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Masters Degrees (Preservation)

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Summary. In 2011, the International Diabetes Federation brought together world experts to develop the first ever Global Diabetes Plan 2011-2021 (Global Diabetes Plan 2011-2021) which sets out the evidence, cost effective solutions and tools for managing the global issue of diabetes in a coherent framework for action. Read more

Summary

In 2011, the International Diabetes Federation brought together world experts to develop the first ever Global Diabetes Plan 2011-2021 (Global Diabetes Plan 2011-2021) which sets out the evidence, cost effective solutions and tools for managing the global issue of diabetes in a coherent framework for action. The key strategy of The Global Diabetes Plan is to implement National Diabetes Programmes, defined as:

“a systematic and coordinated approach to improving the organisation, accessibility and quality of diabetes prevention and care"

Several landmark studies have demonstrated that, through a comprehensive package of treatment and support, the complications of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes can be prevented or significantly delayed, enabling people with diabetes to live longer and healthier lives (Global Diabetes Plan 2011-2021). The sheer complexity of diabetic disease presents a need for integrated care provision at all stages of the patients journey.

The postgraduate certificate/ diploma/ MSc in Lower Limb Preservation in Diabetes aims to meet, in part, the key strategy of the Global Diabetes Plan by the provision of an international educational programme that takes an integrated approach to the management of diabetic disease and its effects in the lower limb.

About

Nationally/internationally there are a number of courses/residency programmes offering advanced learning in the field of patients with at risk lower limbs predominantly suffering from diabetes. All of these have merit but lack academic foundation or approval in the realms of infection, revascularisation, surgical management and optimisation of outcome for those patients at risk and who may ultimately face amputation.

The Postgraduate Certificate/Diploma/MSc programme in Lower Limb Preservation in Diabetes is open to all those who practise or wish to progress their knowledge in Diabetes, Limb Preservation and related areas. The course is designed for, but not limited to: specialist podiatrists, nurses, medical, surgical and healthcare professionals. is targeted at those currently working in or with aspirations to gain education and/or employment in the field of diabetes and limb preservation and is rooted in regional, national and international drivers towards integrated Diabetes care. The programme is multidisciplinary and multi-professional, with rich and challenging content and sound educational process. Delivery of the programme is offered entirely online, maximising a learning approach that fully embraces the opportunity for international practitioner engagement.

The educational programme aims to offer the student the opportunity to develop evidence based theoretical concepts of limb preservation transferable to professional practice, informed by a critical knowledge and understanding of integrative care requirements for those patients “at-risk” due to diabetes; who are in danger of primary amputation (patients with diabetes, end-stage renal disease and/ or peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease), and for those who have already suffered an amputation and are at risk of moving toward a second amputation, or have unacceptable dysfunction.

Attendance

Students are expected to engage with all online classes/sessions associated with the programme and be punctual and regular in attendance.

A student who has not been in attendance for more than three days through illness or other cause must notify immediately the Course Director. The student shall state the reasons for the absence and whether it is likely to be prolonged. Where the absence is for a period of more than five working days, and is caused by illness which may affect their studies, the student shall provide appropriate medical certification in accordance with the General Regulations for Students.

Students who are absent without good cause for a substantial proportion of online classes/ sessions may be required to discontinue studies, in accordance with the General Regulations for Students.

For distance learning students, communication with e-mentors and course directors should be frequent and will be monitored through the record of student logins to the course website. If a student fails to logon to Blackboard or to contact staff for a maximum period of one week, the module coordinator will note the student’s absence and direct contact will then be made with the student either by e-mail or by telephone. The student should notify the Course Director of any reasons as to their absence and if the reason for absence is medical, should provide appropriate medical certification in accordance with the General Regulations for Students.

Work placement / study abroad

There is no formalised placement associated with the programme, however, it is expected that there will be requirement to undertake some practice experience in the workplace. Students are likely to be in full time employment within a health, social or educational setting, for some or all of the period of the programme.

Career options

The Postgraduate Certificate/ Diploma/ MSc programme in Lower Limb Preservation is designed for, but not limited to: specialist podiatrists, nurses, medical, surgical and healthcare professionals and is targeted at those currently working in or with aspirations to gain further education and / or employment in the field of diabetes and limb preservation.



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All CAIS programmes are accredited by the UK Archives and Records Association and The Records and Information Management (RIM) Professionals Australasia. Read more
All CAIS programmes are accredited by the UK Archives and Records Association and The Records and Information Management (RIM) Professionals Australasia.

Overview

These Masters programmes provide a thorough education in the principles, theory and practice of records management and digital preservation. They are delivered via flexible distance learning and entirely online using the University's Virtual Learning Environment. A range of core and optional modules, all written and tutored by acknowledged subject experts, ensure that students complete the programme with:

An in-depth knowledge of record keeping theory and practice and the ability to apply this knowledge in the public sector or in commercial or specialist environments,

A comprehensive training in the creation and management of current and semi-current records an understanding of the legal and ethical issues relating to records management and digital preservation,

An understanding of how digital records should be managed and retrieved,

A knowledge of the issues surrounding the preservation of records and in particular the proper use of metadata and other techniques to help ensure long-term survival of information and records.

