply

The programme is aimed at students with a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering, automation and mechatronics, industrial economics, industrial design or an equivalent degree, and who is ambitious to help develop the next generation of outstanding product offers.

International students are greatly appreciated, especially during teamwork activities, since they contribute unique experiences and enriching viewpoints. International students typically appreciate the open study climate and easy access to teachers and professors.

Why apply

Students of this programme acquire knowledge and practical skills to master multi-disciplinary product development while taking all phases of the product life cycle into consideration. The course called “Product Development Project” is the most central part of the programme. Student teams plan and execute a product development project to solve an industrial problem in close collaboration with a partnered company.

Students are also given the opportunity to enrich their knowledge in business development, product innovation and manufacturing, which are the domains most related to product development. Thus, a master’s degree in product development provides a broad competence base, which is suitable for developing a career in R&D for large corporations, business development, start-up entrepreneurship, consultant and research. The students have the opportunity to groom their interest by choosing courses offered from both technical and management areas.

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January, May or September. The time is ripe to develop low carbon alternatives to petroleum-based products both in terms of what society wants and what economics demand. Read more

Start dates

January, May or September

Overview

The time is ripe to develop low carbon alternatives to petroleum-based products both in terms of what society wants and what economics demand. This makes it’s an exciting time to be part of the rapidly developing Biotech Industries. However, biorefining is a highly technical field and the successful growth of the industry is resulting in a lack of sufficient staff with the technical knowledge necessary to support its expansion. This course has been designed in consultation with existing UK industries to address this skills shortage. Since this programme is aimed at people who are already working, training is via distance learning and we hope to complement these with workshops.

Taught by experts at both Aberystwyth University (AU) and Bangor University (BU) through AU, the Industrial Biotechnology course offers you a highly vocational option.

The MSc comprises five core modules and four complementary modules which have been selected to allow students to study the main components of the biorenewable pipeline, from raw materials through extraction and processing to products; and to carry out your own work-based research. They are:

Core Modules

Biorenewable Feedstocks - each January

Students will learn about dedicated crops, agricultural waste and food waste streams and look at how to match feedstock to end-use. The module will examine: the scale of the challenge facing land-based crop production in the 21st century; the role of emerging technologies to meet these needs sustainably; and practical and economic considerations to scaling up production.

Biorefining Technologies - each January

This module will equip students with a detailed fundamental and practical knowledge of biorefining including pre-processing, processing and product isolation. It will teach them to evaluate the relative limitations and merits of different extraction, microbial biotechnology & fermentation technologies

Biobased Product Development - each September

This module will focus on potential end-products from bio-refineries including the relevant performance tests and the available processing/manufacturing technologies; both current and emerging technologies will be discussed. The module will also pay attention to the product innovation chain including commercial elements, life-cycle analysis and regulatory considerations.

Waste Stream Valorisation - each May

This module explores the potential to valorise a range of waste streams and will include case studies of exemplary waste streams as well as from students’ own chosen areas of interest.

Drivers of the Bioeconomy - each September

This module examines the societal drivers that shape the bio-economy and looks at what makes production viable. The need for energy efficient will be highlighted, along with vertically integrated production pipelines.

Research Methodologies and Advances in Bioscience

This module provides a framework for developing your research skills in the context of your own research question. You will be paired you up with a supervisor whose research field is in your area of interest and your supervisor will then guide you as you develop your ideas.

Work-based Dissertation

You may start your dissertation in any semester but should only be taken when Research Methodology and Advances in Biosciences has been completed and will involve a work-plan developed with your ATP tutor, academic supervisor and employer (if relevant). Working at a rate of 10-15 hrs per week we would expect the dissertation to take a year to complete.

Complementary Modules

Carbon Footprinting and Life Cycle Assessment - each January

(BU) This module will provide a theoretical and critical analysis of the practice and application of Carbon Footprinting (CF) and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) as key tools in assessing the environmental impact of agricultural systems.

Genetics and Genomics - each May

(AU) This module focuses on the challenges facing land based production and the role of emerging technologies to meet these challenges sustainably.

Anaerobic Digestion - each May

(BU) This module covers not only the technological aspects of AD, but also the opportunities and consequences of different feed-stocks, the alternative uses of the produced energy and digestates.

Climate Change - each September

(BU) After an introduction to the science and effects of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, the module will assess historical climate change and will look at current predictions of future change. Methods by which agriculture and industry could adapt to the consequences of – and mitigate its effect on – climate change will be discussed.

Each distance learning module runs for 12 to 14 weeks. Students can start with whichever module they like and take as many or as few as they are able to over the five years of registration.

To achieve a PGCert, students must complete three taught core modules
To achieve a PGDiploma students must complete any six taught modules
To achieve an MSc, students must complete four core modules, two complementary modules and a work-based dissertation.

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As well as giving a solid scientific understanding, the course also addresses commercial, ethical, legal and regulatory requirements, aided by extensive industrial contacts. Read more
As well as giving a solid scientific understanding, the course also addresses commercial, ethical, legal and regulatory requirements, aided by extensive industrial contacts.

Programme Structure

The MSc programmes in Biomedical Engineering are full-time, one academic year (12 consecutive months). The programmes consist of 4 core taught modules and two optional streams. Biomedical, Genetics and Tissue Engineering stream has 3 modules, all compulsory (individual course pages). The second option, Biomedical, Biomechanics and Bioelectronics Engineering stream consists of 5 modules. Students choosing this option will be required to choose 60 credit worth of modules.

