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IN BIOFORCE. 1) Opening Sessions. Objectives. To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme. Read more

Modules Contents and Objectives

IN BIOFORCE

1) Opening Sessions

Objectives: To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme.

Contents: Bioforce presentation. Introduction of the learning programme and objectives.

2) Immersion Internship

Objectives: To facilitate group cohesiveness and participant involvement within the programme.
To make a detailed presentation of the components of the MSc in HPM.
To encourage a joint reflection about humanitarian and development issues.
Show awareness of its own strengths and limitations as a humanitarian programme manager.

Contents: Presentation, preparation and organization of the immersion internships. Discussion and group work on Humanitarian topics.

3) Framework of Humanitarian Aid

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with thorough knowledge of the humanitarian sector and issues at stake: stakeholders, systems, coordination mechanisms, legal and ethical framework, Q&A initiatives and applications relating to programme management.

Contents: Humanitarian actors, systems and challenges. International humanitarian law, ethics & principles. Quality & Accountability initiatives, methods & practical tools.

4) Managing People & Organisations

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage themselves, other people, and organisations involved in humanitarian programmes.

Contents: Strengthening organisational capacity. Change management. Quality & Accountability in people management. Creating & developing trust in diverse teams. HR processes : HR organisation, recruitment, performance management, staff development. How to lead: leadership, management & delegation. Managing team safety and security.

5) Managing Programmes & Projects

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage all stages of the project cycle in humanitarian contexts.

Contents: Programme Cycle Management (PCM):

- Assessment & analysis
- Planning & implementation
- Monitoring & evaluation

Cross-cutting issues in PCM (participation, targeting...) Quality & Accountability in programme management.

6) Managing Finance & Funding

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the critical skills and confidence required to raise funds for humanitarian programmes, and to manage financial resources accountably.

Contents: Donors & donor strategies. Quality & Accountability in finance management. Budgeting & proposal writing. Funding strategies & opportunities. Key principles & concepts of financial management. Practical aspects of financial management.

7) Training of Trainers for Capacity Building in the Sector

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the appropriate methods & tools to develop, facilitate, monitor & evaluate capacity building activities.

Contents: Designing & implementing training activities.

8) Field Exercise

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Develop, through a field scenario-based exercise, operational capacity and autonomy of the trainees.

Contents : Within an operational framework, students will have to implement capabilities developed during the training period. The exercise is based on 5 days role play scenario. Students are placed in the position of aid actors in a context of humanitarian/emergency intervention. They have to implement several programs in the field on behalf of different NGOs. They operate in a complex emergency context where multiple players are involved.

IN ESC GRENOBLE

NB : For the ESC Students it is possible to follow “English track programme” described bellow or to follow a second semester in an English spoken abroad university.
For the other students, they must follow the “English track programme”.

1) Advanced Decision Techniques

Objectives/Learning outcomes: Good knowledge of quantitative tools for decision-making.

Contents: This course presents the main quantitative modelling and simulation tools to help in decision-making.

2) Strategy, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

This course focuses on the strategic choices: the decisions that shape the future of an organization. This course will address first the strategic choices that the manager must operate in an entrepreneurship environment (opportunity, business model design), then different options for development and growth patterns (growth internal / external growth, mergers and acquisitions, alliances).

3) Corporate Governance

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, the students:

- will know how to position and use concepts and techniques in finance, accounting, management control and law learnt during the common core subjects in a more global framework of analysis,
- will have learnt the legislation covering corporate governance,
- will be aware of the present developments in practice and the principal discussions concerning corporate governance,
- will be able to establish a diagnosis on the quality of a company's corporate governance.

Contents: It is essential for every manager to understand who determines the objectives of corporations and of other organizations, how they are governed and how their managers are incentivized and monitored. The course covers the following themes: value creation, the legal rules and the practices of company management(remuneration, ethics, social responsibility, governance "codes"), the legal rights and the behaviour of shareholders, the impact of financial markets on governance (shareholders activism, takeovers, LBOs). In addition the students have the opportunity to apply the main concepts and techniques of finance, accounting and management control to the case of a listed company.

4) Geopolitics

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, students will be able to:

- acquire the basics of a geopolitical culture allowing them to develop a reading list for current geopolitical and economic affairs,
- understand the geopolitical conditions for undertaking business in certain emerging and/or risk-laden geopolitical situations.

Contents: The object of this course is to allow students to acquire knowledge about geopolitical and economic affairs in certain zones and emerging and risk-related countries in the world. During the course, the following themes will be covered:

- the globalisation of the economy and its players, notably national States, and international and non-governmental organisations,
- geopolitical and economic analysis of certain countries and zones: Brazil, Russia, China, the Mediterranean and Africa,
- the problems of Afghanistan and Pakistan will also be discussed,
- Europe will be studied through analysis of the different themes mentioned above.

5) Global Marketing and Strategy

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Students will be able to:

- critically analyse and propose well-justified solutions to key Global Marketing Strategy issues.
- develop a Strategic Marketing plan to go global.

Contents: This module takes a decision-making perspective to Marketing Strategy issues, specifically in the global context.

The course will cover:

- Globalization decision and process,
- International market selection,
- International marketing research,
- International market entry strategies and expansion,
- Standardization versus Adaptation of 4 Ps.

6) Leadership and Responsible Management

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of this course, students will:

- understand the organizational and managerial specificities of contemporary organizations,
- know about recent developments in organizational thinking relating to institutional theory, power and politics, routines, and organizational cognition,
- be able to reflect on the specific challenges to leadership and corporate social responsibility in contemporary organizations.

Contents: This course addresses key issues for understanding and managing contemporary organizations. It seeks to move beyond simple managerialist views by integrating recent developments in organizational thinking with the dual challenges of organizational leadership and corporate social responsibility. Topics covered in this course include institutionalized environments, innovation and entrepreneurship, social movements, networks and social capital, power and politics in contemporary organizations, organizational routines and decision making, sense making and cognition in organizations, and organizational change. Each topic will be introduced through case studies alongside theoretical readings, and each of the course sessions will discuss the consequences of these topics for both leadership processes and corporate social responsibility.
The course will be demanding in terms of class preparation, contribution and after-class work, and hopefully rewarding in terms of generating novel insights into contemporary organizational and managerial challenges.

Applied Research Project

During the whole training period, the students, divided into sub-groups of 2-3 students, work on a problematic related a strong issue in the humanitarian and development sector. It is an applied research which leads to a written report in English and its presentation before a jury composed by the tutor and the partner if possible and relevant. This applied research is an integral part of the training programme and it is monitored by a tutor.
The month of December will be specifically dedicated to work on this project.
During the second semester, even if students are abroad, they have to organize themselves to work on this project.
The grade given on this work will be included in the final transcript.

OBJECTIVE

To work as a team during the whole training period to sort out a humanitarian and/or development management issue.

This project will require:

- To write a report in English (20,000 – 25,000 words) which may remain confidential; it is possible to write a summary for the organisation in a foreign language if required. Students have to submit the final report to the tutor 15 days before the oral presentation. The deadline for the oral presentation is mid-november 2014 (15 November 2014);
- To write a case study-based summary;
- To prepare the oral presentation to the jury in English.

STUDENTS’ PROFILES

Students involved in this applied research are from the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management delivered by ESC Grenoble and Bioforce.

EXPECTED RESULTS

- A specific humanitarian and/or development management issue is defined.
- A bibliographical research is consolidated.
- Concrete proposals and outlooks are drawn up.
- A critical analysis is provided.
- Relevant recommendations are made.

The definition of the issue has to be validated by both Bioforce and ESC Grenoble. A specific deadline will be communicated by Bioforce.

Rigor in diagnostic, analysis and facts interpretations, as well as recommendations will be required.
This work aims to support organizations in their development and functioning. In this way, we expect students to be creative (while being realist) and to practice benchmarks. This research work is neither an operational mission nor a counseling one. The report presented is not an internship report.

EXEMPTION OF “GRAND MÉMOIRE” – FOR THE ESC STUDENTS

Usually, ESC Grenoble students have to write a “Grand mémoire” during their enrollment. As they already write a specific applied research report, they benefit from an exemption of this “Grand mémoire”.

Assignment

Students from the MSc in HPM have to realize an assignment, after their study period, during 20 weeks at least. The presentation before a jury must be done before the 15th of November 2014.
The aim of this assignment is to reinforce students’ autonomy and to further develop their skills as a humanitarian programme manager in the humanitarian and development sector.