Programme Content

The programme consists of a range of core archive and records management modules and optional modules including preservation and disaster management, metadata standards and information taxonomies, business archives, ethics and international perspectives, international concepts in information access, management for information professionals. The module list can be viewed on the course website.

Methods of Assessment

Essays/reports; contribution to module (through online tasks and discussion board debate); dissertation of 15,000 words.

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All CAIS programmes are accredited by the UK Archives and Records Association and The Records and Information Management (RIM) Professionals Australasia. Read more
All CAIS programmes are accredited by the UK Archives and Records Association and The Records and Information Management (RIM) Professionals Australasia.

Overview

These Masters programmes provide a thorough education in the principles, theory and practice of records management and digital preservation. They are delivered via flexible distance learning and entirely online using the University's Virtual Learning Environment. A range of core and optional modules, all written and tutored by acknowledged subject experts, ensure that students complete the programme with:

An in-depth knowledge of record keeping theory and practice and the ability to apply this knowledge in the public sector or in commercial or specialist environments,

A comprehensive training in the creation and management of current and semi-current records an understanding of the legal and ethical issues relating to records management and digital preservation,

An understanding of how digital records should be managed and retrieved,

A knowledge of the issues surrounding the preservation of records and in particular the proper use of metadata and other techniques to help ensure long-term survival of information and records.

Programme Content

The programme consists of a range of core archive and records management modules and optional modules including preservation and disaster management, metadata standards and information taxonomies, business archives, ethics and international perspectives, international concepts in information access, management for information professionals. The module list can be viewed on the course website.

Methods of Assessment

Essays/reports; contribution to module (through online tasks and discussion board debate); dissertation of 15,000 words.

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The programme provides you with an understanding of contemporary information and records management issues. It pays special attention to the management of digital records and electronic resources, and how to manage these alongside analogue resources. Read more

The programme provides you with an understanding of contemporary information and records management issues. It pays special attention to the management of digital records and electronic resources, and how to manage these alongside analogue resources.

Why this programme

  • The programme is designed for those with a vocational interest in records management, archives and digital curation. It will prepare you to work in these fields, and give you a thorough grounding for continuing with research.
  • You will complete a two-week work placement in an archive, records management or digital repository.
  • As a graduate you will be eligible to be accredited by both the Archives & Records Association and CILIP (Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals), providing valuable professional recognition in both the archive and library fields.

Programme structure

You will develop skills in the core competencies of archives, records, and information management, creating and managing digital records, digital curation and preservation issues, archival theory, user needs, and description,

cataloguing, and navigation.

The programme consists of six courses spread over two semesters. You will take courses in:

  • Archives and records information management
  • Records and evidence
  • Description, cataloguing and navigation
  • Management, curation and preservation of digital materials.

Optional courses include: 

  • 2D digitisation
  • Law for cultural heritage institutions
  • Archives and records theory
  • Records and the transition to the digital
  • Palaeography
  • Phenomenology.

To graduate with the MSc you will also need to complete a course in research methods and professional studies, and produce a dissertation.

Career prospects

As a graduate, you will be well placed for a career as an archivist, records manager or digital curator within a variety of public and private organisations.

Positions held by recent graduates include Assistant Archivist and Records Manager.



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Programme description. Our highly regarded Architectural Conservation programme is more than 40 years old; it is the longest-established graduate historic preservation programme in the UK. Read more

Programme description

Our highly regarded Architectural Conservation programme is more than 40 years old; it is the longest-established graduate historic preservation programme in the UK.

Whether you’re approaching the field from an architectural, historical, geological or other viewpoint, this programme will guide you through the foundations and challenges of this important means of nurturing cultural and national identity.

You will benefit from learning on our historic campus (located in Edinburgh’s World Heritage Site), and from the wealth of academic and intellectual activities associated with an internationally-renowned university.

You’ll be part of the Scottish Centre for Conservation Studies (SCCS), a specialist teaching and research unit that provides the depth of expertise and resources that ensures this programme is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation.

Volunteering opportunities are also available through our partnerships with relevant organisations, allowing you to flex your skills in a practical setting.

Programme structure

The programme is assessed through individual written papers, group projects, presentations, and report writing. An intensive overseas field trip (optional; normally to Germany) will give you the chance to explore conservation issues in another setting. Following the taught courses, you will research and write a dissertation of around 14,000–15,000 words on an aspect of architectural conservation.

Learning outcomes

To complete your studies, you must demonstrate your familiarity with the historical and theoretical foundations and challenges of historic preservation; the techniques of recording and research; and the technologies of building repair. Elective courses can also develop more specific skills in areas such as the influences of planning law, contemporary architecture and building economics on the historic built environment; and the special conservation challenges of Modern Movement architecture and urban planning.

You will also develop more general practical and intellectual skills, in areas such as project organisation, historical research, or graphic and oral communication.

