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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Stochastic Processes. Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Stochastic Processes: Theory and Application at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MRes in Stochastic Processes: Theory and Application is delivered through optional modules for the taught element followed by a large research project that contributes to the field in an explicit way, rather than merely applying existing knowledge.

The Department of Mathematics hosts one of the strongest research groups in probability theory, especially in stochastic processes, in the UK. The senior members of this group are world leaders in their fields.

The Department’s research groups include:

Algebra and Topology Group

Areas of interest include: Noncommutative geometry, Categorical methods in algebra and topology, Homotopy theory and homological algebra and others.

Analysis and Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations Group

Areas of interest include: Reaction-diffusion and reaction-diffusion-convection equations and systems, Navier–Stokes equations in fluid dynamic, Complexity in the calculus of variations and others.

Stochastic Analysis Group

Areas of interest include: Functional inequalities and applications, Lévy-type processes, Stochastic modelling of fractal, multi-fractal and multi-scale systems, Infinite dimensional stochastic analysis and others.

Mathematical Methods in Biology and Life Sciences Group

Areas of interest include: Mathematical pharmacology; heat and mass transfer models for plant cooling; modelling cellular signal transduction dynamics; mathematical oncology: multi-scale modelling of cancer growth, progression and therapies, and modelling-optimized delivery of multi-modality therapies; multi-scale analysis of individual-based models; spreading speeds and travelling waves in ecology; high performance computing.

Key Features

The Department of Mathematics hosts one of the strongest research groups in probability theory, especially in stochastic processes, in the UK. The senior members of this group are world leaders in their fields.

Course Content

As a student on the MRes Stochastic Processes programme you will study a range of topics for the taught element including:

Stochastic Calculus based on Brownian Motion

Levy processes and more general jump processes

The advanced Black-Scholes theory

Theory and numerics of parabolic differential equations

Java programming

The Stochastic Processes: Theory and Application course consists of a taught part (60 credits) and a research project (120 credits). Students will have a personal supervisor for their research project from the start of their studies.

Research projects could be of a theoretical mathematical nature, or they could be more applied, for example in financial mathematics or actuarial studies. Some of the research projects will be of an interdisciplinary character in collaboration with some of Swansea's world class engineers. For such projects it is likely that EPSRC funding would be available.

Facilities

The Aubrey Truman Reading Room, located in the centre of the Department of Mathematics, houses the departmental library and computers for student use. It is a popular venue for students to work independently on the regular example sheets set by their lecturers, and to discuss Mathematics together.

Our main university library, Information Services and Systems (ISS), contains a notably extensive collection of Mathematics books.

Careers

The ability to think rationally and to process data clearly and accurately are highly valued by employers. Mathematics graduates earn on average 50% more than most other graduates. The most popular areas are the actuarial profession, the financial sector, IT, computer programming and systems administration, and opportunities within business and industry where employers need mathematicians for research and development, statistical analysis, marketing and sales.

Some of our students have been employed by AXA, BA, Deutsche Bank, Shell Research, Health Authorities and Local Government. Teaching is another area where maths graduates will find plenty of career opportunities.

Research

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that our research environment (how the Department supports research staff and students) and the impact of our research (its value to society) were both judged to be 100% world leading or internationally excellent.

All academic staff in Mathematics are active researchers and the department has a thriving research culture.



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The programme offers a new and unique approach to energy issues and does not teach how to produce more energy but how to use energy more efficiently! The curriculum provides education in alternative energy materials science and engineering with a strong technology component with specialisations on either materials or processes in sustainable energetics. Read more

The programme offers a new and unique approach to energy issues and does not teach how to produce more energy but how to use energy more efficiently! The curriculum provides education in alternative energy materials science and engineering with a strong technology component with specialisations on either materials or processes in sustainable energetics. The goal of this programme is to educate specialists who are able to design, develop and improve materials for use in sustainable energy systems.

The programme offers a joint degree from two of the biggest and most respected universities in Estonia: Tallinn Tech and the University of Tartu

Key features

  • Integrating lectures, laboratory, theoretical classes and experience in industries
  • Professors of the programme are highly recognised scientists. In 2013 Professor Enn Mellikov received the Estonian National Science Award in the field of solar energy
  • Specialisation in Materials will concentrate on solar panels and fuel cells
  • Specialisation in Processes will teach all about the different ways to produce energy: oil shale, wind energy, water, etc.

Course outline

The goal of the programme is to educate engineers and material scientists in the field of sustainable energetics. For that reason there are two specializations to choose between:

  • Specialization on Materials will concentrate on solar panels and fuel cells
  • Specialization on Processes will teach all about the different ways to produce energy: oil shale, wind energy, water etc. It also gives an overview about how to analyse different methods and how to combine them

Master's programme is connected to the industry and will offer experience in the Estonian Energy Company already during the studies.

The main aim of the curriculum is to educate engineers able to solve or minimize problems connected first of all with the utilization but also with the conversion, transportation and storage of energy. The curriculum provides education in alternative energy materials science and engineering at MSc level with a strong technology component.

The curriculum offers an integrated approach towards current and long term materials and energetics issues, focusing on technologies and concepts in sustainable development of industrial production and use of energy.

The courses will be taught both, in Tallinn University of Technology and University of Tartu in compact courses integrating lectures, laboratory and theoretical classes blocked to just several days duration enabling also the integration of foreign visiting students.

Energy is becoming more and more a major cost factor for all the players in the energy business due to increased worldwide consumption on the one hand and on the other hand a need to restrict the production of greenhouse gases.

By 2030, the world's energy needs are expected to be 50% greater than today. Nowadays, much of this energy comes from non-renewable sources, such as fossil fuels- coal, oil and gas. These fuels are being used faster rate than they are produced and may be unavailable for future generations. At the same time, there is a need for a 25% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 to avoid serious changes in the Earth's climate system.

