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Masters Degrees (Print Making)

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Led by Professor Jo Stockham, the Print programme is a two-year specialist MA course. Renamed from Printmaking in 2015, this change signals that the study of the expanded field of Print is equal to the making of prints as a series of medium specific choices. Read more

Led by Professor Jo Stockham, the Print programme is a two-year specialist MA course. Renamed from Printmaking in 2015, this change signals that the study of the expanded field of Print is equal to the making of prints as a series of medium specific choices. We explore the mediated image approached through a range of intellectual approaches provided by a diverse team of tutors, all practicing artists. 

Access to world-class technical facilities in all print media means that we are able to both explore and expand the field of Print addressing the constant interplay between thinking and making, the image and technology. Students from a wide variety of backgrounds choose to study with us because of their interest in questions, which include, the nature of the copy, diagramming, appropriation, materiality of the image, the politics of print and print as a collaborative practice. 

Artists’ books and web based work as forms of distribution and explorations of narrative structures are a growing aspect of the course. We are benefiting from the renewed interest in the circulation, reception and creation of multiple images due to the ubiquity of digital images and computing.

We are embedded in a network of international print publishers, archives and galleries. A publishing project and exhibiting work are an integral part of the course. The potential for collaboration and residency situations where making work is a form of exchange is core to many students and we help them prepare for making applications to such opportunities. 

The aim of the programme is to enable students to work across a broad platform of media appropriate to their self defined ambitions and interests. By equipping graduates with experience of exhibiting, collaboration, editioning, lecturing, curating and a thorough critical engagement with a self defined body of work we aim to develop artists who understand the expressive nuances of different materials and forms of distribution in the expanded field of print. Evidence suggests they will be able to sustain themselves on graduation as exhibiting artists often engaged in related fields such as, teaching, publishing, curating and research.

An active research culture of staff, visiting artists, MPhil and PhD students is a core part of the programme and is shared through lectures, seminars, publications, presentations and exhibitions.

Alumni include, Andrea Buettner, Adam Dant, Mabe Bethonico, William Latham, Haris Epaminonda, Daniel Gustav Cramer, Christiane Baumgartner and Katsutoshi Yuasa.

The programme offers:

  • a critical context to understand the field of Print through making, exhibiting, discussion and writing
  • individual desk space 
  • access purpose-built workshops, offering internationally renowned printmaking facilities and instruction in relief and intaglio, screen printing, stone and plate lithography and large-format digital printing
  • access to college wide workshop facilities including metalwork casting, photography, ceramics and 3D printing. 
  • opportunities for teaching placements, workshop placements, exhibitions, overseas travel and international exchanges
  • an annual collaborative publishing project 
  • introductions to archives and collections, (eg V&A, Tate and British Museum) and editioning workshops (Paupers Press, The Thames Barrier Print Studio, Curwen)
  • a well-established publications programme which most recently published a print by Mark Titchner. Sales from these publications contribute to the Print Appeal Fund to support current students
  • continued support for alumni through Alumni RCA and programme specific events


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BA (Hons) Fine Art. is a multidisciplinary course which allows you to work with paint, print, sculpture and hybrid, drawing, video, sound, performance, text, curation and installation practice in either a focused or pluralistic way. Read more

BA (Hons) Fine Art is a multidisciplinary course which allows you to work with paint, print, sculpture and hybrid, drawing, video, sound, performance, text, curation and installation practice in either a focused or pluralistic way.

You work from your own studio space where you can explore your practice and use the campus project spaces to exhibit your work, participate in group shows and hold meetings and events. You will have access to a broad range of workshops including 3D, print making, media suites and the drawing studio, all staffed with specialist technicians to support your practice.

Initiatives at galleries such as Wysing Arts Centre, Serpentine Galleries, Tate Modern and Camden Arts Centre provide opportunities to interact with the wider art world and you are challenged to consider wider realms of practice through lectures from practising artists such as 2013 Turner Prize winner Laure Prouvost, Cornelia Parker, Cécile B Evans, 2006 Turner Prize nominee Mark Titchner, Jack Strange and Jerwood Painting Fellows Susan Sluglett and Anthony Faroux. You will graduate with your final work shown in the NUA Degree Show, which attracts curators, collectors, critics and potential collaborators from across the UK.

 Join a community of artists and creative thinkers, experimenting, debating, developing ideas, learning new skills and acquiring further knowledge.

Facilities

3D Workshop

Sculpture workshop, foundry, mould-making, wood and plastics fabrication.

Print Making Workshop

For silkscreen, etching, lino-cut and relief printing, mono-printing and collographs.

Drawing Studio

Drawing and life drawing classes in a well-equipped naturally lit environment. Digital options include Wacom Intuos tablets and a digital microscope.

General Technical Sessions

Optional software inductions available to all students introduce you to a wide range of creative possibilities and output options.

The University Archive

House an extensive collection of exhibition materials and publications, including the NUA East Archive.

Media Resource Centre

For digital cameras, tripods, 35mm DSLRs, 35mm film cameras and lighting equipment.

NUA Library

The largest specialist are, design and media collection in the East of England including 32,000 books, 1,300 journal subscriptions and 3,000 DVDs.

Applications

The offer of entry onto a Masters Degree (MA) is based on an expectation that you have the potential to fulfil the aims of the course of study and achieve the standard required to successfully complete the award. Entrants should normally have achieved a BA (Hons)/BSc Degree of 2:1 or above (or its equivalent), in a subject related to your proposed course of study.

Applicants who hold a Degree from another discipline may also be considered for entry, subject to the submission of a satisfactory portfolio of art, design or media-related work in support of their application.

The majority of applicants to courses at NUA will be invited to attend an interview. This provides an invaluable chance to meet face-to-face and is the major factor in determining the success of your submission. The interview is an opportunity to assess your work and the suitability of your application and also provides you with a chance to assess NUA’s staff, campus and facilities and ask questions. The key focus of your application process is on your portfolio. Some courses may require additional entry requirements or passes in specific subjects.

  • Complete the application form, including a well-prepared and considered 500 word statement indicating your intentions for MA study. The form should be word-processed not hand-written.
  • Detach the Reference Form and forward to your chosen referee with a request to complete and return to NUA at the address indicated.
  • Email the completed form to: or post to Admissions, Norwich University of the Arts, Francis House, 3 – 7 Redwell St, Norwich, NR2 4SN
  • We will endeavour to contact you within two weeks of receiving your application and reference from your nominated referee. If your application is acceptable we will arrange a date for interview.

For further information on this course, please visit our website - MA Fine Art.



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See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/media-sciences/graduate-graduate-print-media. The MS program in print media offers students an opportunity to explore new areas of research in the graphic communications field. Read more
See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/media-sciences/graduate-graduate-print-media

The MS program in print media offers students an opportunity to explore new areas of research in the graphic communications field. The program's faculty and curriculum focus on establishing quality and efficiencies pertaining to business, technology, and processes in graphic communications. Our faculty are experts in many different areas, including print, business, color management, web and IT, digital publishing, imaging, and typography. Students have the opportunity to get hands-on experience by working with faculty as graduate assistants either in the classroom or assisting with faculty research. Graduates are employed as industry leaders in advertising, publishing, business operations, communication processes, and product developments.

Plan of study

The program requires 36 semester credit hours of study and includes six core courses, four electives, and a thesis.

- Electives

Students may focus their studies through elective courses. Electives are comprised of selected courses offered by the College of Imaging Arts and Sciences or other RIT colleges. All courses must be pre-approved by the graduate program chair.

- Thesis

All students are required to complete a research thesis that demonstrates original thinking and creativity in the search for new knowledge in the graphic communication industry. Students work with expert faculty and focus on a particular topic of thesis research in areas including content management, publishing workflows, typography and layout, business trends, color management, and applications of printing.

Curriculum

- First Year

Materials and Processes in Printing
Tone and Color Analysis
Operations Management in Graphic Arts
Cross Media Workflow
Research Methods and Trends in Graphic Media
Statistical Analysis and Decision Making
Free Electives

- Second Year

Thesis
Continuation of Thesis
Free Electives

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MA Communication Design. touches on every aspect of 21st century life. It is of fundamental importance to the way we relate to each other and our environment. Read more

MA Communication Design touches on every aspect of 21st century life. It is of fundamental importance to the way we relate to each other and our environment.