Career opportunities

This programme aims to provide students with the broad base of knowledge and skills necessary to embark on a career in one of the many professional sub-disciplines of historic preservation, ranging from heritage management to conservation architecture.

Crucially, your qualification will be extremely well regarded thanks to its recognition by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation, the UK’s official organisation of architectural preservation professionals.



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What is the Master of Food Technology all about?.  The Interuniversity Programme in Food Technology (IUPFOOD) focuses on . Read more

What is the Master of Food Technology all about?

 The Interuniversity Programme in Food Technology (IUPFOOD) focuses on two technological dimensions of prime and crucial importance in food processing and preservation:

  • the transformation (processing) of raw materials into products suited for human consumption
  • the role of postharvest and food preservation unit operations in delivering safe and nutritious foods to the end consumer.

These two concerns are directly translated in the focus points of the IUPFOOD programme.

The InterUniversity Programme in Food Technology (IUPFOOD) is jointly organised by KU Leuven and Ghent University (UGent). The programme builds on KU Leuven’s and UGent’s combined expertise in research and education in the field of food technology.

Structure

The Master of Science in Food Technology (120 ECTS) consists of four major segments:

  • In-depth education segment (60 ECTS)
  • Specialisation segment (18 ECTS)
  • Elective courses segment (12 ECTS)
  • Master’s thesis segment (30 ECTS) 

 In the first year of the Master's programme, students will spend the first semester in Ghent and the second semester in Leuven. The second stage courses of the majors 'Postharvest and Food Preservation Engineering' and 'Food Science and Technology' are taught respectively at KU Leuven and UGent; at both universities, optional courses and thesis research topics are offered.

Objectives

1. Has profound and detailed scientific knowledge and understanding of the (bio)chemical processes in biological raw materials during postharvest storage and their transformation into food products.

2. Has profound and detailed scientific knowledge and understanding of engineering principles of unit operations and their use in the transformation of raw materials into food products as a basis for qualitative and quantitative design, evaluation and optimization of food process and preservation unit operations.

3. Has profound and detailed scientific knowledge and understanding of ecology, physiology, detection, use and combat microorganisms in food systems.

4. Has profound and detailed scientific knowledge and understanding of (bio)-chemical, physical and microbiological methods for analysis of raw materials and foods including the skills to identify and use such methods in the context of research, process and product design and optimization and food control.

5. Has profound and detailed scientific knowledge in different fields of product technology such as vegetable products, dairy products, meat products, fish products, cereal derived products and fermented products including aspects of product development in relation to consumer behavior.

6. Can critically evaluate the functionality and safety of foods in the context of human health including the relation with raw materials and their processing into foods based on analytical data and scientific literature data.

7. Masters the skills and has acquired the problem solving capacity to analyze problems of food quality and safety along the food chain and to elaborate interdisciplinary and integrated qualitative and quantitative approaches and solutions (including implementation) appreciating the complexity of food systems and the processes used while taking into account technical limitations and socio-economic aspects such as feasibility, risks, and sustainability.

8. Has acquired a broad perspective to problems of food security, related to postharvest and food processing, in low income developing countries.

9. Can investigate and understand interaction with other relevant science domains and integrate them within the context of more advanced ideas and practical applications and problem solving.

10. Can demonstrate critical consideration of and reflection on known and new theories, models or interpretation within the broad field of food technology.

11. Can identify and apply appropriate research methods and techniques to design, plan and execute targeted experiments or simulations independently and critically evaluate and interpret the collected data.

12. Can develop and execute independently original scientific research and/or apply innovative ideas within research environments to create new and/or improved insights and/or solutions for complex (multi)disciplinary research questions respecting the results of other researchers.

13. Can convincingly and professionally communicate personal research, thoughts, ideas, and opinions of proposals, both written and oral, to different actors and stakeholders from peers to a general public.

14. Has acquired project management skills to act independently and in a multidisciplinary team as team member or team leader in international and intercultural settings.

Career perspectives

IUPFOOD's objective is to offer a programme that takes the specific needs and approaches of developing countries into account. The IUPFOOD programme prepares graduates for various tasks, including teaching and research. IUPFOOD alumni are mainly active in the following sectors:

  • academic institutions (as teaching and/or research staff)
  • research institutes (as research staff)
  • nongovernmental organisations (in different capacities)
  • governmental institutes (e.g. in research programmes, quality surveillance programmes or national nutritional programmes)
  • private industry (in particular jobs related to quality control)


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The MSc in Architectural Conservation is a taught course aimed at professionals and academics world-wide with an interest in architectural heritage including architects, engineers, archaeologists, art historians, geographers and surveyors. Read more
The MSc in Architectural Conservation is a taught course aimed at professionals and academics world-wide with an interest in architectural heritage including architects, engineers, archaeologists, art historians, geographers and surveyors.

This course is fully recognised by The Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). The course provides both a thorough understanding of architectural heritage and the skills required to contribute to the preservation and development of historic sites. Benefiting from its location in the historic town of Canterbury, the programme combines the study of conservation theory and philosophy with an exploration of the technical aspects of repair and reconstruction. The city’s stunning Cathedral provides students with an education resource, giving them the opportunity to learn from the conservation of a World Heritage Site.