In 2009 Tallinn University of Technology launched in cooperation with University of Tartu a joint master programme „Materials and Processes of Sustainable Energetics“ which teaches different sustainable energy methods.

Keywords such as solar energyfuel cellsbiomass, and wind energy are just the tip of the iceberg to describe the programme. Student can choose specialization either in materials of sustainable energetics or processes of sustainable energetics. Specialization on materials of sustainable energetics will give the student knowledge about solar panels and fuel cells- there is already a spin-off company Crystalsol which specializes on building solar panels. Students who choose to study processes of sustainable energetics will learn different ways how to produce and combine sustainable energy- solar, wind, biomass, etc.

Volume of the programme is 2 years and graduates will be awarded with the Master of Science in Engineering.

Curriculum

Structure of curriculum

Future career options

Since the beginning of the programme, almost 50% of the graduates have continued their studies at PhD level in Tallinn University of Technology or in other universities in Europe or America. This has the result of many career possibilities as a researcher in the field of fuel cells and solar panels for material specialisation students whereas processes students are demanded in industries related to sustainable energetics.



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The MSc in Group Processes and Intergroup Relations is a specialist version of our existing MSc in Social and Applied Psychology that focuses on social psychological theory and research in intergroup and group behaviour. Read more
The MSc in Group Processes and Intergroup Relations is a specialist version of our existing MSc in Social and Applied Psychology that focuses on social psychological theory and research in intergroup and group behaviour.

Group processes and intergroup relations have become an increasingly central part of the discipline of social psychology, addressing issues of prejudice, discrimination, conflict reduction, persuasion and social influence, power, group decision making and ethnic loyalty.

This programme explores major and current research covering issues such as intergroup contact, social and cognitive processes underlying prejudice, discrimination, collective protest, group decision-making, leadership and group performance. Suitable students are encouraged to go on to register for PhD degrees.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/70/group-processes-and-intergroup-relations

About the School of Psychology

As a student within the School of Psychology at Kent, you benefit from our supportive, dynamic and diverse environment for creative research and learning.

All of our taught Master’s (MSc) programmes have been recognised by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the nationally recognised criteria for preparation training for PhD research.

Conducting both basic and applied research in several areas, Psychology at Kent is highly regarded as a leading European centre for postgraduate research. Our long-established international reputation in social psychology is complemented by our strengths in cognitive, developmental and forensic psychology. We attract excellent visiting scholars and postgraduate students from both within the UK and overseas.

Some of our PhD students are self-funded, and others are funded by grants or awards either from the School, UK or their countries of origin. Some are also paid to undertake part-time teaching within the School. We have a strong track record of attracting ESRC research studentship funding, which involves partnerships with external organisations such as Age UK and the Equality and Human Rights Commission and collaborative studentships with partners such as People United.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

SP801 - Statistics and Methodology (40 credits)
SP802 - Current Issues in Social and Applied Psychology Part 1 (20 credits)
SP813 - Advanced Topics in Intergroup Relations (20 credits)
SP844 - Advanced Topics in Group Processes (20 credits)
SP998 - Advanced Research Project in Psychology (60 credits)
SP852 - Developmental Psychology in Professional Practice (20 credits)
SP853 - The Psychology of Eyewitness Testimony (20 credits)
SP817 - Current Issues in Social and Applied Psychology II :Applications (20 credits)
SP842 - Advanced Developmental Social Psychology (20 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is mainly by coursework assignment (4-6,000-word essays), examination (for the Advanced Statistics and Methodology module only), plus the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide the opportunity for the advanced study of group and intergroup processes, with particular emphasis on the context of social psychological theory, different analytical perspectives in social psychological theory, different ways of applying social psychological theory, and the methodological advantages and disadvantages of social psychological investigation

- provide teaching that is informed by current research and scholarship and that requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- help you to develop research skills and transferable skills in preparation for entering academic or other careers as social psychologists

- enable you to manage your own learning and to carry out independent research

- help you to develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Careers

Our postgraduate students commonly go into the fields of health, teaching or further education. For instance, many of our graduates take up roles as assistant psychologists in the NHS with a view to becoming a professional clinical or forensic psychologist. Upon completing our Master’s courses, graduates have also pursued doctoral study and academic careers at higher education institutions.

The programmes we offer help you to develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Professional recognition

All of our taught Master’s (MSc) programmes have been recognised by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the nationally recognised criteria for preparation training for PhD research.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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What is the Master of Geology all about?. You will gain much from the strong emphasis on research in this programme. Read more

What is the Master of Geology all about?

You will gain much from the strong emphasis on research in this programme. Besides enhancing knowledge and skills in numerous specialised courses, including a field-mapping course, you will conduct your own master’s thesis project within a research team (professor(s), postdoc(s), PhD-student(s)) and at the same time develop important scientific skills, such as reporting and presenting, needed in your future career. 

This is an initial Master's programme and can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis.

Structure

The master’s programme offers 4 different majors: Geodynamics and Georesources, Surface Processes and Paleoenvironments, Geology of Basins and Soil and Groundwater.

  • In Geodynamics and Georesources, you will study rock-forming processes and mineral resources in the subsurface. The interaction between various physico-chemical processes in the Earth forms the core of this major. You will develop the ability to analyse and explain the complexity of the various interacting physical and chemical rock-forming processes and apply this knowledge to the exploration of natural resources.
  • In Surface Processes and Paleoenvironments, you will study the interaction between the geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere. The focus is on understanding present-day and past processes and placing these processes in a context of global change on various time scales. You will develop the ability to analyse and explain the complex interaction of surface processes relating to the variability of various aspects of the Earth’s surface.
  • In Geology of Basins, you will study the processes steering the genesis and evolution of sedimentary basins and the surrounding areas. Special attention is given to sedimentary fluxes, the spatial organisation of basins, the evolution of the paleoenvironment, dating of events and exploration strategies. You will develop the ability to analyse and explain the complexity of interacting processes that determine the evolution of sedimentary basins.
  • In Soil and Groundwater, you will study hydrogeological and pedological characteristics and processes with a focus on fundamental and applied aspects of soils and groundwater, including the response to external influences and aimed at sustainable management and protection of these resources. You will develop the attitude to analyse and explain the complexity of physical and chemical processes influencing soil and groundwater, and to come up with remedial measures. 

