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The programme is jointly delivered by the School of Law and the Department of Psychology and is designed for full and part-time study. Read more
The programme is jointly delivered by the School of Law and the Department of Psychology and is designed for full and part-time study.

The contributions to the programme from academics in Psychology, Criminology and Law reflect the multidisciplinary context of applied forensic psychology and will develop your skills in integrating multidisciplinary concepts and communicating to multidisciplinary colleagues. The strong links with external practitioners in the field of forensic psychology give the programme a distinctive emphasis on detention and prisons, the assessment and treatment of the mentally disordered offender and young people in the Criminal Justice System.

The programme is accreditated by The British Psychological Society, so accounts for Stage 1 of the Qualification in Forensic Psychology

Embedded within the programme are a series of optional work experience opportunities that staff members promote among the cohort. Although these opportunities will not attract course credits or extend the period of student registration, staff endeavour to generate a range of relevant opportunities and work with colleagues in the careers service to ensure that necessary paperwork and insurance are in place.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/criminologyandsociology/coursefinder/mscforensicpsychology.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The contributions to the programme from academics in Psychology, Criminology and Law reflect the multidisciplinary context of applied forensic psychology and will develop your skills in integrating multidisciplinary concepts and communicating to multidisciplinary colleagues.

- The strong links with external practitioners in the field of forensic psychology give the programme a distinctive emphasis on detention and prisons, the assessment and treatment of mentally disordered offenders and young people in the Criminal Justice System.

- The assignments that we use are not only exams and traditional academic essays but also include professional reports, oral presentations and written reflections which enable you to build important skills that are critical for your future career as a forensic psychologist.

- The programme is accredited by the MSc British Psychological Society, so accounts for Stage 1 of the Qualification in Forensic Psychology.

- We deliberately limit student numbers to ensure high standards and to enable us to develop a good relationship with each of our students.

Department research and industry highlights

The programme is delivered by a team of leading academics with expertise in their fields. The core teaching staff is made up of:

- Dr Emily Glorney is a Registered Forensic Psychologist with over 15 years of experience working in forensic practice and conducting research across secure hospitals and prisons. Emily is currently working on collaborative research projects with Broadmoor Hospital, exploring the meaning of religion and sprituality in the recovery pathways of patients and developing a quantitative observation system for the alerting of aggressive and violent behaviour.

- Professor Rosie Meek is a Chartered Psychologist and prison researcher, conducting qualitative and quantitative research throughout the UK and internationally. She works closely with a range of Criminal Justice agencies, including prisons and Immigration Removal Centres, a broad range of third sector organisations that work directly with offenders, and the Ministry of Justice. Her specialisms include prison healthcare and education, the role of the voluntary sector in reducing reoffending and promoting desistance, and the evaluation of prison-based interventions and programmes. Dr Meek’s most recent book ‘Sport in Prison’ has been used by those responsible for developing physical activity policy in prisons in England and Wales.

- Dr Laura Mickes is a Cognitive Psychologist who specialises in modelling human memory. Laura was part of the team that developed a widely-used statistical method for use in eyewitness identification research. Her current research is dedicated to identifying and developing procedures that enhance eyewitness accuracy, where she works with Identification Officers at the Metropolitan Police.

- Professor Amina Memon is a Chartered Psychologist with over 25 years of experience in higher education and research. Her research in the area of psychology and law spans cognitive, social and forensic domains. Her work is firmly grounded in policy and practice, for example she studies how to maximise the accuracy, truthfulness and credibility of witness statements, has contributed to training of the police and judiciary and has served as an expert witness in family court cases and criminal trials. Professor Memon’s background in human rights had led to her extending her research to third sector organisations such as Asylum Aid, Plan UK and Freedom From Torture.

- Dr David La Rooy is a Chartered Psychologist. He is an internationally recognised memory expert, expert in investigative interviewing techniques, and conducts research that has influenced the training of child forensic interviewers, the police, lawyers and judges around the world in how best to interview victims of child abuse. He has co-edited two volumes for the 'Wiley Series in the Psychology of Crime, Policing and Law.'

Course content and structure

The programme is made up of the following six core courses (Four delivered in the Autumn term and two in the Spring term) and the dissertation which is undertaken throughout the year.

The programme confers Stage 1 of a two-stage process of professional training in forensic psychology that is assessed by the British Psychological Society (the second stage of professional training is subsequent and external to the MSc Forensic Psychology programme at Royal Holloway). International students would be welcome on the programme of study.

The British Psychological Society requires that core knowledge domains are incorporated into the course so as to reflect the diversity of research and practice in forensic psychology. The unique selling point and emphasis of the programme at Royal Holloway is defined by the multidisciplinarity of the teaching (jointly by forensic psychologists and those carrying out research relevant to forensic psychology in the departments of Psychology and Law) and the research strengths of both departments.

Core course units:
- Research Based Practice in Forensic Psychology
- Young People in the Criminal Justice System
- The Legal Process
- Aspects of the Investigative Process
- Advanced Techniques in Social and Behavioural Research
- Statistics for Research
- Dissertation

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This MA addresses the historical, political, theoretical and ethical issues of applied theatre and develops your ability to contextualise, critique and create- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-applied-theatre/. Read more
This MA addresses the historical, political, theoretical and ethical issues of applied theatre and develops your ability to contextualise, critique and create- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-applied-theatre/

Our aim is to prepare students to be collaborative, responsive, imaginative, politically engaged and culturally aware artist practitioners. The course is aimed at newly-emerging practitioners with a background in theatre, education, activism or social change, as well as at more established practitioners who want to reflect, refresh and develop their skills. We actively encourage the sharing of skills and expertise among our multi-national group of students. We prioritise applicants with some experience in the arts, education, activism or social care, and it is rare that we take applicants directly from their first degree.

Together we explore the ways in which theatre and performance is created by diverse groups of people in a variety of community, social and educational settings: in schools or on the streets, in children’s homes and elderly care, in conflict zones, conferences, crèches and youth clubs, pupil referral units and prisons, women’s refuges and refugee centres, hospitals and hostels – anywhere groups of people meet and interact.

What is applied theatre?

Applied theatre is an umbrella term for a range of exciting worldwide performance forms concerned with personal and social change.

The term embraces: theatre of the oppressed, community theatre, theatre-in-education, drama in education, theatre for development, prison theatre, intercultural arts, intergenerational arts, theatre in museums, archives and heritage sites, story-telling, reminiscence theatre, conflict resolution. The work often moves across art forms. This is not a definitive list, as it is a field that is dynamic and changing.

