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Masters Degrees (Preventive Conservation)

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The full time, distance learning MA Preventive Conservation course will immerse you in the world of preventive conservation and collections care by engaging you with the complexities and challenges of professional practice. Read more
The full time, distance learning MA Preventive Conservation course will immerse you in the world of preventive conservation and collections care by engaging you with the complexities and challenges of professional practice.

On completion of this one-year course you will possess the specialist knowledge and skills required to provide appropriate strategies for the care, storage, display, transit and environmental management of heritage collections.

During the course you will learn about the physical and chemical characteristics of materials commonly found in collections, preventive conservation policies and procedures, conservation-cleaning processes, environmental management strategies as well as the fundamental chemistry and physics underpinning professional practice. You will also undertake a placement that will allow you to contextualise the theory that you have learnt within professional practice. Personal research is encouraged throughout the course and you are provided with the opportunity to shape assignments in support of its development, which often leads to the focus of the final dissertation.

Northumbria University is the market lead in this fast growing area of conservation practice and provides teaching that is at the forefront of this exciting discipline.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/preventive-conservation-dtdpcz6/

Learn From The Best

The teaching team are members, co-ordinators and directory board members of leading international conservation organisations around the world and have extensive experience in professional practice as well as teaching and learning at a distance.

The teaching team continuously draw on their international networks to identify emerging trends in professional practice. This enables them to ensure that course content remains current and that graduates have the skills and knowledge required by prospective employers.

All staff are research-active and regularly present and publish their work around the world at international peer-reviewed conferences. This places them in a strong position to guide and support you in the publication of your own research after graduation, greatly enhancing your employability.

Teaching And Assessment

This course is delivered in a distance learning format and the none-synchronous delivery provides flexibility as to when, where and at what pace you learn, which is particularly valuable if you do not have English as a first language. The format is invaluable if you do not wish to re-locate but if you wish to continue in employment throughout the programme you are advised to take the part time format.

All learning is student-led. You learn by identifying the area of research that is of interest to you and then develop it through the coursework and assignments using the teaching materials as appropriate. This makes the learning process more engaging, personal and meaningful. The formative and summative assignments and dissertation are designed to help you develop as the critical thinker, reflective practitioner and independent learner required in professional practice.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
VA7017 - Collections Care (Core, 30 Credits)
VA7018 - Conservation Science (Core, 30 Credits)
VA7019 - Conservation Cleaning (Core, 30 Credits)
VA7020 - Work Placed Learning (Core, 30 Credits)
VA7021 - Preventive Conservation Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)

Learning Environment

Learning materials, course and module handbooks, assessment information, lecture presentation slides, web-links and reading lists are made available via our innovative e-learning platform Blackboard. You can also access student support and other key University systems through your personal online account.

The course content is delivered using smart interactive materials including lectures with voice overs, high quality virtual tours, rotating 3D artefacts with hot spots that can be magnified for examination purposes and audio-visual demonstrations of the processes and procedures used in professional practice. The high quality interactive learning materials have been developed by subject specialists and are available throughout the course so that you can develop and consolidate your knowledge and understanding as often as required. Discussion boards provide regular opportunities for you to discuss academic issues with the other students in your cohort.

You will be fully supported throughout the course by the teaching team who will help you develop your area of personal research, provide weekly feedback on formative course work and provide swift high quality feedback to any concerns or queries that you might have via e mail.

Research-Rich Learning

Research-rich learning is embedded throughout the course and our academics are research-active, publishing cutting-edge work within this specialised field.

The course has a research-based format engendering an enquiring, analytical and creative approach to the challenges of professional practice.

This course provides a large emphasis on both the development of individual research skills and the importance of group work and by the end of your course you will possess the skills required to position yourself as a confident researcher able to identify, deliver and disseminate research that will contribute to professional and enhance your employability.

Give Your Career An Edge

Northumbria University has led in the development of this area of practice and a high percentage of our graduates secure employment within the sector within six months of graduation or earlier.

The work placement will greatly enhance your future career prospects by providing an invaluable opportunity to apply your skills and knowledge within a professional environment. It will allow you to start developing professional networks and help you identify which aspect of professional practice you would most like to pursue.