Departments

The programme is firmly rooted in the research of the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (KU Leuven) and the Department of Geology (Ghent University). Both departments continuously develop and maintain innovative and widely recognised research programmes on fundamental and applied aspects of geoscience. These generally involve collaborative efforts in various international research networks.

Career perspectives

As a Master in Geology you may be involved in development tasks, research or management functions. In consultancy, you are likely to find a job in environmental geology, hydrogeology or geotechnology. In industry, you will be involved in exploration, exploitation andtreatment of natural resources. In governmental agencies and research institutions, you may be responsible for the inventory, management, research and use of the subsurface or for environmental issues.

If you dream of an academic career, you can start by embarking on a PhD-project in Leuven, Ghent, or elsewhere.



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Rational and economic use of energy, with the least damage to the environment, is vital for the future of our planet. Achieving energy efficiency and reducing environmental pollution are increasingly important aspects of professional engineering. Read more

Rational and economic use of energy, with the least damage to the environment, is vital for the future of our planet. Achieving energy efficiency and reducing environmental pollution are increasingly important aspects of professional engineering. This course equips graduates and practicing engineers with an in-depth understanding of the fundamental issues of energy thrift in the industrial and commercial sectors.

Who is it for?

The MSc in Energy Systems and Processes consists of nine taught modules including an energy audit group project and an individual research project.

The course has been developed to provide up-to-date technical knowledge and skills required for achieving the better management of energy, designing of energy-efficient systems and processes, utilisation of renewable energy sources and the cost effective reduction and control of pollution. This knowledge can be directly applied to help various sectors of the economy in improving their competitiveness in the face of dwindling resources, probable substantial increases in unit energy costs and the urgent requirement to comply with the increasingly restrictive pollution control standards.

The course is suitable for engineering and applied science graduates who wish to embark on successful careers as environmentally aware energy professionals.

Why this course?

The MSc in Energy Systems and Thermal Processes, established in 1972, was the first of its type to be instituted in Europe, and remains the most prestigious degree in technical energy management in the UK. The course has evolved over the past 40 years from discussions with industrial experts, employers, sponsors and previous students. The content of the study programme is updated regularly to reflect changes arising from technical advances, economic factors and changes in legislation, regulations and standards. 

In addition to management, communication, team work and research skills, each student will attain at least the following outcomes from this degree course:

  • Demonstrate competence in the current concepts and theories governing energy flows, heat transfer and energy conversions
  • Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the issues involved in the management of energy in industry and commerce, and the design of energy-efficient systems and processes
  • Effectively acquire and critically review information from various sources
  • Apply effectively learnt techniques and technologies to achieve cost-effective conservation of energy and reduction of environmental pollution in industrial/commercial applications
  • Assess the potential and viability of energy policies and projects and making informed judgement in the absence of complete data.

Informed by Industry

We have a world-class reputation for its industrial-scale research facilities and pilot-scale demonstration programmes in the energy area. Close engagement with the energy sector over the last 40 years has produced long-standing strategic partnerships with the sectors most prominent organisations including Alstom Power, BP, Cummins Power Generation, Doosan Babcock, E.ON, npower, Rolls Royce, Shell, Siemens and Total.

Our strategic links with industry ensure that all of the materials taught on the course are relevant, timely and meet the needs of organisations competing within the energy sector. This industry-led education makes our graduates some of the most desirable in the world for energy companies to recruit.

Accreditation

This MSc degree is accredited by Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE).

Course details

The taught programme for the Energy Systems and Thermal Processes masters is generally delivered from October to March and is comprised of eight compulsory taught modules and one optional module to select from a choice of three. A typical module consists of five days of intensive postgraduate level structured lectures, tutorials or workshops covering advanced aspects of each subject.

Students on the part-time programme will complete all of the compulsory modules based on a flexible schedule that will be agreed with the Course Director.

Group project

The Energy Audit group project is part of the Energy Management for Industry module. It requires teams of students to carry out energy audits on selected industrial/commercial sites. Teams must produce prioritised recommendations to reduce energy costs. Each team is expected to present findings and conclusions at various stages and submit a final report for assessment. 

Part-time students are encouraged to participate in a group project as it provides a wealth of learning opportunities. However, an option of an individual dissertation is available if agreed with the Course Director.

Individual project

The individual research project allows you to delve deeper into a specific area of interest. As our academic research is so closely related to industry, it is common for our industrial partners to put forward real practical problems or areas of development as potential research topics. The individual research project component takes place between April and August.

For part-time students, it is common that their research project is undertaken in collaboration with their place of work. 

Research projects will involve designs, computer simulations, feasibility assessments, reviews, practical evaluations and experimental investigations.

Assessment

Taught modules 40%, Group projects 20%, Individual project 40%

Funding

To help students in finding and securing appropriate funding we have created a funding finder where you can search for suitable sources of funding by filtering the results to suit your needs. Visit the funding finder.

Your career

There is a considerable demand for environmentally aware energy specialists with in-depth technical knowledge and practical skills. Our industry-led education makes graduates of this program some of the most desirable in the world for recruitment by companies and organisations competing in the energy sector.

Graduates of the course have been successful in gaining employment in energy, environmental and engineering consultancies and design practices, research organisations and government departments. A number of our MSc graduates follow further research studies leading to PhD degrees at Cranfield and in other academic institutions.