The MA considers case studies from the UK and from across the globe. Central to this investigation are: questions of identity; representation; discrimination; health; equality; human rights; opportunity; access; social inclusion/exclusion; participation; ethics; evaluation and documentation; aesthetics and the role of the artist.

Placement and partnerships

The course is structured so that practice and theory constantly respond to one another, through practical classes and seminars. All students undertake a placement in a recognised host organisation where you'll work with experienced practitioners, and learn from the inside how participatory arts organisations function.

We have active partnerships with many companies, and the majority of the tutors, including the convenor, are active artists, with a variety of arts practices in performance, community and social settings.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Sue Mayo

Structure

Full time students are in Goldsmiths Monday to Wednesday in terms 1 & 2.

Part time students are in Goldsmiths Tuesday and Wednesday in terms 1 & 2 of year 1, and Mondays only in year 2.

In the summer term, for both years, there are 5 days of teaching in April and May, dates to be confirmed.

Assessment

The MA Applied Theatre has five points of assessment:

a 6,000-word essay based on material covered in Term 1
a 6,000-word reflective portfolio on the placement
a 12,000-word research project/dissertation
These assessments count towards 80% of the final mark.

The remaining 20% is derived from assessment of the two shared complementary/contextual modules, which include Disability Theatre, Performance Praxis, African Theatre, Musical Theatre and Cultural Theory.

Skills
The MA aims to equip you with the appropriate background knowledge and understanding to work creatively and critically within the broad remit of applied theatre. Recent research identified three core skills for participatory artists working in socially engaged theatre practice. These are:

critical thinking (the ability to contextualise and interrogate practice in the light of current thinking and practice)
creativity (the ability to take creative risks based on a strong skill base)
responsiveness (the ability to reflect and adapt)
The course works with these core skills threaded through its methodology, while also offering opportunities to look at the hard skills of planning, documenting and evaluating work.

Careers

Our students go on to work in a range of roles including setting up and running community/participatory theatre companies, as freelance drama workshop facilitators, lecturers, heads of education or participation producers within established theatre companies.

Previous students have gone on to carry out:

work with people with learning disabilities
theatre work with early years
creative work in pupil referral units
cross-arts projects in a range of educational, community and social contexts
theatre education and outreach
community theatre
museum education and theatre in prisons
Previous graduates from the programme have also continued with research study towards the MPhil or PhD qualification.

We have graduates working at the Southbank Centre, the Royal National Theatre, The Young Vic, Brighton Dome, Pan Arts, Rewrite, Ovalhouse, Battersea Arts Centre, the Albany and Talawa Theatre; with MIND, Tender, Magic Me, and Headway.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Forensic psychology is an expanding field. It interfaces with other disciplines such as clinical, social and cognitive psychology, as well as criminology and law in order to address issues of major concern to the justice system, organisations, individuals and society. Read more

Why take this course?

Forensic psychology is an expanding field. It interfaces with other disciplines such as clinical, social and cognitive psychology, as well as criminology and law in order to address issues of major concern to the justice system, organisations, individuals and society.

This is a unique course informed by research at the forefront of the field, with many opportunities to get involved with ongoing projects within the Department.

Applications for this course close 15 January 2016 to be considered for interview on 23 or 25 February and close 15 February 2016 to be considered for interview on 22 and 24 March.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Be taught by the largest group of actively researching academics at the cutting edge of forensic psychology research in the UK
Put your investigative techniques to the test in our Forensic Interviewing Suite
Benefit from our connections with a variety of custodial establishments including adult male and women's prisons, young offenders' institutions and secure hospitals

What opportunities might it lead to?

Accredited by the BPS, our Master’s degree is recognised as providing an important step towards eventual chartered status as a forensic psychologist. It aims to provide you with a systematic knowledge and understanding of forensic psychology, in accordance with the academic requirements of the Division of Forensic Psychology (DFP), the British Psychological Society (BPS) for accredited courses and eventual progression to autonomous practice.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Working in prisons
Probation work
The police force
Social work
Health services
The courts
Academia
Private practice

Module Details

The course content is structured to reflect developments and priorities in the field of forensic psychology and is kept under constant review to keep it up-to-date.

Here are the units you will study:

Theory into Practice: Foundations of Professional Competence in Forensic Psychology: This unit provides a foundation for working as a scientist-practitioner. From an early introduction to concepts of reflective practice, personal development and core skills relevant to completing the course, it moves to encouraging an awareness of factors involved in criminal behaviour and their implications. The focus is on the application and development of skills in analysis and less on the learning of facts and theories. In the second part of the unit, the focus moves to tasks and challenges that forensic psychologists encounter in applied settings. Some, such as the design and evaluation of training for other personnel or consultancy skills, are of major relevance to Stage 2 of the system for progression to chartered status that usually follows the course. Others such as countering manipulation, stress and managing aggression can be crucial to survival as well as effectiveness as a practitioner.

Assessment and Interventions with Offenders: This unit is concerned with providing an understanding of the theoretical and empirical underpinnings, contents and methods of current and widely-used approaches to assessment (including risk assessment) and interventions with offenders. These approaches are linked and provide a framework for the organisation and evaluation of information, particularly in relation to efficient, useful and accurate formulation and what works in the delivery of interventions. It will build upon knowledge of factors related to criminal behaviour with a focus on effective approaches and context-related factors in the understanding and management of offenders in a variety of settings.

Empirical Research Project for Forensic Psychology: For this unit you will undertake a complete piece of empirical research in an area of forensic psychology that you find particularly interesting. It provides an opportunity to develop and integrate a range of skills and areas of knowledge including creative formulations, problem-solving, ethics, handling interpersonal demands, use of IT and analytical techniques, and writing to a publishable standard.

Investigative Psychology and the Legal Process: This focuses on the contribution made by psychology in the context of forensic investigations and the role of psychologists in criminal and civil law proceedings. It is concerned with the application of psychological research and theory in an effort to critique (and improve) practice in criminal and civil justice systems as an applied context for testing the validity and efficacy of psychological theories and innovative practice derived from these theories. Topics cover relevant procedural information to ensure you appreciate investigative, judicial and custodial processes, and the role of psychologists within these frameworks. Theory and research relevant to applied cognitive and social psychology are presented to inform an understanding of eyewitness recall and recognition memory (and memory errors), effective protocols for testing/probing witness memory, detecting deception and juror decision making.