NUA is a centre of design expertise with students winning competitions of national and international importance and graduates leading and working at significant global agencies. You will be encouraged to challenge conventional thinking as you consider the practical application of your ideas. You can elect to work in areas including: graphic design, graphic communication, illustration, information design, interactive communication, publishing and typography. As part of your studies, you will engage in critical debate around contemporary design issues pertinent to your individual research projects.

Under expert tuition you will consider the relationship between your individual practice and its potential dissemination in a wider context. With access to industry standard resources, you will be supported to develop the skills needed to generate innovative projects of high professional quality.

Creative thinking and innovation are at the core of the MA philosophy and you will engage with students from across the postgraduate community to share opportunities and debate contemporary issues.

We encourage our students to engage in critical discourse through course specific seminars, lectures and critiques; larger NUA symposia such as Dialogues (Fine Art) and Cowbird (Design); and attendance at national and international exhibitions and conferences.

Facilities

Design Studios

Open plan studios offer spaces for collaborative working, group critique sessions and individual project work, with access to professional creative software on iMacs.

Digital Print Workshop

The workshop can produce prints from A4 to 1.5m wide on a variety of media. Acces to wide format, CD printing and laster printing. You will have on-hand support from a team of workshop technicians.

Media Resource Centre

A central resource for digital cameras, trips, 35mm DSLRs, 35mm film cameras and lighting equipment.

Laser Cutter

Large-bed cutter for card, board and acrylic materials with associated digital design hardware and software.

Print Making Workshop

For silkscreen, etching, lino-cut and relief printing, mono printing and collographs.

NUA Library

The largest specialist art, design and media collection in the East of England including 32,000 books, 1,300 journal subscriptions and 3,000 DVDs.

Applications

The offer of entry onto a Masters Degree (MA) is based on an expectation that you have the potential to fulfil the aims of the course of study and achieve the standard required to successfully complete the award. Entrants should normally have achieved a BA (Hons)/BSc Degree of 2:1 or above (or its equivalent), in a subject related to your proposed course of study.

Applicants who hold a Degree from another discipline may also be considered for entry, subject to the submission of a satisfactory portfolio of art, design or media-related work in support of their application.

The majority of applicants to courses at NUA will be invited to attend an interview. This provides an invaluable chance to meet face-to-face and is the major factor in determining the success of your submission. The interview is an opportunity to assess your work and the suitability of your application and also provides you with a chance to assess NUA’s staff, campus and facilities and ask questions. The key focus of your application process is on your portfolio. Some courses may require additional entry requirements or passes in specific subjects.

  • Complete the application form, including a well-prepared and considered 500 word statement indicating your intentions for MA study. The form should be word-processed not hand-written.
  • Detach the Reference Form and forward to your chosen referee with a request to complete and return to NUA at the address indicated.
  • Email the completed form to: or post to Admissions, Norwich University of the Arts, Francis House, 3 – 7 Redwell St, Norwich, NR2 4SN
  • We will endeavour to contact you within two weeks of receiving your application and reference from your nominated referee. If your application is acceptable we will arrange a date for interview.

For further information on this course, please visit our website - MA Communication Design.



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Do you have an eye for design? Would you like to help influence the future of visual communications? Southampton Solent University’s MA Visual Communication programme is ideally suited to students who wish to better understand the academic theory that underpins a range of visual mediums. Read more

Overview

Do you have an eye for design? Would you like to help influence the future of visual communications? Southampton Solent University’s MA Visual Communication programme is ideally suited to students who wish to better understand the academic theory that underpins a range of visual mediums.

- Students study the essential academic theories that seek to explain how we understand visual messages.
- The teaching team maintain strong links with industry, providing students with the chance to participate in live briefs, networking events, and guest lectures.
- The course includes time to develop hands-on creative skills. Students are encouraged to create work for their professional portfolio.
- Visual communication at Southampton Solent is taught by a team of professional designers with strong ties to industry.
- Students will have access to a range of specialist facilities throughout their studies. These include Mac computers, professional creative software, digital printing facilities and traditional printing presses.
- Students are invited to pitch for freelance work at Solent Creatives, our on-campus creative agency. These projects involve real businesses and are perfect for portfolio development.
- Tutors encourage students to work in groups with those from other creative disciplines, mirroring industry practices.
- Students will work on competition briefs for organisations such as the Design & Art Directors Association (D&AD) and the Young Creative Network (YCN).

The industry -

Figures released in 2015 by the Department for Culture, Media & Sport suggest that the UK’s creative industries are now worth more than £76.9 billion per year to the UK economy – that’s more than £8.8m per hour. Businesses of all types and sizes make use of creative individuals to take corporate message and translate them into creative outputs that the public can enjoy and understand.

The programme -

This intensive master’s degree helps students to improve their creative skills and build a solid understanding of visual communications theory. The curriculum covers the latest innovations in visual practice, examining the way technological and cultural changes contributed to contemporary academic thinking.

Topics of study include editorial design; art direction; interactive multimedia; information design; image creation; illustration; typographic design; print-making and photographic technique. Students may have workshop sessions with the letterpress, screen-printing, etching and relief printing facilities, as well as the wet darkroom and photo studio. Depending on their creative background, graduates will be well prepared for a range of careers in the creative industries.

Critical research papers and final master’s projects are supported by the University’s expanding research base, encouraging students to make an innovative contribution to visual communication academia.

To help with creative projects and portfolio documentation, Southampton Solent provides a comprehensive media loans scheme. This scheme gives students free access to high-end photographic equipment and accessories.

Visual communication students have the chance to enter major industry awards schemes including those from D&AD and the Royal Society of the Arts. Work-orientated assignments will be offered alongside appropriate live projects from local and national organisations. There will also be opportunities to visit museums, galleries and design studios both nationally and internationally (at additional expense).

Course Content

Units include:

- Visual Communication Practice: Visual communication practice and specialisms such as editorial design, interactive multimedia, information design, image creation, book design and typographic design. Print-making and photographic techniques including letterpress, screen-printing, etching and relief printing, wet darkroom and photo studio practice.
- Web Design: The advantages and limitations of web design and its delivery across a range of devices, from desktop to mobile.
- Project Development: Developing the appropriate graphic design language to apply to your research findings.
- Research Methods:A précis of an article, a critical commentary of two book reviews, your own book review and a proposal for your critical research paper, with an annotated bibliography.
- Critical Research Paper: You’ll research and present an individual seminar, supported by a critical research paper which demonstrates an in-depth, comprehensive and detailed knowledge of your chosen area.
vMaster’s Project: On this final project you’ll bring all your skills together to design, execute and present an individually demanding piece of work that demonstrates systematic and in-depth understanding of your particular discipline of study.

Programme specification document - http://mycourse.solent.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=6152

Teaching, learning and assessment -

The course draws on a variety of teaching methods, including group critiques, individual tutorials, seminars and lectures, peer-learning, live projects and competitions, self-directed study and the use of reflective journals or log-books to express personal and professional development.

Work experience:

You’ll be able to engage directly with employers by organising your own work placement or work-based project, supported and encouraged by the course team as required.

Assessment:

You’ll have access to a full range of print-making facilities, including letterpress, screen-printing, etching and relief printing, alongside digital resources

Our facilities -

You’ll have access to a full range of print-making facilities including letterpress, screen-printing equipment, etching and relief printing, and digital resources.

Web-based learning -

Solent’s virtual learning environment provides quick online access to assignments, lecture notes, suggested reading and other course information.

Why Solent?

What do we offer?

From a vibrant city centre campus to our first class facilities, this is where you can find out why you should choose Solent.

Facilities - http://www.solent.ac.uk/about/facilities/facilities.aspx

City living - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/southampton/living-in-southampton.aspx

Accommodation - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/accommodation/accommodation.aspx

Career Potential

This master’s degree delivers the skills you’ll need for a wide range of visual design fields including animation, art direction, web design, publishing, branding and typography.

Suitable roles for graduates include:

- Design consultancy
- Publishing industry
- Advertising – agency side
- Multidisciplinary design
- Web design
- Television
- Film and multimedia
- Freelance practice
- App design.

Links with industry -

Through this course you’ll develop valuable and appropriate skillsets through engagement with the wider profession, design community and industry.

You’ll have the chance to enter major industry awards schemes, including those from D&AD and the Royal Society of the Arts. Work-orientated assignments will be offered alongside appropriate ‘live’ projects from local and national organisations. There will be opportunities to visit museums, galleries and design studios, both nationally and internationally, as part of the course.