Students are to submit to Bioforce assignment terms of reference in order to be validated. As a second step, the ESC Grenoble will give the final validation.

The ESC Grenoble is in charge of all administrative issues regarding the assignment.

The evaluation process for the assignment is the following:

- A written report including :
- a context (region, country, organisation, programme, …) presentation,
- a description and analysis of the objectives and results obtained,
- an analysis of the key challenges faced during the assignment,
- an analysis of the impact of the training period on their professional capacities as a humanitarian programme manager.

- An oral presentation before a jury.

The final mark will be a global mark including the written report and the oral presentation.

Assessment Process

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN BIOFORCE

The assessment process includes the following exams:

- An individual written exam for the “Managing people and organizations” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing programmes and projects” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing finance and funding” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN GRENOBLE ECOLE DE MANAGEMENT

It is a two-stage process:

- For each module, a continuous assessment is managed by a Grenoble Ecole de Management’s permanent professor.
- For some modules, an exam is organized.

To be successfully completed, the student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20. Each module’s responsible define the share of continuous assessment and exam.

CONDITIONS OF GRADUATION

The diploma is delivered to the students:

- Having obtained a minimum of 10 out of 20 to all exams;
- Having produced and supported the presentation of a report demonstrating analysis and synthesis skills.

Admission

To participate to the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management, the prerequisites are the following:

- Master 1 level or Bachelor’s degree (four years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying at least 1 year of professional experience as a project coordinator, administrator or logistician in international solidarity
- By special dispensation, a L3 (licence) level or Bachelor’s degree (three years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying an outstanding work experience (more than one year).
- have an English language proficiency level of B2 (according to European language levels - Self Assessment Grid).
- Have a profesional project in programme management (Programme coordinator, Logistics coordinator…)

Please note that these prerequisites provide a base for any validation of the application form. The final decision lies with the Coordinators of the training programme.”

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Cities are sites of cultural, business and political exchange. Visual communication is a principal mode by which this exchange occurs. Read more
Cities are sites of cultural, business and political exchange. Visual communication is a principal mode by which this exchange occurs. From large urban structures, through to an individual’s footprint, the visual connects distinct facets into a particular and personal experience.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The MA Visual Communication is an innovative and accessible program with three specialist routes in Graphic Design, Illustration and Photography. The program will examine urban context through three international cities, where students will generate both individual and collaborative responses. The course is distinctive in its structure. Its students will gather at four week-long residential sessions, at Bath Spa University and in two other international cities. The destinations will vary and may include New York, Bangalore, Chicago, Tokyo, Las Vegas, Bangkok and others.

There will be programmed lectures, presentations and frequent opportunities to explore each city. A great advantage of the course structure is its collaborative workshop sessions — Charrettes — in which students will share concentrated periods of intense study, designed to help the development of ideas. The residencies will be social, as well as educational.

Following each residency, individuals will develop their projects with online or onsite tutorial support. Collaborations and discussions with peers will continue through blogging and video conferencing. Students can also have access to workshop, darkroom and print facilities should they require it.

The flexibility of this course will allow MAVC students to work anywhere; you will not need to re-locate in order to study. The course is therefore ideal for emerging as well as established practitioners. In addition the course offers great potential to develop working relationships with those sharing a common interest, from a variety of countries and cultures across the world.

MODULES

Research Methodologies:
Part One introduces generic research methodologies with Part Two considering subject specific material, analysis and evaluation techniques. This will be delivered online or onsite at Bath Spa University.

Developing Practice:
1. Survey: a charrette examining aspects of the city of Bath in the context of its history and contemporary culture which will be approached using your specialist route.
2. Presentation: an exposition of your work approach and practice to the group.
3. Planning: a focused workshop that will examine, critique and then supplement your current research methods.

Practice in Context:
1. Survey: a charrette examining aspects of the host city for this trip. This should be done in the context of its history and contemporary culture and in relation to the outcome of your previous research in Bath. You will develop work in collaboration with other students.
2. Presentation: individual presentation of work from the Developing Practice module.
3. Planning: further development of research skills and presentation of initial outline proposal for the master’s project.

Practice in a Global Context:
1. Survey: a charrette examining the host city for this trip, by making contextual links with organisations in the city. You will work on a project of your own design. This may be collaborative but must contribute to your final MAVC Show.
2. Presentation: collaborative presentation of work from the Practice in Context module.
3. Planning: detail for the Master's Project.

Master's Project:
A synthesis of your experiences based on the cities visited. Create an independent or collaborative piece of work based on a proposal agreed with your tutor in advance.
1. Installation: preparing work for presentation and exhibition.
2. Presentation: sharing outcomes with staff and students.
3. Exhibition: public display of work.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

Teaching will be concentrated in four, week-long residences, during which there will be workshops and lectures led by staff and visiting professionals. Students will use these forums to examine and develop their work practice. They will participate in group charrettes, discussion and analysis and by making presentations of their work.

Between the residences tutors will provide students with individual and group tutorials. These will be delivered either online or onsite at Bath Spa University. There can also be access to university’s facilities including dedicated photographic studios, conventional darkrooms, etching and screen printing workshops as well as digital editing/printing suites.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

Assessment of modules is by written submission, presentation and a final exhibition. A dissertation is optional and can be negotiated on an individual basis. It can form a part of the final exhibition and will be assessed at the same point.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

The purpose of this course is to enable each student to question, re-establish and define their own professional practice. This will enable individuals to control their career trajectory with a view to working in the creative industries internationally. This may include working for design agencies, gaining freelance commissions and initiating commercial opportunities.

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The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers online distance learning programmes that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Certificate in Computer and Communications Law. Read more

M3CC (minimum - one year, part-time)

The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers online distance learning programmes that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Certificate in Computer and Communications Law.

The programme draws on our established teaching and research expertise in IT law, e-commerce law, communications law, computer law and media law.

Law as a subject is particularly suitable for online learning in that it is primarily text-based, so delivery of teaching materials is not restricted by bandwidth limitations. Most of the relevant materials for computer and communications law are available in digital format from databases such as Lexis and Westlaw to which you gain access through your Queen Mary Student account. We use a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) as a platform to deliver clear course structures, teaching materials and to create interactive courses. Your e-learning experience is enhanced by tutorials using discussion boards, blog postings and live chat for class discussions and question and answer sessions. We have designed the course to allow as much interaction and feedback between students and tutors as possible. Your understanding will be deepened by discussing your reading with fellow students and your course tutor and carrying out short tasks related to the course. We also use audio and audio-visual presentations. You will not need to have access to a local law library, a basic internet connection and browser is all that is needed to do the course.

Flexible Learning

Completion of the Certificate takes one to two years, part-time and is tailored for the needs of busy practitioners or other lawyers who would like to obtain knowledge in the computer and communications law field. Students may switch to the Diploma (120 credits) or the LLM (180 credits) after completing the Certificate.

Programme structure
You can study Computer and Communications Law to Postgraduate Certificate, Diploma or LLM level, by distance learning.

The programme is tailored for you if you wish to obtain a specialist Certificate in Digital Media Law, Certificate in IT or IP Law, Certificate in E-commerce Law or a Certificate in Communications Law. The certificate requires the successful completion of 60 credits over a minimum of one year, which can be completed as follows:
◦four taught modules, or
◦three taught modules and the optional research seminar paper/presentation

On successful completion of the certificate you may switch to the diploma. The diploma must be completed within a minimum of two years, and a maximum of six years. The diploma requires the successful completion of 120 credits, which can be completed as follows:
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation), or
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as one 10,000-word dissertation

If you choose to continue to the LLM, you will need to complete 180 credits, which can be completed as follows:
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as three 10,000-word dissertations, (or one 20,000-word dissertation in addition to one 10,000-word dissertation), or
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as two 10,000-word dissertations, (or, with approval, one 20,000-word dissertation)
Modules:
The year is divided into three four-month terms, with a selection of modules and dissertations being offered each term.

◦Taught modules (15 credits)
◦Each module requires around seven and a half hours of work a week over one term. Each module will consist of assessed tasks, a module essay and final assessment exercise (take-home exam).

◦Research seminar paper/presentation (optional) (15 credits) (January – May)
◦This involves a 30 minute presentation at the residential weekend on a topic of your choice agreed with your supervisor followed by the submission of a 5,000-word essay during the May – August term.