Open to students and professionals with an interest in architectural heritage, the course represents an ideal gateway to a career in demanding professional fields, such as conservation-oriented architectural practice, conservation consultancy and heritage management. As the future leaders in these fields, the course’s graduates are expected to play a central role in disciplines that lie at the centre of the current economic, environmental and social agendas.

This programme is offered jointly within two faculties, Humanities and Sciences.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/362/architectural-conservation

About Kent School of Architecture

Research at Kent School of Architecture achieves excellence in both the history and theory of architecture and in sustainable urban, peri-urban and environmental design. School staff have design expertise and specialist knowledge; they are at the forefront of current architectural issues, including sustainability, technology, professional practice and research. Our staff are active at academic and professional conferences, both nationally and internationally, and appear and publish in local and national media. The School promotes innovative and interdisciplinary research, emphasising sustainable design.

Much of the project work involved in the Kent School of Architecture is located on 'live' sites in the local region, using real clients and engaging challenging issues. Students in all stages of the school have been introduced to real urban and architectural design challenges in Lille, Margate, Folkestone, Dover, Rye, Chatham and, of course, Canterbury. Much of this work involves liaising with external bodies, such as architects, planners, council and development groups.

Course structure

The MSc is composed of four taught modules (two modules per term full-time, one module per term part-time) and a dissertation on the topic of your own choice.

The programme has a varied curriculum which reflects the multidisciplinary nature of conservation. The autumn term cultivates a critical understanding of historic buildings and provides an introduction to conservation philosophy and policy. The acquisition of a strong theoretical background is the basis for the study of practical techniques for the survey and preservation of architectural heritage.

Case studies and workshops carried out in collaboration with Canterbury Cathedral introduce you to the properties of historic building materials and the techniques employed in the repair of historic buildings. This aspect of the programme benefits from cutting-edge survey equipment and the use of conservation laboratories. A conservation project offers you the opportunity to design an intervention to an existing historic site in the historic centre of Canterbury. The dissertation that concludes the programme invites you to study an aspect of the conservation cycle of your choice, employing a high standard of scholarship.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

AR841 - Structural Appraisal of Historic Buildings (30 credits)
AR842 - The Legislative Framework (30 credits)
AR843 - Intervention at Historic Buildings (30 credits)
AR844 - Conservation Principles (30 credits)
AR898 - Dissertation: MSc in Architectural Conservation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is mostly through coursework, with essays, reports, projects and the dissertation.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- ensure you are equipped with academic, professional, and personal skills and qualities that enable you to make a positive contribution related to the preservation of historic buildings.

- cultivate an appreciation of the different values that people can attach to historic buildings and places.

- promote an awareness of traditional building crafts as a valuable cultural resource.

- develop a thorough understanding of the processes that maintain and enhance historic places and the activities that change them.

- develop knowledge of the theoretical, historical, and professional context of architectural conservation.

- promote multidisciplinary collaboration and interaction with a wide range of professional bodies and individuals who have a role to play in the development of the built environment.

- ensure graduates develop the knowledge and confidence necessary to provide informed and specialist advice and to cultivate an awareness of their responsibility as consultants in the field of architectural conservation.

- understand the role that architectural conservation has to play as part of the modern ecological agenda.

- encourage the observation of the historic environment as a whole and its use as an educational resource.

- provide teaching informed by research and scholarship.

- develop an understanding of how the boundaries of knowledge are advanced through research.

- enable you to develop strategies for self-improvement and commitment to research and learning.

- build on close ties within Europe and elsewhere, reflecting Kent’s position as the UK’s European university.

- promote the understanding and preservation of local and national architectural heritage.

Careers

Our Master’s programmes have been devised to enhance your prospects in a competitive world. Professionals in the architectural, planning, environmental design and conservation fields who develop higher-level skills, accredited by relevant bodies, will find themselves well-placed to progress in their field. Our students have gone on to work for major public agencies and universities, as well as leading practitioners in the private sector.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Mission Statement. The MAS program prepares professionals to exercise creativity, integrity and leadership in designing, implementing and promoting programs and systems for the creation, organization, management, preservation and effective use of records and archives. Read more
Mission Statement: The MAS program prepares professionals to exercise creativity, integrity and leadership in designing, implementing and promoting programs and systems for the creation, organization, management, preservation and effective use of records and archives.

Program content focuses on:
- Nature of records and archives
- The life-cycle of records from creation to preservation
- Records systems and archival systems
- Selection of records and their acquisition in archives
- Intellectual control of records and archives and provision of access
- Records, archives and the law
- Ethical and professional responsibilities
- History of record-keeping and archives

Graduates may find work in such positions as:
Archivist; digital archivist; archives curator; archives advisor; manuscripts processing archivist; electronic records archivist; audiovisual archivist; data/digital curator; e-discovery advisor; privacy and information officer; records and information manager; records administrator/specialist; records analyst; records policy and program officer; records/preservation system designer; research officer; security specialist; and others.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Archival Studies
- Specialization: Archival Studies
- Subject: Specialty
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Options
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts
- School: School of Library, Archival and Information Studies

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The Higher Diploma in Food Science and Technology will provide you with an excellent education in various aspects of food science, food technology and food microbiology. Read more
The Higher Diploma in Food Science and Technology will provide you with an excellent education in various aspects of food science, food technology and food microbiology.

