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IN THIS 18-MONTH INTENSIVE PART-TIME PROGRAM YOU WILL GAIN. - Skills and know-how in the latest technologies in instrumentation, process control and industrial automation. Read more
IN THIS 18-MONTH INTENSIVE PART-TIME PROGRAM YOU WILL GAIN:

- Skills and know-how in the latest technologies in instrumentation, process control and industrial automation
- Guidance from industrial automation experts in the field
- Knowledge from the extensive experience of instructors, rather than from the clinical information gained from books and college
- Credibility as the local industrial automation expert in your firm
- Networking contacts in the industry
- Improved career prospects and income
- An Advanced Diploma of Industrial Automation

Next intake starts October 09, 2017. Applications now open; places are limited.

Contact us now to secure your place!

Payment is not required until around 2 to 4 weeks before the start of the program.

The EIT Advanced Diploma of of Industrial Automation is recognized worldwide and has been endorsed by the International Society of Automation (ISA). Please ask us about specific information on accreditation for your location.

OVERVIEW

Gain strong underpinning knowledge and expertise in Industrial Automation covering a wide range of skills ranging from instrumentation, automation and process control, industrial data communications, process plant layout, project and financial management and chemical engineering with a strong practical focus. Industrial Automation is an extremely fast moving area especially compared to the more traditional areas such as electrical and mechanical engineering. The field is diverse and dynamic and offers the opportunity for a well paid and enjoyable career. The aim of the course is to empower you with practical knowledge that will improve your productivity in the area and make you stand out as a leader in industrial automation amongst your peers.

*JOB OUTCOMES, INTERNATIONAL RECOGNITION AND PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIP:

A range of global opportunities awaits graduates of the Advanced Diploma of Industrial Automation. Pending full accreditation you may become a full member of Engineers Australia and your qualification will be recognized by Engineers Australia and (through the Dublin Accord) by leading professional associations and societies in Australia, Canada, Ireland, Korea, New Zealand, South Africa, United Kingdom and the United States. The Dublin Accord is an agreement for the international recognition of Engineering Technician qualifications.

For example, current enrolled students can apply for free student membership of Engineers Australia. After graduation, you can apply for membership to become an Engineering Associate, while graduates interested in UK recognition can apply for membership of the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) as a Technician Member of the Institution of Engineering and Technology.

This professional recognition greatly improves the global mobility of graduates, and offers you the opportunity of a truly international career.

You will be qualified to find employment as an Engineering Associate in public and private industry including transportation, manufacturing, process, construction, resource, energy and utilities industries. Engineering Associates often work in support of professional engineers or engineering technologists in a team environment. If you prefer to work in the field you may choose to find employment as a site supervisor, senior technician, engineering assistant, or similar.

PROGRAM STRUCTURE

The program is composed of 72 topics within 21 modules. These cover the following seven engineering threads to provide you with maximum practical coverage in the field of industrial automation:

- Instrumentation, Automation and Process Control
- Electrical Engineering
- Electronics
- Industrial Data Communications and Networking
- Mechanical Engineering
- Project Management
- Chemical Engineering

The modules will be completed in the following order:
1. Practical Instrumentation for Automation and Process Control
2. Practical Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering (for Non- Chemical Engineers)
3. Control Valve Sizing, Selection and Maintenance
4. Fundamentals of Process Plant Layout and Piping Design
5. Practical Process Control for Engineers and Technicians
6. Practical Tuning of Industrial Control Loops for Engineers and Technicians
7. Practical Distributed Control Systems (DCS)
8. Practical Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) for Automation and Process Control
9. Best Practice in Industrial Data Communications
10. Practical Advanced Process Control for Engineers and Technicians
11. Practical Boiler Control and Instrumentation for Engineers and Technicians
12. Practical Hazardous Areas for Engineers and Technicians
13. Practical Safety Instrumentation and Emergency Shutdown Systems for Process Industries Using IEC 6155 and IEC 61508
14. Practical HAZOPS (Hazard and Operability Studies) for Engineers and Technicians
15. Practical Shielding, EMC/EMI, Noise Reduction, Earthing and Circuit Board Layout of Electronic Systems
16. Practical Wireless Ethernet and TCP/ IP Networking
17. Practical Radio Telemetry Systems for Industry
18. Practical SCADA Systems for Industry
19. Motor Protection, Control and Maintenance Technologies
20. Practical Power Distribution for Engineers and Technicians
21. Practical Project Management for Electrical, Instrumentation and Mechanical Engineers and Technicians

COURSE FEES

EIT provides distance education to students located all around the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. We aim to give you a rapid response regarding course fees that are relevant to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student begins to study. For a rapid reply to your query regarding course fees and payment options, please contact a Course Advisor in your region via the below button and we will respond within two (2) business days.