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Your programme of study. If you are naturally curious about how specific regions and countries end up in conflict and how that conflict changes the political system in different countries globally towards peace and different approaches you may be interested in Global Conflict and Peace Processes. Read more

Your programme of study

If you are naturally curious about how specific regions and countries end up in conflict and how that conflict changes the political system in different countries globally towards peace and different approaches you may be interested in Global Conflict and Peace Processes. This degree opens your options to go into politics, the Civil Service, EU, UN, OSCE, public sector, NGOs and many other organisations globally and other careers.

You understand how different conflicts generated peace at internal level, intrastate level and regional level. From this you may build up a portfolio of understanding and experience to assist in countries, report on various issues, speak to specific groups of people like governments, advisors, diplomats and aid workers. You may become so knowledgeable that you are able to offer advice, opinion, outreach, security or economic development for specific regions or you may be able to promote peace upon what you experience at workshops, talks and briefings and at government agencies.

The programme allows you to engage with a range of conflicts and peace process in Northern Ireland, Lebanon and Cyprus to fully appreciate the types of conflicts in our recent past, their commonalities and methods of ensuring peace. This allows you to build up a knowledge and expertise to understand how future conflict may play out or be managed.

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

  • Qualitative Sociology: Philosophy and Methods
  • Advanced Social Theory

Semester 2

  • Global Conflict and Peace Processes

Optional

  • Religious Belief and Practice in the Modern World
  • Quantitative Sociology: Philosophy & Methods
  • The Comparative Study of European Societies
  • Dimensions of Globalisation
  • Post-Conflict Justice and Peace building
  • Sex, Gender, Violence: Critical Approaches

Semester 3

  • Dissertation in Global Conflict and Peace Processes

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You gain a solid set of skills in conflict management, the understanding of characteristics that ensure peace process and you are taught by critical researchers within disciplines involved
  • You gain from research conducted without the Institute of Conflict, Transition and Peace Research

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 Months or 24 Months
  • Full Time or Part Time
  • September

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees:

  • International
  • Scotland and EU
  • Other UK

Find out more from the programme page

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page and the latest postgraduate opportunities

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs 



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Communication for Development is an interdisciplinary field of study and practice, combining studies on culture, communication and development and integrating them with practical fieldwork. Read more
Communication for Development is an interdisciplinary field of study and practice, combining studies on culture, communication and development and integrating them with practical fieldwork. It explores the use of communication – both as a tool and as a way of articulating processes of social change – within the contexts of globalisation.

In this programme, where the form of study strives to be conducive to the course content, progression lies in the group dynamic process as well as in the coursework itself. The multidisciplinary nature of the subject means that the same content should provide in-depth knowledge for students with different backgrounds. One major point of this pedagogical approach is to bring together different experiences. The group diversity should allow students to deepen their knowledge of their own major as well as gain a sufficient overview based on the academic backgrounds and practical experiences of other students. This will allow them to be able to work both interdisciplinary and transcultural in their future professions.

This is Communication for Development

What is the relationship between development communication and the emerging, influential nexus of communication for social change, and where does social communication fit in?

Regardless of what one calls it, communication and media strategies have been utilised in development cooperation for well over sixty years. From an early emphasis on mass media in agricultural extension work, communication for development has grown to encompass a wide array of approaches and methodologies, and has gradually increased in stature to become a key driver of contemporary debates in development. Initially, communication interventions were largely oriented around the use of mass media, and existed within a principally modernising, top-down and technocratic paradigm. Among other complex forces at play, the New World Information and Communication Order (NWICO) debates in the 70s and 80s and the rise of critical and alternative approaches to development stretched the definition of the field. In addition to mass media, practitioners began to evaluate the need for richer interpersonal communication approaches that highlight the importance of power and culture in the success of development initiatives.

Dialogue, participation and the sharing of knowledge

Some of the most significant changes to global development cooperation have come about as a result of this critical field of study. As a discipline, Communication for Development embraces a broad range of functions and practices which centre around dialogue, participation and the sharing of knowledge and information, all with a view to creating empowerment and sustainable social change. Development communication is no longer an emerging discipline but one which has established itself as an integral part of development planning. Labelled part science, part craft and part art, its multidisciplinary nature draws on aspects of anthropology, sociology, psychology and the behavioural sciences, and its implementation depends on flexibility, creativity and an understanding of communication processes. An awareness of the role media and communication have to play in development cooperation and diversity management have transformed the way development is perceived, mapped and implemented, and the field has pioneered some of the most ground-breaking improvements in global development undertakings. As the recent surge in new communications technologies demonstrates, it is not the tools themselves that make good communication, but rather a rich and theoretically informed understanding of the political, social and cultural contexts in which media and communications interventions occur.

Communication for Development as a Field of Study

Despite the fact that every year vast amounts of money are donated to developing countries, the chasm between the ‘haves’ and the ‘have-nots’ continues to widen as billions of people around the world continue to live without running water, sanitation, adequate nutrition or access to basic education.

While the poor and the marginalised have always been at the centre of development, they have been the subjects rather than the objects of communication as traditional development practices overlooked a fundamental truism: that the poor, themselves, are often the best experts on their needs. Marginalised communities, historically denied access to communication tools and channels, have traditionally been passive bystanders to their so-called development as top-down, one-sided mass communication programmes delivered information without taking into account the very important specificities of context – the cultural norms and beliefs, knowledge and folklore of target populations, and how these impact the uptake of information and the potential for social change. Due to this lack of participation by target communities, most development programmes failed to achieve their goals, and a dramatic shift in paradigm was necessary to improve the efficacy and sustainability of development cooperation methods.