The taught modules are delivered to students over two terms of each academic year. The taught modules are examined at the end of each term, and the students begin working on their dissertations on a part-time basis in term 2, then full-time during the months of May to September.

Core Modules
Biomechanics and Biomaterials (15 credit)
Design and Manufacture (15 credit)
Biomedical Engineering Principles (15 credit)
Innovation, Management and Research Methods (15 credit)
Plus: Dissertation (60 credit)

Optional Modules

60 credit to be selected from the following optional modules:
Design of Mechatronic Systems (15 credit)
Biomedical Imaging (15 credit)
Biofluid Mechanics (15 credit)
Artificial Organs and Biomedical Applications (15 credit)
Applied Sensors Instrumentation and Control (30 credit)

Module Descriptions

Applied Sensors Instrumentation and Control

Main topics:

Sensors and instrumentation – Sensor characteristics and the principles of sensing; electronic interfacing with sensors; sensor technologies – physical, chemical and biosensors; sensor examples – position, displacement, velocity, acceleration, force, strain, pressure, temperature; distributed sensor networks; instrumentation for imaging, spectroscopy and ionising radiation detection; 'lab-on-a-chip'.

Control – Control theory and matrix/vector operations; state-space systems, multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) systems, nonlinear systems and linearization. Recurrence relations, discrete time state-space representation, controllability and observability, pole-placement for both continuous and discrete time systems, Luenberger observer. Optimal control systems, Stochastic systems: random variable theory; recursive estimation; introduction to Kalman filtering (KF); brief look at KF for non-linear systems and new results in KF theory.

Artificial Organs and Biomedical Applications

Main topics include: audiology and cochlear implants; prostheses; artificial limbs and rehabilitation engineering; life support systems; robotic surgical assistance; telemedicine; nanotechnology.

Biofluid Mechanics

Main topics include: review of the cardiovascular system; the cardiac cycle and cardiac performance, models of the cardiac system, respiratory system and respiratory performance, lung models, physiological effects of exercise, trauma and disease; blood structure and composition, blood gases. oxygenation, effect of implants and prostheses, blood damage and repair, viscometry of blood, measurement of blood pressure and flow; urinary system: anatomy and physiology, fluid and waste transfer mechanisms, urinary performance and control, effects of trauma, ageing and disease; modelling of biofluid systems, review of mass, momentum and energy transfers related to biological flow systems, fluid mechanics in selected topics relating to the cardiovascular and respiratory systems; measurements in biomedical flows.

Biomechanics and Biomaterials

Main topics include: review of biomechanical principles; introduction to biomedical materials; stability of biomedical materials; biocompatibility; materials for adhesion and joining; applications of biomedical materials; implant design.

Biomedical Engineering Principles

Main topics include: bone structure and composition; the mechanical properties of bone, cartilage and tendon; the cardiovascular function and the cardiac cycle; body fluids and organs; organisation of the nervous system; sensory systems; biomechanical principles; biomedical materials; biofluid mechanics principles, the cardiovascular system, blood structure and composition, modelling of biofluid systems.

Biomedical Imaging

Principle and applications of medical image processing – Basic image processing operations, Advanced edge-detection techniques and image segmentation, Flexible shape extraction, Image restoration, 3D image reconstruction, image guided surgery

Introduction of modern medical imaging techniques – Computerized tomography imaging (principle, image reconstruction with nondiffracting sources, artifacts, clinical applications)

Magnetic resonance imaging (principle, image contrast and measurement of MR related phenomena, examples of contrast changes with changes of instrumental parameters and medical applications)

Ultrasound imaging (description of ultrasound radiation, transducers, basic imaging techniques: A-scan, B-scan and Doppler technique; clinical application)

Positron emission tomography (PET imaging) (principle, radioactive substance, major clinical applications)

Design and Manufacture

Main topics include: design and materials optimisation; management and manufacturing strategies; improving clinical medical and industrial interaction; meeting product liability, ethical, legal and commercial needs.

Design of Mechatronic Systems

Microcontroller technologies. Data acquisition. Interfacing to power devices. Sensors (Infrared, Ultrasonic, etc.). Optoelectronic devices and signal conditioning circuits. Pulse and timing-control circuits. Drive circuits. Electrical motor types: Stepper, Servo. Electronic Circuits. Power devices. Power conversion and power electronics. Line filters and protective devices. Industrial applications of digital devices.

Innovation and Management and Research Methods

Main topics include: company structure and organisation will be considered (with particular reference to the United Kingdom), together with the interfacing between hospital, clinical and healthcare sectors; review of existing practice: examination of existing equipment and devices; consideration of current procedures for integrating engineering expertise into the biomedical environment. Discussion of management techniques; design of biomedical equipment: statistical Procedures and Data Handling; matching of equipment to biomedical systems; quality assurance requirements in clinical technology; patient safety requirements and protection; sterilisation procedures and infection control; failure criteria and fail-safe design; maintainability and whole life provision; public and environmental considerations: environmental and hygenic topics in the provision of hospital services; legal and ethical requirements; product development: innovation in the company environment, innovation in the clinical environment; cash flow and capital provision; testing and validation; product development criteria and strategies.