Research Methods and Data Analysis: This unit is designed to provide a familiarity with psychological research methods and data analysis commensurate with understanding and conducting research at the postgraduate and professional level. Specific methodologies and issues of relevance to specific research areas are addressed within a perspective that emphasises creative problem-solving.

Programme Assessment

We give high priority to integrating our research activities with your teaching programme. This ensures that you learn about the most important and current issues in forensic psychology that effect real-life practice.

Teaching usually takes the form of lectures and small tutorial groups, together with practical sessions in our labs and studios.

We assess you in a variety of ways throughout the course. Here’s how:

Written examinations
Briefing reports and essays
Oral presentations
The giving of expert testimony
A research dissertation

Student Destinations

The work of forensic psychologists is varied. Depending on where practitioners work, it can range from criminal investigations to organisational change, from work with offenders to work with staff who work with offenders, and from matters of civil justice such as child access to operational emergencies such as hostage incidents.

Accredited by the BPS, our Master’s degree is recognised as providing the next important step towards eventual chartered status as a forensic psychologist. Following successful completion of this course, you will usually go on to do a minimum of two years full-time supervised practice in an employment setting.

Roles our graduates have taken on include:

Clinical psychologist
Forensic psychologist
Educational psychologist
Counsellor
Health planning analyst

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Crime and punishment are issues of central importance to society and by bringing academic rigour to their examination the UCD Institute of Criminology contributes to the achievement of national priorities. Read more
Crime and punishment are issues of central importance to society and by bringing academic rigour to their examination the UCD Institute of Criminology contributes to the achievement of national priorities. The Institute brings together leading academics from across UCD and is the only centre of its kind in Ireland. Its members have conducted major research projects on a wide range of topics in the field of criminology and criminal justice, including work on coercive confinement, prison violence and desistance from crime. The work of the Institute has been the focus of debates in parliament, legislative and policy initiatives and numerous reports in the media.

On completion of this programme, students will be able:
- To understand and think critically about the intersections between law, politics and social policy that come to the fore in the study of Criminology and Criminal Justice;
- To apply their knowledge and understanding of Criminology and Criminal Justice to real and hypothetical factual situations;
- To conduct independent research and write coherent, well-structured papers.

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/msccriminologyandcriminaljustice/

Studying abroad

The School affords its students the opportunity to spend a semester abroad as part of the Comparative, International and European Law (CIEL) Graduate exchange programme with our partner Universities in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Students participating in the programme will have their dissertations jointly supervised by staff in UCD and in the institution which
they are visiting. Successful completion of the semester abroad will lead to the award of a Certificate in Comparative, International and European Law.

Your future

A specialisation in criminology and criminal justice will be of interest to graduates who want to work in one of the criminal justice
agencies and to those working in prisons, probation, policing and the courts. This specialisation will equip you with a head start for a career in criminal law and the criminal justice system.

Features

The Institute of Criminology offers a wide range of modules for the Masters programmes. Modules of especial interest to those undertaking this programme include:

- Criminal Justice History considers the history of specific offences in a broad socio-political context. Offences examined will include the history of unlawful killing and the evolution of sexual offences alongside aspects of the criminal justice process.

- Advanced Criminological Theory explores key theories of crime both classic and recent, including biological, psychological and sociological explanations of criminal behaviour and their potential application in the Irish context.

- Crime and Punishment explores a number of central issues in criminal jurisprudence such as responsibility, culpability, harm and moral wrongdoing to deepen an understanding of the basis on which conduct is criminalised and criminal liability imposed.

- International and Transnational Crime focuses on the emergence of international criminal law has emerged as a distinct body of law responding to genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity, before considering the impact of globalisation on crime.

Careers

This programme provides opportunities for those who wish to work or are already working in relevant areas, such as policing, youth justice, prisons, probation and voluntary organisations to enhance their knowledge of the field. It also provides a good platform for doctoral studies and a possible academic career in what has become an area of substantial growth in universities around the world.

We have an excellent Careers Development Centre here at UCD, designed to help you with information regarding future employment or studies. UCD hold a number of graduate events throughout the year including a dedicated law fair at which at which many of the big Law firms will be in attendance. The School of Law has a dedicated careers advisor on it’s Academic staff, Dr. Oonagh Breen, and a staff member from the careers office will be in attendance at the School of law on a number of occasions throughout the academic year. To see the full range of services offered by the careers office go to http://www.ucd.ie/careers/

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/msccriminologyandcriminaljustice/

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/msccriminologyandcriminaljustice/apply,80113,en.html

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned
specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the
world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part- time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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This is a research degree for senior practitioners/managers in the community and criminal justice (CCJ) sectors (police, prisons, probation, youth justice and the third sector) who wish to study at doctoral level and develop research skills appropriate for conducting research into practice. Read more
This is a research degree for senior practitioners/managers in the community and criminal justice (CCJ) sectors (police, prisons, probation, youth justice and the third sector) who wish to study at doctoral level and develop research skills appropriate for conducting research into practice. This course is an interprofessional doctoral where students from across the CCJ sectors
together with students from allied health professions study together in the pursuit of knowledge applied to practice. The doctorate enables you, within your own practice area, to:

•Engage in a programme of research
•Develop as an expert practitioner
•Develop inter-professional working, and learn alongside other healthcare practitioners
•Develop leadership and management expertise including the ability to influence and inform policy-making
•Further your knowledge, understanding and skills in the development and application of anti-oppressive research methods and an understanding of diversity in its widest sense

Course Modules:

The course is structured in two phases. Phase one consists of five taught research modules totalling 120 level 7 credits. These modules may be taken over a period of two-four years, but must be completed before phase two begins. The modules are:

•Criminological research (30 credits)
•Research dilemmas and Strategies (30 credits)
•Qualitative and quantitative methods (30 credits)
•Advanced Statistics and data analysis (15 credits)
•Research into Practice (15 credits)

The research modules are designed to enable you to gain a complete understanding of research design and methodology as a prerequisite to undertaking an independent research study applied to your particular practice discipline. You must achieve an average of 60 per cent across all five modules in order to progress to phase two. If you choose to step off the course during
phase one you may be eligible for the award of Postgraduate Certificate in Applied Research Design (Criminology and Criminal
Justice) (60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Research Design (Criminology and Criminal Justice) (120 credits) depending on the achievement of the appropriate number of credits.