◦Dissertations (for the diploma and LLM only) – on a topic of your own choice
◦10,000-word dissertations (30 credits) – taken over two consecutive terms
◦20,000-word dissertation (60 credits) – taken over four consecutive terms

Modules

Certificate in Digital Media Law Module options
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM028 Online Media Regulation
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM037 Broadcasting Regulation
◦CCDM038 Regulation of Cross-border Online Gambling


Certificate in IP and IT Law Module options
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM013 Advanced IP Issues: Protection of Computer Software
◦CCDM015 Advanced IP Issues: Digital Rights Management
◦CCDM016 Intellectual Property: Foundation
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 – Cloud Computing

Certificate in E-commerce Law Module options
◦CCDM008 Online Banking and Financial Services
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM020 Internet Jurisdictional Issues and Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM025 Mergers and Acquisitions in the IT Sector
◦CCDM027 E-Commerce Law
◦CCDM029 Taxation and Electronic Commerce
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 – Cloud Computing

Certificate in Communications Law Modules
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM021 European Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM026 International Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law

Application Dates

You can start the programme in either the autumn term or the spring term. You should return your completed application forms two months before the start of term. For example, for an autumn start you will need to return your forms by mid-July and for a spring start you will need to return your forms by the beginning of November.

As this is a distance learning programme, we understand that applicants may live overseas or outside London. To comply with official admissions procedures if you are made an offer all applicants will be expected to submit by post (courier) or in person certified copies of qualifications which were uploaded when making an online application.

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The MA Ceramics Programme’s aim is to enable each student to identify their true interests and concerns as artists, designers or makers and to develop appropriate methods to explore their ideas and articulate or express them effectively in imaginative or innovative ways, through the medium of ceramics. Read more

Course Overview

The MA Ceramics Programme’s aim is to enable each student to identify their true interests and concerns as artists, designers or makers and to develop appropriate methods to explore their ideas and articulate or express them effectively in imaginative or innovative ways, through the medium of ceramics.

It also engages students with the key theories and contemporary debates, thus fostering their understandings of the ways in which these influence the development, expression and communication of their ideas, which will impact upon the success of their future practice as artists, makers or academics

Ceramics is a medium in which the practitioner occupies very different positions and frequently has opposing priorities and values drawn from previous personal experiences, technical competence and tacit knowledge.

The MA Ceramics programme is for individuals seeking to extend and develop their practice as well as deepen their knowledge and understandings of the subject, as future practitioners, researchers or academics.

The MA programme allows each student to:
- Develop their authorship of advanced studio work
- Be analytically rigorous
- Develop a greater capacity for reflection

Students are encouraged to challenge norms and question conventions through fusing materiality and concept. This approach is underpinned by a critical and historical approach discourse – a critical language for both fine and applied art and design.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/artanddesign/courses/Pages/maceramics.aspx

Course Content

The MA programme is offered as One Year Full Time, or Two Years Part Time.

Students undertake a sequentially designed course to lead seamlessly from one module to the next and finally into the Major study (equivalent to Dissertation of a more theory based MA). There are no options or electives or alternatives to the scheme. The development of these skills have been embedded into specific modules.

The following Modules will be undertaken by MA Ceramics students:
- MAA7001 Research Methods (20 Credits)
- MAC7004 Studio Project 1 (40 Credits)
- MAC 7006 Studio Project 2 (40 Credits)
- MAC7008 Dissertation (20 Credits)
- MAC7007 Major Project (60 Credits)

Exit points/Awards
- On completing 120 credits in total students will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma.
- On completing 180 credits in total students will be awarded a Master’s Degree (MA Ceramics).

Learning & Teaching

The MA is taught through lecture and seminar with individualised supervisory meetings to develop a learning contract (part of the early Personal Development Planning process [PDP]) and an individualised programme of learning and individualised supervision towards a creative research outcome, defined and monitored by developing PDP.

Our approach to learning and teaching is based on negotiation and dialogue, encouraging students to develop their own, self-directed project to a professional standard within a rigorous yet supportive academic environment. To support this, each student is allocated a Personal Tutor and an additional subject-specialist member of staff (academic tutor) from within the design expertise in a respective design department.

Together, they form the Supervisory Team. The CSAD web application form includes a personal statement, and an outline of the professional or research project that the student wishes to pursue at Masters level. This informs the allocation of personal tutor and subject-specialist member of academic staff (academic tutor) with whom the learning contract is established, which in turn forms the basis for the student’s personal plan, reflected on in the continuing PDP process.

There are opportunities for all MA students to come together in common teaching and presentations, to engage in peer learning groups and peer review of work, and to reflect on the outcomes of these peer reviews in PDP. At several key stages in the MA programme we stress the importance of self-directed and negotiated learning. This is in part a response to what we perceive to be a growing demand for programmes of study that allow students to integrate work, study, career, personal aspirations and other commitments.

All course documentation, including Cardiff Metropolitan University’s Research Studies Manual, CSAD’s Research Study Guide, the MA Ceramics Handbook with module descriptors, assessment guidelines and criteria, will be available as hard copy and electronically. In addition, lecture PowerPoint presentations and workshop-generated material, for example, paragraphs and textual or visual analyses composed during workshops, will be available on the Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

Remote or electronic contact with staff will be available by email and/or VLE. The supervisory team will deliver, manage and monitor each student's progress through a number of individual and team meetings. Students will also be encouraged to form and maintain peer-learning groups, either face-to-face or online. Learning will be supported through the use of the VLE, electronic communications, and other relevant methods. Any students requiring learning support are advised to contact Learning Support in Student Services. Throughout the programme, students are expected to maintain their own Personal Development Plan/Portfolio (PDP), intended to provide evidence of their knowledge and understanding in relation to the learning outcomes of each module.

Each 20 credits is equivalent to 240 learning hours (80 typically are taught and 160 are directed study or independent study).

Assessment

For each module, assessment is in the form of:
- MAA7001 Research Methods (20credits) Written 3000 word paper
- MAC7004 Studio Project1. (40 credits) Constructing a Discourse’ Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation with 1,000-1500 word transcript
- MAC 7006 Studio Project 2. (40 credits)Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation, with 1,000-1500 word transcript Viva Voce.
- MAC7008 (20 credits) ‘Developing a Theoretical Context for Student’s Studio-Based Practice’. Written 5000 word paper
- MAC7007 Major Project. (60 credits) Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation with 1,000-1500 word transcript Viva Voce.

Support will be available through weekly individual tutorials, group seminars, workshops where practical demonstrations, involving student participation. This may include, for example (Theory), communal writing (via computer and data projector) or group discourse analysis.

Students are encouraged to instigate discussion within and outside of the formal delivery Programme Face book pages and blogs further contribute and facilitate this shared learning experience.

Employability & Careers

The MA Ceramics programme enables students to enhance their careers as, or to become, established artist, designers, makers leading towards a career, or towards a PhD or to a Professional Doctorate in either art or design. Cardiff School of Art and Design offers Professional Doctoral programs in both Art and Design.

The MA Ceramics programme is designed to enable students to achieve the attributes of greater flexibility, adaptability, and individual responsibility and autonomy as professional artists, makers and designers or researchers. It is Internationally recognised that the MA Ceramics programme develops individuality , creativity, self-reliance, initiative, and the ability to perform in rapidly changing environments as well as increasing competence with research skills and methods which will make graduates highly employable as academics and or researchers or enable them to develop an active and sustained practice as artists makers or designers.

The MA Ceramics programme particularly characteristic is that it enable graduates, mid- career and professional practitioners from within and outside of the discipline of Ceramics to negotiate and examine strategies of Practice through the medium of Ceramics and yet being able to create their own hybrids of material based practice that can further enhance the territory that Ceramics can occupy.

All students receive individual Semester based PDP tutorials to support employability and life-long learning. Learning Journal blogs, and continuous visual documentation /text that integrates opportunities for self-reflection in programmes in order to help them develop as effective and confident learners are expected to be maintained throughout the programme of study.

At the conclusion of the programme, a very high percentage of MA graduates establish or continue their professional practice, enabled by the links they have made with galleries or organisations associated with the visual arts. Some elect to continue with ceramics at CSAD by undertaking a PhD.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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It aims to produce successful individuals who can. - Understand the whole of the professional design development process and how the initial phases flow to inform the latter stages. Read more

Course Overview

It aims to produce successful individuals who can:
- Understand the whole of the professional design development process and how the initial phases flow to inform the latter stages.

- Appreciate commercial realities and the designer’s role in business.

- Design desirable products for bespoke, batch or mass manufacture.