Transferable skills -

Decision-making under pressure; visual, written and verbal communication skills; critical thinking; and presentation to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Further study -

There’s a chance of progression to further study, including a PhD, on successful completion of the course.

Tuition fees

The tuition fees for the 2016/2017 academic year are:

UK and EU full-time fees: £6,695 per year

International full-time fees: £11,260 per year

UK and EU part-time fees: £3,350 per year

International part-time fees: £5,630 per year

Graduation costs -

Graduation is the ceremony to celebrate the achievements of your studies. For graduates in 2015, there is no charge to attend graduation, but you will be required to pay for the rental of your academic gown (approximately £42 per graduate, depending on your award). You may also wish to purchase official photography packages, which range in price from £15 to £200+. Graduation is not compulsory, so if you prefer to have your award sent to you, there is no cost.
For more details, please visit: http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/graduation/home.aspx

Next steps

Think a career as a visual communicator might be for you? With expert teaching teams, regularly revised curriculums and strong links to industry, Southampton Solent University’s MA Visual Communications programme is the ideal next step towards a broad range of creative careers.

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The International Journalism MA is a one-year professional practice course in which you will develop skills in journalism and thinking about journalism in a global context. Read more
The International Journalism MA is a one-year professional practice course in which you will develop skills in journalism and thinking about journalism in a global context.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for students with a first degree looking to become journalists with an international perspective rooted in the UK’s journalistic traditions. Students with degrees in all disciplines are welcome. Law, Business, Agriculture, and Science are among the first degree subjects that are in demand by many publishers and broadcasters. Overseas applicants are especially welcome. Prospective students need excellent general knowledge based on a worldview and a thorough briefing of what is in the news each day.

Students who successfully complete this MA in International Journalism are very employable in the media.

Objectives

The MA in International Journalism is a keystone course at City and has built up a worldwide reputation. This course has been running since 1982 and has more than 1,000 alumni working in journalism around the world.

During the course, you will become adept at print, broadcast and online journalism in a global context by:
-Studying news in all its forms
-Obtaining a profound understanding of international journalism from a UK perspective
-Practising all platforms of journalism (print, broadcast and online) Exploring theory as well as reflect on your practice

You will learn how to gather and report in various styles and modes for a range of media (print, broadcast, online). You will also explore the contemporary global domain of journalism.

The course attracts students from all over the world, who will become your future professional network. You will benefit from being in one of the world’s most significant media cities with access to thousands of international journalists and sources.

On this course you will gain from using both traditional and contemporary journalism tools, and acquire comprehensive skills,which you can take back to your own country or move on with to anywhere in the world.

Placements

Work placements are an integral part of all MA Journalism courses, giving you the chance to put your learning into practice and, more importantly, make contacts in the industry.

They are also a way you can build up evidence of what you can do to a potential employer (cuttings, video and audio clips).

You are encouraged to undertake work experience during the breaks in the terms.

Academic facilities

You will gain practical skills in our state-of-the-art digital television studio, digital editing suites, radio studios and broadcast newsrooms.

In 2014 we completed a £12m development projects for our Journalism facilities. These facilities were developed in consultation with experts from the BBC and ITN, and were praised by the BJTC. Our facilities include:
-A television studio: enabling simultaneous multi-media broadcast and a major expansion in the number of news and current affairs programmes produced.
-Four radio studios: enabling an increase in output and the potential to explore a permanent radio station.
-Two radio broadcast newsrooms: high-tech facilities that enable you to learn how to produce a radio programme.
-Two digital newsrooms: impressive modern facilities that enable you to learn the skills required to produce newspapers, magazines and websites.
-Two TV editing and production newsrooms: state-of-the-art facilities that enable you to learn about TV production.

Teaching and learning

The International Journalism MA is a professional/practice course with an emphasis on developing practical skills in journalism. The teaching staff are all professional journalists in print, broadcast or online. We focus on "learning by doing" - you cover real stories and produce newspapers, run a radio station, broadcast on the internet, and produce television news programmes and multimedia websites.

During the course, you have opportunities to meet, listen to and question journalists and other people from the media. You are encouraged to reflect on your own experiences as journalists and the ways in which practicing journalists do their jobs by developing an understanding of ethical issues in journalism, the media and international reporting.

You will be treated as a professional journalist throughout the practice-based elements of the course. Learning is intensive and at times teaching hours will resemble those of a full-time job.

Some modules are taught in lecture theatres, such as Global Journalism and Society and Ethics, Rules and Standards, but most are small-group workshops that allow you to develop your journalistic skills and knowledge with the support of our expert academics.

Industry visitors
The MA International Journalism course prides itself on its close connections with journalism practitioners. Here are some of the high-level industry figures who have contributed to the course in recent years:
-David Schlesinger, Global Managing Editor, Reuters
-Lindsey Hilsum, International Editor, Channel 4 News
-Phil Harding, Director English Networks & News, BBC World Service (as External Examiner)
-Yosri Fouda, London bureau chief and host "Top Secret", Al Jazeera
-Salim Amin, ceo A-24 African network and head Camera Pix
-Mark Brayne, Director, Dart Europe
-Waleed Ibrahim, Reuters Iraq Bureau
-Tim Lambon, Deputy Foreign Editor, Channel 4 News
-Gavin McFaydean, Director, Centre of Investigative Journalism
-David Leigh, Investigations Editor, The Guardian
-Sandy McIntyre, head of APTN.

Assessment
Assessment is part of learning, and course assessments vary to reflect the learning being
achieved. They include workshop exercises, studio work, oral presentations, essays, reflections
and production (making journalism products), and different forms (written, oral, visual, aural), as
well as being individual and team-based.

Modules

All students on the International Journalism MA take modules in storytelling and online journalism before specialising in either print, broadcast or online journalism. This choice informs your studies for the rest of the course through to the completion of a final project.

There is a dissertation option for students who prefer a more academic route through the course.

You are encouraged to complete an internship, either in the UK or overseas. This must be arranged by you.

Core modules
-Global Journalism (20 credits)
-Journalistic Storytelling (20 credits)
-International News (15 credits)
-Production (30 credits)
-International Online Journalism (10 credits)
-Journalism Ethics (15 credits)
-Professional Project or Dissertation (30 credits)
-Specialism Journalism or Journalism and Conflict (20 credits)

Elective modules - choose from:
-Print Journalism (20 credits)
-Broadcast Journalism (20 credits)

Career prospects

92.6 per cent of graduates from this course are in employment six months after completing the course (95 per cent in work or further study) (Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey 2014-15). Graduates work in both global and national media and in allied occupations around the world.

Most recently, these have included roles from researchers to editors in broadcasting such as:
-BBC Radio and TV (including BBC World Service)
-ITN
-Channel 4
-Al Jazeera
-Deutsche Welle
-CNN
-France24
-Bloomberg,
-Sky News
-Fox News
-NHK (Japan)
-Thomson Reuters
-Associated Press
-Dow Jones

And major newspapers and magazines including:
-The New York Times
-Financial Times
-The Hindu
-Politiken
-GQ
-Fairfax Media (New Zealand)

In the heart of London’s huge and diverse media district,students have unrivalled access to industry internships and contacts.

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This is an integrated multimedia journalism course that prepares you for a career in the global journalism industry by providing you with the core skills for print, broadcast, magazine and online platforms. Read more

This is an integrated multimedia journalism course that prepares you for a career in the global journalism industry by providing you with the core skills for print, broadcast, magazine and online platforms.

During the course you learn how to gather, organise, write and present information to a professional standard across a variety of platforms and to different audiences.

Key areas of study include • print • broadcast • digital/online journalism • writing and presentation skills • interviewing • TV and radio presentation skills • professional practice • global journalism • shorthand.

By selecting options to meet your own interests you are able to specialise in print journalism, magazine journalism, radio journalism and television journalism.

Throughout the course you gain an understanding of how your chosen area operates in Britain and internationally by examining different examples of journalistic practice. You are able to bring your own experience of journalism in your home country and gain insight into practices in Britain, Europe and the wider world. You study case-studies from regions of the world that interest you in order to compare different approaches to journalism.

Print and online journalism modules prepare you to develop the multiplatform skills to operate effectively as a news and feature journalist in any global newsroom. This means learning to develop a strong news sense, an ability to select and prioritise key facts and quotes, and writing skills for different platforms.