The high quality learning materials provided throughout your course, teamed with our established record of delivery and international network of contacts places your knowledge and understanding at the forefront of that required by the sector enhancing your employability.

Your Future

On completion of this course you will possess the knowledge and skills required to care for collections and be able to understand, develop and implement appropriate strategies for storage, display, transit and environmental management.

We continue to support your continuous professional development after graduation through our LinkedIn alumni page, which enables us to alert you to potential jobs, conferences and publications.

A range of career options are available to graduates, with many choosing to pursue roles such as preventive conservation officers, environmental managers or collections managers in museums, galleries and heritage organisations.

The number of former graduates working in professional practice within the first six months of graduating is very high and former students work within many high profile organisations around the world including the National Trust, TATE, Fitzwilliam Museum Cambridge, Islamic Arts Museum Malaysia, National Museum Qatar, New Brunswick Museum Canada, National Library Israel, Heritage Conservation Centre Singapore, National Gallery Victoria Australia and the National Archives Norway.

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The Principles of Conservation MA offers students an introduction to the context of heritage conservation, of how conservation works, and of the issues and constraints which affect conservation practice. Read more
The Principles of Conservation MA offers students an introduction to the context of heritage conservation, of how conservation works, and of the issues and constraints which affect conservation practice. The programme explores the principles, theory, ethics and practicalities relating to the care and conservation of a wide variety of objects and structures.

Degree information

Students gain an in-depth understanding of approaches to collections care, preventive conservation, risk assessment, conservation strategies, ethics, management and professionalism, and develop critically aware perspectives on professional practice and research processes.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules - students are required to take the following:
-Issues in Conservation: Context of Conservation
-Issues in Conservation: Understanding Objects
-Conservation in Practice: Preventive Conservation
-Skills for Conservation Management

Optional modules - students choose to follow further optional modules up to the value of 30 credits from the following list of related options (the degree coordinator may seek to guide the option choices made by those intending to carry on for the MSc in Conservation for Archaeology and Museums):
-Approaches to Artefact Studies
-Archaeology and Ethnicity
-Archaeolmetallurgy 1: Mining and Extractive Technology
-Archaeometallurgy 2: Metallic Artefacts
-Archaeological Ceramics Analysis
-Archaeological Glass and Glazes
-Interpreting Pottery
-Materials structure and deterioration of craft materials

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, small-group tutorials, workshops and practical projects. Some modules include visits to conservation workshops and museums, including the British Museum, National Trust and the Museum of London. Assessment is through coursework, essays, poster, portfolio, project reports and the dissertation.

Careers

The Institute of Archaeology has a long history of training in conservation, and many of its graduates are now employed in key posts around the world. Many students go on to take the Conservation for Archaeology and Museums MSc. Others pursue careers in preventive conservation and collections management in local and national museums, art galleries and heritage organisations (mainly in Europe, North America and Asia). Some students have also used this degree as a platform to become a PhD candidate at both UCL and elsewhere.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Conservator/Preparator, The Natural History Museum
-Assistant Curator, Tower of London
-MLitt Art, Style and Design, Christie's Education
-Historic Property Steward, English Heritage

Employability
Knowledge and skills acquired during the programme include the understanding of the roles conservators play in the care and study of cultural heritage, and the ethical issues involved. This is complemented by a basic understanding of raw materials, manufacturing technologies, assessment of condition and the ways in which different values and meanings are assigned to cultural objects. The student will be able to perform visual examination techniques as well as assessments and monitoring of museum collections. They will also be proficient in various types of documentation, analysis of numerical data, report writing, and presentation of conservation issues through posters, social media, talks and essays.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study. Its conservation programmes have an international reputation.

Students benefit from the institute's lively international involvement in archaeology and heritage, from its well-equipped facilities, and access to UCL's extensive science, art and archaeology collections.

The institute's conservation laboratories provide a modern and pleasant learning environment, while the Wolfson Archaeological Science Laboratories provide excellent facilities for the examination and analysis of a wide variety of archaeological materials.

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Would you like to apply your arts or applied sciences background to the conservation of fine art?. Northumbria University’s MA Conservation of Fine Art course is the only Master of Arts course in the UK that specialises in the conservation of easel painting and works of art on paper. Read more
Would you like to apply your arts or applied sciences background to the conservation of fine art?