Phase two consists of an independent research study leading to a thesis of 50,000–55,000 words and examined at doctoral level in part by viva voce (oral exam). Phase two builds on the work undertaken in phase one and leads to the production
of original work of publishable quality. Phase two will take a minimum of two years to complete. If you step off the course or cannot complete the course you may be eligible for the award of Master of Arts in Applied Research Design (Criminology and Criminal Justice).

Teaching and Assessment:

We aim to develop independent researchers who are able to integrate theoretical knowledge of research into professional
practice. You will be actively engaged in the pursuit of original knowledge in your professional field.
Assessment in phase one is via a number of different methods including assignments, presentations and research proposals.

In addition you will develop and maintain a scholarly portfolio supported by your supervisory team which will include
two doctoral supervisors and a practice adviser from your own area of employment.

Expertise:

All staff who support students on the course have backgrounds in the CCJ sector including probation, policing, youth justice, prisons and the third sector, and have researched and published extensively. For example; Professor Hazel Kemshall
is a leading expert in the theory and practice of risk assessment and management; Rob Canton is professor of community and criminal justice. He has taught, researched and written on a number of probation and penal topics. He was appointed by the Council of Penological Co-operation within the Council of Europe as an expert and drafted the European Probation Rules. In 2010 he was appointed as a specialist adviser to the House of Commons Justice Select Committee in its enquiry into the role of the probation service.

Graduate careers:

This is a research degree culminating in an independent research study examined at doctoral level. As such it is the highest award a university can confer, equivalent to a PhD.

This course enables senior practitioners and managers to further enhance their careers in the area of research, management and education. Practitioners and managers holding the doctorate will be equipped with the highest level of research skills and will be enabled to apply research to their own practice. The doctorate enables such staff to enhance their knowledge and understanding of the practice discipline and to be at the forefront of policy making for the future benefit of all stakeholders in the community and criminal justice sectors.


"I have always been impressed with De Montfort’s approach to probation training, and recognise that over many years you and your colleagues have contributed enormously to the development of probation staff. The courses at De Montfort University have given a strong ethical basis for their probation practice, and a sound understanding of the theory underpinning their practice."

Steve Pestell, Director of Corporate Services, Norfolk and Suffolk Probation Trust

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Participants will develop the professional and practical skills needed to become a teacher working in post-compulsory education, opening up employment opportunities in a wide range of organisations from general FE colleges to universities, prisons, businesses and the voluntary sector. Read more
Participants will develop the professional and practical skills needed to become a teacher working in post-compulsory education, opening up employment opportunities in a wide range of organisations from general FE colleges to universities, prisons, businesses and the voluntary sector.

The course will equip you with the professional knowledge and skills to work within this sector and adapt to organisational and policy change, it will also provide a base for your further personal and professional development.

After completion of the course you will be able to apply for Qualified Teacher: Learning and Skills status (QTLS).

This course is offered in-service as well as pre-service depending on your needs.

There are several locations available to study this course.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/professional-graduate-certificate-in-education4#about

Study at:

Tresham College of Further and Higher Education - https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/professional-graduate-certificate-in-education8

Central Bedfordshire College - https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/professional-graduate-certificate-in-education4

Bedford College - https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/professional-graduate-certificate-in-education12

Barnfield College - https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/professional-graduate-certificate-in-education11

Bedford Campus - https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/professional-graduate-certificate-in-education2

Course detail

• Learn through taught sessions and professional practice, applying theory to your teaching practice to develop the core skills for teaching in post compulsory education
• Build on your expertise and experience in your field to develop your teaching skills
• Gain a qualification that includes recommendation for Qualified Teacher: Learning and Skills status (QTLS) opening up employment opportunities in a range of settings from schools and FE colleges to universities, prisons, business and the voluntary sector, and which provides a base for further personal and professional development
• Develop your ability to understand and work with professional, organisational and policy change
• Explore issues in teaching, learning and assessment
• Benefit from a qualification that is quality assured by the Institute for Learning (IfL) endorsed by the Learning and Skills Improvement Services (LSIS) as a Diploma in Teaching in the Lifelong Learning Sector (DTLLS) and can be used to achieve Qualified Teacher: Learning and Skills status (QTLS)

Modules

• Planning and preparing for teaching and learning
• Teaching and learning process
• Assessment and evaluation
• Professional practice and skills
• Theories and principles of inclusive Learning and teaching
• Researching practice
• Context - Curriculum design and innovation
• Professional practice and development

Assessment

The course adopts a submission based approach, making effective use of a submission proposal process, which enables you to contextualise the outcomes and ensures their relevance to your own professional practice.

There are regular teaching observations and individual target setting will be used to ensure that you are you are making progress towards achieving the required professional standards.

Assessments include portfolios, reports, essays, presentations, teaching observations, practical tasks and teaching materials.

Careers

This course is primarily ‘in-service’ (although a pre-service route is available at certain locations), which means that all participants will already be employed in a teaching role within the post compulsory sector.

QTLS is now required of all new teachers in state-funded further education. It is available not only to new entrants to teaching, but also to established staff who do not hold a recognised teaching qualification, as a portal to promotion and advancement.

You will be challenged to explore theories of teaching and learning and to examine the implications of such theories for your own development. In doing this you will refine, form and reform your own principles, perspectives and values in relation to professional teaching practice.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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Upon completion of two years full-time supervised practice (or equivalent), attendance at workshops and completion of the thesis portfolio, the Professional Doctorate will equip you with the appropriate experience and qualifications to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a registered psychologist with the right to use the title forensic psychologist. Read more
Upon completion of two years full-time supervised practice (or equivalent), attendance at workshops and completion of the thesis portfolio, the Professional Doctorate will equip you with the appropriate experience and qualifications to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a registered psychologist with the right to use the title forensic psychologist.

More about this course

The course aims to produce competent, informed, reflective, and ethically and professionally sound practitioners of forensic psychology who are able to work in different settings. There will be a synthesis between taught workshops and your practical placements. Trainees are required to demonstrate core forensic psychology competencies at an advanced level and to complete D-level research. In addition to general forensic competencies and research, key areas of the course include consultancy, teaching and training, and assessments and interventions.