Social processes rooted in the communities

This shift towards participatory social processes, rooted in the customs and traditions of communities themselves, is the most fundamental premise of communication for development. Participatory processes aim to utilise cultural specificity as a tool rather than an obstacle, starting at ‘grass-roots’ level and developing methods that are grounded in, and take local and indigenous knowledge seriously. These processes comprise an interchange of knowledge and information, empowering individuals to make choices for themselves, and place communication at the forefront of the planning process while at the same time feedback and consultative processes ensure that communication is on-going and efficacy is maximised. Through the creation of ‘bottom-up’ processes, individuals become fundamental initiates in development schemes, a factor which is strongly linked to their long-term sustainability.

ComDev addresses the gap

As the divide between the ‘connected’, developed world and developing countries grows, so does the need for new, innovative methods for addressing global inequality increase, and Communication for Development is the field devoted to the study and implementation of these processes. The power of media and the potential of Information Communication Technology (ICT) to educate and to address global crises such as the spread of HIV have led to exciting and creative innovations in development cooperation, and this dynamic field continues to grow and develop. As globalisation and the development of ICTs change world markets and pose an increasing threat to developing countries and their more vulnerable communities, practitioners schooled in contemporary mass communication theories and concepts have become a vital part of development across the globe.

Why choose Malmö University?

Despite the wider acceptance of community-driven and participatory approaches to development by large multilateral and bilateral development agencies, the field continues to struggle for institutionalisation, and to be granted sufficient resources by managers and funding agencies.

Paradoxically, the role of media and communication in development cooperation has seen a strange turn after the first World Congress on Communication for Development, held in Rome in 2006 and organized by FAO, the World Bank and the Communication Initiative, in partnership with a broad strand of important organisations in the field. The summit in Rome managed to mobilize almost a thousand participants from research and practice, government and non-government. It was supposed to mark the definite break-through of the science and practice of ComDev. Instead, what happened had more the character of an implosion of the ComDev field, which only recently is gaining a new momentum. Today, we are however actually seeing a long series of new institutional initiatives, in the world of ComDev, both in practice and university curricular development. At university level, new MAs in ComDev have developed in places like Albania, South Africa, Kenya, Spain, Paraguay, the UK and Colombia. The field is finally becoming more significantly institutionalised in the world of academia, although it is still grappling with finding its identity between media and communication studies on one side, and cultural studies, political science and not least development studies on some of the other sides. The interdisciplinarity embedded in ComDev, combined with the outlined processes of globalisation, mediatisation and the proliferation of bottom-up agency are all contributing to put ComDev at a cross-roads.

Internet-based distance-learning

Malmö University was the first to pioneer the use of an Internet-based distance-learning platform to make the education available to students globally. With its mix of online collaboration and discussion, paired with webcast seminars the entire programme can be conducted over the internet. This enables students from all corners of the globe to participate, work in their own time and attain the education. The use of the Live Lecture function in seminars makes students, equipped with microphones and webcams, able to participate in lectures and discussions online, resulting in a ‘virtual classroom’. This way, students in New Zealand and South Africa can communicate and work on projects with classmates in Fiji and India, sharing ideas and working together towards the common goal of improving development practices.

ComDev fosters teamwork

As a relatively new degree, students embarking on this specialised programme have the advantage of being schooled in the latest theories and philosophies, while being given the opportunity to apply these theories and concepts to real-life projects and problems in human development through individual assignments and group projects. Geared as it is towards individuals working in the fields of journalism, media and development, ComDev fosters teamwork and facilitates the exchange of knowledge and perspectives among participants.

Final project and field-work

The final project has always been an important element of the programme. Over the past 10 years, students of ComDev have had the opportunity to apply what they have learned theoretically to a broad range of contexts and scenarios in the process of completing their projects, and field-work has been conducted in India, South Africa, Mozambique, Kenya, Croatia and Sarajevo, to name but a few. During their project work, students have the opportunity to explore a particular research area or topic of concern at a deeper level, and the accompanying written dissertation provides a fantastic opportunity to consolidate and further the knowledge and skills gained during the education. This project work also demonstrates a solid foundation in research, which will aid those students who wish to continue into doctoral level studies. In choosing the topic for their projects, students are free to ‘think outside the box’, and employ innovativeness and creativity to their field-work endeavours, and project works have included documentaries, short films, photo essays, and a wide array of dissertations presented in interesting and original ways. Students are also encouraged to join forces and collaborate on projects, as teamwork is regarded as a vital part of effective development cooperation. For a list of all the Project Works to date, see the ComDev portal, under ‘History’.

Career opportunities

The global demand for media and communication skills continues to increase as organisations such as UNICEF have made it a policy to hire ComDev practitioners, not only for international development schemes, but for diversity management and other forms of transcultural cooperation.

The UN Inter-Agency Round Table of Communication for Development has played a big role in institutionalising the field by bringing together UN agencies and international partners to discuss and debate the broad, challenging and essential role of Development Communication has to play in worldwide development cooperation. The 12th United Nations Inter-Agency Roundtable on Communication for Development had as its theme “Advancing the Rights of Adolescent Girls through Communication for Development”. For example, UNICEF has recently revisited their C4D strategy and work, calling for a stronger linkage with the universities and building widespread capacity within their own global organisation. UNESCO equally recognises the importance of communication, and has included it as part of its mandate and vision, integrating communication in its policies, budget and hiring policy, reflecting the growing need for skilled communication professionals.

Former ComDev students end up working in a truly diverse variety of settings. Some of the UN agencies placing hiring ads seek ‘communication for development’ practitioners by name. More commonly, though, practitioners are working in positions such as information or communications officer, where their roles may include a variety of tasks, not all of which would be strictly considered ComDev. Some practitioners are able to make a living as consultants working on projects with NGOs and CSOs, bilateral aid programs (such as Sida or DFID), or with the UN and World Bank. Since skills, knowledge and aptitudes gained through an education in ComDev are relevant to a variety of job functions within the development sector, you may also find alumni working in a range of allied positions, such as conflict resolution positions or as a learning and outcomes coordinator, to name but a few.