Northumbria University’s MA Conservation of Fine Art course is the only Master of Arts course in the UK that specialises in the conservation of easel painting and works of art on paper.

Integrating a mix of fine art, science and forensic techniques, you will study a range of subjects including studio and work-based practice, conservation theory, science, technical examination, -preventive conservation and research training skills.

In addition to the core modules studied, you will have the option to undertake a work placement during years one and two in the UK or abroad.

Learn From The Best

This course is taught by a team of specialist academics who have extensive experience in the field of conservation, science and the Fine Art sectors.

Applying their specialist knowledge to their day-to-day teaching, the members of our staff are actively involved in research and consultancy - activities which are helping to define this exciting and complex profession.

We also engage with the wider conservation sector to ensure that the content of this course is in-line with professional standards and employer expectations.

Throughout the duration of this course you will receive ongoing support from our teaching staff to ensure you leave equipped with - the necessary skills and knowledge to successfully pursue a career within conservation or a related discipline.

Teaching And Assessment

Offering the opportunity for you to specialise in either works of art on paper or easel paintings conservation, this course consists of modules that will explore a range of key areas including conservation theory and practice, conservation science, art history and preventive conservation

You will leave with the technical skills required to undertake examinations, cleaning, structural repairs and stabilisation of works of art, in addition to an in-depth understanding of the historic significance artistic practice and materials play-in understanding artworks.

Significant emphasis is also placed on ethics and developing your skills in research development.

This course is primarily delivered through practical workshops where you will develop a wide range of skills using especially prepared materials and case studies selected from our unique archive collection. These activities inform and run parallel with work conducted on project paintings and other challenging artefacts.

Assessment methods focus on you applying your practical skills, academic concepts and theories to your project documentation and the authentically constructed materials that mirror real life scenarios. You will also undertake a dissertation to further demonstrate your knowledge and understanding of this subject.

Learning Environment

When studying the MA Conservation of Fine Art course you will be housed in a Grade II listed building in the heart of Newcastle city centre. You will be able to utilise techniques such as x-ray, infra-red reflectography, and ultraviolet florescence and false colour infrared photography to examine materials and artworks spanning centuries, in addition to gaining access to intriguing archives and cutting edge technology.

You may also have access to other advanced technologies such as UV fluorescence microscopy, polarised light microscopy (PLM), UV/VIS spectrophotometry, fourier transform infrared (FTIR), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX).

You will also receive ongoing support through our innovative e-learning platform, Blackboard, which will allow you to access learning materials such as module handbooks, assessment information, online lectures, reading lists and virtual gallery tours.

Research-Rich Learning

Research-rich learning is embedded throughout all aspects of this course and our staff are continuously involved and informed by fast-moving emerging developments in conservation research and ethical debates.

All of our staff possess individual specialisms, in areas such as the development and evaluation of conservation treatments for paintings, characterisation of artists’ materials and techniques, studies in material deterioration and comprehensive documentation of works of art.

Our team also collaborate with national and international research organisations.

When studying this master’s degree, you are encouraged to develop your own individual research skills to ensure you graduate with confidence in your own practical and academic experience. These skills are further enhanced when you undertake your dissertation under the guidance of your assigned tutor.

Give Your Career An Edge

This course has been developed to reflect national guidelines and ensure that you graduate with the necessary skills and knowledge to kick-start your career within this profession. There are also many additional opportunities available to further enhance your career edge whilst you study.

Throughout the duration of this course you will create a professional portfolio, which will include examples of practical work and displays of your intellectual achievement to provide a demonstration of your skills and enhance your performance at interviews.

In addition to completing a placement to further enhance your development you will also have the opportunity to present research papers at an organised symposium.

We actively encourage you to engage with professional bodies and attend key conferences to allow you to network with professionals who are already working within the profession, and you may also have the opportunity to advantage of our partnership with Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums, whose collection supports a number of activities. Our long standing links with the National Trust, Tate Britain and the estate of Francis Bacon have created exciting projects for our MA and PhD students.

Your Future

This course will equip you with a deep understanding of both the skills and knowledge required to work effectively in fine art conservation laboratories or conservation jobs across the world.

You may choose to work in galleries or museums, or progress your research to PhD level.