You also

  • learn how to produce accurate material for publication to a given length and deadline
  • develop an understanding of how news is consumed and how to meet the needs and expectations of a range of audiences
  • develop both multidisciplinary and team working skills that equip you to work with people from a range of backgrounds

Broadcast journalism modules develop your skills in radio and TV broadcasting, and in interviewing and presenting. You produce radio and TV packages in a dedicated TV and radio studio and two dedicated newsrooms.

Alongside practical skills, the course gives you the opportunity to study the ethical, legal and regulatory context in which journalism is practised. Theoretical content deepens your understanding and critical awareness of on-going debates about the economic and political role played by journalists and global news organisations in modern societies.

Read about opportunities and experiences available to our students on our Journalism blog.

Sheffield Hallam University acts as a centre for the NCTJ national examinations.

Course structure

Semester one core modules

  • writing for the media
  • radio journalism
  • magazine journalism

Semester one optional modules

  • sports journalism 1
  • media law and regulation 1
  • practical PR and professional experience

Semester two core modules

  • print and online reporting
  • TV journalism
  • international journalism and PR

Semester two optional modules

  • sports journalism
  • media law and regulation 2
  • public affairs
  • PR: politics and lobbying

Semester three core modules

  • international journalism project

Assessment

  • coursework
  • critical evaluation
  • dissertation or project
  • a combination of practical and theoretical work

Employability

Journalism is a global industry and this course prepares you for a career in your home country or elsewhere in • print journalism • magazine journalism • sports journalism • online journalism • broadcast journalism (TV and radio) • public relations.

Journalism is a broad term and you could pursue a very rewarding career in any of its many forms.

A career in journalism suits those who are flexible and enjoy team work as you may be dealing with breaking news and a tight deadline. In today’s newsrooms journalists require skills across a range of media-platforms and need to be able to communicate news and information to a range of audiences.

There are opportunities to work on regional newspapers, television and radio throughout the world, but some choose to pursue a career in a national media industry and may therefore be based in a capital city. Many journalists work on a freelance basis and the demand for experienced freelancers is increasing, making this an attractive option, especially for feature writing.

In the UK salaries vary considerably depending on whether the post is a regional or national one. A regional journalist just starting out on a career in the UK can expect to earn £12,000 – £15,000 as a trainee, whereas an experienced person working for a national newspaper can expect up to around £35,000 – £40,000. 



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Learn essential skills, produce print and online magazines, and complete at least seven weeks' work experience. This course is suitable for anyone with a first degree in any subject who wants to be a firstclass magazine journalist. Read more
Learn essential skills, produce print and online magazines, and complete at least seven weeks' work experience.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for anyone with a first degree in any subject who wants to be a firstclass magazine journalist. Students must have excellent general knowledge and be prepared to work across print and digital platforms with a variety of content. Students will have passion for communicating in words and pictures - and an appetite for fun and hard work is essential.

Magazine Journalism students write, design and produce the department’s showcase magazine XCity and its website Xcityplus.com. Read the latest digital edition and check out the listings at the back to find out where our graduates are working now.

Objectives

This hugely successful, well-established course will prepare you for a broad range of magazine scenarios, from writing for a glossy men’s magazine; to researching a story for an online business-to-business publication; to reviewing a play for a national newspaper supplement and much in between.

You'll learn the essential skills of reporting, feature writing, subbing, interviewing, researching, and design and layout. You'll produce print and online magazines, and complete at least seven weeks' work experience.

The course will give you a thorough grounding in print and multimedia journalism. You will develop professional skills in reporting, interviewing, research, feature writing and production (print and online), benefitting from the experience of leading magazine and specialist journalists and around 30 visiting editors, commissioning editors and editorial directors from the UK’s leading publishing houses.

Graduates from the course have won the Professional Publishers Association’s ‘Most Promising Postgraduate Student of the Year’ for the last nine years.

We have been running Journalism courses at City since 1976. In the years since, over 5,000 students have graduated and are now working in the media in the UK and internationally.

Academic facilities

You will gain practical skills in our state-of-the-art digital television studio, digital editing suites, radio studios and broadcast newsrooms.

In 2014 we completed a £12m development projects for our Journalism facilities. These facilities were developed in consultation with experts from the BBC and ITN, and were praised by the BJTC. Our facilities include:
-A television studio: enabling simultaneous multi-media broadcast and a major expansion in the number of news and current affairs programmes produced.
-Four radio studios: enabling an increase in output and the potential to explore a permanent radio station.
-Two radio broadcast newsrooms: high-tech facilities that enable you to learn how to produce a radio programme.
-Two digital newsrooms: impressive modern facilities that enable you to learn the skills required to produce newspapers, magazines and websites.
-Two TV editing and production newsrooms: state-of-the-art facilities that enable you to learn about TV production.

Placements

Work placements are an integral part of all Journalism MA courses, giving you the chance to put your learning into practice and, more importantly, make contacts in the industry. You are encouraged to seek work experience while you study on this course.

Teaching and learning

Some modules are taught in lecture theatres, but most are small-group workshops that allow you to develop your journalistic skills and knowledge with the support of our expert academics.

Our students have the option of taking part in a Teeline shorthand course alongside their studies. This costs £100 (refundable if you reach 100 words per minute) and runs across two terms.

Assessment

All MA Journalism courses at City are practical, hands-on courses designed for aspiring journalists. As a result, much of your coursework will be journalistic assignments that you produce to deadline, as you would in a real news organisation.

Assessment is part of learning, and course assessments vary to reflect the learning being achieved. They include workshop exercises, studio work, oral presentations, essays, reflections, exams and production (making journalism products), and different forms (written, oral, visual, aural), as well as being individual and team-based.

Modules

The magazine industry has never been more exciting and challenging. This course prepares you for the exciting world of magazines which may be more varied than you imagine - whether it's writing a feature for a glossy men's magazine, podcasting an interview, or researching and crafting a story for the newsdesk of a business-to-business publication.

All of our MA Journalism students must undertake underpinning core modules in Ethics, Rules and Standards, and a Final Project.

Core modules
-Ethics, Rules and Standards (30 credits)
-Journalism Portfolio (30 credits)
-Editorial Production (30 credits)
-UK Media Law (15 credits)
-The Magazine Business (15 credits)
-Final Project (30 credits)

Elective modules - choose one of the following two modules:
-Social and Digital Journalism (15 credits)
-Political Headlines (15 credits)

Specialisms - choose one of the following specialisms:
-Lifestyle Specialism (15 credits)
-International Correspondent Specialism (15 credits)
-Arts and Culture Specialism (15 credits)
-Humanitarian Reporting Specialism (15 credits)
-Finance and Business Specialism (15 credits)
-Sports Specialism (15 credits)
-Political Reporting Specialism (15 credits)
-Entertainment Specialism (15 credits)
-Security and Crime Specialism (15 credits)
-Investigative Reporting Specialism (15 credits)

Career prospects

Alumni of City’s MA Magazine Journalism course occupy top positions in:
-Grazia
-Harper’s Bazaar
-Sunday Times Magazine
-Guardian Weekend magazine
-Marie Claire
-FHM
-Stylist
-Esquire
-The Debrief
-Radio Times
-New Statesman
-Prospect
-Pulse
-Architects’ Journal
-Estates Gazette
-Chemist & Druggist
-Travel Weekly
-IKEA Magazine
-Waitrose Kitchen
-BA High Life
-The Press Association
-Daily Mail
-The Daily Telegraph
-The Sunday Times
-Observer
-The Sun
-The Independent
-Evening Standard

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The brand new, broad and practice-based MA Design takes students on a creative journey where you will explore processes making, materials and context. Read more
The brand new, broad and practice-based MA Design takes students on a creative journey where you will explore processes making, materials and context. You will challenge and extend your design practice at an advanced level whilst developing a range of artistic and practical skills.

The course is delivered through a series of project-based modules 'Make', 'Play' and 'Live', through which you will engage with real-world problems and issues of relevance to contemporary design practice and work towards the production of a physical object.

Course detail

The course attracts a diverse range of practicing designers, makers and industry professionals from a range of disciplines, including but not exclusively: ceramics, fashion design, jewellery design, product design, lighting, fine art and architecture and equally broad ranging staff backgrounds in robotics, graphics, product design and fine art. You will work both independently and collaboratively, pushing boundaries and exchanging ideas across design disciplines.

Students value the experience and knowledge of staff, bringing different perspectives and industry insight to teaching in a highly professional and creative environment. Our students benefit from active links with the on-site Centre for Fine Print Research (3 teaching staff are members), leaders in 3D and 2.5D print research, bringing opportunities for placements, collaborative projects and exhibitions.