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The aim of this programme is to train new professionals in the field of nanotechnology, materials and chemical engineering. Read more
The aim of this programme is to train new professionals in the field of nanotechnology, materials and chemical engineering. It is of particular interest for graduates in any of the branches of the experimental sciences and technologies (chemistry, chemical engineering, biochemistry, biotechnology, physics, quantum chemistry, biological chemistry, microbiology, etc.) and it clearly prepares them for future research.

The students will acquire the skills required for them to join universities, research institutes, industry and services with a strong sense of innovation, development and entrepreneurial vision.

Student Profile

The Master’s Degree is designed for candidates holding a bachelor’s degree in any of the branches of the experimental sciences and technologies: chemistry, chemical engineering, biochemistry, biotechnology, physics, materials, quantum chemistry, biological chemistry, microbiology, etc.). It clearly prepares students for future careers in research.

Career Opportunities

Graduates in the University Master's Degree in Nanoscience, Materials and Processes: Chemical Technology at the Frontier are capable of working in:
-Research at universities and research institutes. The master's degree is a requirement for being admitted to a PhD programme and the key to a future career as a researcher.
-Research, development and innovation in industries based on new scientific and technical knowledge (biotechnology, microelectronics, telecommunications, energy storage, new materials, etc.) and traditional industries (chemical, pharmaceutical, biomedical, ceramics, textiles, etc.) interested in innovation.
-Management, control and strategic planning of nanotechnological techniques, products and processes in the electronics industry, telecommunications, biomedicine, biotechnology, pharmacology, etc.

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What's the Master of Chemical Engineering all about? . The Master of Science in Chemical Engineering programme is primarily aimed at applying chemical engineering principles to develop technical products and to design, control and improve industrial processes. Read more

What's the Master of Chemical Engineering all about? 

The Master of Science in Chemical Engineering programme is primarily aimed at applying chemical engineering principles to develop technical products and to design, control and improve industrial processes. Students also learn to take environmental and safety issues into account during all phases of the process.

Two guiding principles of sustainable development – the rational exploitation of resources and energy, and the application of the best available technology – are emphasised, as is the mantra “reduce, reuse, recycle”.

As a chemical engineering student, you will learn to think in a process-oriented manner and grasp the complexity of physico-chemical systems. Even more than other specialists, you will be asked to solve problems of a very diverse nature. Insights into processes at the nano and micro scale are fundamental for the development of new products and/or (mega-scale) technologies.

While students should have a foundational knowledge of chemistry, the underlying chemistry of the elements and components, their properties and mutual reactions are not the main focal points of the programme.

With a focus on process, product and environmental planet engineering, the programme does not only guarantee a solid chemical engineering background, it also focuses on process and product intensification, energy efficient processing routes, biochemical processes and product-based thinking rather than on the classical process approach.

Structure 

The programme itself consists of an important core curriculum that covers the foundations of chemical engineering. The core curriculum builds on the basic knowledge obtained during the Bachelor’s. In this part of the programme, you will concentrate on both the classical and the emerging trends in chemical engineering. 

Students also take up 9 credits from ‘Current trends in chemical engineering’-courses. These courses are signature courses for the Master’s programme and build on the research expertise present within the department. These courses encompass microbial process technology, process intensification, exergy analysis of chemical processes and product design. 

The curriculum consists of a broad generic core, which is then strengthened and honed during the second year, when students select one of the three specialisations: product, process and environmental engineering.

This choice provides you with the opportunity to specialise to a certain extent. Since the emerging areas covered in the programme are considered to be the major challenges within the chemical and related industries, graduating in Leuven as a chemical engineer will give you a serious advantage over your European colleagues since you will be able to integrate new technologies within existing production processes.

During their Master’s studies, students are encouraged to take non-technical courses (general interest courses), organized for instance by other faculties (economics, social sciences, psychology…) in order to broaden their scope beyond mere technical courses.

An important aspect of the Master’s programme is the Master’s thesis. Assigning Master’s thesis topics to students is based on a procedure in which students select 5 preferred topics from a long list.

The Master’s programme highly values interactions with the chemical industry which is one of the most important pillars of the Flemish economy. As such, some courses are taught by guest professors from the industry.

International and industrial experience

One or two semesters of the programme can be completed abroad in the context of the ERASMUS+ programme. Additionally, you can apply for an industrial internship abroad through the departmental internship coordinator. These internships take place between the third Bachelor’s year and the first Master’s year, or between the two Master’s years.

The department also offers a new exchange programme with the University of Delaware (United States) and with the Ecole Polytechique in Montréal (Canada).

The faculty’s exchange programmes are complemented by the BEST network (Board of European Students of Technology). This student organisation offers the opportunity to follow short courses, usually organised in the summer months. The faculty also participates in various leading international networks.

You can find more information on this topic on the website of the Faculty website.

Career perspectives

The chemical sector represents one of the most important economic sectors in Belgium. It provides about 90,000 direct and more than 150,000 indirect jobs. With a 53 billion euro turnover and a 35% share of the total Belgian export, the chemical sector is an indispensable part of the contemporary Belgian economy.

As a chemical engineer you will predominantly work in industrial branches involved in (the production of) bulk and specialty chemicals, oil and natural gas (petrochemical companies and refineries), non-ferrometallurgics, energy, waste treatment, food, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and biotechnology. The following professional activities lie before you:

  • design, planning and building of installations ('project engineer')
  • monitoring and optimisation of existing processes ('process engineer')
  • design/formulation and optimisation of products ('product engineer')
  • R&D of technical products, processes and devices
  • customer services, retailing ('sales engineer')
  • management

Apart from the traditional career options, your insight into complex processes will also be much appreciated in jobs in the financial and governmental sector, where chemical engineers are often employed to supervise industrial activities, to deliver permissions, and to compose regulations with respect to safety and environmental issues.