Subjects that you will cover during the course include:

- food proteins
- food fats
- food macromolecules
- sensory science
- food packaging
- food processing and preservation
- food microbiology

UCC has a 100-year history of teaching and research in the food sciences and is currently one of Europe’s largest multidisciplinary education and research institutions. You will be taught by world-class academics who work in all aspects of food science.

Our first-rate facilities include extensive and well-equipped laboratories and a large pilot plant with excellent dairy, meat and bakery facilities, in addition to a unique pilot-scale brewery.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/cko06/

Course Details

On successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

- apply the principles of food chemistry and technology and food microbiology to food systems
- demonstrate an ability to perform selected techniques in food analysis
- develop the capacity to undertake lifelong learning
- communicate effectively with the food industry and with society at large.

Format

The course is one year full time, or two years part time.

Students take taught modules to the value of 60 credits as follows:
FS3002 Chemistry of Food Proteins (5 credits)
FS3003 Chemistry and Technology of Oils and Fats (5 credits)
FS3004 Sensory Analysis, Flavour and Colour (5 credits)
FS3005 Macromolecules and Rheology (5 credits)
FS3006 Food Processing and Preservation (10 credits)
FS3007 Dairy Product Technology (5 credits)
FS3008 Fundamentals of Food Packaging (5 credits)
FS3012 Library Project (10 credits)
MB3003 Food and Industrial Microbiology I (5 credits)
MB3014 Food and Industrial Microbiology II (5 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is principally by end-of-semester written examinations. There are also some elements of continuous assessment.

Careers

On successful completion of this course, you will have a solid foundation in food science. You will also understand the principles and practical application of the processing and preservation technologies used in the food industry. You can use your knowledge as a basis for further study or for employment in food-related industries.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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Food Technology at Ghent. -Inter-university programme - Joint degree offered by the two leading universities in Flanders. -High-level research-based education to solve food security problems in developing countries. Read more
Food Technology at Ghent:
-Inter-university programme - Joint degree offered by the two leading universities in Flanders.
-High-level research-based education to solve food security problems in developing countries.
-Farm to fork multi-disciplinary approach.

Food should not only be produced, it should also be delivered to the ultimate consumer in an acceptable form if it is to fulfil its nutritional destiny. To bring foods to the consumer in an acceptable form, on the one hand processing technologies are used to convert edible raw materials into foods with decreased inherent stability; on the other hand preservation technologies are required to increase the stability and shelf life of foods.

Based on these considerations two technological dimensions are the key objectives: the transformation (processing) of raw materials into products suited for human consumption and the role of postharvest and food preservation unit operations in delivering safe and nutritious foods to the end consumer.

Structure

Semester 1 (Sept-Jan)
-Preceded by introduction courses.
-Food Science and Food Engineering at UGent.
Semester 2 (Febr-June)
-Food Science and Food Engineering at KULeuven.
Semester 3 (Sept-Jan) and Semester 4 (Febr-June)
-Major in Food Science and Technology (UGent).
OR
-Major in Postharvest and Food Preservation and Engineering (KULeuven).
-Tailor-made sub programme including elective courses.
-Master dissertation at the university of the major.

Learning outcomes

Our programme will prepare you to become professionals in areas of food technology to equip future personnel with the necessary technical and managerial knowledge, skills and attitudes, which is required to successfully contribute to solving problems related to food security. The programme particularly focuses on countries where food security is a current and future major concern and key challenge.

Other admission requirements

Each application will be evaluated by the Educational Committee for admission. Applicants are fluent in English (written and oral). Candidates from countries where English is not the language of instruction need to have obtained a score of at least 550 on the paper-based TOEFL test (or a score of at least 80 on a internet-based TOEFL test) or at least 6,5 on the IELTS test.

Direct access is given to students who are, based on the specific entrance requirements of those programmes, directly admitted to the Master of Science in Bioscience Engineering: Food Science and Technology (Master of Science in de Bio-ingenieurswetenschappen: Levensmiddelentechnologie) at KU Leuven or to the Master of Science in Bioscience Engineering: Food Science and Nutrition (Master of Science in de Bio-ingenieurswetenschappen: Levensmiddelenwetenschappen en Voeding) at UGent.

Access is given to students who are, based on the specific entrance requirements of those programmes, admitted to the Master of Science in Bioscience Engineering: Food Science and Technology (Master of Science in de Bio-ingenieurswetenschappen: Levensmiddelentechnologie) at KU Leuven or to the Master of Science in Bioscience Engineering: Food Science and Nutrition (Master of Science in de Bio-ingenieurswetenschappen: Levensmiddelenwetenschappen en Voeding) at UGent after successful completion of a preparatory programme (15 to 60 credits) or transitional programme (45 to 90 credits).

