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IN BIOFORCE. 1) Opening Sessions. Objectives. To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme. Read more

Modules Contents and Objectives

IN BIOFORCE

1) Opening Sessions

Objectives: To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme.

Contents: Bioforce presentation. Introduction of the learning programme and objectives.

2) Immersion Internship

Objectives: To facilitate group cohesiveness and participant involvement within the programme.
To make a detailed presentation of the components of the MSc in HPM.
To encourage a joint reflection about humanitarian and development issues.
Show awareness of its own strengths and limitations as a humanitarian programme manager.

Contents: Presentation, preparation and organization of the immersion internships. Discussion and group work on Humanitarian topics.

3) Framework of Humanitarian Aid

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with thorough knowledge of the humanitarian sector and issues at stake: stakeholders, systems, coordination mechanisms, legal and ethical framework, Q&A initiatives and applications relating to programme management.

Contents: Humanitarian actors, systems and challenges. International humanitarian law, ethics & principles. Quality & Accountability initiatives, methods & practical tools.

4) Managing People & Organisations

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage themselves, other people, and organisations involved in humanitarian programmes.

Contents: Strengthening organisational capacity. Change management. Quality & Accountability in people management. Creating & developing trust in diverse teams. HR processes : HR organisation, recruitment, performance management, staff development. How to lead: leadership, management & delegation. Managing team safety and security.

5) Managing Programmes & Projects

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage all stages of the project cycle in humanitarian contexts.

Contents: Programme Cycle Management (PCM):

- Assessment & analysis
- Planning & implementation
- Monitoring & evaluation

Cross-cutting issues in PCM (participation, targeting...) Quality & Accountability in programme management.

6) Managing Finance & Funding

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the critical skills and confidence required to raise funds for humanitarian programmes, and to manage financial resources accountably.

Contents: Donors & donor strategies. Quality & Accountability in finance management. Budgeting & proposal writing. Funding strategies & opportunities. Key principles & concepts of financial management. Practical aspects of financial management.

7) Training of Trainers for Capacity Building in the Sector

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the appropriate methods & tools to develop, facilitate, monitor & evaluate capacity building activities.

Contents: Designing & implementing training activities.

8) Field Exercise

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Develop, through a field scenario-based exercise, operational capacity and autonomy of the trainees.

Contents : Within an operational framework, students will have to implement capabilities developed during the training period. The exercise is based on 5 days role play scenario. Students are placed in the position of aid actors in a context of humanitarian/emergency intervention. They have to implement several programs in the field on behalf of different NGOs. They operate in a complex emergency context where multiple players are involved.

IN ESC GRENOBLE

NB : For the ESC Students it is possible to follow “English track programme” described bellow or to follow a second semester in an English spoken abroad university.
For the other students, they must follow the “English track programme”.

1) Advanced Decision Techniques

Objectives/Learning outcomes: Good knowledge of quantitative tools for decision-making.

Contents: This course presents the main quantitative modelling and simulation tools to help in decision-making.

2) Strategy, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

This course focuses on the strategic choices: the decisions that shape the future of an organization. This course will address first the strategic choices that the manager must operate in an entrepreneurship environment (opportunity, business model design), then different options for development and growth patterns (growth internal / external growth, mergers and acquisitions, alliances).

3) Corporate Governance

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, the students:

- will know how to position and use concepts and techniques in finance, accounting, management control and law learnt during the common core subjects in a more global framework of analysis,
- will have learnt the legislation covering corporate governance,
- will be aware of the present developments in practice and the principal discussions concerning corporate governance,
- will be able to establish a diagnosis on the quality of a company's corporate governance.

Contents: It is essential for every manager to understand who determines the objectives of corporations and of other organizations, how they are governed and how their managers are incentivized and monitored. The course covers the following themes: value creation, the legal rules and the practices of company management(remuneration, ethics, social responsibility, governance "codes"), the legal rights and the behaviour of shareholders, the impact of financial markets on governance (shareholders activism, takeovers, LBOs). In addition the students have the opportunity to apply the main concepts and techniques of finance, accounting and management control to the case of a listed company.

4) Geopolitics

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, students will be able to:

- acquire the basics of a geopolitical culture allowing them to develop a reading list for current geopolitical and economic affairs,
- understand the geopolitical conditions for undertaking business in certain emerging and/or risk-laden geopolitical situations.

Contents: The object of this course is to allow students to acquire knowledge about geopolitical and economic affairs in certain zones and emerging and risk-related countries in the world. During the course, the following themes will be covered:

- the globalisation of the economy and its players, notably national States, and international and non-governmental organisations,
- geopolitical and economic analysis of certain countries and zones: Brazil, Russia, China, the Mediterranean and Africa,
- the problems of Afghanistan and Pakistan will also be discussed,
- Europe will be studied through analysis of the different themes mentioned above.

5) Global Marketing and Strategy

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Students will be able to:

- critically analyse and propose well-justified solutions to key Global Marketing Strategy issues.
- develop a Strategic Marketing plan to go global.

Contents: This module takes a decision-making perspective to Marketing Strategy issues, specifically in the global context.

The course will cover:

- Globalization decision and process,
- International market selection,
- International marketing research,
- International market entry strategies and expansion,
- Standardization versus Adaptation of 4 Ps.

6) Leadership and Responsible Management

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of this course, students will:

- understand the organizational and managerial specificities of contemporary organizations,
- know about recent developments in organizational thinking relating to institutional theory, power and politics, routines, and organizational cognition,
- be able to reflect on the specific challenges to leadership and corporate social responsibility in contemporary organizations.

Contents: This course addresses key issues for understanding and managing contemporary organizations. It seeks to move beyond simple managerialist views by integrating recent developments in organizational thinking with the dual challenges of organizational leadership and corporate social responsibility. Topics covered in this course include institutionalized environments, innovation and entrepreneurship, social movements, networks and social capital, power and politics in contemporary organizations, organizational routines and decision making, sense making and cognition in organizations, and organizational change. Each topic will be introduced through case studies alongside theoretical readings, and each of the course sessions will discuss the consequences of these topics for both leadership processes and corporate social responsibility.
The course will be demanding in terms of class preparation, contribution and after-class work, and hopefully rewarding in terms of generating novel insights into contemporary organizational and managerial challenges.

Applied Research Project

During the whole training period, the students, divided into sub-groups of 2-3 students, work on a problematic related a strong issue in the humanitarian and development sector. It is an applied research which leads to a written report in English and its presentation before a jury composed by the tutor and the partner if possible and relevant. This applied research is an integral part of the training programme and it is monitored by a tutor.
The month of December will be specifically dedicated to work on this project.
During the second semester, even if students are abroad, they have to organize themselves to work on this project.
The grade given on this work will be included in the final transcript.

OBJECTIVE

To work as a team during the whole training period to sort out a humanitarian and/or development management issue.

This project will require:

- To write a report in English (20,000 – 25,000 words) which may remain confidential; it is possible to write a summary for the organisation in a foreign language if required. Students have to submit the final report to the tutor 15 days before the oral presentation. The deadline for the oral presentation is mid-november 2014 (15 November 2014);
- To write a case study-based summary;
- To prepare the oral presentation to the jury in English.

STUDENTS’ PROFILES

Students involved in this applied research are from the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management delivered by ESC Grenoble and Bioforce.

EXPECTED RESULTS

- A specific humanitarian and/or development management issue is defined.
- A bibliographical research is consolidated.
- Concrete proposals and outlooks are drawn up.
- A critical analysis is provided.
- Relevant recommendations are made.

The definition of the issue has to be validated by both Bioforce and ESC Grenoble. A specific deadline will be communicated by Bioforce.

Rigor in diagnostic, analysis and facts interpretations, as well as recommendations will be required.
This work aims to support organizations in their development and functioning. In this way, we expect students to be creative (while being realist) and to practice benchmarks. This research work is neither an operational mission nor a counseling one. The report presented is not an internship report.

EXEMPTION OF “GRAND MÉMOIRE” – FOR THE ESC STUDENTS

Usually, ESC Grenoble students have to write a “Grand mémoire” during their enrollment. As they already write a specific applied research report, they benefit from an exemption of this “Grand mémoire”.

Assignment

Students from the MSc in HPM have to realize an assignment, after their study period, during 20 weeks at least. The presentation before a jury must be done before the 15th of November 2014.
The aim of this assignment is to reinforce students’ autonomy and to further develop their skills as a humanitarian programme manager in the humanitarian and development sector.