As self-employed persons, chemical engineers work in engineering offices or as consultants. Due to their often very dynamic personality, chemical engineers can also be successful as entrepreneurs.



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The M.Ed. Teaching and Learning Processes provides you with the access requirements for the First State Examination for teachers, which qualifies you to teach at state-run schools in Germany and opens up a large number of non-school career paths. Read more

About the programme

The M.Ed. Teaching and Learning Processes provides you with the access requirements for the First State Examination for teachers, which qualifies you to teach at state-run schools in Germany and opens up a large number of non-school career paths.
In addition, you receive top-notch training in the education sciences, qualifying you for high-powered roles in the school sector as your career progresses. As a graduate of this programme you may also proceed with doctoral study in the education sciences and in the didactics subjects.

Features

– greater teaching competence: a significantly increased pedagogy and psychology component compared to the conventional secondary-school Realschule-track teacher training curriculum
– an international teaching degree: the Master of Education is widely recognised abroad
– excellent staff-student ratio in the Secondary School Education (Realschule) track

Who should study this Master's programme?

This Master's degree is ideal for those graduating from the Bachelor of Education programme offered by the University or one of the long-cycle teacher training programmes concluding with a state examination.

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Research profile. The Institute for Materials and Processes (IMP) brings together researchers from materials science and chemical, mechanical and bio-engineering, conducting world-class research into every conceivable kind of material. Read more

Research profile

The Institute for Materials and Processes (IMP) brings together researchers from materials science and chemical, mechanical and bio-engineering, conducting world-class research into every conceivable kind of material.

Work covers the design, synthesis and processing of materials, as well as biomedical and process engineering. IMP has one of the UK's largest carbon capture engineering research groups, and particular strength in biomedical and biological engineering. The Institute has excellent laboratory facilities, including the latest instruments for research in adsorption, biomedical engineering, conversation materials science, high pressure and temperature advanced materials synthesis, ice mechanics, and particular strength in multiphase flows and multiscale modelling. We provide high-quality training in research for both postgraduate students and postdoctoral researchers.

Masters by Research

An MSc by Research is based on a research project tailored to a candidate’s interests. It lasts one year full time or two years part time. The project can be a shorter alternative to an MPhil or PhD, or a precursor to either – including the option of an MSc project expanding into MPhil or doctorate work as it evolves. It can also be a mechanism for industry to collaborate with the School.

Training and support

The development of transferable skills is a vital part of postgraduate training and a vibrant, interdisciplinary training programme is offered to all research students by the University’s Institute for Academic Development (IAD). The programme concentrates on the professional development of postgraduates, providing courses directly linked to postgraduate study.

Courses run by the IAD are free and have been designed to be as flexible as possible so that you can tailor the content and timing to your own requirements.

Our researchers are strongly encouraged to present their research at conferences and in journal during the course of their PhD.

Every year, the Graduate School organises a Postgraduate Research Conference to showcase the research carried out by students across the Research Institutes

Our researchers are also encouraged and supported to attend transferable skills courses provided by organisations such as the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Facilities

The Institute has excellent laboratory facilities, including the latest instruments for research in adsorption, biomedical engineering, conservation materials science, high pressure and temperature advanced materials synthesis, ice mechanics, and multi-phase flows and multiscale modelling.



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The Specializing Master in Fiber Design and Textile Processes was created because there is a need to explore this topic by paying particular attention to these types of new materials. Read more
The Specializing Master in Fiber Design and Textile Processes was created because there is a need to explore this topic by paying particular attention to these types of new materials.
Founded and launched by two centers of excellence: Città Studi Biella with its tradition of technical skills and POLI.design.
The goal is to offer a unique educational program by providing quality knowledge and skills for designing innovative fibers and new materials including the Internet of Things (IoT) and environmental sustainability, thanks to the local companies involved throughout the academic program and their generous support.

For more info visit the page: http://www.polidesign.net/it/fiber

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As the only course to explicitly address the topic of sustainable cities, our Sustainable Cities MA, MSc is unique in the UK. It is an interdisciplinary course that focuses on the human and physical processes shaping urban ecologies and environments. Read more

As the only course to explicitly address the topic of sustainable cities, our Sustainable Cities MA, MSc is unique in the UK. It is an interdisciplinary course that focuses on the human and physical processes shaping urban ecologies and environments. We also offer the opportunity to gain practical experience through an internship.

Key benefits

  • Unique in the UK as the only MA/MSc to address sustainable cities explicitly.
  • An exciting interdisciplinary course
  • Internships are available.

Description

Our Sustainable Cities MA, MSc course will give you advanced understanding of contemporary debates about sustainable cities, with a specific focus on the human and physical processes shaping urban ecologies and environments.

We aim to:

  • Develop your critical understanding of the interrelationships between urbanization and human lifestyles, politics, economy, ecology and environment.
  • Develop your critical understanding of human impacts on physical processes in cities, and the implications for habitation and liveability. 
  • Develop your ability to evaluate advanced scholarship in the field of urban policy critically, with reference to sustainable cities.
  • Promote initiative and develop your independent critical judgment in identifying, analysing and solving problems at an advanced level. 
  • Develop your relevant transferable skills which are embedded in our learning and assessment schemes. 
  • Develop your practical skills in data handling, interpretation and use, and develop your skills in connecting physical dynamics to social, political and management processes.
  • Enable you to focus on the challenges of managing cities in an integrated and sustainable manner, regardless of your first degree discipline.
  • Enable you to deploy scientific, social and economic theory within a sustainability framework which takes into account the need to address the needs of society, the economy and the protection of environmental resources.