You will have access to cutting-edge facilities and technical expertise in fabrication, fashion, textiles, print and photography, in addition to regular guest speakers and live projects, bringing you up-to-date with the latest techniques and developments.

Modules

• Make (30 credits)
• Play (30 credits)
• Research Practice (30 credits)
• Practice in a Professional Context (30 credits)
• Live (60 credits)

Format

You will be taught through a combination of seminars, workshops, lectures and individual tutorials.

Students are responsible for setting their own projects, there are no set briefs and a large proportion of your time will be allocated to self-directed study with guidance from teaching and technical staff.

You will have access to a rolling programme of design-focused guest speakers from industry and academia and students are encouraged to make visits relevant to the practice.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a combination of practical work and accompanying critical design log. Research practice is essay and presentation based.

You will present and communicate design ideas to staff and your peer group as part of the 'play' module, and the 'live' module encourages a live aspect to include the degree show or a negotiated live project with industry.

Careers / Further study

The course places strong emphasis on developing making skills, knowledge and creativity commensurate with the needs of professional practice in design and the creative industries today. It aims to prepare you for professional practice as self-employed designer/makers, artists, design teachers/lecturers and for work in design studios and interior design.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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See the department website - http://saunders.rit.edu/graduate/mba_program.php. The master of business administration degree provides students with the capabilities for strategic and critical thinking needed for effective leadership in a global economy where creative management of both people and technology is vital. Read more
See the department website - http://saunders.rit.edu/graduate/mba_program.php

The master of business administration degree provides students with the capabilities for strategic and critical thinking needed for effective leadership in a global economy where creative management of both people and technology is vital. The curriculum begins with a solid grounding in the functional areas of business and combines that foundation with the flexibility that allows students to specialize in one or two areas of expertise. In the classroom, students learn the latest theories and concepts, and how they can be immediately applied to solve problems in the workplace.

Plan of study

The MBA program requires 48 credit hours and consists of 16 courses, 11 of which are devoted to core functional areas and five available in concentration areas and as electives.

- Concentrations

An MBA concentration is a sequence of three courses in one discipline, giving you in-depth knowledge in that subject matter. In addition to the program's core courses, at least one area of concentration must be selected to complete the MBA program.

Our most popular MBA concentrations are featured below. Customized concentrations can also be created that leverage graduate courses offered at Saunders, as well as the other RIT colleges, providing a wide array of disciplinary focus areas. While several examples are provided, many possibilities exist. Students may also elect to complete a second concentration, if they choose. A graduate advisor can assist in developing a customized plan of study.

- Accounting

Designed for students planning to enter corporate accounting, this concentration is also an excellent complement to a concentration in finance or management information systems.

- Entrepreneurship

The entrepreneurship concentration is designed to enable students to recognize and commercialize attractive business opportunities—either by new independent ventures or by established firms seeking growth or rejuvenation. It involves integrating all functions of business (marketing, innovation, finance, accounting, etc.) within one coordinated value-creating initiative.

The concentration requires an applied entrepreneurial learning experience that may be satisfied through either the Field Experience in Business Consulting (MGMT-753) course or an approved commercialization project. These projects may involve students developing their own businesses or working with RIT incubator companies, local start-up firms, or RIT multidisciplinary commercialization projects.

- Environmentally sustainable management

With a goal of familiarizing students with environmentally sustainable business practices, this concentration is attractive to those with an overall interest in understanding how firms can manage social and political demands for more environmentally sustainable products and operations. It may be of particular interest to those students in industries with a significant environmental impact such as the automotive, chemical, energy, transportation, or agricultural industries, where environmental issues are central to operational and strategic decision making.

- Finance

This concentration is designed to provide a foundation of knowledge in finance and allow students to choose courses appropriate for a career in investments or corporate finance. Students interested in investments will acquire advanced skills in securities evaluation and portfolio management. Those interested in corporate finance will acquire advanced skills in budgeting, planning, global financing and operations, and corporate risk management.

- International business

This concentration prepares graduates for today's global business environment. Regardless of size, nearly all enterprises operate globally: sourcing, producing, researching, and marketing worldwide. Suppliers and competitors are not only across the street, they are around the globe. Balancing the needs of local, regional, and national communities--and the benefits attained from global competition and cooperation--requires an understanding of the international dimensions of business. Managers and professionals must be able to think, market, negotiate, and make decisions designed for the diversity, complexity, and dynamism that are the hallmarks of global business.

- Management and leadership

Managers need to combine effective leadership with analytical reasoning. The management and leadership concentration provides students with the leadership skills needed to be successful managers in business, nonprofit, and public organizations. Students develop the essential analytical and decision-making skills for today's rapidly changing world. They learn why change is difficult, when to initiate change, and how to introduce and manage change in the workplace. These courses also prepare students for the demands of managing people and projects.

- Management information systems

This concentration enhances students' understanding of modern information systems. It was designed for students who may not have a background in computers or information systems.

- Marketing

The overall process of entering markets, creating value for customers, and developing profit for the firm are the fundamental challenges for today's marketing manager. Effective marketing must consider the target audience, along with the changing business environment and competitive pressures of technological and global challenges. Additionally, digital media, the Internet, and big data continue to drive the development of our global marketplace. Digital marketing is evolving quickly creating an enormous need to understand the implications of these shifts for strategic initiatives in marketing and advertising.

- Operations management and supply chain management

This concentration focuses on providing the knowledge to assist in developing, and implementing, efficient supplier systems in order to maximize customer value. Supply chain management is focused on the coordination of the associated processes required both within a business, as well as across businesses/suppliers, to deliver products and services - from raw materials to customer delivery. In addition to courses covering project management, quality control, process improvement and supply chain management, additional electives allow students to broaden their knowledge base across other relevant operations and supply chain management functions.

- Product commercialization

This concentration targets students who are interested in developing expertise in managing the marketing-related activities required to move new products and services through preliminary business and development stages to a successful launch. The commercialization of new corporate offerings is increasingly important as product life cycles get shorter.

- Quality and applied statistics

This concentration is for students interested in studying the technical aspect of managing quality (i.e., statistical quality control). Students gain an understanding of the basics of statistical process control, quality improvement, acceptance sampling, and off-line quality control techniques such as the design of experiments.

- Technology management

In a constantly changing environment, the ability of an organization to innovate and renew itself is critical if it is to survive and prosper. Technology managers, who are typically responsible for the innovation and application of new technology, are central to the long-term strategy and success of their companies. To manage these processes well, managers need to understand both business and technological perspectives. Co-op or internship experience in high-technology settings may be helpful to students pursuing a specialty in technology management.

- Customized concentration options

In addition to the above concentrations, MBA students may create a customized three-course concentration utilizing graduate courses from Saunders and other RIT colleges. Some examples are listed below, while additional options may be pursued on a case by case basis. To create a customized concentration the approval of a Saunders College graduate advisor is needed, and course prerequisites may apply.

- Communication and media technologies

Communication, and the technologies for message creation and dissemination, is at the center of dramatic economic, social, and cultural changes occurring as a result of technological development and global connectedness. This concentration, offered by the College of Liberal Arts, prepares students for careers as communication experts in commerce, industry, education, entertainment, government, and the not-for-profit sector.

- Health systems administration

Specifically designed for students employed in the health care environment, this concentration, offered by the College of Applied Science and Technology, introduces up-to-date, industry-relevant content that is continually developed in response to the changing health care environment. All courses in this concentration are offered online.

- Human resource development

The field of human resource development has grown in both size and importance over the last decade, leading to a higher demand for educated and skilled human resource professionals. This concentration, offered by the College of Applied Science and Technology, provides education in training, and career and organizational development.

- Industrial and systems engineering management

Organizations need individuals who possess a blend of technical and business skills, as well as the integrated systems perspective needed to commercialize complex products and services. This concentration, offered by the Kate Gleason College of Engineering, may be significantly interdisciplinary.

- Information technology

Corporations are aware of the cost savings and performance improvement possible when information technology is applied in a systematic manner, improving organizational information flow, employee learning, and business performance. Information technology includes a mixture of computers and multipurpose devices, information media, and communication technology. Students may choose from the following areas of specialization: Web programming/multimedia, software project management, programming, or telecommunications. This concentration is offered by the B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences.