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By studying the MA in Archive Administration at postgraduate level, you will learn professional principles and techniques and acquire the core skills which will enable you to play a part in the preservation, management and exploitation of an invaluable informational and historical resource. Read more

About the course

By studying the MA in Archive Administration at postgraduate level, you will learn professional principles and techniques and acquire the core skills which will enable you to play a part in the preservation, management and exploitation of an invaluable informational and historical resource.

This course is designed to prepare you for work in any archive or records management environment. It provides the professional training which is required for entry into these professional areas and is accredited at Diploma and Masters level by the Archives and Records Association.

The university has a proud tradition of research excellence, as demonstrated in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It placed the university in the top 50 institutions for research power and intensity. It submitted 77% of eligible staff and 95% of the university's research was of an internationally recognised standard.

This Degree will suit you:

• If you wish to receive first-rate training in Archive Administration
• If you wish to gain the knowledge and skills needed to enter professional work in Archive Administration
• If you wish to nurture an interest in palaeography and diplomatic
• If you wish to enter the emerging marketing of Archive Administration and Digital Information Management.

Course structure and content

The course is divided into two parts: Part I (120 credits) is the taught course, successful completion of which reaches Diploma-level. Part II (60 credits) involves writing a dissertation, to be submitted for the Master’s-level qualification.

The course is available full-time or part-time (part-time students must be generally able to attend classes for half of each week in term time, over two years). Exit points exist at Diploma (9 months) and Master's level (12 months).

Teaching methods include lectures, seminars and practical workshops. Lectures and seminars are intended to provide a clear framework for further reading, questioning and thought. We aim to provide a supportive learning environment: help and guidance are always available.

A significant proportion of your learning takes place in study visits and fieldwork, where you will need to observe and relate what you have learnt to the practice in a number of record keeping environments. Practical experience gained before embarking on the course provides a very important foundation for the training experience of the course itself.

Core modules:

Archive Management: Archive Services
Archives Collection Development and Description
Records and Information Governance
Study of Records: Creators and Users
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Digital Information: Management for Access and Preservation
Latin for Postgraduate Study
Medieval and Post -Medieval Palaeography and Diplomatic
Post Medieval Palaeography and Diplomatic
Rare Books and Special Collections

Contact time

6 - 10 hours a week in the first two semesters. During semester three you will arrange your level of contact time with your assigned supervisor.

Assessment

The taught part of the course (Part 1) is delivered and assessed through lectures, student seminars, practical exercises, case studies, course work and formal examinations. Successful completion allows the award of a Diploma. The subsequent successful submission of your research dissertation (Part 2) leads to the award of an MA.
Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. This Masters will place you in the jobs market as a highly-trained archive administrator with knowledge and skills in archive management and record and information governance. By balancing the theory and practice you will be provided the professional training which is required for entering the professional archive and records management environment. This course will also equip you with a wide range of general work skills such as research, analysis, writing, presentation and management, ensuring your employability is improved across all areas.

Study skills

You will develop skills in quickly and accurately assimilating and interpreting data – which you will find invaluable in archive administration and future use. You will develop productive strategies for planning and problem-solving that can be applied beyond your chosen area of study, making you a versatile academic as well as a productive professional. You will also enhance your research skills which you will draw on in both your dissertation and future career.

Study in a practical context

The University of Aberystwyth boasts library resources which are amongst the best in Europe. The Department’s specialist Thomas Parry Library is one of the leading libraries for Information Studies. As a student, you will have access to this exceptional resource where you can apply your learning in activities which will convert the purely academic theory into the proven know-how of experience.

In addition to this, you will also have access to the University's Hugh Owen Library which houses more than 700,000 volumes and subscribes to more than 3,500 current periodicals. Also, the National Library for Wales next to the campus is one of the UK's five copyright libraries housing more than 6,000,000 volumes.

Self-Motivation and discipline

Studying at a Postgraduate level requires high levels of discipline and self-motivation. You will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff but you will be ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your masters’ degree. This process of independent study at an extremely high level will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

Transferable skills

This Masters programme is designed to equip you with a range of transferable skills that you can apply to a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines. Whether you pursue a career in an archive administration pathway or not, the prestige of your Masters will open doors into workplaces in every industry.

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This degree in Early Modern English Literature is taught with the British Library and provides a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in the light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts. Read more

This degree in Early Modern English Literature is taught with the British Library and provides a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in the light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts.

The required module taught at the British Library is specifically designed to teach students how to search collections of early modern manuscripts and rare books held in major research libraries worldwide and how to identify the agents involved in their production, transmission and preservation in libraries and private collections.

Ideal foundation for doctoral work and careers in the arts, education, curatorship and broadcasting.

Key Benefits

  • A strong tradition of Shakespeare and early modern literary studies at King's.
  • Unique access to unparalleled collections at the British Library and to the expertise of world-class curators, who will teach the core module and supervise some dissertations.
  • Close links with the London Shakespeare Seminar, the London Renaissance Seminar, and with the Institute of English Studies.
  • Located in the heart of literary London.