The course combines pure and applied research methods from human and physical geography, giving you an advanced level understanding of contemporary debates about sustainable cities. We focus on the human and physical processes shaping urban ecologies, environments and social processes.

Course purpose

The degree combines pure and applied research methods from human and physical geography leading to an advanced level understanding of contemporary debates about sustainable cities. Specific foci will be the human and physical processes shaping urban ecologies, environments and social structure and process.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We will teach you through a combination of lectures and seminars, normally for 20 hours for a 20-credit module. In addition we expect you to complete 180 hours of independent study per module. For your 12,000 word dissertation, we will provide four workshops and five hours of one-to-one supervision to complement your 587 hours of independent study.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

Performance on taught modules in the Geography Department is normally assessed through essays and other written assignments, oral presentations, lab work and occasionally by examination, depending on the modules selected. All students also undertake a research-based dissertation of 12,000 words.

Career prospects

The skills that you develop on this course will allow you to excel in a wide range of careers in international organisations, agencies, consultancies, national and city governments, charities, research organisations and academia.



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The teaching period will involve 2 evening sessions (6 hours per week) over 24 teaching weeks. There is also one Saturday workshop. Read more
The teaching period will involve 2 evening sessions (6 hours per week) over 24 teaching weeks. There is also one Saturday workshop. This structure may be subject to some modification (contact the Course Co-ordinator for further information). Evening courses take place at the ISE, Dublin. The Conflict and Dispute Resolution Studies course is designed to encourage an understanding of the nature and causes of conflict in political, ethnic, community, civil and related environments, and provides an overview of prevailing systems of remedy and redress and dispute resolution. The course examines the causes of conflict in corporate, statutory, voluntary, political, and community-based settings and provides training in Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) processes such as adjudication, facilitation, ombudsmanship and mediation, and addresses internationally significant commissions and tribunals on post-conflict justice. This one-year course interests those who wish to study non-adversarial dispute resolution processes. It is of particular interest to those, in both the public and private sectors, who wish to study civil mediation and other non-adversarial dispute and conflict resolution processes which are increasingly a part of legislative and management structures in the EU and internationally. It aims at achieving standards of best practice for those who recognise the value of alternative dispute resolution processes in resolving commercial, community, workplace and other pre-litigation disputes and in minimising damage caused by conflict. Through an alliance with Mediation Forum-Ireland those who complete the CDRS course will have the opportunity to have their names included in the relevant specialist panel of Accredited Mediators. Students are required to take all core compulsory modules: Course Content:

Understanding Conflict,
Aspects and Dynamics of Conflict,
Theories and Processes of Conflict Resolution,
Processes and Skills for Moving Beyond Conflict.

The assessment is based on two essays of approximately 4,000 – 4,500 words each, a 4,000 – 4,500 reflective log, and on a practical skills-based assessment to be completed by 1 August. One essay will focus on the underlying theory and philosophy of conflict, the other essay will focus on the theories and processes of conflict resolution. To complete the Diploma satisfactorily a pass mark of 40% must be achieved in the two essays and the log and practical assessment must be undertaken to a satisfactory standard.

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This MSc focuses on how individuals construe the social world and the processes that underlie social judgement and behaviour. Read more

This MSc focuses on how individuals construe the social world and the processes that underlie social judgement and behaviour. The programme draws on the research of outstanding academic staff working in the areas of social cognition, social endocrinology, socio-cognitive neuroscience, and judgement and decision-making to provide unique, cutting-edge perspectives on humans as social beings.

About this degree

The programme provides an understanding of how the human emotional, cognitive and neural systems have evolved to sustain social co-ordination and adaptation to the environment. Key topics include: social perception, motivation, attitudes, embodiment, emotion, social judgement and decision-making, and social neuroscience.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Understanding Individuals and Groups
  • Social Cognition, Affect, and Motivation
  • Current Issues in Attitude Research
  • Social Neuroscience
  • Research Statistics
  • Social Cognition: Research Methods

Optional modules

Options may include the following:

  • Knowledge, Learning, and Inference
  • Applied Decision-making
  • Principles of Cognition
  • Human Learning and Memory
  • Social Psychology
  • The Psychology of Health
  • Organisational Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Consumer Behaviour
  • Consulting Psychology
  • Business Psychology Seminars
  • Current Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience II: Elaborative and Adaptive Processes
  • Current Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience III: Translational Research
  • The Brain in Action
  • Programming for Cognitive Science
  • Judgement and Decision-making
  • Talent Management
  • Evolution and Social Behaviour

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through lectures, tutorials and seminars. The Division of Psychology & Language Sciences has advanced technology for the study of socio-cognitive processes, including fMRI, eye-, speech- and motion tracking equipment for dyadic and group settings, as well as a 360ovideo camera. Assessment is through coursework, online assessment and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Social Cognition: Research and Applications MSc

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates have taken up positions in research, marketing, teaching, and management consultancy. 

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Behaviour Change Adviser, Bupa
  • PhD in Psychology, Humboldt University of Berlin
  • Research Consultant, Behaviour Change Partners
  • Business Director, Mindshare
  • University Lecturer, Northumbria University and studying PhD in Self-perception, Northumbria University

Employability

On completion of this programme students will have acquired an understanding of the processes involved in the construction of the social reality, in particular how cognitive and affective processes guide social judgement and behaviour, and how these processes are implemented in the brain. The students will have acquired methodological skills to design and carry out socio-cognitive research which will enable them to address real-world social problems and/or pursue an academic career. In addition, they will have acquired knowledge related to theoretical and philosophical issues underlying psychological research.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language.

Our work attracts staff and students from around the world. Together they create an outstanding and vibrant environment, taking advantage of cutting-edge resources such as a behavioural neuroscience laboratory, a centre for brain imaging, and extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for graduate students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation, from basic processes to applied research. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.



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