- Understand sustainability, inclusively, and other important ethical and social issues that must be considered by today’s designers.

- Have traditional design skills such as sketching, dealing with form, communication and innovation.

- Are able to use design tools such as 3D CAD, CAM and rapid prototyping in order to optimise the design and reduce time to market.

The Cardiff School of Art & Design have substantial expertise in the delivery of courses at the interface of engineering and product design whilst the National Centre for Product Design & Development Research is one of the UK’s leading centres for rapid product design & development whose expertise covers the whole process from design management, concept and detailed design, ergonomics and CAD to prototyping, tooling and batch manufacture.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/artanddesign/courses/Pages/mscapd.aspx

Course Content

MSc students take the following modules:
- APD401M Product Development Principles & Practice (20 Credits)
- APD403M Sustainability Issues in Design for Production (20 Credits)
- MAA7001 Research Methods in Art & Design (20 Credits)
- APD405M User Testing & Evaluation (20 Credits)
- APD406M Form Shape & Colour (20 Credits)
- APD407M Major Project (60 Credits)
- APD408M(A) Industrial Placement (20 Credits)

Each 20 credits is equivalent to 240 learning hours (80 typically are taught and 160 are directed study or independent study).

- Facilities
Dedicated studio space. Cardiff School of Art and Design offers an extensive range of spaces, workshops and equipment, creating a vibrant and creative learning environment, within a new purpose designed building and a fully renovated extension. Workshop and technical facilities include a foundry; and access to other workshops across the full range of Art and Design disciplines. Membership of the Fablab is included in the indicative coursework costs below. Cardiff School of Art and Design has a wide range of tools and equipment for use by students; necessary workshop training in their use includes access to materials used as part of timetabled workshop inductions. You also have access to and use of recycled materials within workshop areas.

Assessment

For each module, assessment is as follows:
- APD401M Product Development Principles & Practice (20 Credits) 6000 word equivalent assignment. This will normally be a written assignment.

- APD403M Sustainability Issues in Design for Production (20 Credits) 6000 word equivalent. This module will typically be assessed via a design project. A proportion of the assignment may however be awarded for written or presentatio​n work.

- MAA7001 Research Methods in Art & Design (20 Credits) Written submission, plus seminar presentation, typically 3,000 words plus a 10-20 minute presentation.

- APD405M User Testing & Evaluation (20 Credits) 6000 word equivalent. This module may be linked with others in order to provide a design project vehicle. In any case it will involve practical exercises and a proportion if not all of the assignment may be awarded for written or presentation work.

- APD406M Form Shape & Colour (20 Credits) 6000 word equivalent. This project is likely to be assessed through practical design activity, although a proportion of the assignment may be awarded for written or presentation work.

- APD407M Major Project (60 Credits). 18,000-word equivalent. Performance will be measured using the Final Report, Formal Presentation, Viva Voce examination and final product. Of the marks that are available for the project the allocation of the marks to each of the measures is as follows:

Final Report: 40%

Final Product (prototype): 40%

Formal Presentation: 5%

Viva Voce: 15%

- APD408M(A) Industrial Placement (20 Credits) 6000 word equivalent. A 3000 word ( maximum) report reflecting on the student’s experience within the professional working environment. A reflective placement Logbook (or Blog equivalent) recording critical reflections on events, activities and experiences. Important Note: Because of the difficulties of assessment in the workplace and the potential for disparity of treatment, this module is not awarded a mark other than “Pass” or “Fail”.

Support will be available through weekly small group seminars (normally no more than 16 students per group), exploring the theme of lectures and allowing students to clarify their understanding.

These sessions may also be workshops where practical demonstrations, involving student participation, are run. This may include, for example, communal writing or small group discourse analysis. Weekly tutorials will also be available.

Employability & Careers

Your year(s) of study with us enable you to develop professional contacts, observe how successful practitioners make their living, and hone your skills and ideas for commercial and professional advantage. Such cross-disciplinary collaborations prepare you for a world where you will inevitably work with people from all walks of life. Your live projects and assessments will get you accustomed to the importance of deadlines and working to specific briefs and tight specifications.

Over the next few years, CSAD will be developing opportunities for incubation of business proposals from its graduates and postgraduate training to get business opportunities up and running.

All students’ are expected to complete a portable ‘record of achievement’ and use their PDP to support employability and life-long learning, normally in the form of a blog, that integrates opportunities for self-reflection in programmes in order to help them develop as effective and confident learners.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers a programme of online distance learning courses that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Diploma in Computer and Communications Law. Read more

M3DL - (Minimum - two years; part-time)

The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers a programme of online distance learning courses that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Diploma in Computer and Communications Law.

The programme draws on the established strengths of the Centre for Commercial Law Studies (CCLS) in computer, e-commerce, internet, communications law, media law and associated topics.

Law as a subject is particularly suitable for online learning in that it is primarily text-based, so delivery of teaching materials is not restricted by bandwidth limitations. Most materials for Computer and Communications Law are available in digital format from databases such as Lexis and Westlaw to which you gain access through your Queen Mary Student account. We use a virtual learning environment (VLE) as a platform to deliver clear course structures, teaching materials and to create interactive courses. Your e-learning experience is enhanced by tutorials using discussion boards, blog postings and live chat for class discussions and question and answer sessions. We have designed the courses to allow for as much interaction and feedback between students and tutors as possible. Your understanding will be deepened by discussing your reading with fellow students and your course tutor and carrying out short tasks related to the module. We also use audio and audio-visual presentations. You will not be required to have access to a local law library, a basic internet connection and browser is all that is needed to do the programme.

Your degree certificate will make no distinction between the Postgraduate Diploma studied by presence in London and the Postgraduate Diploma studied by distance learning.

Programme

The programme must be completed within a minimum of two years, and a maximum of six years. The diploma requires the successful completion of 120 credits which can be completed as follows:

◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation), or
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as one 10,000-word dissertation
If you choose to continue to the LLM, you will need to complete 180 credits, which can be completed as follows:
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as three 10,000-word dissertations, (or one 20,000-word dissertation in addition to one 10,000-word dissertation), or
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as two 10,000-word dissertations, (or, with approval, one 20,000-word dissertation)

Modules and Dissertation

The year is divided into three four-month terms, with a selection of modules and dissertations being offered each term.

◦Taught modules (15 credits)
◦Each module requires around seven and a half hours of work a week over one term. Each module will consist of assessed tasks, a module essay and final assessment exercise (take-home exam).

◦Dissertations – topic of your own choice.
◦10000 dissertations (30 credits) – taken over two consecutive terms.
◦20000 dissertation (60 credits) – taken over four consecutive terms.

◦Research seminar paper/presentation (optional) (15 credits) (January – May)
◦This involves a 30 minute presentation at the residential weekend on a topic of your choice agreed with your supervisor followed by the submission of a 5000 word essay during the May – August term.

During each term a selection of three to four modules from the list below will be offered. Modules are usually offered on a two year cycle. The terms are as follows:
◦Autumn Session: From the beginning of September until December
◦Spring Session: Beginning of January until April
◦Summer Session: Beginning of May until August

Modules
◦CCDM008 Online Banking and Financial Services
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM013 Advanced IP Issues: Protection of Computer Software
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM015 Advanced IP Issues: Digital Rights Management
◦CCDM016 Intellectual Property: Foundation
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM020 Internet Jurisdictional Issues and Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM021 European Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM025 Mergers and Acquisitions in the ICT Sector
◦CCDM026 International Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM027 E-Commerce Law
◦CCDM028 Online Media Regulation
◦CCDM029 Taxation and Electronic Commerce
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM037 Broadcasting Regulation
◦CCDM038 Regulation of Cross-Border Online Gambling
◦CCDM039 Internet Governance
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 Cloud Computing

Application Dates

You can start the programme in either the autumn term or the spring term. You should return your completed application forms two months before the start of term. For example, for an autumn start you will need to return your forms by mid-July and for a spring start you will need to return your forms by the beginning of November.

As this is a distance learning programme, we understand that applicants may live overseas or outside London. To comply with official admissions procedures if you are made an offer all applicants will be expected to submit by post (courier) or in person certified copies of qualifications which were up-loaded when making an online application.

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This is a one-year Masters Research degree programme beginning in September. Read more

The programme

This is a one-year Masters Research degree programme beginning in September. It offers students with a good BSc degree in Biochemistry, Biology or related disciplines the opportunity to acquire a wide range of advanced research techniques through carrying out a one-year laboratory based research project under the direction of a member of staff selected by the student. Students will advance their research skills (including data analysis, bioinformatics tools and presentation skills).