Dissertation

The choice of Dissertation topic will be made by the student in consultation with academic staff and (where applicable) with the sponsoring company. The topic agreed is also subject to approval by the Module Co-ordinator. The primary requirement for the topic is that it must have sufficient scope to allow the student to demonstrate his or her ability to conduct a well-founded programme of investigation and research. It is not only the outcome that is important since the topic chosen must be such that the whole process of investigation can be clearly demonstrated throughout the project. In industrially sponsored projects the potential differences between industrial and academic expectations must be clearly understood.

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The MSc in Electronics with Embedded Systems aims to produce postgraduates with an advanced level of understanding in the design of real-time embedded systems for time-critical, power sensitive applications. Read more
The MSc in Electronics with Embedded Systems aims to produce postgraduates with an advanced level of understanding in the design of real-time embedded systems for time-critical, power sensitive applications. Practical skillset development is emphasized throughout the course. Students will be taught the theory, protocol and the efficient use of both analogue and digital interfaces and sensor devices together with the principles of and use of Real-Time-Operating-Systems (RTOS). A key focus of the course will be in the implementation of power aware sustainable solutions, the course will provide an in-depth discussion of the underlying power management hardware sub-systems within modern MCUs and will show and use software techniques that will exploit these to reduce power consumption.

Broader consideration of embedded system design will be examined. In particular, the design process, risk assessment, product life-cycle, software life-cycle, safety and regulation will be investigated and used. It is intended that the course will re-focus existing knowledge held by the student in software engineering and hardware engineering and deliver a set of enhanced practical skills that will enable the student to fully participate in this multi-disciplined, fast expanding and dominating engineering sector of embedded systems.

Course Structure

Each MSc course consists of three learning modules (40 credits each) plus an individual project (60 credits). Each learning module consists of a short course of lectures and initial hands-on experience. This is followed by a period of independent study supported by a series of tutorials. During this time you complete an Independent Learning Package (ILP). The ILP is matched to the learning outcomes of the module. It can be either a large project or a series of small tasks depending on the needs of each module. Credits for each module are awarded following the submission of a completed ILP and its successful defence in a viva voce examination. This form of assessment develops your communication and personal skills and is highly relevant to the workplace. Overall, each learning module comprises approximately 400 hours of study.

The project counts for one third of the course and involves undertaking a substantial research or product development project. For part-time students, this can be linked to their employment. It is undertaken in two phases. In the first part, the project subject area is researched and a workplan developed. The second part involves the main research and development activity. In all, the project requires approximately 600 hours of work.

Further flexibility is provided within the structure of the courses in that you can study related topic areas by taking modules from other courses as options (pre-requisite knowledge and skills permitting).

Prior to starting your course, you are sent a Course Information and Preparation Pack which provides information to give you a flying start.

MSc Electronics Suite of Courses

The MSc in Electronics has four distinct pathways:
-Robotic and Control Systems
-Embedded Systems
-System-on-Chip Technologies
-Medical Instrumentation

The subject areas covered within the four pathways of the electronic suite of MSc courses offer students an excellent launch pad which will enable the successful graduate to enter into these ever expanding, fast growing and dominant areas. With ever increasing demands from consumers such as portability, increased battery life and greater functionality combined with reductions in cost and shrinking scales of technologies, modern electronic systems are finding ever more application areas.

A vastly expanding application base for electronic systems has led to an explosion in the use of embedded system technologies. Part of this expansion has been led by the introduction of new medical devices and robotic devices entering the main stream consumer market. Industry has also fed the increase in demand particularly within the medical electronics area with the need of more sophisticated user interfaces, demands to reduce equipment costs, demands for greater accessibility of equipment and a demand for ever greater portability of equipment.

There are plenty of opportunities for employment in the electronic systems subject area, in particular, there is a demand for engineers that can solve problems requiring a multi-disciplined approach covering skills from software engineering, control engineering, digital electronic systems engineering, analogue electronic engineering, medical physics, and mechanics amongst others. The MSc in Electronics and its specialist pathways will provide the foundations required to re-focus existing knowledge and enter this exciting world of multi-disciplined jobs.

The technical tasks undertaken in ILPs, along with the required major project, thoroughly exercise the concepts covered in the course modules and give scope for originality and industry-relevant study. Team-working activities encouraged within modules, along with the all-oral individual examination regimen employed in this Electronics MSc Suite, have proven solidly beneficial in refining the communication and employability-enhancing skills that are strongly valued by industry.

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Quality by Design (QbD) is based on the application of product and process sciences, from early-to-late stages of the product development cycle, to provide accelerated regulatory submission pathways for new drug applications. Read more
Quality by Design (QbD) is based on the application of product and process sciences, from early-to-late stages of the product development cycle, to provide accelerated regulatory submission pathways for new drug applications.