Students are to submit to Bioforce assignment terms of reference in order to be validated. As a second step, the ESC Grenoble will give the final validation.

The ESC Grenoble is in charge of all administrative issues regarding the assignment.

The evaluation process for the assignment is the following:

- A written report including :
- a context (region, country, organisation, programme, …) presentation,
- a description and analysis of the objectives and results obtained,
- an analysis of the key challenges faced during the assignment,
- an analysis of the impact of the training period on their professional capacities as a humanitarian programme manager.

- An oral presentation before a jury.

The final mark will be a global mark including the written report and the oral presentation.

Assessment Process

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN BIOFORCE

The assessment process includes the following exams:

- An individual written exam for the “Managing people and organizations” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing programmes and projects” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing finance and funding” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN GRENOBLE ECOLE DE MANAGEMENT

It is a two-stage process:

- For each module, a continuous assessment is managed by a Grenoble Ecole de Management’s permanent professor.
- For some modules, an exam is organized.

To be successfully completed, the student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20. Each module’s responsible define the share of continuous assessment and exam.

CONDITIONS OF GRADUATION

The diploma is delivered to the students:

- Having obtained a minimum of 10 out of 20 to all exams;
- Having produced and supported the presentation of a report demonstrating analysis and synthesis skills.

Admission

To participate to the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management, the prerequisites are the following:

- Master 1 level or Bachelor’s degree (four years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying at least 1 year of professional experience as a project coordinator, administrator or logistician in international solidarity
- By special dispensation, a L3 (licence) level or Bachelor’s degree (three years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying an outstanding work experience (more than one year).
- have an English language proficiency level of B2 (according to European language levels - Self Assessment Grid).
- Have a profesional project in programme management (Programme coordinator, Logistics coordinator…)

Please note that these prerequisites provide a base for any validation of the application form. The final decision lies with the Coordinators of the training programme.”

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Process systems engineering deals with the design, operation, optimisation and control of all kinds of chemical, physical, and biological processes through the use of systematic computer-aided approaches. Read more

Process systems engineering deals with the design, operation, optimisation and control of all kinds of chemical, physical, and biological processes through the use of systematic computer-aided approaches. Its major challenges are the development of concepts, methodologies and models for the prediction of performance and for decision-making for an engineered system.

Who is it for?

Suitable for engineering and applied science graduates who wish to embark on successful careers as process systems engineering professionals. 

The course equips graduates and practising engineers with an in-depth knowledge of the fundamentals of process systems and an excellent competency in the use of state-of-the-art approaches to deal with the major operational and design issues of the modern process industry. The course provides up-to-date technical knowledge and skills required for achieving the best management, design, control and operation of efficient process systems. 

Why this course?

Process systems engineering constitutes an interdisciplinary research area within the chemical engineering discipline. It focuses on the use of experimental techniques and systematic computer-aided methodologies for the design, operation, optimisation and control of chemical, physical, and biological processes, e.g. from chemical and petrochemical processes to pharmaceutical and food processes. 

A distinguished feature of this course is that it is not directed exclusively at chemical engineering graduates. Throughout the years, the course has evolved from discussions with industrial advisory panels, employers, sponsors and previous students. The content of the study programme is updated regularly to reflect changes arising from technical advances, economic factors and changes in legislation, regulations and standards.

By completing this course, a diligent student will be able to: 

  • Evaluate the technical, environmental and economic issues involved in the design and operation of process plants and the current practice in process industries.
  • Apply effectively the knowledge gained to the design, operation, optimisation and control of process systems via proper methodologies and relevant software.
  • Apply independent learning, especially via the effective use of information retrieval systems and a competent and professional approach to solving problems of industrial process systems.
  • Apply and critically evaluate key technical management principles, including project management, people management, technology marketing, product development and finance.
  • Apply advanced approaches and use effectively related tools in more specialised subjects related to process industries (for example risk management, biofuels or CFD tools).
  • Integrate knowledge, understanding and skills from the taught modules in a real-life situation to address problems faced by industrial clients; creating new problem diagnoses, designs, or system insights; and communicating findings in a professional manner in written, oral and visual forms.
  • Define a research question, develop aim(s) and objectives, select and execute a methodology, analyse data, evaluate findings critically and draw justifiable conclusions, demonstrating self-direction and originality of thought.
  • To communicate his/her individual research via a thesis and in an oral presentation in a style suitable for academic and professional

Accreditation

This MSc degree is accredited by Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE)

Course details

The taught programme for the MSc in Process Systems Engineering is delivered from October to February and is comprised of six compulsory taught modules. There are four optional modules to select the remaining two modules from.

Group project

The Group Project, which runs between February and April, enables you to put the skills and knowledge developed during the course modules into practice in an applied context while gaining transferable skills in project management, teamwork and independent research. The group project is usually sponsored by industrial partners who provide particular problems linked to their plant operations. Projects generally require the group to provide a solution to the operational problem. Potential future employers value this experience. This group project is shared across the MSc in Process Systems Engineering and other courses, giving the added benefit of gaining new insights, ways of thinking, experience and skills from students with other backgrounds

During the project you will develop a range of skills including learning how to establish team member roles and responsibilities, project management, and delivering technical presentations. At the end of the project, all groups submit a written report and deliver a presentation to the industrial partner. This presentation provides the opportunity to develop interpersonal and presentation skills within a professional environment.

It is clear that the modern engineer cannot be divorced from the commercial world. In order to provide practice in this matter, a poster presentation will be required from all students. This presentation provides the opportunity to develop presentation skills and effectively handle questions about complex issues in a professional manner.

Part-time students are encouraged to participate in a group project as it provides a wealth of learning opportunities. However, an option of an individual dissertation is available if agreed with the Course Director.

Individual project

The individual research project allows you to delve deeper into a specific area of interest. As our academic research is so closely related to industry, it is very common for our industrial partners to put forward real-world problems or areas of development as potential research topics.

The individual research project component takes place between April/May and August for full-time students. For part-time students, it is common that their research projects are undertaken in collaboration with their place of work under academic supervision; given the approval of the Course Director.

Individual research projects undertaken may involve designs, computer simulations, feasibility assessments, reviews, practical evaluations and experimental investigations.

Assessment

Taught modules 40%, Group project 20% (dissertation for part-time students), Individual Research Project 40%

Funding

To help students in finding and securing appropriate funding we have created a funding finder where you can search for suitable sources of funding by filtering the results to suit your needs. Visit the funding finder.



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The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers online distance learning programmes that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Certificate in Computer and Communications Law. Read more

M3CC (minimum - one year, part-time)

The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers online distance learning programmes that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Certificate in Computer and Communications Law.

The programme draws on our established teaching and research expertise in IT law, e-commerce law, communications law, computer law and media law.

Law as a subject is particularly suitable for online learning in that it is primarily text-based, so delivery of teaching materials is not restricted by bandwidth limitations. Most of the relevant materials for computer and communications law are available in digital format from databases such as Lexis and Westlaw to which you gain access through your Queen Mary Student account. We use a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) as a platform to deliver clear course structures, teaching materials and to create interactive courses. Your e-learning experience is enhanced by tutorials using discussion boards, blog postings and live chat for class discussions and question and answer sessions. We have designed the course to allow as much interaction and feedback between students and tutors as possible. Your understanding will be deepened by discussing your reading with fellow students and your course tutor and carrying out short tasks related to the course. We also use audio and audio-visual presentations. You will not need to have access to a local law library, a basic internet connection and browser is all that is needed to do the course.

Flexible Learning

Completion of the Certificate takes one to two years, part-time and is tailored for the needs of busy practitioners or other lawyers who would like to obtain knowledge in the computer and communications law field. Students may switch to the Diploma (120 credits) or the LLM (180 credits) after completing the Certificate.

Programme structure
You can study Computer and Communications Law to Postgraduate Certificate, Diploma or LLM level, by distance learning.

The programme is tailored for you if you wish to obtain a specialist Certificate in Digital Media Law, Certificate in IT or IP Law, Certificate in E-commerce Law or a Certificate in Communications Law. The certificate requires the successful completion of 60 credits over a minimum of one year, which can be completed as follows:
◦four taught modules, or
◦three taught modules and the optional research seminar paper/presentation

On successful completion of the certificate you may switch to the diploma. The diploma must be completed within a minimum of two years, and a maximum of six years. The diploma requires the successful completion of 120 credits, which can be completed as follows:
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation), or
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as one 10,000-word dissertation

If you choose to continue to the LLM, you will need to complete 180 credits, which can be completed as follows:
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as three 10,000-word dissertations, (or one 20,000-word dissertation in addition to one 10,000-word dissertation), or
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as two 10,000-word dissertations, (or, with approval, one 20,000-word dissertation)
Modules:
The year is divided into three four-month terms, with a selection of modules and dissertations being offered each term.