- Print media

Leadership and management in the print media industry require an understanding of the cutting-edge technology and emerging markets to articulate a corporate vision that encompasses new opportunities and directions. This concentration, offered by the College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, is designed to provide a solid technical background in cross-media digital workflow processes and a keen understanding of the issues and trends in the print media industry.

- Public policy

Formulating public policy and understanding its impact are critical, whether you work in government, not-for-profit, or the private sector. This concentration, offered by the College of Liberal Arts, gives students the skills to effectively formulate public policy and evaluate its impact, particularly as related to science and technology issues. The courses focus on policy formation, implementation, and analysis.

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This is an advanced practice-based research programme for students wishing to extend their research into the areas of film, photography and electronic arts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mres-filmmaking-photography-electronic-arts/. Read more
This is an advanced practice-based research programme for students wishing to extend their research into the areas of film, photography and electronic arts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mres-filmmaking-photography-electronic-arts/

The programme is particularly relevant for students who have an MA degree and are looking to postion and develop their research and practice work.

It will be tailor-made to your individual research area and practice, giving you the opportunity to develop research skills and pursue your own area of interest.

You'll work closely with a personal supervisor to develop your work in the areas of filmmaking, photography and digital arts.

You’ll also receive training and guidance in ethical and legal obligations, and be encouraged to accommodate feminist, anti-racist, decolonising and other appropriate approaches to your chosen subject.

The programme meets the needs of two groups:

students who have completed an MA in Filmmaking, Photography, or Electronic Arts and cognate programmes (for example, our MA in Photography: The Image & Electronic Arts)
film, photography and electronic arts professionals who wish to extend their research-based practice

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Sean Cubitt.

Structure

A personalised programme
The programme is personalised for each student, and is based on your individual research into your chosen practice. It gives you the opportunity to develop appropriate research skills and to pursue a research practice project of your own design, developed and reworked in discussion with a personal supervisor.

The curriculum is personalised for individual students, but all students will share a common curriculum and receive training and guidance in ethical and legal obligations, and be encouraged to accommodate feminist, anti-racist, decolonising and other appropriate approaches to their chosen subject.

The course will add value to recent MA practice graduates and to film, photography and electronic arts professionals by giving a deeper and more specialised engagement in a major research project supervised by staff experienced in both creative and professional research. Research training will give you the skills to design and complete your own research and to work to research briefs.

All students undertake the Practice-Based Research Methods Seminar in the first term, producing a detailed 5000 word project outline at the end. They will also take in the second term one of a selected range of optional modules to help develop their critical and theoretical awareness. In the first term, they begin work with their personal supervisor on the design and execution of their project. Supervision will determine the specific means used: some students will embark directly on a single piece of work; others may undertake a series of workshop-based activities.

Aims

The programme's subject-specific learning outcomes require you to think critically about a range of issues concerning the media, understood in the widest sense, and to be able to justify their views intellectually and practically. The central outcome will be to design and conduct a substantial practice-based research project.

As appropriate to each individual project, you will be encouraged to analyse, contextualise, historicise, and theorise your chosen medium with reference to key debates in history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of film and the media. You will learn to produce high quality research under time constraints, by working independently.

All students will develop a range of transferable qualities and skills necessary for employment in related areas. These are described by the Quality Assurance Agency as: ‘the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility, decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations, and the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development’. You will be guided to work independently and to think through the intellectual issues.

Progress is carefully monitored, to make sure that you are making progress towards the achievement of the outcomes. Different kinds of practical and intellectual skills are required for each part of the programme. In consultation with supervisors, you will be guided to the most appropriate practical and intellectual approaches, and to the most appropriate technical and critical sources.

Structure

You take the following modules:

Practice-Based Research Methods (30 credits)
This module provides research methods training for the MRes in Film Photography and Electronic Arts, and may be taken by practice-based students in the MPhil programme in Media and Communications. In all years it will address the legal and ethical constraints operating on research by practice. In any given year, the syllabus will address such topics as technique (colour, composition, editing, post-production, sound-image relations, text-image relations), anti-racist, feminist and decolonial critique; hardware and software studies; environmental impacts of media production, dissemination and exhibition; media critical approaches to art, political economy, and truth. The interests of students and supervisors will guide the selection of specific content of the course in its delivery, whose aim is to inculcate advanced thinking on the making, delivery and audiences for research-based practice.

Research Project (120 credits)
The project in the MRes Film, Photography and Electronic Arts comprises a portfolio of practical work (such as photographs, video, film, installation, websites or other digital/print material) alongside a textual component. The work submitted should be original, and be as integral to the research aims, processes and outcomes of the project as the textual component. The final project as a whole will therefore demonstrate the integration of its practical and research components, so that text and practice reflect critically on each other. The length of the textual element should normally be between 5,000 and 10,000 words. The practical component should be a ‘substantial’ body of work. Given the potential range of media that can be used, and their differing potential relationships with the research process and the textual component, it is impossible to be precise. In the case of film/video it would normally entail the submission of a work (or works) of about 25 minutes in length (or more), but detailed requirements will be worked out on a case-by-case basis.

Students will undertake to design and conduct a substantial practice-based research project in collaboration with their supervisor. The project will be informed by research, as appropriate, into the materials, techniques and critical contexts of production, distribution and exhibition in audiovisual, electronic image and allied arts. As appropriate to each individual project, students will be encouraged to analyse, contextualise, historicise, and theorise their chosen medium with reference to key debates in history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of film and the media, especially in relation to anti-racist, decolonial, feminist, environmental and other key ethical and political dimensions of their aesthetic practice. They will learn to produce high quality research under pressure, by working independently. The exact conceptual and methodological direction of the research must initially come from the student, though this will be developed and reworked in discussion with the personal supervisor. Areas of research can be drawn from a wide remit, including the full range of media and cultural forms of contemporary societies and may be theoretical or empirical; technically- or more academically-based. Projects which are conceptually coherent, and practicable in their aims and methods can be considered, subject only to the in-house expertise of staff. The module encourages the development of knowledge and skills specific to the production, distribution and exhibition of contemporary media.

Assessment

There are two assessment points:

A: You are required to write one 5,000 word essay linked to the Practice-Based Research Methods seminar. The exact theme and title will be decided in discussion between you and your supervisor and relate to your specialist field of research, but as a guide it will demonstrate your readiness to undertake the project through critical evaluation of legal, ethical, critical and reflexive parameters and functions of practice-based research.

In addition, you will be assessed in the option module you undertake during the Spring Term.

B: The project in the MRes Film, Photography and Electronic Arts comprises a portfolio of practical work (such as photographs, video, film, installation, websites or other digital/print material) alongside a textual component. The work submitted should be original, and be as integral to the research aims, processes and outcomes of the project as the textual component. The final project as a whole will therefore demonstrate the integration of its practical and research components, so that text and practice reflect critically on each other.

Department

We are ranked:
22nd in the world for communication and media studies**
1st in the UK for the quality of our research***

**QS World University Rankings by subject 2015
***Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

We’ve also been ranked by LinkedIn as one of the top graduate universities for media professionals, because so many of our graduates go on to find jobs in the industry.

The department includes some of the top academics in the world for this discipline – the pioneers of media, communications and cultural studies. They actively teach on our programmes, and will introduce you to current research and debate in these areas. And many of our practice tutors are industry professionals active in TV, film, journalism, radio and animation.

We also run EastLondonLines.co.uk – our 24/7 student news website – which gives students the opportunity to gain experience working in a real-time news environment.

And we run regular public events featuring world-renowned writers and practitioners that have recently included Danny Boyle, Gurinda Chadha, Noel Clark and Tessa Ross. So you’ll get to experience the latest developments and debates in the industry.

Skills & Careers

The course is designed to support students who wish to strengthen their opportunities in professional media, including the media industries and creative practice, private sector firms, public sector institutions and civil society organisations with communications departments.

We envisage that a small proportion of graduates will seek careers in teaching, including secondary and higher education, in which case their projects and supervision will be tailored to that end.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Students who wish to know more of the transnational nature of the modern world;. Students who wish to continue their anthropological study at a postgraduate level and engage in critical contemporary theory;. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

Students who wish to know more of the transnational nature of the modern world;

Students who wish to continue their anthropological study at a postgraduate level and engage in critical contemporary theory;

Students who wish to understand cultural transformation from a global perspective;

Students who come from other disciplines, such as Law or Politics, and now wish to incorporate an anthropological perspective on issues of migration and diaspora.