•This is the first MSc dedicated to the new QbD approach to pharmaceutical process and product development
•QbD instils quality into the product while it is being developed and manufactured rather than waiting for post-production testing
•This forms part of a major initiative, being driven and supported by US, EU, and Japanese regulatory authorities, and defined within the Q8, Q9 and Q10 Guidelines from the International Committee on Harmonization (ICH)
•Benefit from investment in new, dedicated good manufacturing practice laboratories, links to the pharmaceutical industry and involvement of industrial practitioners in our course design and delivery

The course contains areas of core knowledge and skills with an emphasis on application of ‘Quality by Design’ principles and continuous improvement activities to the development and manufacture of pharmaceutical products. The course has been structured to ensure you have a coherent and balanced programme of study in the following areas:

• Principles and Practices of Quality by Design
• Product Design: Pre-formulation and Formulation
• Analytical Techniques in Materials Science
• Process Design, Control and Manufacturing
• Advances in Drug Delivery
• Biopharmaceuticals
• Process Analytical Technology and Chemometrics
• Experimental Design and Research Methods

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As well as giving a solid scientific understanding, the course also addresses commercial, ethical, legal and regulatory requirements, aided by extensive industrial contacts. Read more
As well as giving a solid scientific understanding, the course also addresses commercial, ethical, legal and regulatory requirements, aided by extensive industrial contacts.

Students who successfully complete the course will have acquired skills that are essential to the modern biomedical and healthcare industry, together with the expertise required to enter into management, product innovation, development and research.

Programme Structure

The MSc programmes in Biomedical Engineering are full-time, one academic year (12 consecutive months). The programmes consist of 4 core (compulsory) taught modules and two optional streams. Biomedical, Genetics and Tissue Engineering stream has 3 modules, all compulsory (see below). The second option, Biomedical, Biomechanics and Bioelectronics Engineering stream consists of 5 modules. Students choosing this option will be required to choose 60 credit worth of modules. See individual course pages.

The taught modules are delivered to students over two terms; Term 1 (September – December) and Term 2 (January – April) of each academic year. The taught modules are examined at the end of each term, and the students begin working on their dissertations on a part-time basis in term 2, then full-time during the months of May to September.

Core Modules
Biomechanics and Biomaterials (15 credit)
Design and Manufacture (15 credit)
Biomedical Engineering Principles (15 credit)
Innovation, Management and Research Methods (15 credit)

Additional Compulsory Programme Modules
Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine (15 credit)
Genomic Technologies (15 credit)
Molecular Mechanisms of Human Disease (30 credit)
Dissertation (60 credit)

Module Descriptions

Biomechanics and Biomaterials

Main topics include: review of biomechanical principles; introduction to biomedical materials; stability of biomedical materials; biocompatibility; materials for adhesion and joining; applications of biomedical materials; implant design.

Biomedical Engineering Principles

Main topics include: bone structure and composition; the mechanical properties of bone, cartilage and tendon; the cardiovascular function and the cardiac cycle; body fluids and organs; organisation of the nervous system; sensory systems; biomechanical principles; biomedical materials; biofluid mechanics principles, the cardiovascular system, blood structure and composition, modelling of biofluid systems.

Design and Manufacture

Main topics include: design and materials optimisation; management and manufacturing strategies; improving clinical medical and industrial interaction; meeting product liability, ethical, legal and commercial needs.

Genomic Technologies

Main topics: General knowledge of genomic and proteomic technology; Microarrary technology; Transgenic technology. Drug discovery technology; Translational experiment-design and interpretation; Sequencing in microbiology research

Innovation and Management and Research Methods

Main topics include: company structure and organisation will be considered (with particular reference to the United Kingdom), together with the interfacing between hospital, clinical and healthcare sectors; review of existing practice: examination of existing equipment and devices; consideration of current procedures for integrating engineering expertise into the biomedical environment. Discussion of management techniques; design of biomedical equipment: statistical Procedures and Data Handling; matching of equipment to biomedical systems; quality assurance requirements in clinical technology; patient safety requirements and protection; sterilisation procedures and infection control; failure criteria and fail-safe design; maintainability and whole life provision; public and environmental considerations: environmental and hygenic topics in the provision of hospital services; legal and ethical requirements; product development: innovation in the company environment, innovation in the clinical environment; cash flow and capital provision; testing and validation; product development criteria and strategies.

Molecular Mechanisms of Human Disease

Main topics: The module will focus on the following subject material with emphasis on how these processes are altered in a variety of human diseases. Where appropriate, therapeutic intervention in these processes will be highlighted. Signalling pathways resulting from activation of membrane, intracellular or nuclear receptors will be discussed. Examples include: Mammalian iron, copper and zinc metabolism, G-Protein coupled receptor signalling, Wnt signalling, JAK/STAT signalling and cytokine signalling, Steroid signalling

Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

Main topics: Fundamentals of tissue structure, function and pathology. Tissue regeneration. Tissue engineering substitutes. Cells, cell culture, stem cells, cell and gene therapy. Extracellular matrix, structure, scaffolds. Cell signalling, growth factors, cytokines, neurotransmitters, receptors and other signalling molecules. Bioreactors, ex-vivo and in-vivo. Engineering host tissue responses.

Dissertation

The choice of Dissertation topic will be made by the student in consultation with academic staff and (where applicable) with the sponsoring company. The topic agreed is also subject to approval by the Module Co-ordinator. The primary requirement for the topic is that it must have sufficient scope to allow the student to demonstrate his or her ability to conduct a well-founded programme of investigation and research. It is not only the outcome that is important since the topic chosen must be such that the whole process of investigation can be clearly demonstrated throughout the project. In industrially sponsored projects the potential differences between industrial and academic expectations must be clearly understood.