◦Taught modules (15 credits)
◦Each module requires around seven and a half hours of work a week over one term. Each module will consist of assessed tasks, a module essay and final assessment exercise (take-home exam).

◦Research seminar paper/presentation (optional) (15 credits) (January – May)
◦This involves a 30 minute presentation at the residential weekend on a topic of your choice agreed with your supervisor followed by the submission of a 5,000-word essay during the May – August term.

◦Dissertations (for the diploma and LLM only) – on a topic of your own choice
◦10,000-word dissertations (30 credits) – taken over two consecutive terms
◦20,000-word dissertation (60 credits) – taken over four consecutive terms

Modules

Certificate in Digital Media Law Module options
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM028 Online Media Regulation
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM037 Broadcasting Regulation
◦CCDM038 Regulation of Cross-border Online Gambling


Certificate in IP and IT Law Module options
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM013 Advanced IP Issues: Protection of Computer Software
◦CCDM015 Advanced IP Issues: Digital Rights Management
◦CCDM016 Intellectual Property: Foundation
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 – Cloud Computing

Certificate in E-commerce Law Module options
◦CCDM008 Online Banking and Financial Services
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM020 Internet Jurisdictional Issues and Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM025 Mergers and Acquisitions in the IT Sector
◦CCDM027 E-Commerce Law
◦CCDM029 Taxation and Electronic Commerce
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 – Cloud Computing

Certificate in Communications Law Modules
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM021 European Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM026 International Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law

Application Dates

You can start the programme in either the autumn term or the spring term. You should return your completed application forms two months before the start of term. For example, for an autumn start you will need to return your forms by mid-July and for a spring start you will need to return your forms by the beginning of November.

As this is a distance learning programme, we understand that applicants may live overseas or outside London. To comply with official admissions procedures if you are made an offer all applicants will be expected to submit by post (courier) or in person certified copies of qualifications which were uploaded when making an online application.

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The MA Ceramics Programme’s aim is to enable each student to identify their true interests and concerns as artists, designers or makers and to develop appropriate methods to explore their ideas and articulate or express them effectively in imaginative or innovative ways, through the medium of ceramics. Read more

Course Overview

The MA Ceramics Programme’s aim is to enable each student to identify their true interests and concerns as artists, designers or makers and to develop appropriate methods to explore their ideas and articulate or express them effectively in imaginative or innovative ways, through the medium of ceramics.

It also engages students with the key theories and contemporary debates, thus fostering their understandings of the ways in which these influence the development, expression and communication of their ideas, which will impact upon the success of their future practice as artists, makers or academics

Ceramics is a medium in which the practitioner occupies very different positions and frequently has opposing priorities and values drawn from previous personal experiences, technical competence and tacit knowledge.

The MA Ceramics programme is for individuals seeking to extend and develop their practice as well as deepen their knowledge and understandings of the subject, as future practitioners, researchers or academics.

The MA programme allows each student to:
- Develop their authorship of advanced studio work
- Be analytically rigorous
- Develop a greater capacity for reflection

Students are encouraged to challenge norms and question conventions through fusing materiality and concept. This approach is underpinned by a critical and historical approach discourse – a critical language for both fine and applied art and design.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/artanddesign/courses/Pages/maceramics.aspx

Course Content

The MA programme is offered as One Year Full Time, or Two Years Part Time.

Students undertake a sequentially designed course to lead seamlessly from one module to the next and finally into the Major study (equivalent to Dissertation of a more theory based MA). There are no options or electives or alternatives to the scheme. The development of these skills have been embedded into specific modules.

The following Modules will be undertaken by MA Ceramics students:
- MAA7001 Research Methods (20 Credits)
- MAC7004 Studio Project 1 (40 Credits)
- MAC 7006 Studio Project 2 (40 Credits)
- MAC7008 Dissertation (20 Credits)
- MAC7007 Major Project (60 Credits)

Exit points/Awards
- On completing 120 credits in total students will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma.
- On completing 180 credits in total students will be awarded a Master’s Degree (MA Ceramics).

Learning & Teaching

The MA is taught through lecture and seminar with individualised supervisory meetings to develop a learning contract (part of the early Personal Development Planning process [PDP]) and an individualised programme of learning and individualised supervision towards a creative research outcome, defined and monitored by developing PDP.

Our approach to learning and teaching is based on negotiation and dialogue, encouraging students to develop their own, self-directed project to a professional standard within a rigorous yet supportive academic environment. To support this, each student is allocated a Personal Tutor and an additional subject-specialist member of staff (academic tutor) from within the design expertise in a respective design department.

Together, they form the Supervisory Team. The CSAD web application form includes a personal statement, and an outline of the professional or research project that the student wishes to pursue at Masters level. This informs the allocation of personal tutor and subject-specialist member of academic staff (academic tutor) with whom the learning contract is established, which in turn forms the basis for the student’s personal plan, reflected on in the continuing PDP process.

There are opportunities for all MA students to come together in common teaching and presentations, to engage in peer learning groups and peer review of work, and to reflect on the outcomes of these peer reviews in PDP. At several key stages in the MA programme we stress the importance of self-directed and negotiated learning. This is in part a response to what we perceive to be a growing demand for programmes of study that allow students to integrate work, study, career, personal aspirations and other commitments.

All course documentation, including Cardiff Metropolitan University’s Research Studies Manual, CSAD’s Research Study Guide, the MA Ceramics Handbook with module descriptors, assessment guidelines and criteria, will be available as hard copy and electronically. In addition, lecture PowerPoint presentations and workshop-generated material, for example, paragraphs and textual or visual analyses composed during workshops, will be available on the Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

Remote or electronic contact with staff will be available by email and/or VLE. The supervisory team will deliver, manage and monitor each student's progress through a number of individual and team meetings. Students will also be encouraged to form and maintain peer-learning groups, either face-to-face or online. Learning will be supported through the use of the VLE, electronic communications, and other relevant methods. Any students requiring learning support are advised to contact Learning Support in Student Services. Throughout the programme, students are expected to maintain their own Personal Development Plan/Portfolio (PDP), intended to provide evidence of their knowledge and understanding in relation to the learning outcomes of each module.

Each 20 credits is equivalent to 240 learning hours (80 typically are taught and 160 are directed study or independent study).

Assessment

For each module, assessment is in the form of:
- MAA7001 Research Methods (20credits) Written 3000 word paper
- MAC7004 Studio Project1. (40 credits) Constructing a Discourse’ Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation with 1,000-1500 word transcript
- MAC 7006 Studio Project 2. (40 credits)Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation, with 1,000-1500 word transcript Viva Voce.
- MAC7008 (20 credits) ‘Developing a Theoretical Context for Student’s Studio-Based Practice’. Written 5000 word paper
- MAC7007 Major Project. (60 credits) Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation with 1,000-1500 word transcript Viva Voce.

Support will be available through weekly individual tutorials, group seminars, workshops where practical demonstrations, involving student participation. This may include, for example (Theory), communal writing (via computer and data projector) or group discourse analysis.

Students are encouraged to instigate discussion within and outside of the formal delivery Programme Face book pages and blogs further contribute and facilitate this shared learning experience.

Employability & Careers

The MA Ceramics programme enables students to enhance their careers as, or to become, established artist, designers, makers leading towards a career, or towards a PhD or to a Professional Doctorate in either art or design. Cardiff School of Art and Design offers Professional Doctoral programs in both Art and Design.

The MA Ceramics programme is designed to enable students to achieve the attributes of greater flexibility, adaptability, and individual responsibility and autonomy as professional artists, makers and designers or researchers. It is Internationally recognised that the MA Ceramics programme develops individuality , creativity, self-reliance, initiative, and the ability to perform in rapidly changing environments as well as increasing competence with research skills and methods which will make graduates highly employable as academics and or researchers or enable them to develop an active and sustained practice as artists makers or designers.