This course is designed to equip students with the necessary skills of a researcher in biomedical sciences, ecology, evolution and behaviour or plant molecular sciences.

The aims of this degree programme are:
• to provide training in the key generic skills required to be a scientific researcher;
• to provide advanced training in a specialised branch of biological sciences research;
• to ensure familiarity with a range of transferable, advanced research skills;
• to provide practice in communicating results of research both by oral presentation and by
preparation of a Master thesis.

Students are offered: a major supervised research project lasting approximately eight months, the opportunity to work with a leading scientist in a chosen field, experience of working as part of a research team and development of high level practical research skills in the lab or field.

Teaching, learning and assessment

Although this is a research degree there is a taught component with lectures being delivered throughout the first two terms. As part of this there is a requirement to complete coursework, prepare and present your research to a School audience by means of a poster as well as a 20 minute oral presentation in the summer term. All elements of the programme must be passed in order to be able to submit the final project for assessment in summer.

Students receive regular, scheduled, feedback on their performance in taught modules, their project plan, literature review/draft introduction (autumn term), draft materials and methods write up (spring term), preparatory oral presentation (spring term); oral presentation (summer term); and draft project write up (summer term).

Applying

Before applying you will need to peruse and then identify academic staff members whose projects you are interested in. https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/biologicalsciences/prospectivestudents/mastersbyresearch/home.aspx.

The project will be selected from one of three major research areas within the School: Biomedical Sciences (BMS), Plant Molecular Sciences (PMS), and Ecology Evolution and Behaviour (EEB).
Once you have identified your area of interest, you should contact potential supervisors (via e-mail) to discuss details of the projects and availability of placement. Having made contact remember to state at least 2 the supervisors and project names in the 'supporting statement' section of our online application.

Places/projects on our course are limited. In order to secure your place and confirm your acceptance to our programme, it is advisable to pay a tuition fee deposit after you receive our offer.

Further learning and career opportunities

The programme prepares students for future careers in Biological Sciences research, including doctoral degrees, and related areas of employment. Students are provided with training in a range of subject specific and transferable skills.

If you wish to discuss the MSc informally, please contact the MSc Programme Director Dr Pavlos Alifragis () (01784 444988).

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This is the first masters level degree course that brings academic rigour and focus to this multi-disciplinary subject. The MSc in Flow Assurance for Oil and Gas Production is suitable for engineering and applied science graduates who wish to embark on successful careers in the oil and gas industry. Read more

Course Description

This is the first masters level degree course that brings academic rigour and focus to this multi-disciplinary subject. The MSc in Flow Assurance for Oil and Gas Production is suitable for engineering and applied science graduates who wish to embark on successful careers in the oil and gas industry. Our strategic links with industry ensures that all the materials taught on the course are relevant, timely and meets the needs of organisations competing within the sector. This industry-led education makes our graduates some of the most desirable the world for energy companies to recruit.

In the foreseeable future, hydrocarbon (oil and gas) will still be the major energy source irrespective of the developments in renewable and nuclear energy. The term ‘flow assurance’ was coined by Petrobras in the early 1990s meaning literally “guarantee of flow.” It covers all methods to ensure the safe and efficient delivery of hydrocarbons from the well to the collection facilities. It is a multi-disciplinary activity involving a number of engineering disciplines including mechanical, chemical, process, control, instrumentation and software engineering.

Previously uneconomical fields are now being exploited - oil and gas are produced in hostile environments from deep water to the Arctic. As conventional oil reserves decline, companies are developing unconventional oil fields with complex fluid properties. All of these factors mean that flow assurance plays an increasingly important role in the oil and gas industry.

Course overview

The MSc in Flow Assurance for Oil and Gas Production is made up of nine compulsory taught modules (eight compulsory and one optional from a selection of three), a group project and an individual research project.

In addition to management, communication, team work and research skills, each student will attain at least the following outcomes from this degree course:

- Develop a professional ability to undertake a critical appraisal of technical and/or commercial literature.
- Demonstrate an ability to manage research studies, and plan and execute projects in the area of oil and gas production technology and flow assurance.
- Use of the techniques appropriate for the management of a oil and gas production and transport systems.
- Gain an in-depth understanding of the technical, economic and environmental issues involved in the design and operation of oil and gas production and transport systems.

Group project

The group project runs between February and April and is designed to give students invaluable experience of delivering a project within an industry structured team. The project is sponsored by industrial partners who provide particular problems linked to their plant operations. Projects generally require the group to provide a solution to the operational problem. This group project is shared across the Process Systems Engineering MSc, Flow Assurance MSc and Carbon Capture and Transport MSc, giving the added benefit of gaining new insights, ways of thinking, experience and skills from students with other backgrounds.

During the project you will develop a range of skills including learning how to establish team member roles and responsibilities, project management, and delivering technical presentations. All groups submit a written report and deliver a presentation to the industry partner. Part-time students will take an additional elective module instead of the group project.

It is clear that the modern design engineer cannot be divorced from the commercial world. In order to provide practice in this matter, a poster presentation will be required from all students. This presentation provides the opportunity to develop presentation skills and effectively handle questions about complex issues in a professional manner.

Recent Group Projects include:

- Waste water treatment process design
- A new operation mode design for a gas processing plant.

Individual Project

The individual research project allows students to delve deeper into a specific area of interest. Our industrial partners often put forward practical problems or areas of development as potential research topics. For part-time students, their research project is usually undertaken in collaboration with their place of work. The individual project takes place from April/May to August.

Recent Individual Research Projects include:

- Separation – from Subsea to Topside
- Evaluation of Multiphase Flow Metering
- Multiphase Jet Pumps
- Sand Transport in Undulating Terrains.

Modules

The taught programme for the Flow Assurance masters is generally delivered from October to March and is comprised of eight compulsory modules, and one optional module to select from a choice of four. The modules are delivered over one to two weeks of intensive delivery with the later part of the module being free from structured teaching to allow time for more independent learning and reflection. Students on the part-time programme will complete all of the compulsory modules based on a flexible schedule that will be agreed with the course director.

Core -

Management for Technology
Risk Management and Reliability Engineering
Pumps and Pumping Systems
Process Plant Operations
Advanced Control Systems
Introduction to Flow Assurance
Multiphase Flows
Multiphase Flows
Production Technology and Chemistry

Optional -

Process Measurement Systems
Process Design and Simulation
Computational Fluid Dynamics
Structural Integrity

Assessment

Taught modules: 40%; Group project: 20% (dissertation for part-time students); Individual Research Project: 40%.
The taught modules are assessed by an examination and/or assignment. The Group Project is assessed by a written technical report and oral presentations. The Individual Research Project is assessed by a written thesis and oral presentation.

Funding

Bursaries are available; please contact the Course Director for more information.

Cranfield Postgraduate Loan Scheme (CPLS) - https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Study/Postgraduate-degrees/Fees-and-funding/Funding-opportunities/cpls/Cranfield-Postgraduate-Loan-Scheme

The Cranfield Postgraduate Loan Scheme (CPLS) is a funding programme providing affordable tuition fee and maintenance loans for full-time UK/EU students studying technology-based MSc courses.

Career opportunities

There is considerable global demand in the oil and gas industry for flow assurance specialists with in-depth technical knowledge and practical skills. The industry led education makes our graduates some of the most desirable for recruitment in this sector. The depth and breadth of the course equips graduates with knowledge and skills to tackle one of the most demanding challenges to secure our energy resource. Graduates of the course can also be recruited in other upstream and downstream positions. Their knowledge can additionally be applied to the petrochemical, process and power industries.

Further Information

For further information on this course, please visit our course webpage - http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/courses/masters/flow-assurance-for-oil-and-gas-production.html

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The Aberystwyth MSc in Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) is designed to provide you with a range of key skills and expertise required to understand, analyse and interpret remote sensing and other spatial datasets. Read more
The Aberystwyth MSc in Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) is designed to provide you with a range of key skills and expertise required to understand, analyse and interpret remote sensing and other spatial datasets. In this highly interdisciplinary Masters course, you will be exposed to the cutting edge of understanding from a range of subject areas, taught by world-class experts.

All the Remote Sensing Masters are offered through the collaboration of the Institutes of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences (IBERS), of Mathematics, Physics and Computer Science (IMPACS), of Computer Sciences, and of Geography, History, Politics and Psychology (IGHPP).