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Sustainable engineering refers to the integration of social, environmental, and economic considerations into product, process, and energy system design methods. Read more
Sustainable engineering refers to the integration of social, environmental, and economic considerations into product, process, and energy system design methods. Additionally, sustainable engineering encourages the consideration of the complete product and process lifecycle during the design effort. The intent is to minimize environmental impacts across the entire lifecycle while simultaneously maximizing the benefits to social and economic stakeholders. The MS in sustainable engineering is multidisciplinary and managed by the industrial and systems engineering department.

The program builds on RIT’s work in sustainability research and education and offers students the flexibility to develop tracks in areas such as renewable energy systems, systems modeling and analysis, product design, and engineering policy and management. Course work is offered on campus and available on a full- or part-time basis.

Educational objectives

The program is designed to accomplish the following educational objectives:

- Heighten awareness of issues in areas of sustainability (e.g., global warming, ozone layer depletion, deforestation, pollution, ethical issues, fair trade, gender equity, etc.).

- Establish a clear understanding of the role and impact of various aspects of engineering (design, technology, etc.) and engineering decisions on environmental, societal, and economic problems. Particular emphasis is placed on the potential trade-offs between environmental, social, and economic objectives.

- Strong ability to apply engineering and decision-making tools and methodologies to sustainability-related problems.

- Demonstrate a capacity to distinguish professional and ethical responsibilities associated with the practice of engineering.

Plan of study

Technical in nature, the program equips engineers with the tools they need to meet the challenges associated with delivering goods, energy, and services through sustainable means. In addition to basic course work in engineering and classes in public policy and environmental management, students are required to complete a research thesis directly related to sustainable design challenges impacting society. Many thesis projects support the sustainability-themed research being conducted by RIT faculty in the areas of fuel-cell development, life-cycle engineering, and sustainable process implementation.

Students must successfully complete a total of 33 semester credit hours of course work comprised of five required core courses; two graduate engineering electives in an area of interest such as energy, modeling, manufacturing and materials, transportation and logistics, or product design and development; one social context elective; one environmental technology elective; two semesters of Graduate Seminar I, II (ISEE-795, 796); and a thesis. This research-oriented program is designed to be completed in two years.

Curriculum

- First Year

Fundamentals of Sustainable Engineering
Engineering of Systems I
Renewable Energy Systems
Graduate Seminar I
Lifecycle Assessment
Engineering Electives
Graduate Seminar II

- Second Year

Technology Elective
Social Context Elective
Research and Thesis

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See the Department website - http://www.rit.edu/kgcoe/program/sustainable-engineering-0. Sustainable engineering refers to the integration of social, environmental, and economic considerations into product, process, and energy system design methods. Read more
See the Department website - http://www.rit.edu/kgcoe/program/sustainable-engineering-0

Sustainable engineering refers to the integration of social, environmental, and economic considerations into product, process, and energy system design methods. Additionally, sustainable engineering encourages the consideration of the complete product and process lifecycle during the design effort. The intent is to minimize environmental impacts across the entire lifecycle while simultaneously maximizing the benefits to social and economic stakeholders. The master of engineering in sustainable engineering is multidisciplinary and managed by the industrial and systems engineering department.

The program builds on RIT’s work in sustainability research and education and offers students the flexibility to develop tracks in areas such as renewable energy systems, systems modeling and analysis, product design, and engineering policy and management. The program is offered on campus, and available on a full- or part-time basis.

Educational objectives

The program is designed to accomplish the following educational objectives:

- Heightened awareness of issues in areas of sustainability (e.g., global warming, ozone layer depletion, deforestation, pollution, ethical issues, fair trade, gender equity, etc.).

- Clear understanding of the role and impacts of various aspects of engineering (design, technology, etc.) and engineering decisions on environmental, societal, and economic problems. Particular emphasis is placed on the potential trade-offs between environmental, social, and economic objectives.

- Strong ability to apply engineering and decision-making tools and methodologies to sustainability-related problems.

- Demonstrated capacity to distinguish professional and ethical responsibilities associated with the practice of engineering.

Plan of study

Technical in nature, the program equips engineers with the tools they need to meet the challenges associated with delivering goods, energy, and services through sustainable means. In addition to basic course work in engineering and classes in public policy and environmental management, students are required to complete a capstone project directly related to sustainable design challenges impacting society. Many of these projects can be incorporated into sustainability themed research by RIT faculty in the areas of fuel-cell development, life-cycle engineering, and sustainable process implementation.

Students must successfully complete a total of 36 credit hours through course work and a capstone project. This program is designed to be completed in three semesters.

Curriculum

- First Year

Fundamentals of Sustainable Engineering
Engineering of Systems I
Renewable Energy Systems
Lifecycle Assessment
Engineering Elective

- Second Year

Engineering Elective
Social Context Elective
Technology Elective
Engineering Capstone

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The two year MSc programme Biosystems Engineering is for students with an (agricultural) engineering background on bachelor level that are interested to pursue a MSc degree in a field where the interaction between technology and biology plays an important role. Read more

MSc Biosystems Engineering

The two year MSc programme Biosystems Engineering is for students with an (agricultural) engineering background on bachelor level that are interested to pursue a MSc degree in a field where the interaction between technology and biology plays an important role.

Programme summary

During the master Biosystems Engineering, students are educated in finding innovative solutions. The programme combines knowledge of technology, living systems, natural and social sciences with integrated thinking using a systems approach. Solutions can be applied to either the field of food or nonfood agricultural production. During the programme, you develop independence and creativity while acquiring skills that enable you to analyse problems and work as part of an interdisciplinary team. Biosystems Engineering is a tailor-made, thesis oriented programme based on the specific interests and competencies of the student.