The MA Ceramics programme particularly characteristic is that it enable graduates, mid- career and professional practitioners from within and outside of the discipline of Ceramics to negotiate and examine strategies of Practice through the medium of Ceramics and yet being able to create their own hybrids of material based practice that can further enhance the territory that Ceramics can occupy.

All students receive individual Semester based PDP tutorials to support employability and life-long learning. Learning Journal blogs, and continuous visual documentation /text that integrates opportunities for self-reflection in programmes in order to help them develop as effective and confident learners are expected to be maintained throughout the programme of study.

At the conclusion of the programme, a very high percentage of MA graduates establish or continue their professional practice, enabled by the links they have made with galleries or organisations associated with the visual arts. Some elect to continue with ceramics at CSAD by undertaking a PhD.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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It aims to produce successful individuals who can. - Understand the whole of the professional design development process and how the initial phases flow to inform the latter stages. Read more

Course Overview

It aims to produce successful individuals who can:
- Understand the whole of the professional design development process and how the initial phases flow to inform the latter stages.

- Appreciate commercial realities and the designer’s role in business.

- Design desirable products for bespoke, batch or mass manufacture.

- Understand sustainability, inclusively, and other important ethical and social issues that must be considered by today’s designers.

- Have traditional design skills such as sketching, dealing with form, communication and innovation.

- Are able to use design tools such as 3D CAD, CAM and rapid prototyping in order to optimise the design and reduce time to market.

The Cardiff School of Art & Design have substantial expertise in the delivery of courses at the interface of engineering and product design whilst the National Centre for Product Design & Development Research is one of the UK’s leading centres for rapid product design & development whose expertise covers the whole process from design management, concept and detailed design, ergonomics and CAD to prototyping, tooling and batch manufacture.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/artanddesign/courses/Pages/mscapd.aspx

Course Content

MSc students take the following modules:
- APD401M Product Development Principles & Practice (20 Credits)
- APD403M Sustainability Issues in Design for Production (20 Credits)
- MAA7001 Research Methods in Art & Design (20 Credits)
- APD405M User Testing & Evaluation (20 Credits)
- APD406M Form Shape & Colour (20 Credits)
- APD407M Major Project (60 Credits)
- APD408M(A) Industrial Placement (20 Credits)

Each 20 credits is equivalent to 240 learning hours (80 typically are taught and 160 are directed study or independent study).

- Facilities
Dedicated studio space. Cardiff School of Art and Design offers an extensive range of spaces, workshops and equipment, creating a vibrant and creative learning environment, within a new purpose designed building and a fully renovated extension. Workshop and technical facilities include a foundry; and access to other workshops across the full range of Art and Design disciplines. Membership of the Fablab is included in the indicative coursework costs below. Cardiff School of Art and Design has a wide range of tools and equipment for use by students; necessary workshop training in their use includes access to materials used as part of timetabled workshop inductions. You also have access to and use of recycled materials within workshop areas.

Assessment

For each module, assessment is as follows:
- APD401M Product Development Principles & Practice (20 Credits) 6000 word equivalent assignment. This will normally be a written assignment.

- APD403M Sustainability Issues in Design for Production (20 Credits) 6000 word equivalent. This module will typically be assessed via a design project. A proportion of the assignment may however be awarded for written or presentatio​n work.

- MAA7001 Research Methods in Art & Design (20 Credits) Written submission, plus seminar presentation, typically 3,000 words plus a 10-20 minute presentation.

- APD405M User Testing & Evaluation (20 Credits) 6000 word equivalent. This module may be linked with others in order to provide a design project vehicle. In any case it will involve practical exercises and a proportion if not all of the assignment may be awarded for written or presentation work.

- APD406M Form Shape & Colour (20 Credits) 6000 word equivalent. This project is likely to be assessed through practical design activity, although a proportion of the assignment may be awarded for written or presentation work.

- APD407M Major Project (60 Credits). 18,000-word equivalent. Performance will be measured using the Final Report, Formal Presentation, Viva Voce examination and final product. Of the marks that are available for the project the allocation of the marks to each of the measures is as follows:

Final Report: 40%

Final Product (prototype): 40%

Formal Presentation: 5%

Viva Voce: 15%

- APD408M(A) Industrial Placement (20 Credits) 6000 word equivalent. A 3000 word ( maximum) report reflecting on the student’s experience within the professional working environment. A reflective placement Logbook (or Blog equivalent) recording critical reflections on events, activities and experiences. Important Note: Because of the difficulties of assessment in the workplace and the potential for disparity of treatment, this module is not awarded a mark other than “Pass” or “Fail”.

Support will be available through weekly small group seminars (normally no more than 16 students per group), exploring the theme of lectures and allowing students to clarify their understanding.

These sessions may also be workshops where practical demonstrations, involving student participation, are run. This may include, for example, communal writing or small group discourse analysis. Weekly tutorials will also be available.

Employability & Careers

Your year(s) of study with us enable you to develop professional contacts, observe how successful practitioners make their living, and hone your skills and ideas for commercial and professional advantage. Such cross-disciplinary collaborations prepare you for a world where you will inevitably work with people from all walks of life. Your live projects and assessments will get you accustomed to the importance of deadlines and working to specific briefs and tight specifications.

Over the next few years, CSAD will be developing opportunities for incubation of business proposals from its graduates and postgraduate training to get business opportunities up and running.

All students’ are expected to complete a portable ‘record of achievement’ and use their PDP to support employability and life-long learning, normally in the form of a blog, that integrates opportunities for self-reflection in programmes in order to help them develop as effective and confident learners.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers a programme of online distance learning courses that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Diploma in Computer and Communications Law. Read more

M3DL - (Minimum - two years; part-time)

The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers a programme of online distance learning courses that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Diploma in Computer and Communications Law.

The programme draws on the established strengths of the Centre for Commercial Law Studies (CCLS) in computer, e-commerce, internet, communications law, media law and associated topics.

Law as a subject is particularly suitable for online learning in that it is primarily text-based, so delivery of teaching materials is not restricted by bandwidth limitations. Most materials for Computer and Communications Law are available in digital format from databases such as Lexis and Westlaw to which you gain access through your Queen Mary Student account. We use a virtual learning environment (VLE) as a platform to deliver clear course structures, teaching materials and to create interactive courses. Your e-learning experience is enhanced by tutorials using discussion boards, blog postings and live chat for class discussions and question and answer sessions. We have designed the courses to allow for as much interaction and feedback between students and tutors as possible. Your understanding will be deepened by discussing your reading with fellow students and your course tutor and carrying out short tasks related to the module. We also use audio and audio-visual presentations. You will not be required to have access to a local law library, a basic internet connection and browser is all that is needed to do the programme.

Your degree certificate will make no distinction between the Postgraduate Diploma studied by presence in London and the Postgraduate Diploma studied by distance learning.

Programme

The programme must be completed within a minimum of two years, and a maximum of six years. The diploma requires the successful completion of 120 credits which can be completed as follows:

◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation), or
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as one 10,000-word dissertation
If you choose to continue to the LLM, you will need to complete 180 credits, which can be completed as follows:
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as three 10,000-word dissertations, (or one 20,000-word dissertation in addition to one 10,000-word dissertation), or
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as two 10,000-word dissertations, (or, with approval, one 20,000-word dissertation)

Modules and Dissertation

The year is divided into three four-month terms, with a selection of modules and dissertations being offered each term.

◦Taught modules (15 credits)
◦Each module requires around seven and a half hours of work a week over one term. Each module will consist of assessed tasks, a module essay and final assessment exercise (take-home exam).

◦Dissertations – topic of your own choice.
◦10000 dissertations (30 credits) – taken over two consecutive terms.
◦20000 dissertation (60 credits) – taken over four consecutive terms.

◦Research seminar paper/presentation (optional) (15 credits) (January – May)
◦This involves a 30 minute presentation at the residential weekend on a topic of your choice agreed with your supervisor followed by the submission of a 5000 word essay during the May – August term.

During each term a selection of three to four modules from the list below will be offered. Modules are usually offered on a two year cycle. The terms are as follows:
◦Autumn Session: From the beginning of September until December
◦Spring Session: Beginning of January until April
◦Summer Session: Beginning of May until August

Modules
◦CCDM008 Online Banking and Financial Services
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM013 Advanced IP Issues: Protection of Computer Software
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM015 Advanced IP Issues: Digital Rights Management
◦CCDM016 Intellectual Property: Foundation
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM020 Internet Jurisdictional Issues and Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM021 European Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM025 Mergers and Acquisitions in the ICT Sector
◦CCDM026 International Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM027 E-Commerce Law
◦CCDM028 Online Media Regulation
◦CCDM029 Taxation and Electronic Commerce
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM037 Broadcasting Regulation
◦CCDM038 Regulation of Cross-Border Online Gambling
◦CCDM039 Internet Governance
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 Cloud Computing

Application Dates

You can start the programme in either the autumn term or the spring term. You should return your completed application forms two months before the start of term. For example, for an autumn start you will need to return your forms by mid-July and for a spring start you will need to return your forms by the beginning of November.