Recent illustrious alumni list, include Virginia Lladó-Buisán Head of Conservation & Collection Care Bodleian Libraries, Britta New, Paintings Conservator at the National Gallery in London and Eleanor Hasler, Head of Paper Conservation at Kew Gardens.

As your professional development is in-line with the current postgraduate professional standards for the Conservation of Fine Art, your access to postgraduate professional jobs within the conservation sector is likely to be enhanced.

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Textile Conservation is a multidisciplinary subject which combines academic knowledge with cultural awareness, aesthetic sensitivity and technical skill. Read more
Textile Conservation is a multidisciplinary subject which combines academic knowledge with cultural awareness, aesthetic sensitivity and technical skill. This MPhil is both an academic programme and professional training; it will give you a framework of theoretical knowledge and a range of practical experience which will enable you to contribute to the understanding and preservation of culturally significant textile artefacts.

Why this programme

-If you are looking to enter a career in textile conservation practice in a museum or other institution, or to pursue doctoral-level research in this field, this programme is designed for you.
-You will take part in a project-based work placement, where you can explore a possible future career while meeting professional practitioners and developing your skills and experience.
-You will be based in our specialist conservation laboratories. The facilities include workrooms, a wet lab, dye lab, chemistry lab and well-equipped analytical lab.
-You will benefit from our close links with Glasgow Museums, as well as the University’s own Hunterian Museum. Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing. You will have the opportunity to draw on the museums’ rich and varied textile collections.
-This is the only programme of its kind in the UK, and one of only a few specialist textile conservation programmes in the world.

Programme structure

You will take core courses over two semesters in each year, with a work placement in the summer between the first and second years. You will write up your dissertation over the second summer and submit it at the end of August.

The core courses will develop an understanding of
-The practical skills used in textile conservation
-Related practical skills including dyeing and photography
-The science underpinning textile deterioration and conservation treatments
-Preventive conservation techniques
-The technological, cultural, historic and aesthetic contexts of textile artefacts
-The place of conservation in the wider cultural sector.

Year 1
-Research methods in practice
-Principles and practice: core skills and ethics
-Understanding textiles: technology
-Principles and practice: developing skills
-Preventive conservation
-Material cultures
-Placement

Year 2
-Principles and practice: advanced skills
-Conservation in practice
-Deconstructing the artefact
-Principles and practice: conservation projects
-Professional development
-Research management
-Dissertation

Career prospects

The programme is at career-entry level and graduates are qualified to go on to a post-training internship or directly into the workplace as a textile conservator in a museum or other institution around the world, as well as to undertake further study at PhD level.

The great majority of graduates of this programme and if its predecessor, the Textile Conservation Centre’s MA Textile Conservation programme, now work in museums and other institutions. Graduates of the two programmes have an outstanding record of employment on graduation and of remaining in the sector. They now work in nearly 30 countries and are in senior positions worldwide.

MPhil graduates have been awarded Mellon Fellowships at Denver Art Museum and the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, in the USA, while others now work for National Museums Scotland, Historic Royal Palaces and the National Maritime Museum in the UK and Heritage Conservation Center, Singapore, among others.

However, it is worth noting that many graduates go on to short-term contract posts initially. It is easier to find a textile conservation post if you are able to be flexible in terms of location.

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The MA Conservation of Cultural Heritage is a hands-on programme, taught by experts in the field, giving you the opportunity to develop a wide range of advanced conservation skills in preparation for a career in the heritage sector. Read more
The MA Conservation of Cultural Heritage is a hands-on programme, taught by experts in the field, giving you the opportunity to develop a wide range of advanced conservation skills in preparation for a career in the heritage sector.

The University of Lincoln aims to provide an ideal environment in which to advance your knowledge and conservation skills at postgraduate level.

You will have access to a wide variety of historic materials and can choose to focus on remedial treatment, preventive conservation or collections management.

For those already working in conservation, a blended learning option allows submission of practical projects derived from your current place of employment.

The School of History & Heritage has strong links with museums, professional bodies and agencies in the heritage field, which can provide opportunities for placements and study abroad.

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We are highly regarded within the sector nationally and internationally for this vocational MSc Care of Collections programme, which offers exceptional training in preventive conservation and the management of cultural and heritage collections regardless of humanities or science background. Read more
We are highly regarded within the sector nationally and internationally for this vocational MSc Care of Collections programme, which offers exceptional training in preventive conservation and the management of cultural and heritage collections regardless of humanities or science background.