Thesis tracks

Farm Technology
This topic consists of four main themes, namely automation for bioproduction, greenhouse technology, livestock technology and soil technology. All these topics have the shared goal of designing systems in which technology is applied to the demands of plants, animals, humans and the environment. Examples of such applications include precision agriculture, conservation tillage, fully automated greenhouses and environmentally friendly animal husbandry systems that also promote animal welfare.

Systems and Control
Production processes and various kinds of machinery have to be optimised to run as efficiently as possible; and with the least amount of possible environmental impact. To achieve this, computer models and simulations are developed and improved. Examples include designing control systems for a solar-powered greenhouse to include a closed water cycle and designing a tomato-harvesting robot.

Information Technology
Information and communication play a vital role in our society. It is necessary to acquire, use and store data and information to optimise production processes and quality in production chains. This requires the design and management of business information systems, software engineering, designing databases and modelling and simulation.

Environmental Technology
Environmental technology revolves around closing cycles and reusing waste products and by-products. Processes have to be designed in such a way that they either reuse waste or separate it into distinct and reusable components. Examples include the production of compost, the generation of green energy or the design of environmentally friendly animal husbandry systems and greenhouses.

AgroLogistics
The goals of agrologistics are to get the right product in the right quantity and quality at the right time and to the right place as efficiently as possible while fulfilling the requirements of the stakeholders (such as government legislation and regulations). This requires the design of effective, innovative logistics concepts in agrifood chains and networks. Examples are the design of greenhouses developed for optimal logistics or designing a dairy production process with minimal storage costs.

Biobased Technology
The importance of biobased economy is increasing. Energy savings and the use of renewable energy are directions for achieving an environmentally sustainable industrial society. Biomass of plants, organisms and biomass available can be turned into a spectrum of marketable products and energy. In this track, you learn more about process engineering, biological recycling technology, biorefinery and how to abstract a real system into a physical model and analyse the physical model using dedicated software.

Your future career

Most graduates are employed in the agrofood sector, or related sectors of industry and trade, from local to international companies. They are project leaders, product managers, technical experts, sales specialists or managers at many kinds of companies including designers of agricultural buildings (animal husbandry systems, greenhouses) and bioenergy production systems. Others find jobs with IT companies (climate control computers, automated information systems) or firms in the agro-food chain that produce, store, process, distribute and market agricultural products. In the service sector or at governments, graduates enter careers as consultants, information officers or policymakers in the fields of technology and sustainable agricultural production, while others enter research careers at institutes or universities.

Alumnus Patrick Honcoop.
"I am working as a product manager at 365 FarmNet in Germany. 365FarmNet supports farmers to manage their whole agrarian holding with just one software application. I am responsible for the content of the software. I am the link between the farmers, the agrarian holdings and the software developers. I really enjoy these dynamics and variety within my function. Just like during my studies, when we visited farmers, companies and fairs during courses and excursions organised by the study association."

Related programmes:
MSc Animal Sciences
MSc Plant Sciences
MSc Geo-information Science
MSc Geographical Information Management and Applications
MSc Organic Agriculture

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Pharmacy at Sunderland is ranked sixth in the country, according to The Guardian University Guide 2013. Read more
Pharmacy at Sunderland is ranked sixth in the country, according to The Guardian University Guide 2013.

Course overview

Do you want to contribute to the discovery and development of drugs that could potentially improve the health and well-being of millions of people? The UK has long been a leader in this complex technical area, in which each new drug requires around $1 billion of development work.

Our research-led teaching and state-of-the-art facilities make the University of Sunderland one of the UK's top locations for pharmaceutical science. Our strong links with the pharmaceutical industry ensure a flow of guest speakers and good contacts for your chosen Masters project/dissertation. Previous projects have involved collaborations with companies such as AstraZeneca, Pfizer and Helena Biosciences.

The course covers advanced pharmaceutics, pharmaceutical analysis, drug design, pharmacology, proteomics and pharmacogenomics. You will also cover regulatory processes for medicines, in line with ICH guidelines. The course is a direct response to employers’ search for postgraduates who have a mix of theoretical and practical skills and who will push boundaries in drug development.

With a Masters course, it’s important to consider the relevance of the research interests of tutors who will supervise your dissertation. At Sunderland, our interests include pharmaceutical analysis, process chemistry, various drug discovery programmes, and drug delivery systems, including those for large biological pharmaceuticals. Our academic team have produced some ‘world-leading’ research, according to the latest Research Excellence Framework (2014).

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with self-directed research. The topic of the project / dissertation is negotiated to fit both your personal interests and the expertise of Sunderland's supportive tutors. Modules on this course include:
Core modules
-Essential Research and Study Skills (20 Credits)
-Fundamentals for Pharmaceutical Science (20 Credits)
-The Pharmaceutical R&D Cycle and its Regulation (20 Credits)

Choose four out of the five following modules
-Advanced Pharmacology (15 Credits)
-Pharmacogenomics and Proteomics (15 Credits)
-Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis (15 Credits)
-Advanced Drug Design (15 Credits)
-Advanced Pharmaceutics (15 Credits)

Choose one Masters option
-Double Project (60 Credits)
Or
-Double Dissertation (60 Credits)
Or
-Single Project (30 Credits) and Single Dissertation (30 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, seminars, open learning, laboratory work and group work.