You will have access to these three world-class institutes. The superb teaching staff members maintain active national and international research programmes in their specialist subjects and ensure that every exciting development is brought into the course material. Their collective expertise and experience, and the superb departmental facilities available at Aberystwyth, ensure that your Remote Sensing course has a rigorous academic core with strong practical relevance.

The Aberystwyth MSc in Remote Sensing and GIS has a strong vocational dimension, with field-based and work experience modules that link the latest theoretical concepts with real applications. You will develop a cache of practical, technical and analytical skills which will stand you in excellent stead for entry into further study, public sector organisations and private companies.

Our lecturers are active researchers working at the cutting edge of their disciplines, and you will benefit from being taught the latest geographical theories and techniques. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework assessment (REF 2014) DGES retained its crown of the best Geography department in Wales, with 78% of the research being undertaken classified as either "world leading" or "internationally excellent”. DGES is also in the top ten of UK Geography departments with regard to research power, which provides a measure of the quality of research, as well as of the number of staff undertaking research within the department.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/gis-remote-sensing-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you wish to obtain a Master’s degree with leading input from four internationally-renowned research departments;
- If you have a 2:1 degree or higher in a related discipline;
- If you wish to gain academic expertise, field skills and technical experience in a remote sensing discipline;
- If you wish to enter one of a diverse range of careers requiring research, analysis and practical excellence.

Course detail

The Master’s in Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) combines the fields of GIS and Remote Sensing to provide students with a strong theoretical and conceptual background and vocational training in these inter-related topics. Having completed your undergraduate degree in a related field, this MSc will enable you to bring your skills and knowledge up to date with a mastery of the latest technological tools and contemporary theoretical understanding. The course particularly focuses on conveying new approaches to data processing, analysis and interpretation as well as the use of innovative technologies, such as unmanned airborne vehicles.

The Remote Sensing component will introduce you to a range of technologies (including radar, optical/hyperspectral sensing and lidar) in a breadth of application contexts (including climate change, human impacts on terrestrial ecosystems, glaciology, hydrology, forestry, coastal change, carbon cycle science to biodiversity). Within GIS, you will encounter fundamental concepts and software functionality.

Whatever your own previous experience or future aspiration, you will benefit from the marvellous integration of cutting-edge theory and practical application, across four world-class departments. In addition to this input, you will be encouraged to conduct your own reading of up-to-date articles on key aspects of GIS and remote sensing, and also to participate in relevant meetings and conferences, such as the Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry Society Annual Conference.

As a graduate of the Aberystwyth MSc in Remote Sensing and GIS, you will possess the latest technological, theoretical and practical understanding of the subject. Recent graduates in remote sensing have been highly successful in continuing within academia and finding employment within private enterprises and in UK and international government agencies. You can be fully confident that this MSc, as a statement of contemporary academic expertise proved in practice, will make you highly desirable to employers, academic institutions and recruiting government bodies.

Format

The course is a full-time programme, taught over one year, and is divided into two parts over three semesters. In part one, you will establish a breadth of necessary skills in a number of core modules whilst directing your own study by choosing specialist modules, worth a total of 120 credits. In part two, you will apply your learning in the individual dissertation worth an additional 60 credits.

Contact time approximately 8-10 hours a week in the first two semesters. During semester three you will arrange your level of contact time with your assigned supervisor.

Assessment

The taught part of the course (Part 1) is delivered and assessed through lectures, student seminars, practical exercises, case studies, course work and formal examinations. The subsequent successful submission of your research dissertation (Part 2) leads to the award of MSc.

Employability

Every aspect of the Aberystwyth Master’s in Remote Sensing and GIS programme is designed to enhance your employability: indeed, successful completion of this degree is in itself certain to do so by building your CV; but more significant is the hugely enhanced array of knowledge, abilities and skills with which you will graduate. We know from past graduates’ success that prospective employers take a similar view, as our alumni have taken positions with UK and international government bodies, private enterprises and leading research establishments.

By completing the Aberystwyth Master’s in Remote Sensing and GIS, you will have strengthened your employability in both specialist and more general areas of work. As a specialist, you will be a highly competent contributor to any work relating to climate change, human impacts on terrestrial ecosystems, glaciology, hydrology, forestry, coastal change, carbon cycle science and biodiversity. In more generic employment situations, your strengths will be broad and deep because you can demonstrate your mastery of any planning, research, analysis and reporting skills that your employer will require.

All employers, whether subject-related specialists or more general corporate bodies and consultancies, place a high value on first-rate technical aptitude, clarity in research and analysis and fluency in communication. You will gain these skills, and much more, as you progress through your studies at Aberystwyth to become an engaging candidate for areas of work relating to remote sensing and beyond.

- Field Expertise in Practise
As a highly practical Master’s course, the MSc in Remote Sensing and GIS includes field trips which will take you into the Cambrian Mountains. This will provide you with hands-on experience in the use of field equipment and the collection of ground truth data to support the interpretation and analysis of remote sensing and GIS datasets.

Such activities convert the purely academic theory of research and data collection into the proven know-how of experience and, importantly, the necessary repertoire of presentation skills to communicate your findings successfully. This experience gained by this approach, which begins at the concept stage and ends in written and live presentation, is a rare advantage in the competitive jobs market. The MSc in Remote Sensing and GIS is set up to help you pursue this edge throughout your studies, securing your theoretical learning with practical knowledge.

- Advanced Skills in Research and Technology
As you would expect, the content of this MSc is strongly weighted in favour of understanding all the scientific processes and advanced technical tools at your disposal. A number of modules, such as the Advanced Research Skills, are designed to develop your thinking to the point that critical analysis and evaluation becomes second-nature. The benefits of practising such skills go beyond the Master’s course and into further study and any professional employment you choose.

Masters students have access to a dedicated computer laboratory (located within the Llandinam Tower) for research in GIS and remote sensing which is fully equipped with the latest software. You will get to grips with an impressive array of GIS and remote sensing software systems, technologies and programming languages including IDL ENVI, ARCGIS, ArcInfo, Erdas Imagine, Cyclone (LiDAR processing), Gamma (radar processing) and python. This highly specific and technical experience will more than satisfy employers within related employment sectors and impress those in other, unrelated areas of work.

- Project Management in the Dissertation
The Master’s dissertation requires you to work independently and to pursue your own individual dissertation topic. You will access to the support and expertise of any of the four departments relevant to remote sensing, but you are required to cultivate a professional work ethic to deliver the combination of research, analysis, communication and presentation demanded by your dissertation. This rigorous part of the MSc will require you to employ project management skills which are entirely transferrable to almost any work context that Master’s graduates apply for.

Studying for this Master’s degree will allow you to sharpen up all your core scientific disciplines, your professional work ethos and your presentation and communication skills. Once secured by obtaining your Masters Degree, you will have gained confidence in the level of your academic expertise and practical field skills, which in turn will enhance your employability in both highly specialised related professions and also on broader, unrelated professional paths.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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The Professional Doctorate in Biomedical Science comprises four compulsory modules with integrated doctoral level research, aimed at full-time practitioners wishing to expand and extend their skills and knowledge to support exisiting roles, or to meet the demands of new ones. Read more
The Professional Doctorate in Biomedical Science comprises four compulsory modules with integrated doctoral level research, aimed at full-time practitioners wishing to expand and extend their skills and knowledge to support exisiting roles, or to meet the demands of new ones. For example, this qualification is ideal for those taking on or seeking managerial or consultancy roles. It is open to employees working in the NHS or equivalent healthcare industry, or practicing in laboratories in the UK and internationally. Modules cover good clinical practice, research management, and highlight the concept and value of reflective practitioners. We also introduce you to training on a personal, professional and academic level through workshops, coursework and personal portfolios.

Course detail

You will study the following compulsory modules:

• Research Theory and Practice - Training in project management to help you achieve a work/life/research balance, plus research governance, Health and Safety, good clinical practice and intellectual property rights. Through coursework, you will also gain skills in presentation, statistics, IT, writing for publications and being a reflective practitioner/researcher.

• Project Development towards a Doctorate - You'll begin this module with an idea of the area of research you'd like to explore, and we guide you in researching the literature, formulating hypotheses, and planning your research methodology, work packages and timescales.

• Interim Report - Designed to encourage the 'thoughtful researcher', this module features structured sessions on scientific writing, thesis writing skills, systematic review, poster presentation and oral presentation skills.