Students with a degree in social anthropology wishing to pursue more specialist migration and diaspora related topics along with regional or language-based study
Students without a previous degree in Anthropology looking for an MA conversion degree to serve as a qualification for pursuing a further research degree in issues relating to migration and diaspora.
The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language courses will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

The MA in Migration and Diaspora Studies is a broad-based degree for students who want to receive specialized research training in Migration and Diaspora Studies, including a relevant language, which will prepare them to proceed to advanced postgraduate research in Migration and Diaspora Studies at SOAS or elsewhere.
The programme encourages a transdisciplinary approach to issues of migration and diaspora, providing historical depth as well as perspectives from anthropology, sociology, and postcolonial studies. The programme also works closely with a number of departments across the school, such as Development Studies, the Centre for Gender Studies as well as Law and Politics, which also run migration and diaspora related courses. Most of these courses are available as options on the programme, making it a unique MA in terms of both its breadth and depth.
The MA in Migration and Diaspora Studies is considerably enriched by the SOAS Centre for Migration and Diaspora Studies, which runs seminars, films and public lectures and also hosts a number of international scholars. The Centre is also a part of a migration research network of London colleges including LSE and UCL. Students on the programme therefore have unparalleled access to a critical body of scholars and scholarship on migration and diaspora related issue.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

The Japanese pathway is available for students who have an intermediate level of Japanese. Students will be required to take a placement exam in the week before classes begin in order to determine if their level is suitable. Please contact Professor Drew Gerstle () for further information.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-migration-and-diaspora-studies-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Core course:

- African and Asian Diasporas in the Contemporary World (1 unit)
- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (1 unit)
- Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

Foundation course:
- Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology (1 unit). This is recommended for students without a previous anthropology degree.

OPTION COURSES
- Students choose their remaining unit (or two units if not taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) from the Option Courses list. A language course from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures may also be included.

In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and African and Asian Diasporas in the Contemporary World (1 unit) in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two optional anthropology units. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

Programme Specification

MA Migration and Diaspora Studies and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 253kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-migration-and-diaspora-studies-and-intensive-language/file93570.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Aims and Outcomes:
- To introduce students to important areas of contemporary social theory which deal with issues of migration, globalisation, the postcolonial world, and cultural transformations.

- To ground students in the historical basis of these issues

- To encourage transdisciplinary thinking on issues of migration

- To enable students to translate theoretical perspectives for practical application in the material world.

- To provide students with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:

- Students will be expected to grasp the key debates in migration and diaspora studies from a critical perspective

- To understand the global/historical/political and cultural background within which issues of migration and diaspora occur.

- A critical understanding of the ways that migration has shaped the modern world, and the implications of this for future research.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- The development of analytical and theoretical skills based on a detailed understanding of the social science literature on migration and diaspora.

- To approach theories and debates from a critical and reflexive basis.

- To develop their presentation skills and their ability to articulate arguments coherently in order to promote class discussion and critical engagement with ideas and practices.

Subject-based practical skills:

- Communicate effectively in writing, in academic English

- Retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources including print and other forms of mass media

- Listen to and discuss ideas introduced during seminars.

- Students with no knowledge of media technologies will have the opportunity to learn photographic and film making techniques through the Media unit.

- Practice research techniques in a variety of specialized research libraries and institutes

- In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
Students will be expected to learn to:

- Plan, organise and write masters’ level essays and dissertations.
- Structure and communicate ideas effectively both orally and in writing.
- Understand unconventional ideas.
- Present (non–assessed) material orally.
- Function as a student and researcher in a radically different environment.
- Be able to apply for funding to do a PhD.
- Be prepared to enter a Social Science PhD programme.
- An ability to work, and be at ease in, a multicultural environment

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Fashion media is experiencing explosive growth worldwide in response to the dynamic role of fashion in modern popular and consumer culture. Read more
Fashion media is experiencing explosive growth worldwide in response to the dynamic role of fashion in modern popular and consumer culture.

The ability to be a successful fashion journalist requires very specific skills relating to writing, visual appreciation and a technical understanding of fashion which touches on a broad range of influences.

This programme will explore fashion media in the broadest sense, including new digital media opportunities and the rapid growth of international media dedicated to fashion and lifestyle.

Why should I choose this programme?

Magazines and digital media demand well-trained fashion journalists with an understanding of context, history and trends. Journalists, whether digital or print based, need to be informed on both the technical and creative aspects of fashion design. They also need to be versatile writers capable of working across a wide variety of media.

This programme will provide you with the skills and know-how to secure jobs in a demanding but exciting sector, with a strong focus on digital media.

Key skills, aims and objectives

Ideas generation, research interviewing, writing and editing skills
Visual appreciation of fashion
Technical understanding of fashion and its context, history and trends
The ability to work in both digital and print media
Future opportunities

This programme will prepare you for a career in fashion journalism, both print and digital media.

Typical entry level jobs open to graduates of the programme include:

‌•Junior Fashion Writer
‌•Copy Editor
‌•Web Editor
‌•Social Media Editor
‌•Fashion Assistant
‌•Brand Agency Researcher
‌•Trend Researcher
‌•E-commerce Product Writer
‌•Fashion News Reporter
‌•Features Assistant

How to apply

Applying to study at RUL is a quick and easy process. We accept direct applications, have no formal application deadlines and there is no application fee.

Step 1 Apply

You can apply in the following ways:

•Apply online
•Apply directly to us using the application form available here http://www.regents.ac.uk/media/1188903/Regents-application-form.pdf
Once you have completed the application form, please send us the following supporting documents, by post, email or fax:

•Copies of academic transcripts and certificates of all academic study undertaken after secondary school
•One letter of academic reference
•A copy of your CV/resumé showing your work experience if applicable.
•A 300 to 500-word personal statement in support of your application, outlining your reasons for applying to your chosen programme and how you feel you will benefit from the course of study
•A copy of your passport photograph (ID) page
•One recent passport-sized, colour photograph, jpeg format (this must be emailed to us at )
•If not a native English speaker, proof of your English proficiency

Please note: most candidates will be assessed for admission on the basis of their submitted application materials. However, RUL reserves the right to invite candidates for interview and to reject those who decline to attend.

Step 2 Making an offer

We will assess whether you meet our minimum entry requirements and will make you an offer by both email and post, or notify you that you have been unsuccessful.

If you have completed your education and have met all the entry requirements, you will be sent an unconditional offer. If you still have to finish your exams, or have yet to submit supporting documentation, we will make you a conditional offer.

You can expect to receive a decision on your application within 10 working days of receipt of your completed application and supporting documents.

Step 3 Accepting the offer

If you wish to accept the offer you must:

•Confirm your acceptance via email/post/telephone/in person
•Pay the registration fee (non-refundable)
•Pay the non-EU advance tuition fee deposit, if applicable (non-refundable)
•Please note: although there is no formal deadline to pay your registration fee or non-EU advance deposit, if you need to apply for an international student visa to study in the UK, then we recommend that you pay these as soon as possible.

Please see here for information on how to pay http://www.regents.ac.uk/study/how-to-pay.aspx

Step 4 Full acceptance and visa

On receipt of your acceptance we will issue the final set of documentation and, where needed, the relevant visa support documentation. To find out if you need a student visa please consult the UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) website for current information: http://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/uk-visas-and-immigration (please note it is your own responsibility to arrange the appropriate visa).

For more information on course structure, admissions and teaching and assessment, please follow this link: http://www.regents.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/programmes/pg-dip-fashion-journalism.aspx#tab_course-overview

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Are you looking for a Masters-level qualification that will open doors to jobs and promotions in the field of data analytics? This 2-year Masters course combines core modules in information science with specialised modules in Database Modelling as well as Statistics and Business Intelligence. Read more
Are you looking for a Masters-level qualification that will open doors to jobs and promotions in the field of data analytics? This 2-year Masters course combines core modules in information science with specialised modules in Database Modelling as well as Statistics and Business Intelligence.

As part of the focus on data analytics, you will cover topics such as how to design and manipulate databases with relational algebra and SQL. You will also analyse (big) data in order to improve organisational decision-making, using techniques such as regression analysis, clustering, distance measures, probability and distributions.

In the second year, for one semester, you’ll undertake an internship, study in another country or join a research group. This valuable experience will enhance your employability and further develop your theoretical and practical skills.