You will become adept in the skills essential for a heritage career including project design and report writing, and gain valuable museum or heritage experience.

Twinned with a heritage organisation in the UK, you will experience collection management and operation in the working environment. You are not expected to have a high level of scientific knowledge for this programme, but a strong interest in the subject is anticipated.

Designed with entry to the heritage profession in mind, our stimulating programme embodies elements of art and science and includes a wide range of transferable skills.

Distinctive features

Our range of programmes is designed for all entry levels, from experienced practitioner to graduate wishing to enter the sector.
Taught by internationally-recognised experts in the field.
The degree offers specialist skills for building a portfolio of qualifications for entry to the museum sector.
You will be ‘twinned’ with a real heritage organisation and have the opportunity to study the operation of this organisation and how it relates to the care of collections.
Committed to opening up the profession regardless of discipline background, we do not presume a significant level of scientific knowledge.
High proportion of transferable skills (particularly in research, project design and report writing).

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This is a two-year course, which educates and trains graduate students to be conservators capable of researching, analysing, cleaning, preserving and caring for a wide range of archaeological and museum objects. Read more
This is a two-year course, which educates and trains graduate students to be conservators capable of researching, analysing, cleaning, preserving and caring for a wide range of archaeological and museum objects.

It is intended for those who wish to become practising artefact conservators, or work in the fields of artefact research or preventive conservation. Graduates of the course will normally work in museums or large heritage organisations such the National Trust or English Heritage.

Graduate students are drawn from a wide range on disciplines, but manual dexterity, a very basic knowledge of chemistry and an enthusiasm and desire to work with museum objects are essential.

Course Structure

Modules:
-Conservation Theory
-Conservation Skills
-Artefact Studies
-Care of Collections
-Conservation Practice
-Dissertation

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical classes as well as a dissertation. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate among Conservators in that area. Practicals then provide opportunities for students to implement and develop their skills, based on the knowledge that they have gained through their lectures and through independent study outside the programmes formal contact hours. Self-learning development packages allow students to continue their learning in a structured way outside the practical sessions. The dissertation allows students to develop advanced research skills in an aspect of conservation or artefact studies.

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the programme, as students develop their knowledge, skills and the ability as independent learners and practitioners that is one of the key attributes that the programme develops in its students. The programme therefore prepares students them for work or further study once they have completed the programme, with an emphasis on taking their learning from the classroom to real life situations in Museums and conservation laboratories. All teaching is delivered by qualified conservators.

In the first two terms of the first year students typically attend 4-5 hours a week of lectures, 6 hours of practical work including seminars, 3 hours of structured self-development learning and up to 9 hours of conservation skills working in the conservation laboratory. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to undertake their own independent study to prepare for their classes and broaden their subject knowledge.

The balance shifts in the third term, as students develop their abilities as independent learners through supervised practical conservation work for 4 days a week over 10 weeks and create a portfolio of their work and reflections.

The emphasis on using the independent study and research skills developed in the first year of the course is continued through the dissertation, which marks out the researcher route. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom they will typically have ten one-to-one supervisory meetings, students undertake a detailed study of a particular area resulting in a significant piece of independent research.

The department also has an exciting programme of weekly one hour research seminars which students are strongly encouraged to attend.

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Designed for a new generation of heritage leaders, this programme provides the interdisciplinary skills needed to deliver the heritage programmes and projects of the future. Read more
Designed for a new generation of heritage leaders, this programme provides the interdisciplinary skills needed to deliver the heritage programmes and projects of the future. The programme combines aspects of cultural heritage - historic buildings, museums, collections, sites and landscapes - with the best preventive conservation and heritage management policies, projects, methodologies and practices.

Degree information

Students are encouraged to take a long view of preservation and heritage management, and challenged to define problems, set objectives and explore a range of sustainability issues and strategies. Concepts of value, sustainability, life expectancy, stewardship, ownership, vulnerability and risk are interwoven with the scientific study of historic materials, assemblies, technologies and systems.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (120 credits), a research report (60 credits) and an optional project placement (not credit bearing). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months) is offered. There are no optional modules for this programme.