The course is delivered by a combination of professional workshops, supervised practice, research, and individual, group, and peer supervision. Course leaders are registered forensic psychologists with experience working in prisons, secure hospitals, and independent forensic practise in the UK and the US. Because working in multidisciplinary environments is increasingly important, some lectures are taught by registered psychologists in other fields, including health, occupational, and counselling psychology.

Throughout the course, critical reflection is encouraged on current discourses within contemporary forensic issues. We expect you to adopt a questioning stance to forensic practice that constantly looks to the multplicity of clients’ needs and expectations.

The course is assessed through a thesis portfolio (46,000 words in total) and a Viva Voce that assesses the thesis portfolio. Components that make up the portfolio include the following:
-D Level Research Dissertation
-Assessment Case Study
-Treatment Case Study
-Consultancy Case Study
-Communication Portfolio
-Teaching Portfolio (including DVD of teaching)
-Training Portfolio
-Professional Skills Competency Portfolio
-Competency Log Book as appendix

Professional accreditation

The course is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC), meaning that students who successfully complete the course are eligible to apply for registration as a forensic psychologist.

Modular structure

All teaching takes place in small groups, including presentations, visiting experts, seminars and workshops. Training begins with a two-week Induction period, during which time seminars will be given both morning and afternoon Wednesday through Friday. Subsequently, workshops take place every three to four weeks on a Friday.

Individual supervision sessions are arranged at the convenience of trainees and supervisors. As a trainee, you can expect supervision every 3-4 weeks during your first year and every 1-2 months during your second year. You will meet with your supervisory team at least four times a year. Supervisors will also provide telephone and email supervision throughout the year. We also expect trainees to take part in peer supervision through group meetings and through the use of Weblearn discussion forums.

The course does not have a module structure. However, several essential themes are addressed by lectures, supervision, and teaching and learning exercises throughout the course. These include, for example:
-Working with clients, eg developing a working alliance, giving feedback/cultural diversity, Intervention approaches, risk assessment approaches, trauma-informed intervention
-Working with other professionals, eg leadership and group process, multidisciplinary working and case conferences, providing supervision and directing the work of others
-Ethical and reflective practice, eg ethical decision making, reflective thinking and writing, evaluating practice including quality control
-Research skills, eg systematic review, writing for publication.

After the course

You can expect to go into careers within the prisons service, health service, charity sector, or academic sector in a professional capacity as a chartered psychologist and registered forensic psychologist.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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This course is accredited by the British Psychological Society and forms the essential component for Stage 1 of the Chartership process towards becoming a chartered forensic psychologist. Read more
This course is accredited by the British Psychological Society and forms the essential component for Stage 1 of the Chartership process towards becoming a chartered forensic psychologist. The course offers some students the opportunity of ongoing work experience placements with local prisons and the local forensic secure unit.

Course details

It provides an advanced and up-to-date understanding of theoretical and applied issues in forensic psychology. It integrates the development of an appropriate psychological and professional knowledge base with training in many of the professional skills utilised in practice. The course also emphasises the importance of ongoing assessment, intervention and throughcare, and highlights the role of the forensic psychologist as a project manager, consultant, investigator and practitioner. The course strikes an excellent balance between aspects of investigative psychology and the applied professional and clinical aspects of practice as a forensic psychologist.

Professional accreditation

This course is accredited by the BPS. This gives students Stage 1 of the two-stage process towards becoming a chartered forensic psychologist.

What you study

Core modules
-Applied Qualitative Research Methods
-Applied Quantitative Research Methods
-Assessment and Interventions in Forensic Practice
-Forensic Psychology Project
-Law, Justice and Psychology
-The Psychology of Investigations

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

The course utilises seminars and lectures. There are aspects of self-directed learning in some modules and applied learning including visits to courts and specialist expert external speakers. There is also the possibility for some students to undertake placements with a local forensic unit, the Hutton Centre and prisons in the North East.

The course is assessed using a variety of methods, formative and summative. These include traditional essay writing, applied assignments including functional analysis reports, the development of training plans, and the delivery of evidence and cross-examination in the unique court room facility at the University.

Employability

After Stage 1, students can become chartered forensic psychologists by successfully completing the Stage 2 Qualification in Forensic Psychology.

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This innovative MA allows you to explore ways in which drama and theatre might be applied to educational, therapeutic and community contexts. Read more
This innovative MA allows you to explore ways in which drama and theatre might be applied to educational, therapeutic and community contexts. Applied drama/ theatre is an umbrella term which includes the practice of drama in a wide range of settings, such as drama and theatre in education; young people’s theatre; drama, health and healing; reminiscence and heritage theatres; theatre in prisons; theatre for development and community theatre.

This course addresses the 'social turn' at the cutting-edge of contemporary theatre, where new forms of participation are blurring the boundaries between performer and spectator. During the course you will have the opportunity to explore creative and research opportunities in some of these diverse and dynamic contexts and analyse the politics and values of applied drama. You will experience radically different approaches to performance-making in both conventional theatre spaces and in non-theatrical settings, enabling you to consider the relationship between innovative performance practices and work in applied theatre. The programme considers the international dimension of applied and participatory theatre, and the local and global implications of artistic practice.

By the end of this degree you will be well prepared to work in different locations and have developed your own praxis and practical skills as a practitioner, workshop leader and artist.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/dramaandtheatre/coursefinder/maappliedandparticipatorytheatre.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The course is taught by world leading experts in applied theatre, whose published research includes theatre education, theatre and health, theatre and refugees, devised theatre and applied drama/theatre.

- You will have the opportunity to benefit from our industry partnerships and our professional links with theatre companies. Previous students have benefitted from working with Age Exchange Theatre Trust, the Lyric Hammersmith, The Globe Theatre Education, Attic Theatre, Bravo 22 Company and many local schools, museums and hospital settings.

- The 2008 Research Assessment Exercise ranked the majority of the Department's research activities as world-leading (4*) or internationally excellent (3*).

- Royal Holloway has the largest Drama Department in the UK with 25 academic members of staff working at the cutting edge of the discipline.

- We foster an excellent research environment and support a vibrant community of postgraduate and doctoral students.

- You will benefit from a range of unique performance spaces which include a traditional Japanese Noh theatre, the fully equipped Caryl Churchill Theatre and the substantial Victorian Boilerhouse.

Department research and industry highlights

You will benefit from working in partnership with professional practitioners, undertaking placements in different settings and developing your own practice. Previous practical projects have included reminiscence theatre in a day centre for the elderly; theatre with young people at risk of offending; drama and film with young carers; an interfaith installation with students of different religious beliefs; theatre with young people in hospital; theatre with young disabled performers; performance with unaccompanied refugees, and many, many more. Each project is designed and facilitated by students, and professional placements support their development.