Description

Our Early Modern English Literature MA is an innovative and exciting partnership between the Department of English at King’s and the British Library. 

The course focuses on the transmission of key early modern literary texts, meaning both the circulation of literary texts in manuscript and print as well as the way they were received. The specific process through which a literary text reaches its readers or its audience is central to its interpretation. 

You will learn to read early modern handwriting, to transcribe neglected literary manuscripts and rare printed texts, and to edit them for the modern reader. In focusing on transmission, the course explores the impact of the materiality of the text and of the material conditions of its (re) production on the way it is interpreted.

The Material Legacy of Early Modern Literary Texts module, which is taught at the British Library, is specifically designed to teach you how to search collections of early modern manuscripts and rare books held in major research libraries worldwide, and how to identify the factors and people involved in their production, transmission and preservation in libraries and private collections.

Course purpose

Early Modern English Literature is taught with the British Library and provides a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in the light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts. Ideal foundation for doctoral work and careers in the arts, education, curatorship and broadcasting.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide you with four to six hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars. We will expect you to undertake 26 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide you with two to four hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars. We will expect you to undertake 13 hours of independent study.

Assessment

We assess all of our modules through coursework, normally with a 4,000-word essay. For your dissertation module, you will write a 4,000-word critical survey and a 15,000-word dissertation.

Regulating body

King’s College London is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.



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The MSc in Human Anatomy is a unique Master's programme created in response to the need to provide training in human gross anatomy for those who wish to improve their understanding of the structure and function of the human body, as well as those for whom this is a new area of study. Read more
The MSc in Human Anatomy is a unique Master's programme created in response to the need to provide training in human gross anatomy for those who wish to improve their understanding of the structure and function of the human body, as well as those for whom this is a new area of study. The programme aims to provide expertise for those intending to use the knowledge gained in a learning and teaching environment.

The programme is the only one of its kind in the UK
It combines whole body dissection with practicing techniques for the presentation of material for learning and teaching
Provides an introduction to anatomical preservation and presentation techniques
Full body dissection of Thiel embalmed (soft fix) cadavers
Opportunity for self-directed original research

What does the course involve?

The programme is based around human gross anatomy, being supplemented by relevant embryology, neuroanatomy, clinical and surgical anatomy topics and anatomical techniques. Many components are examined entirely by course work through seminar presentations, essays, practical techniques and the development of web-based teaching tutorials and websites.

Both semesters 1 and 2 have a strong emphasis on gross anatomy through whole body dissection working in groups of no more than four per cadaver. Semester 1 also has modules in Embryology and Developmental Anatomy and in Anatomical techniques, while semester 2 has modules in Neuroanatomy and in Clinical and Surgical Anatomy Topics.

Semester 3 allows students to focus on an independent and novel research project in one of the following areas:

Thiel cadaveric anatomy
The anatomy of a specific region of clinical/surgical interest
Functional anatomy
Anatomy and biomechanics
Education

Our reputation

The College of Life Sciences at the University of Dundee was ranked ahead of all other Universities in Scotland and is one of the UK's top 5 universities in the category of Biological Sciences out of 51 Universities.
Staff have international reputations in practice and research.
The award-winning staff of the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID) are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, cranio-facial reconstruction and the study of the human body.

Benefits of studying with us

Study human gross anatomy in the renowned Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification
Access to Thiel embalmed cadavers
Introduction to anatomical preservation and presentation techniques and skills
Exposure to a wide range of IT and personal presentation skills

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Want a programme with true pedigree? Try the Master of Conservation of Monuments and Sites, run by the RLICC (Raymond Lemaire International Centre for Conservation), founded by Raymond Lemaire. Read more

Want a programme with true pedigree? Try the Master of Conservation of Monuments and Sites, run by the RLICC (Raymond Lemaire International Centre for Conservation), founded by Raymond Lemaire. The RLICC has more than 40 years of experience in training, research and consulting in the field of preservation of constructed heritage. Its advanced international and interdisciplinary study programme in the conservation and restoration of historic monuments and sites is a three-semester programme.

Structure 

The Master of Conservation of Monuments and Sites, 90 credits, is a three-semester, research-based academic degree spread over two years. The first academic year consists of theoretical courses, seminars and project work. 

The first semester is chiefly dedicated to the establishing of a common theoretical framework, providing students from different backgrounds with a common basis, according to the interdisciplinary character of the programme. Optional courses offered by the other Advanced Master’s programmes of the Department of Architecture, and project-based education oriented towards building archaeology, documenting and surveying heritage, and larger-scale urban sites and landscapes, complete his semester.

In the second semester, the theoretical framework is dedicated to the technical and policy aspects of heritage. On the project level, its backbone consists of interdisciplinary project work integrating all aspects of conservation, based on a group work format, this is completed with a workshop abroad.

The third semester consists mainly of the Master’s thesis, i.e. individual research work in the field of conservation, supported by an ad hoc study programme. This semester concentrates on research training with seminars, including a thematic week (open to first and second year’s students), supporting the writing of the Master’s thesis. It is completed with a professional internship, which aims to introduce students to the world of heritage practice.