The Masters project may involve collaboration with a pharmaceutical company. Previous projects have involved collaborations with companies such as AstraZeneca, Pfizer and Helena Biosciences.

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working and problem solving. Assessment methods include laboratory reports, oral presentations, case studies, critical reviews, examinations and the Masters project.

Facilities & location

This course is based in the Sciences Complex at our City Campus, which boasts multi-disciplinary laboratories and cutting-edge equipment thanks to multi-million pound investments.

Facilities for Pharmaceutics
We have pharmaceutical-related equipment for wet granulation, spray drying, capsule filling, tablet making, mixing inhalation, film coating and freeze drying. As well as standard pharmacopoeial test methods, such as dissolution testing, friability and disintegration, we also offer highly sophisticated test methods. These include rheometry, thermal analysis (differential scanning calorimetry and hot stage microscopy), tests for powder flow, laser diffraction, photon correlation spectroscopy, image analysis and laser confocal microscopy.

Facilities for Medicinal Chemistry
Our state-of-the-art spectroscopic facility allows us to confirm the structures of new molecules that could be potential pharmaceutical products and to investigate the structures of potential medicinal substances that have been isolated from plants. We are equipped with Liquid Chromatography-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Mass Spectroscopy (LC-NMR/MS) platforms; this is an exceptional facility for a university. We also have low and high resolution mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance and elemental analysis equipment. Our facilities allow you to gain hands-on experience of a wide range of analytical techniques such as atomic absorption spectroscopy and infra-red spectroscopy, which are of great importance in determining both ionic/metal content of pharmaceuticals and simple chemical structures respectively. You will also gain experience of revolutionary protein and DNA separation techniques, as well as Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography (x8) and Gas Chromatography for separating all kinds of samples of pharmaceutical or biomedical interest.

Facilities for Pharmacology
Our highly technical apparatus will give you first-hand experience of the principles of drug action and the effects of drugs on pharmacological and cellular models. As a result, you gain a better understanding of the effects of drugs on specific receptors located throughout the human body and related physiological effects.

University Library Services
We’ve got thousands of books and e-books on pharmaceutical and biomedical science, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date academic and industry articles. Some of the most important sources for your studies include:
-Embase, which is a complex database covering drug research, pharmacology, pharmaceutics, toxicology, clinical and experimental human medicine, health policy and management, public health, occupational health, environmental health, drug dependence and abuse, psychiatry, forensic medicine and biomedical engineering/instrumentation
-PsycINF, which includes information about the psychological aspects of medicine, psychiatry, nursing, sociology, pharmacology and physiology
-PubMed, which contains life science journals, online books and abstracts that cover fields such as medicine, nursing, dentistry, veterinary medicine and health care
-Science Direct, which offers more than 18,000 full-text journals published by Elsevier
-Web of Science, which covers a broad range of science areas

Learning Environment
Sunderland Pharmacy School has a rich heritage in scientific studies and our degree courses are extremely well respected in the industry. We are fully plugged into relevant medical and pharmaceutical industry bodies, with strong links and an exchange of ideas and people. Your Masters project may involve collaboration with a pharmaceutical company, including working at their sites.

Employment & careers

Graduates from this course can pursue a variety of careers in the following areas; Drug Design, Pharmaceutical Analysis and Research, Pre-clinical Research in Experimental and Biological Studies, Formulation and Product Development, Pharmacogenomics and Proteomics, Clinical Research, Product Registration, Licensing and Regulatory Affairs.

Previous Sunderland graduates have been employed in companies such as GSK, Eisai, Reckitt Benckiser, Merck, Sharp & Dohme and Norbrook Laboratories.

Some students may apply for a PhD programme or those who already hold a Pharmacy degree can pursue MSc/PG Pharmaceutical Sciences for the Overseas Pharmacist Assessment Programme (OSPAP) and go through one-year pre-registration training.

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The course combines relevant theory with practice and, by equipping you with appropriate knowledge and skills, enhances your employment prospects in the publishing and related media industries. Read more
The course combines relevant theory with practice and, by equipping you with appropriate knowledge and skills, enhances your employment prospects in the publishing and related media industries.

The MA in Publishing at Oxford Brookes is respected throughout the world. The course gives you a broad understanding of the key issues facing the publishing industry in the 21st century, and provides scope to develop specialist skills required for your career development. It also enables in-depth exploration of specialist areas through independent study and a dissertation or a major project.

This is one of a number of courses run by the Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies which enjoy a high international standing in the publishing world. We have close links with publishing companies in Oxford, London and the south-east of the UK, and our staff have extensive experience in national and international publishing roles.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/publishing/

Why choose this course?

Studying Publishing at Oxford Brookes gives you:
- Excellent employment prospects

- Extensive industry links and networking with specialist external speakers

- A great location in Oxford, which is a global publishing centre

- Unrivalled access to work experience and International internships

- Specialist careers advice, including our Working in Publishing Day

- A large faculty with a variety of research interests and extensive industry expertise

- Comprehensive coverage of the industry from mass market trade fiction, illustrated non-fiction, digital and academic publishing, journals, magazines, rights.