• Professional Development for Biomedical Science - Develop the skills and confidence you need to be a reflective practitioner. You'll do this through a range of workshops including intellectual property, leadership, presentation skills, systematic reviews, biomedical ethics and group dynamics.

• Research Project - You'll conduct research at your workplace that will inform your 30,000 word thesis. You submit your proposal idea for research when you apply for the programme, and develop it with a supervision team from UWE and a suitable work colleague. The final thesis should be completed and submitted no later than 12 months after the end of the five-year programme.

Format

There are five one-day sessions per annum, covering the modular structure and supervised research and learning, giving you excellent opportunities to engage with experts throughout the course, both in person and online.

Assessment

Assessed work varies with each module, but will comprise a written research proposal, reflection on the research process, a systematic review of the research topic, visual and oral presentations, and a reflective portfolio of attendance at workshops and research seminars. There will be doctorate-level viva voce examinations midway through your research and after your research thesis submission.

There are 30 credits per module (120 in total) and you must complete them before submitting your final thesis. Interim qualifications, based on modular credits, are available at the end of Years 1 and 2 if you can't complete the full five-year programme.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) at Queen Mary offers a programme of online distance learning that leads to the award of a University of London LLM in Computer and Communications Law. Read more

M3S3 (minimum - two years; part-time)

The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) at Queen Mary offers a programme of online distance learning that leads to the award of a University of London LLM in Computer and Communications Law.

The programme draws on our established teaching and research expertise in IT law, e-commerce law, communications law, computer law and media law.

Law as a subject is particularly suitable for online learning in that it is primarily text-based, so delivery of teaching materials is not restricted by bandwidth limitations. Most of the relevant materials for computer and communications law are available in digital format from databases such as Lexis and Westlaw to which you gain access through your Queen Mary Student account. We use a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) as a platform to deliver clear course structures, teaching materials and to create interactive courses. Your e-learning experience is enhanced by tutorials using discussion boards, blog postings and live chat for class discussions and question and answer sessions. We have designed the course to allow as much interaction and feedback between students and tutors as possible. Your understanding will be deepened by discussing your reading with fellow students and your course tutor and carrying out short tasks related to the course. We also use audio and audio-visual presentations. You will not need to have access to a local law library, a basic internet connection and browser is all that is needed to do the course.

Your degree certificate will make no distinction between the LLM Computer and Communications Law studied by presence in London and the LLM studied by Distance Learning.

Programme

Structure
You can study Computer and Communications Law to Postgraduate Certificate, Diploma or LLM level, by distance learning.

You will need to gain 180 credits for the LLM, which can be completed as follows:
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as three 10,000-word dissertations, (or one 20,000-word dissertation in addition to one 10,000-word dissertation), or
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as two 10,000-word dissertations, (or, with approval, one 20,000-word dissertation)

Distance learning
Increasingly we all face more pressures in our business lives and finding the time to attend courses can be very difficult. Distance learning is the solution to your training needs; it allows you the full benefits of studying for a recognised UK university qualification whilst still in full-time employment using this freedom and flexibility to your advantage.

You can set the pace at which you learn and decide when, where and how long you want to study for.

This programme is delivered via our web-based virtual learning environment (VLE). All written assignments are submitted through the e-learning system. You are encouraged to interact with teaching staff and other students in online discussion forums, join group activities and be part of the student community.

Modules and Dissertations
The year is divided into three four-month terms, with a selection of modules and dissertations being offered each term.
◦Taught modules (15 credits)
◦Each module requires around seven and a half hours of work a week over one term. Each module will consist of assessed tasks, a module essay and final assessment exercise (take-home exam

◦Dissertations – topic of your own choice
◦10000 dissertations (30 credits) – taken over two consecutive terms
◦20000 dissertation (60 credits) – taken over four consecutive terms

◦Research seminar paper/presentation (optional) (15 credits) (January – May)
◦This involves a 30 minute presentation at the residential weekend on a topic of your choice agreed with your supervisor followed by the submission of a 5000 word essay during the May – August term.

During each term a selection of three to four modules from the list below will be offered. Modules are usually offered on a two year cycle. The terms are as follows:
◦Autumn Session: From the beginning of September until December
◦Spring Session: Beginning of January until April
◦Summer Session: Beginning of May until August

Modules
◦CCDM008 Online Banking and Financial Services
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM013 Advanced IP Issues: Protection of Computer Software
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM015 Advanced IP Issues: Digital Rights Management
◦CCDM016 Intellectual Property: Foundation
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM020 Internet Jurisdictional Issues and Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM021 European Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM025 Mergers and Acquisitions in the ICT Sector
◦CCDM026 International Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM027 E-Commerce Law
◦CCDM028 Online Media Regulation
◦CCDM029 Taxation and Electronic Commerce
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM037 Broadcasting Regulation
◦CCDM038 Regulation of Cross-Border Online Gambling
◦CCDM039 Internet Governance
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 Cloud Computing

Application Dates

You can start the LLM in Computer and Communications Law programme in either the autumn term or the spring term. You should return your completed application forms two months before the start of term. For example, for an autumn start you will need to return your forms by mid-July and for a spring start you will need to return your forms by the beginning of November.

As this is a distance learning programme, we understand that applicants may live overseas or outside London. To comply with official admissions procedures if you are made an offer all applicants will be expected to submit by post (courier) or in person certified copies of qualifications which were up-loaded when making an online application.

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The MSc in Human Anatomy is a unique Master's programme created in response to the need to provide training in human gross anatomy for those who wish to improve their understanding of the structure and function of the human body, as well as those for whom this is a new area of study. Read more
The MSc in Human Anatomy is a unique Master's programme created in response to the need to provide training in human gross anatomy for those who wish to improve their understanding of the structure and function of the human body, as well as those for whom this is a new area of study. The programme aims to provide expertise for those intending to use the knowledge gained in a learning and teaching environment.

The programme is the only one of its kind in the UK
It combines whole body dissection with practicing techniques for the presentation of material for learning and teaching
Provides an introduction to anatomical preservation and presentation techniques
Full body dissection of Thiel embalmed (soft fix) cadavers
Opportunity for self-directed original research

What does the course involve?

The programme is based around human gross anatomy, being supplemented by relevant embryology, neuroanatomy, clinical and surgical anatomy topics and anatomical techniques. Many components are examined entirely by course work through seminar presentations, essays, practical techniques and the development of web-based teaching tutorials and websites.

Both semesters 1 and 2 have a strong emphasis on gross anatomy through whole body dissection working in groups of no more than four per cadaver. Semester 1 also has modules in Embryology and Developmental Anatomy and in Anatomical techniques, while semester 2 has modules in Neuroanatomy and in Clinical and Surgical Anatomy Topics.

Semester 3 allows students to focus on an independent and novel research project in one of the following areas:

Thiel cadaveric anatomy
The anatomy of a specific region of clinical/surgical interest
Functional anatomy
Anatomy and biomechanics
Education

Our reputation

The College of Life Sciences at the University of Dundee was ranked ahead of all other Universities in Scotland and is one of the UK's top 5 universities in the category of Biological Sciences out of 51 Universities.
Staff have international reputations in practice and research.
The award-winning staff of the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID) are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, cranio-facial reconstruction and the study of the human body.

Benefits of studying with us

Study human gross anatomy in the renowned Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification
Access to Thiel embalmed cadavers
Introduction to anatomical preservation and presentation techniques and skills
Exposure to a wide range of IT and personal presentation skills

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This unique two-year international programme is offered in collaboration with Yale University. There is a focus on developmental psychopathology drawing on multidisciplinary perspectives, with a specific emphasis on neuroscience. Read more
This unique two-year international programme is offered in collaboration with Yale University. There is a focus on developmental psychopathology drawing on multidisciplinary perspectives, with a specific emphasis on neuroscience. Students spend year one in London, primarily based at the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families and year two at Yale.

Degree information

The programme provides students with an excellent foundation in developmental psychopathology and neuroscience, with a focus on:
-The emergence of childhood clinical disorders (e.g. autism, depression and PTSD)
-Multiple theoretical frameworks of disorder
-Research practice, including science communication
-The translational issues around research and psychological treatments
-This two-year MRes has a total value of 330 credits. 135 credits of taught modules are taken in the first year and in the second year, the research portfolio, comprising an oral presentation, proposal, dissertation and research poster, comprises a total of 195 credits.