Objectives

The master after master programme offered by the Raymond Lemaire International Centre for Conservation aims at educating young professionals in the conservation and restoration of immovable heritage (buildings, structures and sites), both into the tradition of the discipline and into the new scientific methods.

Graduates of the MCMS have acquired and developed skills that allow for the necessary interdisciplinary research, communication and collaboration between the various disciplines involved in the restoration of architectural heritage as for example : archaeology, history, urbanism, architecture, engineering, human sciences, conservation and restoration sciences, .... They have learned to use relevant source material, to approach a problem in a scientific way, to understand the approaches and possibilities of other disciplines than their own, and they have developed the necessary common terminology, methodology and skills to carry out research and to prepare jointly restoration studies, projects, and long-term programs. They have learned to reflect critically about ongoing concepts and debates on heritage preservation. Based on the above they have acquired the necessary common language and they master with a critical attitude the research methodologies and practices used in conservation of monuments and sites, as reflected in international guidelines, charters and literature. They have obtained knowledge and experience (through project works) that strengthens them to be part of interdisciplinary research and to communicate in a restoration team.

Career perspectives

Employment options for graduates from the RLICC are numerous and wide-spread. Alumni are currently working as independent professionals in conservation and restoration of architectural heritage all over the world. They display highly appreciated professional experience in private architecture and restoration offices as well as in leadership and policymaking positions in regional, national and international conservation institutions such as UNESCO, ICOMOS and the Council of Europe. All levels of the heritage administration, be they regional, national or international, count RLICC alumni among their ranks.



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Digital Humanities is a field of study, research, and invention at the intersection of humanities, computing, and information management. Read more

What is Digital Humanities?

Digital Humanities is a field of study, research, and invention at the intersection of humanities, computing, and information management. It is methodological by nature and multidisciplinary in scope involving the investigation, analysis, synthesis, and presentation of information in electronic form.

Digital humanists do not only create digital artefacts, but study how these media affect and are transforming the disciplines in which they are used. The computational tools and methods used in Digital Humanities cut across disciplinary practice to provide shared focal points, such as the preservation and curation of digital data, the aesthetics of the digital (from individual objects to entire worlds), as well as the creation of the born-digital.

Why Take this Course?

This M.Phil. provides a platform for a technically innovative research path within the humanities giving students the opportunity to engage with a new and dynamic area of research. It provides them with the technologies, methodologies, and theories for digitally-mediated humanities providing a framework for new and bold research questions to be asked that would have been all but inconceivable a generation ago.

Course Outcomes

Those who complete this course will have highly specialised IT skills combined with an advanced understanding of how these skills can be applied to a wide variety of digital objects (text, image, audio, and video). It will also provide students with the theories and perspectives central to the field, including the aesthetics implicit in digital creation and migration, best practice in terms of the standards used for a number of data formats, as well as the growing concerns of digital curation and preservation. Through the internship programme students will get real world experience working with cultural heritage partners or digital humanities projects. Moreover, several modules will integrate content from these partners in their learning outcomes, providing opportunities for students to engage with cutting-edge issues and technologies.

What's on the course?

This MPhil consists of three core modules and three optional modules. There is also a dissertation module in which a research topic is chosen in agreement with your supervisor.

Core modules

Theory and Practice of Digital Humanities
Web Technologies
Internship at cultural heritage institution, library, or project
Optional modules (for the 2012-13 academic year):
Cyberculture/Popular Culture
Computational Theories of Grammar and Meaning
Corpus Linguistics
From Metadata to Linked Data
Programming for Digital Media (Full year module)
Contextual Media (Full year module)
Visualising the Past
Heritage Visualisation in Action
NB: Some optional modules require prerequisites

How is it taught and examined?

The taught component of the course begins in September and ends in April. Contact hours depend on the modules you take. Theory-based modules meet for two hours a week (such as 'Theory and Practice of Digital Humanities' and 'Cyberculture/Popular Culture'); practice based modules (such as 'Web Technologies' and 'Digital Scholarly Editing') typically meet for three hours a week to include lab time. Modules are assessed through a combination of essays, in-class presentations, assignments, and projects (either individual or group), depending on the module. There are no examinations. The supervised dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words is submitted by 31 August.

Applicants should have a good honours degree (at least an upper second, GPA of at least 3.3) in any of the disciplines of the humanities. The admissions process will be carried out in two stages. In stage I candidates will apply online and have the opportunity of submitting a sample of their own critical writing (3,000-5,000 words) and a cover letter. Those candidates passing this initial assessment will go onto to stage II that will take the form of interviews (either in person, telephone, video, or skype) which will be arranged by a member of the admissions subcommittee. Taken together, these stages will allow the admissions committee to assess the candidates' general suitability for postgraduate work as well as clarifying my query re on line application]

Applications are also welcome from professionals in the library and cultural heritage sectors. Those already in employment may opt to take the degree over two years: the first year all coursework is taken and the second year the dissertation is written.

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