Core modules
-Sustainability and Heritage Value
-Heritage Materials and Assemblies
-Sustainable Strategies
-Project Planning, Management and Maintenance

Dissertation/report
All MSc students submit a 10,000-word dissertation on a topic related to the main themes of the programme. The topic can be chosen to enhance career development or for its inherent interest.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught using a variety of media and strategies including problem-based and case-based learning, discussion groups, project work, exercises, coursework and reports. Assessment is through written assignments, oral examination and the 10,000-word dissertation.

Fieldwork
A two-week study visit to Malta forms an integral part of the degree. This is hosted by Heritage Malta, the national agency responsible for the management of national museums, heritage sites and their collections in Malta and Gozo.
Travel and accomodation expenses for the visit to Malta are covered by the programme.

Careers

Most graduates are expected to assume responsibility for directing major projects within museums, libraries, archives, or organisations responsible for historic buildings and archaeological sites; or as a part of interdisciplinary architectural, engineering or project management practices. Additional career enhancement may be achieved by using the MSc as a foundation for PhD research.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Senior Project Manager, National Trust
-Consultant to Ministry of Culture India, Advisory Committee on World Heritage Matters
-Carbon Consultant, Sturgis Carbon Profiling
-Project Planner, Transport for London
-Green Building Consultant, ECADI (East China Architectural Design & Research Institute)

Employability
The programme, which is accredited by RICS, is an internationally recognised qualification from a world-leading university that improves equips students with the skills and expertise needed to contribute to heritage projects at an advanced level.
There is an opportunity to undertake a placement at a leading heritage organisation or practice during the programme.
Students gain access to an extensive alumni network of professionals who have studied on the programme and are currently leaders in the field.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Bartlett is the UK's largest multidisciplinary Faculty of the Built Environment, bringing together scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future.

Students on this programme benefit from: international, interdisciplinary teachers who are leading professionals in their field; real-life heritage case studies as the basis for discussing complex and demanding issues; access to public stewards and private owners of heritage - in order to learn from practice and leading heritage stakeholders; a fully funded study visit to Malta; project placement opportunities with leading international heritage organisations.

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This is a two-year course, which educates and trains graduate students to be conservators capable of researching, analysing, cleaning, preserving and caring for a wide range of archaeological and museum objects. Read more
This is a two-year course, which educates and trains graduate students to be conservators capable of researching, analysing, cleaning, preserving and caring for a wide range of archaeological and museum objects. It is intended for those who wish to become practising artefact conservators, or work in the fields of artefact research or preventive conservation. Graduates of the course will normally work in museums or large heritage organisations such the National Trust or English Heritage.

Graduate students are drawn from a wide range on disciplines, but manual dexterity, a very basic knowledge of chemistry and an enthusiasm and desire to work with museum objects are essential.

Course Structure

Modules:
-Conservation Theory
-Conservation Skills
-Artefact Studies
-Care of Collections
-Conservation Practice
-Professional Practice

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical classes as well as an industrial placement. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate among Conservators in that area. Practicals then provide opportunities for students to implement and develop their skills, based on the knowledge that they have gained through their lectures and through independent study outside the programmes formal contact hours. Self-learning development packages allow students to continue their learning in a structured way outside the practical sessions. The industrial placement forms a major part of the contact time in the programme for Professional Practitioners, allowing students to gain direct experience of practical and applied skills in Conservation. Industrial partners include the Museum of London, National Museum of Wales and Victoria & Albert Museum.

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the programme, as students develop their knowledge, skills and the ability as independent learners and practitioners that is one of the key attributes that the programme develops in its students. The programme therefore prepares students for work or further study once they have completed the programme, with an emphasis on taking their learning from the classroom to real life situations in Museums and conservation laboratories. All teaching is delivered by qualified conservators.

In the first two terms of the first year students typically attend 4-5 hours a week of lectures, 6 hours of practical work including seminars, 3 hours of structured self-development learning and up to 9 hours of conservation skills working in the conservation laboratory. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to undertake their own independent study to prepare for their classes and broaden their subject knowledge.

The balance shifts in the third term, as students develop their abilities as independent learners through supervised practical conservation work for 4 days a week over 10 weeks and create a portfolio of their work and reflections.