As this is a distance learning programme, we understand that applicants may live overseas or outside London. To comply with official admissions procedures if you are made an offer all applicants will be expected to submit by post (courier) or in person certified copies of qualifications which were up-loaded when making an online application.

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IN BRIEF. Complies with the core curriculum of the Royal College of Physicians for Geriatric Medicine. Delivered off-site on a part-time basis. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Complies with the core curriculum of the Royal College of Physicians for Geriatric Medicine
  • Delivered off-site on a part-time basis
  • Identifies there is more to modern practice than technical medicine
  • A part-time only course

COURSE SUMMARY

Geriatric medicine is an expanding, acute speciality. With increasing numbers of elderly people the need for specialist training will continue.

This comprehensive course is offered in collaboration with the North Western Postgraduate Medical Deanery and will ensure that the theory underpinning knowledge is delivered alongside and applied to the clinical situation. It meets the needs of clients and physicians and ensures that a quality service is delivered effectively and efficiently. It is a modular course delivered off-site on a part-time, day release basis.

TEACHING

All teaching will endeavour to be evidence-based, holistic and multi-disciplinary, recognising that there is more to modern practice than simply technical medicine. It is a modular course delivered off-site on a part-time, day release basis.

ASSESSMENT

Medical Ethics and Law

  • 20 minute presentation – 20%
  • 5,000 word assignment – 80%

Medical Teaching and Communication

  • 45 minute observed teaching session - 20%
  • 3,000 word assignment – 80%

Health Service Management

  • 3,500 word Planning Change Management Assignment – 100%

General Principles of Ageing

  • 5,000 word assignment – 80%
  • 20 minute presentation – 20%

Common Diseases of the Older Adult I

  • 5,000 word assignment – 80%
  • 20 minute Presentation -  20%

Common Diseases of the Older Adult II

  • 5,000 word assignment – 80%
  • 20 minute Presentation -  20%

Psychiatry of Old Age

  • 5,000 word assignment – 80%
  • 20 minute Presentation -  20%

Medicine for the Older Adult

  • 5,000 word assignment – 80%
  • 20 minute Presentation -  20%

Dissertation

CAREER PROSPECTS

This exciting and innovative course will enable you to gain a critical appreciation and in-depth understanding of the theoretical background underpinning your speciality. It also provides an opportunity to critically evaluate and appraise the current contextual and practice issues involved in the delivery of your specialist field.



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Study an Environment MSc at Cranfield. Management of the natural environment is increasingly important in all sectors from business to public policy. Read more

Study an Environment MSc at Cranfield

Management of the natural environment is increasingly important in all sectors from business to public policy. This course will equip you to critically evaluate environmental issues and contribute to the economic and policy decision making process in organisations of any size.

Who is it for?

This course provides students with the necessary up-to-date knowledge and understanding of environmental issues as they impact on the public, private and voluntary sectors. It also provides students with the ability and skills to critically appraise alternative environmental measures and develop the ability to identify and recommend suitable solutions for effective environmental management.

Core modules develop a range of knowledge and skills including environmental principles (such as the ecosystem services framework), economic and financial methods, and social, policy and governance viewpoints. Electives allow further development of economics and strategic thinking methods, or other skills including risk communication, environmental life cycle analysis and environmental auditing.

This course will equip you to critically evaluate environmental issues and contribute to the economic and policy decision making process in organisations of any size. It will give you the skills and experience required to monitor and critically evaluate business practice through the environmental auditing and other assessment methods, or to participate in economic and policy decision making.

Why this course?

  • Employment prospects – our reputation and links with employers ensure outstanding opportunities to secure excellent positions.
  • Flexibility – Five core modules and three pairs of electives allow you to emphasise business issues or economics and policy. A wide choice of topics for your personal project means that you can choose your own specialism. The course is available on a full-time or part-time basis.
  • Excellence in teaching – In the last Teaching Quality Assessment our courses were rated as “excellent”. Eighty percent of the staff are members of the Registered Practitioners with the Higher Education Academy.
  • Track record – we have been providing Masters-level training for over 20 years.
  • Professional recognition – We regularly consult with senior representatives of key industries on questions of course and curriculum design to ensure that the programme continues to reflect the changing needs of the various sectors in which our students aim to work. The course is accredited by the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM).
  • Postgraduate level – Cranfield University is entirely postgraduate. Many of the students on the course have considerable professional experience.
  • Expert staff – The course is designed and delivered by experts in the field of environmental management.
  • Practical focus – We believe in giving you as much hands-on work as possible so that you are learning by doing.

Accreditation

This degree has been accredited by the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM).

Course details

This course comprises eight modules, an individual project and a group project. 

Group project

Group projects, which run between February and April, enable you to put the skills and knowledge developed during the course modules into practice in an applied context while gaining transferable skills in project management, teamwork and independent research. Group projects are usually sponsored by industrial or public sector partners who provide particular problems linked to their businesses. Projects generally require the group to provide a solution to the operational problem. Potential future employers value this experience. The group projects are across the MSc courses in the environment programme, giving the added benefit of gaining new insights, ways of thinking, experience and skills from students with other backgrounds.

During the project you will develop a range of skills including learning how to establish team member roles and responsibilities, project management, and delivering technical presentations. At the end of the project, all groups submit a written report and deliver a presentation to the industrial partner. This presentation provides the opportunity to develop interpersonal and presentation skills within a professional environment. The project is assessed through a written report and an oral presentation by the group. In addition, a poster exhibition provides the opportunity to develop presentation skills and effectively handle questions about complex issues in a professional manner.

Individual project

The individual research project allows you to delve deeper into a specific area of interest. As our academic research is so closely related to industry and public sector organisations, it is very common for our partners to put forward real-world problems or areas of development as potential research topics.

The individual research project component takes place between April/May and August for full-time students. For part-time students, it is common that their research projects are undertaken in collaboration with their place of work under academic supervision, given the approval of the Course Directors.

Individual research projects undertaken may involve a wide range of techniques from qualitative analysis to quantitative modelling.

Assessment

Taught modules 40%, group project 20% (dissertation for part-time students), individual thesis project 40%

Funding Opportunities

To help students in finding and securing appropriate funding we have created a funding finder where you can search for suitable sources of funding by filtering the results to suit your needs. Visit the funding finder.

Your career

Successful students develop diverse and rewarding careers in government ministries, non-governmental organisations (NGOs), environmental and business consultancies, public sector organisations such as environmental protection agencies, and the manufacturing and service industries in the private sector. 

The international nature of the course means that career opportunities are not restricted to the UK. Cranfield graduates develop careers around the world. 

We have been providing Masters level training for over 20 years. Our strong reputation and links with potential employers provide you with outstanding opportunities to secure interesting jobs and develop successful careers. The increasing interest in sustainability and corporate and social responsibility has also enhanced the career prospects of our graduates. 

Cranfield's applied approach and close links with industry mean 93% of our graduates find jobs relevant to their degree or go on to further study within six months of graduation. Our careers team support you while you are studying and following graduation with workshops, careers fairs, vacancy information and one-to-one support. 



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This is a one-year Masters Research degree programme beginning in September. Read more

The programme

This is a one-year Masters Research degree programme beginning in September. It offers students with a good BSc degree in Biochemistry, Biology or related disciplines the opportunity to acquire a wide range of advanced research techniques through carrying out a one-year laboratory based research project under the direction of a member of staff selected by the student. Students will advance their research skills (including data analysis, bioinformatics tools and presentation skills).

This course is designed to equip students with the necessary skills of a researcher in biomedical sciences, ecology, evolution and behaviour or plant molecular sciences.

The aims of this degree programme are:
• to provide training in the key generic skills required to be a scientific researcher;
• to provide advanced training in a specialised branch of biological sciences research;
• to ensure familiarity with a range of transferable, advanced research skills;
• to provide practice in communicating results of research both by oral presentation and by
preparation of a Master thesis.