- Access to a wide range of visiting speakers from the publishing industry who regularly contribute to the programmes

- A variety of awards to suit your needs and career aspirations

- Access to unique research resources and specialist publishing collections; The Booker Prize Archive; André Deutsch Collection, African Publishing Collection; the Bodleian Library

- The opportunity to visit international book fairs including Frankfurt and Bologna and London

- An industry advisory board with representatives from major publishers such as Bloomsbury, Faber, HarperCollins, Hodder and Random House Group

- Links with publishing organisations such as the Independent Publishers Guild, OPuS (Oxford Publishing Society) and the Society of Young Publishers – regular events are held at Oxford Brookes

- An extensive network of alumni throughout the world

- The opportunity to attend an international Summer School in Florence with students from Slovenia, Germany, Italy and France.

Teaching and learning

As a student studying with us, you will engage in a range of teaching and learning experiences. Some of the key teaching methods we use are:
- lectures that provide you with foundation knowledge and a framework for study that will enable you to achieve the module's learning outcomes

- seminars and workshops that encourage you to engage in discussion with tutors and peers to test your understanding and ability to apply ideas, to develop your graduate attributes, and to encourage deeper learning

- computer workshops to give you the opportunity to test, clarify, and apply your digital skills

- field trips to book fairs and to the industry, for example, printers, publishers, retailers, so that you can observe at first hand aspects of the industry taught in lectures and workshops

- work experience and internship opportunities across a broad range of departments and market sectors

- group work role play for example, simulating new product development in a real-life publishing context

- individual supervision in support of self-directed outcomes for the dissertation, major project or independent study module

- use of resource-based learning materials and virtual learning environments to support student learning through computer-aided assessment and computer-aided learning.

Assessment is primarily by coursework. A limited number of class tests assess your skills in applying marketing terms and in proofreading.

How this course helps you develop

In addition to the skills and knowledge of contemporary publishing strategies and issues provided through the formal teaching in the compulsory and optional modules, you will develop a professional network which will enable you to navigate effectively through this international industry. You will gain skills in team working, digital and financial literacy, marketing and sales that combined with an innovative approach to contemporary media issues will enable you to start or to enhance your career in publishing.

Our publishing courses attract graduates from a wide range of disciplines who are seeking entry with advanced standing into the publishing industry. We also attract people wishing to update and enhance their knowledge of publishing practice and people working in publishing who are seeking, for the purpose of career advancement, knowledge outside their own specialist field.

Candidates from around the world enrol on the course to learn about publishing within the context of a global industry - in the past three years we have had postgraduate students from over 30 countries in Europe, Asia, Africa, and North and South America.

Careers

The Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies (within the School of Art) at Oxford Brookes offers the largest range of postgraduate courses in publishing in Europe. Our programmes in Publishing provide you with the skills, knowledge and equally important access to networks that kick-start your career in publishing, or improve your current position.

Graduates who have completed publishing courses at Oxford Brookes have been exceptionally successful in obtaining employment soon after graduation and have a strong record of career progression because our courses enjoy a high international standing. Our flexible work experience opportunities with local, regional, national and international publishing enterprises provide you with the essential up-to-date practical knowledge that will enhance your employment prospects on completing the programme. In addition our teaching staff have extensive experience in national and international publishing roles and a broad range of contacts that are at your disposal for your individual interests in this diverse industry.

While studying with us, you will develop a wide range of publishing and general management skills, including advanced IT proficiency. Graduates who have completed our publishing courses have been exceptionally successful in obtaining employment in trade, children's journals, ELT and schools publishing, rights management, digital and production roles. Our alumni have strong records of career progression.

Our graduates have established an enviable reputation in the publishing industry and they are extremely successful in obtaining good jobs fast. Evidence from our alumni suggests that they are able to enter the industry at a higher level than would otherwise have been possible. Our international alumni are working in publishing companies in New York, rights management in Toronto, production in India, digital enterprises in Kenya and a variety of roles throughout European publishing companies. In addition, European and UK students are working in Oxford and Cambridge University Presses, Taylor and Francis, Simon and Schuster, Sage, Penguin, Elsevier, Touch Press, Lion Hudson and Barefoot Books to name only a few.

Research highlights

The Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies is one of the leading centres for publishing education in the world. Our staff and students contribute to a vibrant research environment that is interdisciplinary in emphasis and international in scope. We focus on areas such as book consumption and the life cycle of books, book trade and publishing history (especially 18th-21st centuries), museum publishing, serials publications, pedagogy and publishing education, and the future of the industry. Members of staff have published award-winning monographs, key pedagogical textbooks, and a range of scholarly articles and edited collections.

Students pursuing doctoral studies with us are investigating such topics as girl’s magazines in the cultural and consumer marketplace, the future of university libraries, German publishing in the First World War, and marketing strategies for children’s literature in the Middle East. We also supervise students for the PhD by Publication. Most of our research students are based in Oxford, but a number work on their studies from a distance with regular contact in person and by email.

Research is supported by the resources of Oxford Brookes Library –especially its Special Collections featuring the Booker Archive, the Publishing in Africa Collection, the Rainbird Archive, and the Peter Stockham Collection of Children’s Books—as well as by other local and regional archives and university libraries.

The Centre carries out independent research and training with the international publishing industry. Recent research and consultancy clients include the British Council, Hewlett Packard, the Society of Experimental Biology and Sports Books.

If you have a topic relating to publishing that you would like to study at doctoral level, please contact us with a preliminary synopsis.

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