Course content and structure

You will study three core course units and complete a dissertation.

Core course units:
The MA in Applied and Participatory theatre will appeal to anyone who is interested in socially engaged art. It is focused on theatre in different institutional, therapeutic and community settings, and raises questions about how artists might encourage public participation in a range of different forms of theatre and performance-making. You will study three core course units and complete a dissertation.

You will follow a course called Applied and Participatory Theatre Workshop where you will develop your skills as a practitioner and artist, as well as engaging in critical debates about the field. The next specialist module is the Independent Practical Project, where you gain valuable professional experience in community settings.

In addition to the two modules above you will study a shared module for all MA students in the Drama and Theatre Department that considers the contexts for theatre and performance, its histories and practices. The details and assessment methods of this course are being updated for the new year and will appear in more detail on the department website once validated.

The fourth module is the dissertation on a chosen subject within your field of study with accompanying Research Methodologies course that supports students in independent research and writing.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- enhanced and applied their skills as reflective theatre practitioners
- explored the scope of theatre studies and its critical and research methodologies
- developed their understanding of contemporary performance practices and its contexts
- explored the links between theory and practice
- developed their ability to undertake independent research and analysis.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of means including essays, performance analyses, evaluative reflections on practice, and practical projects, as well as a final dissertation of 10-14,000 words. Practical projects are sometimes carried out in a group and may include an element of assessment for an individual’s contribution to group working and direction. All students undertake a summer term practical project.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different drama and theatre-related areas, including careers in professional theatre, training and education. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies and many of our students go on to advanced research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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'Theology is simply that part of religion that requires brains.' - G K Chesterton. Theology is primarily concerned with how we live out and understand our Christian faith. Read more
'Theology is simply that part of religion that requires brains.' - G K Chesterton

Theology is primarily concerned with how we live out and understand our Christian faith. As well as teaching the theoretical aspects of the faith, our postgraduate theology programmes have always placed a special emphasis on the application of theology to specific practical situations and the preparation and formation of people for Christian ministry in a fast moving age:

'Theology has importance for the Church in every age so that it can respond to the plan of God "who desires all men to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth" (1 Tim 2:4). In times of great spiritual and cultural change, theology is all the more important.' (Donum Veritatis, 1)

Why St Mary's?

At St Mary’s we are particularly concerned that academic theology should be in the service of the churches, the world, and wider society. For over a decade we have worked directly with numerous Roman Catholic Dioceses to deliver a comprehensive training in ministry. Consequently we now offer three specialist postgraduate theological pathways:
• Chaplaincy and Ministry
• Christian Spirituality
• Systematic Theology

It is possible to study for three postgraduate qualifications in Theology: the Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma and Master's Degree. Each builds on the other so having completed the two core modules of the course you will be eligible for the Postgraduate Certificate. If you successfully complete the Optional Modules you will be eligible for the Postgraduate Diploma and if this is followed with the Dissertation you will be eligible for the Master's degree.

St Mary’s now has agreements with the Roman Catholic Dioceses of Northampton, Portsmouth, and Plymouth, and the Southern Permanent Diaconate Formation Programme. We teach the MA at Saturday classes in Ashburton (Devon), Beaconsfield (Buckinghamshire), Winchester (Hampshire) and - for those training for Catholic diaconal ministry - Wonersh (Surrey).

A Student View

Teresa (London)
"One of the great benefits of this MA Course is the opportunity the oral and written assignments have given me to reflect theologically on, and relate the issues discussed in the lectures to, my work as a School Chaplain... I also greatly appreciated the opportunity the lectures afforded to meet regularly with a group of fellow Chaplains and to share our own experiences and reflections on Chaplaincy."

Career Prospects

The study of Theology develops students intellectually in a way that fits them in particular for pastoral work. It is an excellent preparation for any profession that involves working with people in a pastoral context.

In addition to the more general employment opportunities that require graduates with a breadth of human understanding, critical and social skills, and an awareness of current affairs, there are some professional openings in which expertise in biblical, theological and pastoral skills is an integral part of professional training.

These include the various forms of pastoral work and pastoral ministry, chaplaincy in schools, colleges, universities, hospitals, armed forces, prisons, retreat work, spiritual direction and guidance, teaching, catechesis and adult formation.

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The MSc in Applied Forensic Psychology and MSc in Forensic Psychology Studies (for students without Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership with the British Psychological Society) are renowned for producing high calibre graduates. Read more
The MSc in Applied Forensic Psychology and MSc in Forensic Psychology Studies (for students without Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership with the British Psychological Society) are renowned for producing high calibre graduates. Feedback from employers indicates they are consistently impressed with the ability of York graduates to apply theory to practice and this is reflected in the destinations of many of our recent graduates.

The courses provide an equal balance of practice-based, methodological and theoretically driven modules designed to foster autonomy within the bounds of professional practice, independent learning and self-directed reflection. The highly specialist forensic modules, delivered by practising experts in the field, combined with generic practice-based modules, tutorials and the support of a highly experienced core course team, will provide you with the requisite practitioner-based skills, understanding, and knowledge to work effectively and increase your employability in a forensic setting. The MSc in Applied Forensic Psychology will also facilitate chartership within the British Psychological Society Division of Forensic Psychology for students who go on to undertake a further two years of forensic practice as outlined in the conditions for membership.

The MSc Applied Forensic Psychology course is formally accredited by the British Psychological Society.

Content

The MSc in Applied Forensic Psychology and MSc in Forensic Psychology Studies are full-time (51-week), 180-credit programmes divided into seven modules (6 taught, 1 independent study):

The practitioner skills modules will facilitate confidence in your ability to work as a practitioner in a forensic setting and will also provide you with leading edge information technology, presentation and communication skills required for a wide variety of roles.
The research evidence and theory modules will provide a grounding in theory, research methods and statistics that will provide the key skills for employment in a variety of settings (e.g., prisons, secure units, the police, prison and probation services) and the key skills for those who wish to pursue a research degree in a forensic or a related field.

The empirical research project will provide the academic grounding for those wishing to pursue an academic career or gain more specialist knowledge in a particular topic area.