Internship
This option offers the opportunity to spend three months working full-time in one of the many companies/industries with which we have close links. You may be able to extend this over more than one semester in cases where it is adjacent to a vacation period. We will endeavour to help those who prefer this option to find and secure a suitable position but ultimately we are in the hands of the employers who are free to decide who they take into their organisation.

Research
If you take this option, you will be assigned to our Computer Science and Informatics Research Group. There is every possibility that you may contribute to published research and therefore you may be named as part of the research team, which would be a great start to a research career.

Study Abroad
We have exchange agreements with universities all over the world, including partners in Europe, Asia, the Americas and Oceania. If you take the Study Abroad option, you will spend a semester at one of these partners, continuing your studies in English but in a new cultural and learning environment. Please note that this option may require you to obtain a visa for study in the other country.

All of Northumbria’s information science postgraduate courses are accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals. This accreditation makes our courses stand out and enhances their credibility and currency among employers, and is also crucial for progressing to Chartership status once qualified.

Learn From The Best

Our teaching staff include cutting-edge researchers whose specialisms overlap with the content of this course, helping ensure that teaching is right up-to-date. Specialisms include big data, data mining, decision-making, digital literacy, information behaviour, information retrieval systems, recommender systems, and the link between information science and cognitive psychology.

Our eminent academics have written books that regularly appear on reading lists for information science courses at universities all over the world. They also work as external examiners and reviewers of courses at other UK and non-UK universities.

Our course is delivered through the Northumbria iSchool, which is one of only six iSchools in the UK. A hallmark of an iSchool is an understanding that expertise in all forms of information is required for progress in science, business, education and culture. This expertise must cover the uses and users of information, the nature of information itself, as well as information technologies and their applications.

Information Science at Northumbria was established over 70 years ago and has developed in close collaboration with the profession. That dynamic working relationship has allowed us to not only reflect professional requirements, but also to be instrumental in understanding and shaping those requirements.

Teaching And Assessment

Our teaching is linked to what you want to learn and also to what you need to learn in order to achieve greater success in information science. Our long established relationship with employers ensures that you receive the most relevant and up-to-date knowledge to bring innovation, relevance, ethical sensitivity and currency to all you do. There is an emphasis on learning by doing; coursework will include projects, portfolios of work, reports and presentations as well as essays. All this helps you to make sense of the subject, getting a clear understanding of important concepts and theories.

The Advanced Practice semester will be assessed via a report and presentation about your internship, study abroad or research group activities.

While some assessments contribute to your final grade, there are other assessments that are provided purely to guide your progress and reinforce your learning. You can expect both your tutors and your peers to provide useful comments and feedback throughout the course.

Module Overview

Year One
KC7013 - Database Modelling (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7020 - Information Organisation and Access (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7021 - Statistics and Business Intelligence (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7022 - Information Systems and Technologies (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7023 - Research Methods and Professional Practice (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7024 - User Behaviour and Interaction Design (Core, 20 Credits)

Year Two
KC7026 - Masters Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)
KF7005 - Engineering and Environment Advanced Practice (Core, 60 Credits)

Learning Environment

Northumbria uses a range of technologies to enhance your learning, with tools including web-based self-guided exercises, online tests with feedback, videos and tutorials. These tools support and extend the material that is delivered during lectures, and are available anywhere anytime. Group work and peer interaction feature prominently in our learning and teaching, this reflects the practices you’re likely to encounter within the working environment.

You will have 24/7 term-time access to Northumbria’s library, which has over half a million print books as well as half a million electronic books available online. Our library was ranked #2 in the Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey for 2015 and, since 2010, it has been accredited by the UK Government for Customer Service Excellence.

The University has advanced search software and database tools, including NORA Power Search that allows you to use a single search box to get fast results from across a wide and reliable range of academic resources. The use of such software and tools is an important aspect of our information science courses.

Give Your Career An Edge

This course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals. This reflects the relevance of the curriculum, which is informed by contact with employers and close professional links.

The topics and activities in the course have a strong emphasis on employability. For example you will develop skills in how to analyse, monitor and evaluate user behaviour. You will also learn how to evaluate and use a range of appropriate technologies for solving problems and supporting decision-making in organisations. Your knowledge and practical skills will help you take a lead on research-informed approaches that give organisations and professionals a valuable advantage.

The Advanced Practice semester will help you develop a track record of achievement that will help you stand out from other job applicants.

A two-year master’s course, like this one, will carry particular weight with employers. They’ll understand that you’ll have a deeper understanding of topics as well as more hands-on practical experience.

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This course is designed for recent graduates with little or no public relations (PR) experience, who want to pursue a career in an exciting and expanding sector. Read more

This course is designed for recent graduates with little or no public relations (PR) experience, who want to pursue a career in an exciting and expanding sector. It is also ideal if you are a public relations practitioner with one or two years of experience, looking to develop your strategic and analytical skills whilst gaining a broader understanding of the PR industry.

The course combines academic learning and professional practice with a hands-on approach. Key areas of study include

  • the origins and history of PR from a global perspective
  • how PR is used to manage and restore organisational reputation
  • public affairs and government communication
  • how charities and campaigning groups use PR
  • the ethical dimensions of PR and how to be an ethical PR practitioner
  • the impact of globalisation on PR practice and how to create compelling and relevant international PR campaigns

You learn the latest techniques to succeed in the fast changing world of communications, and gain the analytical, strategic, management and organisational skills to succeed at the highest levels in PR. You develop your ability to

  • critically evaluate key concepts, theories and debates
  • plan and manage PR campaigns
  • write for a wide range of communication media including print, broadcasting, and online
  • work effectively across a wide range of media channels
  • think and work creatively
  • critically reflect on your own professional development
  • develop a strong and effective social media profile
  • use social scientific research skills across academic and industry work

During the course you put important PR campaigns under the spotlight and work on live briefs to develop your professional skills in real-life situations. You learn how to work with bloggers and journalists, to meet their needs and develop your organsiation's reputation, and bring new ideas into the public sphere. You also develop an understanding of how academic research helps us understand the practice and development of public relations across the world.

You gain practical skills in • content creation and curation • writing news releases • organising events • researching and creating strategic PR campaigns • dealing with the media • blogger relations • crisis management • creative use of online and social media • advocacy approaches to engage with hard-to-reach audiences.

We give you the skills you need to communicate with key audiences across different media channels including print, broadcast, social media and online. It is not about ‘spin’, but great writing and verbal skills, critical and creative thinking, and understanding how the media works. You are encouraged to think about an organisation's aims and objectives and how PR knowledge can be used to achieve or question them.

The course is delivered by a team that includes award winning PR industry specialists with national and international experience across TV, health, charity, public and private sectors.

Public Relations Consultants Association

This course also benefits from Partner University status with the Public Relations Consultants Association (PRCA). A limited number of Universities are endorsed by the PRCA for offering excellent courses which are intellectually rigorous and esteemed by employers.

Our students gain automatic free student membership of the PRCA and all the benefits that come with it, including • exclusive access to work placements • internships • graduate schemes and entry level jobs • free and unlimited online training • free access to the industry recognised PRCA Online Certificate.

Professional recognition

This course is recognised by the Chartered Institute of Public Relations (CIPR).

When you enrol on a course recognised by the CIPR you are eligible for CIPR Student Membership. This gives you access to the members area of the CIPR website, where they have a dedicated student area which offers help and advice on getting into the PR industry.

Course structure

Postgraduate certificate – core modules

  • PR – essential theory and history
  • PR for the digital era
  • Practical PR and professional experience

Postgraduate certificate – optional modules

  • Writing for PR
  • Media law and regulation

Postgraduate diploma – core modules

  • PR issues and crisis management
  • Corporate communications
  • PR, politics and lobbying

Postgraduate diploma – optional modules

  • international journalism and PR
  • print and online news reporting

MA modules

  • Dissertation

Assessment

  • essay
  • dissertation
  • portfolio and critical evaluation of professional standard work

Employability

Organisations are increasingly recognising the value of PR and the importance of effective communication. As more media platforms are launched, and the communication mix becomes more complex, the demand for honest, ethical and skilled PR practitioners continues to grow.

The course gives you the knowledge and skills to work as a public relations officer or executive in • public and private sector organisations • PR agencies • charities • pressure groups • the voluntary sector.

It also prepares you for work • as a campaigns director • in public affairs or lobbying • as an account manager or director making the headlines for your creative campaigns.

Many of our students also move into marketing and social media roles.

The skills from the course are transferrable to a range of other professions as you gain competencies in writing, communicating, presenting ideas and working in a team. 



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