Year One core modules
-An Introduction to Psychoanalytic Theory
-The Clinical Theory of Psychoanalysis
-Research Methods I: Research Skills
-Research Methods II: Introduction to Statistical Analysis
-Research Methods III: Evaluating Research Literature (formative)
-Introduction to Neuroscience Methods
-Affective Neuroscience
-Multiple Perspectives on Development and Psychopathology I
-Multiple Perspectives on Development and Psychopathology II

Year Two core modules
-Series of formative workshops (e.g. fMRI; EEG; Advanced research design; Integrating cross-disciplinary models)
-Research Portfolio (see below)

Dissertation/research project
The research portfolio comprises a project presentation – made up of an oral presentation, slides and a written proposal, a written dissertation and a research poster. All students undertake a research project supervised by a faculty member while at Yale, completing a dissertation of 15,000–17,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme comprises lectures, research classes, tutorials, small-group seminars, and computer-based practical classes. Assessment is predominantly through essays, statistical assignments, a piece of science communication and unseen examinations. In the second year assessment will be based on the research portfolio - comprising an oral presentation, written research proposal, the dissertation and a poster. Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website.

Careers

Typically our students are interested in pursuing a research or clinical career. Of students who graduated within the last two years, 23% are now enrolled on PhD programmes; 38% are employed as research associates, 23% are undertaking further training and the remaining 16% are undertaking clinical work.

Employability
The two-year structure allows students to not only develop in-depth theoretical knowledge and research skills but also provides the opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of research under the mentorship of a leading Yale academic and their research lab. A grounding in quantitative analysis and fMRI/EEG skills combined with a focus on clinical disorders during childhood make students particularly attractive as prospective PhD candidates and doctoral Clinical Psychology applicants. Students are encouraged to publish their research where possible.

Some students seek voluntary clinically relevant experience across both years, which is particularly helpful for those considering applications to Clinical Psychology doctoral programmes.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Students acquire excellent research skills in statistical analysis and a grounding in neuroimaging methods, including fMRI and EEG, and expertise in critical evaluation of research.

The programme is based at the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families in London, a world-renowned centre for research, training and clinical practice in the field of child mental health.

UCL Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. The division has excellent links with other universities including Yale, providing unique research and networking opportunities for postgraduate students.

Our work attracts staff and students from around the world. Together they create an outstanding and vibrant environment, taking advantage of cutting-edge resources, including state-of-the art neuroimaging equipment. The division offers an extremely supportive environment with opportunities to attend numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

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Do you want to be part of a vibrant artistic community to develop your art practice and critical awareness of contemporary art discourse? The MFA course… Read more
Do you want to be part of a vibrant artistic community to develop your art practice and critical awareness of contemporary art discourse? The MFA course aims to challenge and extend its students' work and relationship to the visual world by providing the creative and intellectual framework for the exploration of current attitudes and phenomena in the context of contemporary art, culture and society.

Why study MFA Art, Society & Publics at Dundee?

A central aim of the course is to foster subjective artistic concerns by deepening students’ individual art practice, research interests and professional knowledge. Students are taught how to develop and sustain an art practice. By providing the skills to function in academia students are additionally enabled to identify a potential long-term academic context for their practice. For those interested in working in the two distinct areas of art world and academia, each with its own values, students are helped to develop PhD study proposals.

What's great about MFA Art, Society & Publics at Dundee?

This course is taught by Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design which has been rated as the top institution in Scotland for research in art and design, and one of the best in the whole of the UK (RAE 2008). The MFA Art, Society & Publics course will develop your skills in creativity, aesthetics and artistic technique.

DJCAD is committed to the sharing of knowledge and experience across teaching resources and opportunities, and these include the possibility of collaborating throughout the year on creative and critical projects that aim to integrate art practice, art-writing and curating. For the individual student, the MFA course leads to a curated public exhibition, the Masters Show.

The course benefits from a truly international environment; postgraduate students come from all over the world including China, Korea, Saudi Arabia, Republic of Ireland, Iran, Greece, USA and Germany.

How you will be taught

You will be stimulated to develop a highly ambitious and informed art practice by engaging in studio-based practice, research-based work and (interdisciplinary) seminars with international visiting artists and speakers. Professional skills such as presentation of practical and theoretical work will be developed through presentation opportunities and elective modules that focus on engagement and building professional relationships.

What you will study

You will be stimulated to develop a highly ambitious and informed art practice by engaging both individually and through collaborative opportunities. We believe that students learn most from their peers, guided by a well-structured, content-rich course that is led by committed teachers. Practice and research-based work is supported through events such as (interdisciplinary) seminars with internationally active DJCAD staff and visiting artists and speakers. Professional skills such as presentation of practical and theoretical work are developed through situations and opportunities that focus on engagement and building professional relationships. Optional specialist masterclasses on performance, sound and lighting are some of the elective activities that bring undergraduate and Masters students together for short, intense working periods.

How you will be assessed

Students are assessed on studio work, evidence of inquiry, written work and oral presentation. At the end of the course a body of work is presented at the Masters Degree Show.

The programme has two early exit points: Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma.

Careers

The first cohort of MFA Art, Society & Publics students graduated in 2014. They are practicing as artists, curators, lecturers, researchers, running artist-led organisations. Others are undertaking practice-led PhD study.

During the course the students worked with groups, individuals and resources with whom many continue to work. including The Maria Gugging Clinic and The Maria Gugging Museum, Vienna; Summerhall, Edinburgh; Deveron Arts; Museum Services, University of Dundee; Artists’ Book Collection Dundee; Taigh Chearsabhagh Museum & Arts Centre; Dighty Connect, Douglas Community Centre, Dundee.

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This programme has been designed provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of the physiology of sport and exercise. Read more
This programme has been designed provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of the physiology of sport and exercise. The programme facilitates the integration of theory and professional practice, and throughout the programme the research process and emphasis on student autonomy of learning become increasingly important.

Programme Structure and Content
Research skills oriented modules form the bedrock of SHES’ MRes programmes. As a result taught modules are aligned with both discipline specific and the (higher) cognitive skills our MRes programmes aim to provide. Within a modular structure all students undertake compulsory modules in research skills totalling 40 credits:

Research Skills (20 credits)
and 20 credits from the following modules:

How to Conduct Statistics (20 credits);
Presentation of Statistics (10 credits);
Peer Reviewing (10 credits);
Latent Variable Modelling (10 credits);
plus 20 credits from optional modules and a final compulsory Research Project comprising 120 credits.

Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

How to conduct Statistics and Presentation of Statistics modules
The purpose of these two taught modules is to provide students with an in-depth understanding and critical appreciation of statistical procedures. As independent study based modules, they will enable students to gain a comprehensive understanding of a statistical procedure of their choosing (following consultation with the staff member responsible for the module). Towards this end, students will likely cover (i) relevant background issues; (ii) when to use utilise particular statistical tests;(iii) how to conduct statistical testing via appropriate software; (iv) how to correctly interpret computational output; and (v) how to present the findings following analysis.

Students learn about these themes through a “learning by teaching” paradigm via the development of a statistics oriented verbal presentation and written assignment resembling a book chapter/resource. The verbal presentation will be conducted first in order to obtain developmental feedback for the written assignment.

Peer Reviewing Scientific Research
Students work closely with their supervisor to perform an initial review of a previously submitted (and subsequently published) research article. Students will then follow the paper along the peer review process, discussing their review with their supervisor, and then be required to adequately address concerns which have been raised. Collectively this will mean that the student will cover a contemporary research topic in a highly focused and in-depth manner gaining a comprehensive understanding of how to prepare their own manuscripts (eg research proposal, Research Project) and how to evaluate the research of others. Students will also attend the School’s Research Seminar series.

Latent Variable Modelling
This module introduces postgraduate students to the concepts of Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) and to give a basic grounding in their implementation. It also covers an introduction to SEM using LISREL and topics including: measurement models and structural models; exploratory factor analysis; confirmatory factor analysis (CFA); structural modelling with observed and latent variables; conceptual issues, common misunderstandings and limitations.

Research Project
Under the guidance of their supervising tutor(s), students will pro-actively determine the content of this unit. The initial stages of the Research Project will develop the work of the project proposal and taught phases of the MRes programmes. This will involve the surveying and reviewing of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to their area of inquiry. Ethical approval of the study will be obtained before data may be collected, thereby introducing students to this integral part of the research process. Throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field. It is expected that the resulting projects will be publishable in international, peer-reviewed journals.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

Optional Modules:

In addition to the core/compulsory modules students choose a further 20 credits from the following optional modules:

The taught programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

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