Assessment

Students on both courses are encouraged to write concisely to a high academic standard for a range of different audiences. Hence, assessment methods are varied and include assessed coursework and closed exams:
-Short answer paper
-Briefing paper
-Case formulation
-Open essay
-Research protocol
-Multiple choice paper
-Practical reports
-Empirical research project

Students will be allocated a personal supervisor to monitor their progress throughout the academic year and provide support and guidance if necessary.

Placements

The MSc in Applied Forensic Psychology course does not include a placement component. However, some students may be able to obtain voluntary work experience in forensic settings to complement their studies. In addition, the course team is sometimes able to help secure placements for students who have little or no forensic experience, although this cannot be guaranteed. As well as receiving supervision from the provider, students will also be assigned to a member of the course team who will oversee their performance throughout the placement. Since they are not a required or essential component of the MSc course, placements are not assessed.

You are advised to contact local organisations at the start of the Autumn Term if you are considering undertaking work experience during your studies. Please also be aware that some placement providers (particularly charities) may require volunteers to commit for a full year and this should be borne in mind when arranging accommodation.

Our students have succeeded in securing placements with the following establishments/organisations:
-HMP Doncaster
-HMP Full Sutton
-Durham and Tees Valley Probation Trust
-The Farndon Unit
-Strength to Change, Hull
-Stockton Hall Hospital, York
-North Yorkshire Probation
-Rampton Secure Hospital

In the 2015/16 academic year, students have undertaken work experience with:
-Stockton Hall Hospital, York
-Circles of Support and Accountability
-The Petros Organisation, York
-NSPCC
-The University of York (supporting PhD students)
-YACRO
-Springwood Lodge Hospital, Leeds

On some occasions, students have managed to secure full or part-time employment with the placement provider after graduating from the MSc programme.

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This MA course is for those interested in developing current practice of using theatre and drama in the community and education settings or of using theatre and drama with people whose lives have been affected by the criminal justice system. Read more

ABOUT MA APPLIED THEATRE

This MA course is for those interested in developing current practice of using theatre and drama in the community and education settings or of using theatre and drama with people whose lives have been affected by the criminal justice system.

The MA Applied Theatre encourages investigation into the possibilities and contradictions of drama and theatre practice as transformative and rehabilitative, and engages practically and critically with a range of theories and current practices.

Key features of the MA Applied Theatre are the exploration of theatre work in specific settings; key practices in applied theatre; project-based study examining specific professional work with a varied range of client groups; or specialising in working with people whose lives have been affected by the criminal justice system.

This course develops knowledge of the ways in which drama and theatre are used to benefit a range of distinct groups that are key to today’s evolving cultural landscape. The course offers two specialist pathways: Drama in the Community and Drama Education or Drama and the Criminal Justice System. Each pathway is specifically designed to support current practice at work, or a particular field of interest in the developing landscape of applied theatre and drama in the UK. Students will have the opportunity to develop their own practice and
scholarship.

DRAMA IN THE COOMUNITY AND DRAMA EDUCATION PATHWAY

This pathway is for individuals wishing to develop current – or new – practice of using theatre and drama with people in a range of settings that may include schools, theatres, outreach departments, hospitals and prisons. Concerned with advanced enquiry into theatre for
change or education, this pathway enables students to situate their own emergent/developing practice within a wider understanding of the applied theatre field. Delivery of the course involves contributions and placement opportunities from prestigious key UK organisations.

DRAMA AND THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

This pathway is for individuals wishing to develop current – or new – practice of using theatre and drama with people whose lives have been affected by the criminal justice system. Concerned with advanced enquiry into prison theatre, this pathway enables you to situate your
own emergent/developing practice within a wider understanding of the applied theatre field. Delivery of the course involves contributions and placement opportunities from prestigious key UK organisations.

ASSESSMENT

Each unit has a written and/or practical assessment. Submission of a dissertation addressing the student’s specialist area of interest.

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THE NEXT INTAKE FOR THIS COURSE IS SEPTEMBER 2013. PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION. Criminology and Criminal Justice (CCJ) is a rapidly growing area of study and employment opportunity, particularly in areas. Read more
THE NEXT INTAKE FOR THIS COURSE IS SEPTEMBER 2013. PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION

Criminology and Criminal Justice (CCJ) is a rapidly growing area of study and employment opportunity, particularly in areas
of crime reduction, youth justice, community safety and restorative justice. Constant change in the justice sector requires practitioners to adopt and adapt to the latest thinking and legislative requirements.

This course offers advanced study of this subject area at masters level to both recent graduates and established criminal and
community justice practitioners. It will equip you with the knowledge, understanding, skills and values you require to engage with the complex issues presented by work within this sector. It is also an excellent opportunity for those wishing to advance their academic and research careers within this field as a progressive step towards a PhD and/or careers in academic and research institutions.

Course modules:

Core:
Critical Criminology, Policy and Practice (15 credits)
Diversity and Criminal Justice (15 credits)
Criminological Research (30 credits) (Completion of this module is a prerequisite for the masters dissertation)
Risk, Public Protection and High Risk offenders (15 credits)
Dissertation (60 credits)

You will then also undertake three 15 credit option modules selected from the following:

Youth Justice
Rehabilitation and Reintegration
International and Comparative Policing
Victim Work and Restorative Justice
Theoretical Perspectives on Sexual Offending

Professional practice 15 credit option modules (for those with relevant work experience only):

Managing the Practice of Risk
Managing Partner ships and Inter-Agency Work

Other professional practice module options are available in partnership with other Postgraduate courses within the Youth, Community and Education Division.

We also run modules that can be taken on an individual basis that offer a ‘taster’ for Postgraduate study. Contact us to find out more.

Teaching and Assessment:

Although categorised as distance learning, the realities of a “blended” approach combines a direct introductory teaching workshop and opportunities for supplementary teaching inputs with independent and distance learning strategies as
relevant to individual student needs and circumstances.

All students will be required to engage with the university’s virtual learning environment, undertaking online interactive tasks, seminars and discussion. A capacity to study independently will be essential. You will need internet access for the
duration of the course.

Assessments for the modules include a variety of assignments, case study exercises, online tasks, presentations, portfolios, group and individual projects. A 60 credit dissertation on a subject of individual interest completes the course.

Expertise:

This course is run by the CCJ division, which has an excellent reputation for courses grounded in flourishing research which is
explicitly linked to teaching. The division has one of the largest groupings of applied CCJ academics in the country. The teaching staff are all highly experienced, the majority having practice backgrounds prior to moving into higher education as lecturers and researchers.