Students are offered: a major supervised research project lasting approximately eight months, the opportunity to work with a leading scientist in a chosen field, experience of working as part of a research team and development of high level practical research skills in the lab or field.

Teaching, learning and assessment

Although this is a research degree there is a taught component with lectures being delivered throughout the first two terms. As part of this there is a requirement to complete coursework, prepare and present your research to a School audience by means of a poster as well as a 20 minute oral presentation in the summer term. All elements of the programme must be passed in order to be able to submit the final project for assessment in summer.

Students receive regular, scheduled, feedback on their performance in taught modules, their project plan, literature review/draft introduction (autumn term), draft materials and methods write up (spring term), preparatory oral presentation (spring term); oral presentation (summer term); and draft project write up (summer term).

Applying

Before applying you will need to peruse and then identify academic staff members whose projects you are interested in. https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/biologicalsciences/study-here/postgraduate/home.aspx

The project will be selected from one of three major research areas within the School: Biomedical Sciences (BMS), Plant Molecular Sciences (PMS), and Ecology Evolution and Behaviour (EEB).
Once you have identified your area of interest, you should contact potential supervisors (via e-mail) to discuss details of the projects and availability of placement. Having made contact remember to state at least 2 the supervisors and project names in the 'supporting statement' section of our online application.

Places/projects on our course are limited. In order to secure your place and confirm your acceptance to our programme, it is advisable to pay a tuition fee deposit after you receive our offer.

Further learning and career opportunities

The programme prepares students for future careers in Biological Sciences research, including doctoral degrees, and related areas of employment. Students are provided with training in a range of subject specific and transferable skills.

If you wish to discuss the MSc informally, please contact the MSc Programme Director Dr Pavlos Alifragis () (01784 444988).

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A general advanced mechanical engineering course particularly relevant to the energy and transport sectors, including mechanical engineering design and assessment. Read more

A general advanced mechanical engineering course particularly relevant to the energy and transport sectors, including mechanical engineering design and assessment. Students will learn project management, design, computer-aided engineering, operation and optimisation of machinery, structural mechanics and integrity.

Who is it for?

Advanced Mechanical Engineering at Cranfield is unique in that it offers you a broad range of mechanical engineering projects with the added component of a management flavour. This provides the opportunity for you to enhance your mechanical engineering skill with a view to developing your career in the management of large engineering projects.

In addition to management, communication, team work and research skills, you will attain at least the following learning outcomes from this degree course:

  • Demonstrate knowledge, fundamental understanding and critical awareness of advanced mechanical engineering techniques necessary for solutions in the transport and energy sectors
  • Demonstrate systematic knowledge across appropriate advanced technologies and management issues to provide solutions for international industries and/or research organisations
  • Demonstrate the ability to acquire, critically assess the relative merits, and effectively use appropriate information from a variety of sources.

Why this course?

The MSc in Advanced Mechanical Engineering is differentiated from other courses available primarily by its industrial context through the strong links we have with national and international industry. We build our industrial links through research and consultancy, which allows us to provide practical and current examples to help illustrate learning throughout the course.

This course is also available on a part-time basis for individuals who wish to study whilst remaining in full-time employment. This enables students from all over the world to complete this qualification whilst balancing work/life commitments. We are very well located for visiting part-time students from all over the world, and offer a range of library and support facilities to support your studies. This MSc programme benefits from a wide range of cultural backgrounds which significantly enhances the learning experience for both staff and students.

Informed by Industry

This degree is particularly industrially focused; although the course does not at present have an industrial advisory board, the course staff are heavily involved in industrially funded and oriented research and development.

The Head of Department, for example, sits on the IMechE Offshore Engineering committee, two BSI committees, the Engineering Integrity Society and is Chairman of the International Ship and Offshore Structures Congress Offshore, Renewable Energy Committee. Course content is reviewed annually by the course team and project/group work is by and large related to the Department's industrially funded research.

Accreditation

This MSc degree is accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE)

Course details

The taught programme for the Advanced Mechanical Engineering masters is generally delivered from October until March and is comprised of eight compulsory taught modules. Students on the part-time programme will complete all of the compulsory modules based on a flexible schedule that will be agreed with the Course Director.

Group project

The group project undertaken between October and April enables you to put the skills and knowledge developed during the course modules into practice in an applied context while gaining transferable skills in project management, teamwork and independent research. You will put in to practice analytical and numerical skills developed in the compulsory modules.

The aim of the group project is to provide you with direct experience of applying knowledge to an industrially relevant problem that requires a team-based multidisciplinary solution. You will develop a fundamental range of skills required to work in a team including team member roles and responsibilities, project management, delivering technical presentations and exploiting the variety of expertise of each individual member. Each group will be given an industrially relevant assignment to perform. Industry involvement is an integral component for the group project, to give you first-hand experience at working within real life challenging situations. 

It is clear that the modern design engineer cannot be divorced from the commercial world. In order to provide practice in this matter, a poster presentation will be required from all students. This presentation provides the opportunity to develop presentation skills and effectively handle questions about complex issues in a professional manner. All groups submit a written report and deliver a presentation to the industry partner.

Individual project

The aim of the individual research project is to provide you with direct experience in undertaking a research/development project in a relevant industrial or research area. You will make a formal presentation of your findings to a panel of academics and industry experts and submit a research thesis.

The individual research project component takes place from March to August.

For part-time students it is common that their research thesis is undertaken in collaboration with their place of work and supported by academic supervision.

Assessment

Taught modules 40% Group Project 20% Individual Research Project 40%

Funding

To help students in finding and securing appropriate funding we have created a funding finder where you can search for suitable sources of funding by filtering the results to suit your needs. Visit the funding finder.

Your career

Industry driven research makes our graduates some of the most desirable in the world for recruitment. The MSc in Advanced Mechanical Engineering takes you onto a challenging career in industry, government or research. The course reflects the strengths and reputation of Cranfield particularly in the energy, transport and management sectors.



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The MSc in Global Management is offered as a single degree in Reims, or as a double degree with the prestigious . D'Amore Mc Kim School of Business, Northeastern University Boston. . Read more

The MSc in Global Management is offered as a single degree in Reims, or as a double degree with the prestigious D'Amore Mc Kim School of Business, Northeastern University Boston. In addition, it is a partner of the International Partnership of Business Schools [IPBS] Master of International Management [MIM].

WHY JOIN THIS PROGRAMME ?

Single Degree Option

  • Be exposed to real-time business activities with a European study tour, company visits and conferences
  • Immerse into a professional context with an end-of-studies internship in France or abroad and an optional study period in China (additional fees apply).
  • Forge your intercultural skills thanks to a multicultural team of professors and students with an open-door policy facilitating student guidance and tutoring.
  • Consolidate your original training thanks to core management modules to build a solid, competitive professional profile, by expanding your key skills in strategy, finance, marketing and logistics.
  • Add some language proficiency with the preparation for the French Chamber of Commerce Language Certificate for international students.

From the NEOMA Business School you will earn a Master of Science in Global Management (MSc).

Two-Year Degree Option

This adapted curriculum offers students who want to gain or enhance their business management knowledge and skills the opportunity to earn a Master of Science in two years.

  • Build a strong background in leadership and management
  • Earn a 4-month professional experience
  • Gain maturity, test yourself in new situations and go beyond your comfort zone
  • Improve your communications skills in English
  • Benefit from an international environment: cross-cultural agility all taught in English, multicultural body of students and professors on both campuses (Reims-Rouen)

From the NEOMA Business School you will earn the Master of Science of your choice:

Double Degree Option

Bringing together their respective complementary expertise in entrepreneurship and leadership, D’Amore McKim School of Business and NEOMA Business School thrive to deliver a curriculum that will equip you with the mindset and the tools to raise global and complex challenges, and become global leaders.

  • Gain a double degree in under two years and become part of two worldwide alumni networks
  • Benefit from complementary skills honing in on the expertise of each school
  • Stand out in the global market and boost your employment opportunities across France and the USA.
  • Build a comprehensive professional experience from two different cultures
  • Take advantage of the guidance and support of two leading business schools

If you choose to study at NEOMA Business School in France and D’Amore-McKim School of Business in Boston, you will earn two master's degrees from two elite business schools across two different continents. 

From the D’Amore-McKim School of business you will earn a MS in International Management.

From the NEOMA Business School you will earn a MSc in Global Management.