This move towards greater emphasis on independent learning and acting in the role of professional conservator continues in the final year, where students have a placement in a working conservation lab for 9 months. They gain experience of working with a wide range of material and develop further their practical skills, within a real-life working environment. A focus is placed upon problem solving and organisational and managerial skills, under the supervision of a professional conservator. The department also has an exciting programme of weekly one hour research seminars which students are strongly encouraged to attend.

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These programmes of study are designed for students who have a passion to pursue a conservation or heritage based research project defined by themselves, but with the support of an academic environment and supervisors. Read more
These programmes of study are designed for students who have a passion to pursue a conservation or heritage based research project defined by themselves, but with the support of an academic environment and supervisors.

As a research student, you will have access to support and training designed to develop the practical and critical skills necessary for investigation and study at doctoral level. Direction will be available from a supervisory team and you will have the opportunity to benefit from the School’s research expertise in a broad range of conservation and cultural heritage areas.

Strong links exist with the Colleges of Science and Arts, and an interdisciplinary research culture can facilitate collaboration with colleagues across a wide range of topics.

Current doctoral research topics include:
-How can architectural paint research and analysis enhance the conservation-restoration and historiography of cultural built heritage in the UK?
-Regarding mediocrity: conservation, interpretation and presentation of the Doddington Hall tapestries.
-Biodeterioration of limestone: role of microbial biofilms and possible intervention strategies (in collaboration with Dr Ronald Dixon, School of Life Sciences).
-Nineteenth-Century Amateur Art in Places of Christian Worship.
-Tennyson and the Archive.
-David Brewster and the Development of the Kaleidoscope.
-The Life and Work of William Logsdail.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Research areas covered within the School include:
-Archaeological conservation
-Architectural paint research
-Collections Management
-Conservation of a broad range of objects and material types
-Cultural heritage and climate change
-Material culture
-Paint and pigment analysis
-Preventive conservation

Previous areas of PhD study include:
-The Materials, Construction and Conservation of Eighteenth-Century Women’s Shoes.
-A Practical and Historical Examination of Jacob Christian Schaffer (1718-1790) and his Search for Non-rag Paper.
-An Analysis of the Success and Cultural Significance of Parian Ware Sculpture in Victorian England.
-'Curatorship and Conservation: A Theoretical Enquiry into the Scope of Each Realm, their Interaction and the Consequences for the Perception of Works of Art'.
-The History, Development and Conservation of Wrought Iron in Lincolnshire; the Significance of Minor Architectural Details.

How You Study

Study at MPhil/PhD level takes the form of supervised individual research. You are expected to work on one topic of your choice for the duration of the study period. On a regular basis, you are expected to produce appropriate written work, submit it to your supervisors, then meet with your supervisors to receive feedback on your submission and agree the next stage of work.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

The assessment at PhD level takes the form of an approximately 80,000 word thesis.

A PhD is awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

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This intensive one-year conversion course aims to enable graduates from a non-conservation background to advance their knowledge and skills in preparation for further study or a career in the heritage sector. Read more
This intensive one-year conversion course aims to enable graduates from a non-conservation background to advance their knowledge and skills in preparation for further study or a career in the heritage sector.

You have the opportunity to learn from practitioners with extensive experience and can benefit from our team’s strong links with museums, professional bodies and heritage agencies.

During this course, you will be expected to produce your own portfolios of specialist drawings and photographs, and have the chance to develop technical skills for the treatment of historic objects. You will be encouraged to take advantage of opportunities to become involved in live projects.

How You Study

You will have access to a wide variety of historic materials and will have the chance to focus on their remedial treatment and preventive conservation.

The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, research and one-to-one learning.

Weekly contact hours on this programme may vary depending on the individual modules and the stage of study. Postgraduate level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend at least two - three hours in independent study. For more detailed information please contact the programme leader.

How You Are Assessed

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Students on this course are assessed through coursework and a phase test.

Special Features

Students on this programme will receive a free tool kit and personal protection equipment for use during their studies.

Career and Personal Development

This programme is designed to provide students from non-conservation backgrounds with the opportunity to develop the skills, knowledge and understanding required to undertake the study of conservation at Masters level. For others, it may provide a foundation for further training or work in fields allied to conservation.

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