A number of high profile research staff within the division have been involved in developing modules on the masters course around their subject expertise.

Graduate careers:

Graduates can progress towards a PhD, or enhance their employability in a variety of roles and specialisms including; Policing, probation, youth justice, victim work and restorative justice, custody and security management services, prisons, community safety and prevention initiatives, voluntary, private and charity sector partnerships.

Experienced CCJ practitioners can enhance their knowledge and understanding of both their own role and wider debates on policy and practice. Completion of the course is likely to enhance the possibilities for new directions and promotion opportunities in professional practice.

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This course is designed for experienced artists and professionals who have worked within a clinical setting and would like to build a rewarding career as an art psychotherapist. Read more

Summary

This course is designed for experienced artists and professionals who have worked within a clinical setting and would like to build a rewarding career as an art psychotherapist.

You will be taught by leading experts who will equip you with the skills, experience, and confidence to work as an art psychotherapist in challenging, yet rewarding environments. Our graduating students are eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professionals Council (HCPC). Registered practitioners work in a variety of different settings including psychiatric hospitals, social services departments, special education, prisons and the voluntary sector.

Our comprehensive programme is divided into three areas covering theory, experiential learning and work placement experience. The theoretical aspect covers child developmental and psychodynamic principles alongside art therapy theory and Jungian analytical psychology. This perspective is located within the larger field of analytical psychotherapy and provides you with an in-depth theoretical underpinning that informs clinical practice.

A vital part of the programme is a supervised clinical placement which allows you to complete one hundred mandatory days of practice during your training. Placements are available in a variety of settings that include mental health (both in the NHS and other psychiatric hospitals and day centres), disabilities services or in hospitals or social services, special education, or a range of other settings.

Content

The course is divided into three distinct areas; theory, which will develop your understanding as it relates to clinical practice, experiential learning where you will engage in art therapeutic processes to develop an understanding of the discipline from the inside while developing your identity as an artist, and lastly, a work placement. You will also get the opportunity to collaborate with the other students within the arts and play therapies in workshops and shared modules.

Our full-time course starts with an intensive week followed by two taught days, two further days of clinical placement and one day for studio practice per week. The part-time route starts with an intensive week followed by one day per week in University and a minimum of one further day on clinical placement. You will need to complete one hundred days of supervised clinical practice over the duration of the programme. You will also attend weekly personal therapy which is compulsory to become a professional registered practitioner.

We also offer introductory courses which provide a useful background in related professions. For more information on our Introduction Courses, Summer Schools and Foundation Course in Art Psychotherapy, see our Psychology Short Courses.

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The Forensic Psychology MSc will provide you with a thorough grounding in the theory, themes, issues and practical skills central to psychological research into behaviour relevant to crime and forensic settings. Read more
The Forensic Psychology MSc will provide you with a thorough grounding in the theory, themes, issues and practical skills central to psychological research into behaviour relevant to crime and forensic settings.

The programme is accredited by the British Psychological Society as fulfilling the Stage 1 requirements towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist and obtaining Full Membership of the Division of Forensic Psychology with the British Psychological Society. Graduates of the programme who go on to successfully complete Stage 2 of the qualification in Forensic Psychology will be eligible to apply for registration with the UK Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC).

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

The course was designed to cover the BPS Division of Forensic Psychology's (DFP) core curriculum. Many experienced forensic psychology practitioners visit the course to contribute their knowledge. It will give you an opportunity to gain an understanding of how psychology works in a forensic setting.

The course has been accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) as fulfilling the Stage 1 requirements towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist and obtaining Full Membership of the Division of Forensic Psychology with the British Psychological Society. and a Forensic Psychologist registered with the UK Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC). Graduates of the programme who go on to successfully complete Stage 2 of the qualification in Forensic Psychology will be eligible to apply for registration with the UK Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC). The requirements for Stage 2 involve a period of supervised practice in a forensic setting. Please see the BPS and HCPC websites for more information.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

You will complete the twelve modules listed below. The first five 10-credit modules cover the theoretical basis of forensic psychology across a range of settings, through all stages of the criminal justice process, i.e. from investigation to punishment and through care, and as applied to a broad range of crimes. A double (20-credit) module provides an overview of a key aspect of forensic practice, risk assessment and the associated risk management of offenders. Two further 10-credit modules are particular features of this course and explore the legal process (taught by the Coventry Law School), and practice and application in forensic psychology (involving a number of guest speakers who are practitioners in forensic settings). The latter module is delivered in a four day intensive teaching block in June that provides students with a variety of teaching delivery styles. Two modules (30 credits) cover advanced research methods including both quantitative and qualitative methods, and a further 10 credit module focusing on study skills and project planning prepares students for the final module (50 credits), which is an independent research dissertation/project.

-Psychology and Criminal Behaviour (M81PY)
-Psychology in the Criminal Justice System (M82PY)
-Treatment of Offenders and Victims (M144PY)
-Applied Police Psychology (M141PY)
-Violent and Sexual Crime (M87PY)
-Risk Assessment and Management of Offenders (M143PY)
-The English Legal Process (M48CLS)
-Practice and Application in Forensic Psychology (M86PY)
-Advanced Quantitative Research Methods (M140PY)
-Advanced Qualitative Research Methods (M139PY)
-Study Skills, Project Planning and Ethics (M142PY)
-Dissertation (M70PY)

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

The MSc Forensic Psychology provides career opportunities in a variety of forensic settings, such as the prison, probation and police services, local government and other agencies. Expected jobs are varied but may include Assistant Forensic Psychologist, Crime Scene Analyst, Prison Psychologist, Lecturer in Forensic Psychology, Researcher, Police Analyst, Police Officer and Probation Officer.

Course alumni have gone on to work in a wide range of settings and roles such as psychological assistants and trainees in a range of settings (including in prisons and mental health settings), probation officers and psychologists within probation, drug support workers, youth offending team staff, police analysts, university lecturers, PhD students, academic researchers and at least one alumnus has set up a new forensic related company.

GLOBAL LEADERS PROGRAMME

To prepare students for the challenges of the global employment market and to strengthen and develop their broader personal and professional skills Coventry University has developed a unique Global Leaders Programme.

The objectives of the programme, in which postgraduate and eligible undergraduate students can participate, is to provide practical career workshops and enable participants to experience different business cultures.

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