CURRICULUM

In an increasingly uncertain environment, the key to a solid career is the capacity to navigate increasingly complex ethical dilemmas and take intelligent risks in a globalised and localised arena. 

The curriculum provides hard and soft skill training, it is strongly experiential and case study based. Advanced seminars cover the main corporate functions: business statistics, finance, accounting, marketing, strategy, innovation, supply chain management, human resources. Particular attention is given to developing soft skills: cross-cultural awareness, communication and negotiation, team management and leadership.

More importantly, beyond standard business modules the curriculum pays particular attention to current socio-economic and geopolitical events, and how they guide business and management practices. Specialised modules highlight the responsibility of business managers toward the great global concerns: the environment, technology, human rights, peace.

The programme is designed to form agile and operational managers, who are aware of the global forces that drive business as well as the future of humanity, and who are prepared to face them with bold action.

For a detailed description of the Single degree, Double degree and Two-Year Option curriculum, please visit the website

AFTER CLASSES

An obligatory end-of-studies internship or other professional experience in France of abroad concludes the programme. The duration of this internship ranges from min 4 to max 6 months ending 31st December. 

The NEOMA BS Teaching and Learning Center and Career Center support students during in their internship search with specialised workshops and face-to-face meetings. The NEOMA BS Corporate Club and Alumni Association provide internship opportunities across the globe.

To complete their degree, students present a Master’s thesis under the supervision of NEOMA BS staff.

Following graduation students may apply for an extension for their visa for 12 month sunder conditions in order to search for a job in the EU.

CAREERS

The M.Sc. in Global Management is geared to providing you with advanced professional skills to become an international manager with solid practical experience and an expert in intercultural business relations with a global vision and outlook.

A variety of international corporate functions to which you can aspire:

  • Account Manager
  • Accounting and Finance Manager
  • Human Resources Manager
  • Sales Manager
  • International Development Manager


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Our MSc Paediatric Dentistry course will equip you with the advanced academic knowledge and clinical skills required to practice as a specialist in paediatric dentistry. Read more

Our MSc Paediatric Dentistry course will equip you with the advanced academic knowledge and clinical skills required to practice as a specialist in paediatric dentistry.

This is a full-time, three-year master's degree that combines the taught and research elements of the MSc with a mandatory clinical training unit.

You will build up your knowledge of literature in this field, learning from consultants and specialists in paediatric dentistry. Taught elements are delivered in lectures, seminars, practical skills sessions and online learning.

You will develop your clinical skills at the University Dental Hospital of Manchester, with general anaesthesia lists running at Royal Manchester Children's Hospital and Trafford General Hospital.

Clinical teaching involves close supervision of a personal cohort of patients with a broad range of paediatric dental needs, including those with dental anomalies, trauma and caries, under supervision by hospital specialists and consultants. Clinical training involves attendance at consultant new patient clinics.

Completing this course will prepare you to practice as a specialist paediatric dentist or pursue a clinical academic or research career in this field. You will be eligible to sit the Membership in Paediatric Dentistry tri-collegiate specialty membership examination upon completion of the course. 

Aims

This course aims to:

  • provide you with a high level of clinical training at the large consultant-led paediatric dental department within the University Dental Hospital of Manchester;
  • provide you with the knowledge and skills to practice at the level of a specialist in paediatric dentistry, including dental treatment of the paediatric patient under local analgesia, inhalational sedation, IV sedation and general anaesthesia;
  • equip you with in-depth critical appraisal skills that will enable you to independently appraise paediatric dental literature;
  • improve your oral presentation skills;
  • ensure you are competent in the design and interpretation of original clinical research at the forefront of current dental research;
  • provide you with the knowledge and experience to plan, implement and complete a research project.

Teaching and learning

We employ a diverse range of teaching methods, including clinical teaching both in the labs and on clinic, didactic lectures, and seminars to help you understand key course concepts.

Additional self-directed learning enables you to reflect upon your clinical work, skills and key concepts introduced within seminars.

Seminars are supervised by consultants and specialists in paediatric dentistry and will enable you to develop communication and presentation skills, as well as appreciate the relevance of scientific study to clinical practice.

In addition, the course is designed to provide a foundation in research skills and methodologies to prepare you for further research or to pursue a clinical academic career.

This complements the research project and dissertation, where master's students have the opportunity to demonstrate the collation and presentation of information in this field.

The varied blend of training methods aims to promote a stimulating and dynamic teaching environment. Inherent within the course is the expectation that you will acquire the skills to enable you to work independently and effectively in an interdisciplinary clinical environment.

Coursework and assessment

Formal assessment for the Research Methods, Biostatistics, and Guideline Development and Implementation units will be undertaken via marked written assignments.

The CPD unit will be assessed via a combination of written and practical examinations.

For the clinical skills component, assessment is through examination of a variety of skills procedures carried out in the skills facility.

For the clinical component, case write-up and presentation, assessment is through marking of both the written component oral presentation of cases and clinical governance projects.

This course will have the majority of its clinical activity in the Paediatric Dental department in the University Dental Hospital of Manchester, with general anaesthesia lists running in the Royal Manchester Children's Hospital and Trafford General Hospital. Clinical teaching will be delivered by consultants and specialists in paediatric dentistry.

The dissertation is marked in line with all of our dentistry MSc dissertations.

Course unit details

Year 1

  • Research Methods
  • Biostatistics
  • Guidelines Development and Implementation
  • CPD
  • Clinical treatment and consultation sessions at University Dental Hospital of Manchester
  • Clinical Skills Teaching
  • Seminars
  • Research Project

Year 2

  • Continued Clinical Training
  • Seminars
  • Research Project

Year 3

  • Seminars
  • Continued Clinical Training
  • Research Project

Facilities

You will have access to a range of library and IT facilities across the University.

For the clinical aspects of the course, you may make use of your own premises and Ordsall Dental Health Centre. For the skills aspects of the course, the University's facilities are available.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service .

CPD opportunities

We will strongly encourage you to attend conferences and courses that will provide CPD. Attendance at journal club and selected seminars will also provide you with some CPD hours.

Career opportunities

Paediatric dentistry is a stimulating and rewarding speciality, and offers a number of career opportunities. Paediatric dentists may work in private practice, the community dental setting and in dental hospitals.

In addition to this clinical role, many paediatric dentists participate in teaching and research. These interests can be combined with part-time clinical work or undertaken on a full-time basis.

In the UK, consultants in paediatric dentistry may work in a community or hospital setting and concentrate on the management of complex, multidisciplinary cases. They also play an important role in the management of the unit in which they work.



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Our three-year MSc (Clin) Periodontology course focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of periodontal disease. You will learn the skills needed to critically evaluate and solve problems relating to periodontology. Read more

Our three-year MSc (Clin) Periodontology course focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of periodontal disease. You will learn the skills needed to critically evaluate and solve problems relating to periodontology.

Your research skills will also be developed as you learn how to design research projects, collect data, conduct simple analyses and interpret the results.

These projects may be within areas such as genetics, microbiology or biomaterials.

Your research will benefit from our links with the Cochrane Oral Health Group and the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre for the Treatment of Cranio-Facial Anomalies.

Our course is also designed to prepare you to become a Member in Restorative Dentistry through the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh.

Aims

The course aims to provide you with:

  • the knowledge, skills and attitudes fundamental to diagnosis and treatment of periodontics and related procedures;
  • the knowledge, skills and attitudes to enable critical evaluation and problem solving for periodontal problems to allow independent practice;
  • knowledge relating to the contemporary practise of periodontics (including an appreciation of an interdisciplinary approach to comprehensive patient care), to allow communication with both specialist and non-specialist audiences;
  • competence in the design and interpretation of original clinical research at the forefront of current dental research;
  • the knowledge and experience to plan, implement and complete a research project showing initiative and personal responsibility;
  • the knowledge, skills and attitudes to prepare you for advanced clinical practice in periodontics;
  • a comprehensive understanding of the complex issues involved in the scientific basis of periodontology.

Teaching and learning

We use a range of teaching methods in each unit to promote a stimulating and dynamic teaching environment. You will acquire the skills to enable you to work independently and effectively in an interdisciplinary clinical environment.

Our methods include seminars and lectures to both introduce and delve more deeply into key course concepts, as well as peer-to-peer and staff-to-student feedback and discussion through group work.

External bodies guide the subject areas we cover and the balance of formal teaching (seminars and lectures) to clinical experience to comply with standards for specialist level training. Additional, self-directed learning enables you to reflect upon your clinical work and skills, and the key concepts introduced within seminars.

We use a problem-based learning format for tutorials, enabling you to develop communication and presentation skills, as well as appreciate the relevance of scientific study to clinical practice.

The course is also designed to provide a foundation in research skills and methodologies to prepare you for further research or to pursue a clinical academic career. This complements the research project and dissertation, where MSc students have the opportunity to demonstrate the collation and presentation of information in this field.

The aim of the dissertation unit is to offer research training in the identification, formulation and implementation of a specific research project.

Through the clinical units, you will also be exposed to industrial partners and experts from outside the University in the seminar series and practical sessions, providing access to world-class clinical academics.

The course creatively incorporates the clinical expertise of specialists in periodontology from a variety of backgrounds, including specialist practice and hospital-based clinical academia, to support learning.

Coursework and assessment

Formal assessment for the Research Methods and Biostatistics components takes the form of two tutor-marked assignments per unit.

Assessment of each course unit generally follows a standard plan, which involves mid or end of unit assignments (eg literature reviews) and end of semester examinations (for each unit completed during the semester) in the format of OSCEs and written examinations, including MCQs/SBAs.

Clinical progress will be monitored using clinical logbooks and regular clinical competency assessments. Patient case reports outlined in your logbook will provide formative assessment of your clinical competencies during the course.

Course unit details

There are four parts to this course:

  • Research Methods
  • Biostatistics
  • Specialist Clinical Component
  • Dissertation.

Course content for Year 1

  • Basic science of applied periodontology (15 credits)
  • Diagnosis and treatment planning (15 credits)
  • Non-surgical treatment (15 credits)
  • Adjunctive treatments and antimicrobials (15 credits)
  • Oral health and disease in populations (15 credits)
  • Research methods (15 credits)
  • Biostatistics (15 credits)
  • Clinical case reflection and presentation I (15 credits)

Course content for Year 2

  • Management of complicating factors (15 credits)
  • Periodontal surgery (15 credits)
  • Advanced diagnosis and treatment planning (15 credits)
  • Clinical case reflection and presentation II (15 credits)
  • Dissertation (undertaken during semester one and two) (60 credits)

Course content for Year 3

  • Mucogingival surgery (15 credits)
  • Implant basic science (15 credits)
  • Implant treatment planning (15 credits)
  • Basic Implant surgical and restorative techniques (15 credits)
  • Advanced Implant surgical and restorative techniques (15 credits)
  • Peri-implant lesions (15 credits)
  • Advanced (implant) regenerative techniques (15 credits)
  • Clinical case reflection and presentation III (15 credits)

Career opportunities

Most of our graduates return to their place of employment after completing the course.

A smaller number go on to pursue further academic training and undertake higher research degrees (eg MPhil or PhD programmes).

Accrediting organisations

The course is designed to prepare candidates to challenge the membership in restorative dentistry (periodontology) of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh. We will request confirmation of eligibility from the College. This has been provided to our other three year courses.



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Founded on a strong dynamic between students and staff, the Fine Art MA is for disciplined artists who want to develop their work both through personal tutorials and interaction within an informed, ambitious peer group. Read more
Founded on a strong dynamic between students and staff, the Fine Art MA is for disciplined artists who want to develop their work both through personal tutorials and interaction within an informed, ambitious peer group.

The course is taught by a group of experienced and well-connected artists and curators. You follow a highly personalised programme of study and contribute to the overall group experience in a weekly series of lectures, seminars and crits.

You will have the opportunity to exhibit your work and curate group exhibitions, while also completing an extended essay and slide presentation for your assessment and as the basis of your future professional practice.

Why study with us?

• Highly personalised programme of study that allows you to pursue your own artistic vision
• Chance to exhibit your work and curate group exhibitions
• Teaching staff of practising artists, curators and researchers, all with strong contacts in the art world
• Student body of mature and disciplined artists
• Prime location in one of the UK's most lively and creative cities
• Excellent local galleries run by former Brighton students
• Access to dedicated shared studio space at nearby Phoenix Gallery for full-time students

Course structure

The course runs for 12 months full-time and 24 months part-time.

Regular seminars, tutorials and crits take place each Tuesday and Wednesday. Most students are part-time and attend each Tuesday in Year 1 and each Wednesday (plus Tuesday evening) in Year 2. Full-time students attend group activities on both of these days and spend the rest of the week either researching or working in our shared studios.

Part-time students research and make work in their own studios outside the university and use College facilities (such as workshops or libraries) for practical and presentation purposes. All students have access to the Postgraduate Project Space to install and exhibit work.

Areas of study

The course is split into two main sections. Both involve elements of theory and practice – together with portfolio and visual documentation preparation – and culminate in assessed exhibitions.

Section 1:

The first section (one year part-time or six months full-time) concentrates on the identification and development of your chosen mode of practice, with a degree of re-evaluation and experimentation being the norm.

You will display and discuss your work within a group to form a social and professional bond with your fellow students. You will also attend lectures and seminars given by the regular staff team and visiting guest speakers.

Section 2:

The second section prepares you for the final assessment exhibition. This involves regular crits and group meetings. You will present a seminar linked to your work, develop your professional practice and networking skills, and receive tutorials on the extended essay that you write during the summer vacation.

Modules:

Reconfiguring Practice: Proposal and Presentation
Research and Practice Methodologies: Seminar and Research Diary
Consolidating Practice: Exhibition/Visual Documentation
Research and Practice Methodologies: Student Presentation
Critical Essay
Fine Art Mentoring (optional module)

Careers and employability

As well as going on to become practising fine artists, our graduates take up jobs in galleries including Fabrica Gallery, Chrysalides House Art School and Gallery, and Pallant House Gallery.

Many go on to lecturer and research positions at universities including University of the Arts London, University College Falmouth, Northbrook Metropolitan College, and the Malta College of Fine Art and Technology.

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The Professional Doctorate in Biomedical Science comprises four compulsory modules with integrated doctoral level research, aimed at full-time practitioners wishing to expand and extend their skills and knowledge to support exisiting roles, or to meet the demands of new ones. Read more
The Professional Doctorate in Biomedical Science comprises four compulsory modules with integrated doctoral level research, aimed at full-time practitioners wishing to expand and extend their skills and knowledge to support exisiting roles, or to meet the demands of new ones. For example, this qualification is ideal for those taking on or seeking managerial or consultancy roles. It is open to employees working in the NHS or equivalent healthcare industry, or practicing in laboratories in the UK and internationally. Modules cover good clinical practice, research management, and highlight the concept and value of reflective practitioners. We also introduce you to training on a personal, professional and academic level through workshops, coursework and personal portfolios.

Course detail

You will study the following compulsory modules:

• Research Theory and Practice - Training in project management to help you achieve a work/life/research balance, plus research governance, Health and Safety, good clinical practice and intellectual property rights. Through coursework, you will also gain skills in presentation, statistics, IT, writing for publications and being a reflective practitioner/researcher.

• Project Development towards a Doctorate - You'll begin this module with an idea of the area of research you'd like to explore, and we guide you in researching the literature, formulating hypotheses, and planning your research methodology, work packages and timescales.

• Interim Report - Designed to encourage the 'thoughtful researcher', this module features structured sessions on scientific writing, thesis writing skills, systematic review, poster presentation and oral presentation skills.

• Professional Development for Biomedical Science - Develop the skills and confidence you need to be a reflective practitioner. You'll do this through a range of workshops including intellectual property, leadership, presentation skills, systematic reviews, biomedical ethics and group dynamics.

• Research Project - You'll conduct research at your workplace that will inform your 30,000 word thesis. You submit your proposal idea for research when you apply for the programme, and develop it with a supervision team from UWE and a suitable work colleague. The final thesis should be completed and submitted no later than 12 months after the end of the five-year programme.

Format

There are five one-day sessions per annum, covering the modular structure and supervised research and learning, giving you excellent opportunities to engage with experts throughout the course, both in person and online.

Assessment

Assessed work varies with each module, but will comprise a written research proposal, reflection on the research process, a systematic review of the research topic, visual and oral presentations, and a reflective portfolio of attendance at workshops and research seminars. There will be doctorate-level viva voce examinations midway through your research and after your research thesis submission.

There are 30 credits per module (120 in total) and you must complete them before submitting your final thesis. Interim qualifications, based on modular credits, are available at the end of Years 1 and 2 if you can't complete the full five-year programme.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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