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This course is about searching for traces of meaning in everyday practices, and looking beyond traditional shapes of religiosity. Read more

Master's specialisation in Practical Theology

This course is about searching for traces of meaning in everyday practices, and looking beyond traditional shapes of religiosity.
Have God and religion disappeared from modern society? According to some scholars of religion there is a global resurgence of religion, yet there is vast secularisation in most European societies continues. How can theology explain the transformation of the Christian religion in society? We need fresh expressions of theological concepts and new methods of research to understand religion beyond traditional studies of religiosity.
In the Master’s specialisation in Practical Theology, students are introduced in theological theory-building to understand the dynamics and meaning of lived religion at four different levels: the personal, inter-group relations, organisational and societal. Students learn to use empirical research methods to build new theological theory based on lived religion. Graduates of this Master’s specialisation in Practical Theology can become researchers, policy makers, educators or spiritual caregivers.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/practicaltheology

Why study Practical Theology at Radboud University?

- The new theoretical approach of Practical Theology at Radboud University manifests itself in the search for theological concepts that match the changing shape of the Christian religion in the life of individuals as well as fresh expressions of religious institutions.
- Our department has constructed new, unique methodologies that focus on a qualitative study of narratives, communication, and ritual (liturgy). We have expertise in spiritual biographical research, practice-oriented research and discourse analysis.
- We have a long-standing expertise in survey research, with a specialisation in cross-religious surveys where Christian believers are compared with believers of other religions (Islam, Hinduism).
- This programme is not just geared towards Europe, but also places developments in a global perspective.
- With electives, students have plenty of room to choose a direction that meets their professional and academic interests. Taking a few seminars from the other theology disciplines of choice (Church History, Literary Theology or Practical Theology) is mandatory to broaden students general knowledge on Theology.
- The third year is aimed at training students for a specific profession. Students can choose research (English), education (Dutch), religion and policy (Dutch) or spiritual care (Dutch).
- Teaching takes place in a stimulating, collegial setting with small groups, allowing for ample opportunity for questions and discussion.
- Radboud University and its Theology department are Roman Catholic in origin, but its Master’s programme in Theology is open to all students. Our students have very diverse religious and cultural backgrounds.

Change perspective

Graduates of Practical Theology will be able to pinpoint how certain groups of people view spirituality today, how they give meaning to lives and how this, sometimes, is at odds with traditional religious conventions. You will get insight in the different forms that religion takes in contemporary society and will be able to take that on board when participating in debates in the public arena.

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Theology or related area

2. A proficiency in English
In order to take part in this programme, you need to have fluency in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:
- An TOEFL score of >575 (paper based) or >232 (computer based) or >90 (internet based)
- A IELTS score of >6.5
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher

Career prospects

In a globalising world, more and more institutions require skills in theological communication and hermeneutics. Practical theologians search for traces of meaning in everyday practices and look beyond traditional forms of religiosity. Our graduates have an analytical attitude and the skills to make sound judgments which will help them participate in debates in the public arena. Using arguments based on Christian faith, they can convey their faith in society. In addition, the programme teaches you how to think independently and critically about the way that Christian doctrine can give meaning to contemporary issues.

Job positions

The Master’s programme in Theology has a strong emphasis on career prospects by allowing students to focus on one professional path in their third year: research, education, spiritual care or religion and policy.

Our approach to this field

Radboud University’s Master’s specialisation in Practical Theology is all about studying lived religion and lived spirituality. How do people today connect with Christian stories? The role of practical theologians is to research new religious motives. Where and in what way do people find inspiration? How do they give meaning to their lives?

Searching for new forms of religiosity
In other words, at Radboud University, we train our practical theologians to search for new forms of religiosity in order to gain an understanding of the transformation of religion. The church is not the only place for contemplation; sometimes people turn to the beach, the woods or even a health club. Symbols are given new meanings. Metaphors get a different connotation. The challenge is to deal with the tension between religious traditions and the many contemporary forms of spirituality.

We look at the role that religion and spirituality play, not only for individual people, but also for inter-group relationships and on organisational and societal levels. We try to get a grasp on differences between religious practices, how faith schools profile their religious character in their education policy, and how municipalities give religion a place in the services they offer, among other topics.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/practicaltheology

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The Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice (Online), also known as Professional Legal Training (PLT), is the link between a student's law degree and becoming a practising lawyer. Read more

The Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice (Online), also known as Professional Legal Training (PLT), is the link between a student's law degree and becoming a practising lawyer. The PLT program is a coursework degree that provides structured and supervised legal training, based on the Competency Standards for entry level lawyers developed by the admitting authorities and the Australian Professional Legal Education Council (APLEC). The online program can be undertaken full-time or part-time, and consists of the following three components: -Practical Legal Training: 1 semester (full-time) or 2 semesters (part-time); -Practical Experience (75 days); and -Continuing Practical Training (75 hours, undertaken concurrently with Practical Experience component). 

Professional outcomes

Successful completion of the Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice will enable you to apply for admission to legal practice in Australia (except South Australia and Northern Territory). Students should contact the relevant admitting authority to ascertain the requirements for admission in specific States or Territories. 

Structure and subjects

The Professional Legal Training online program has three components:

1. Practical legal training component

This component is delivered online over one semester (full-time) or two semesters (part-time).

Practical Legal Training concentrates on the development of ‘lawyering’ skills such as legal research, analysis and problem solving, legal writing and drafting, interviewing and oral communication, advising, advocacy, dispute resolution and professional ethics and conduct.

Online PLT students will be expected to attend Bond University for one learning intensive for one week near the beginning of the Practical Legal Training component.

2. Practical experience component

Students are required to complete 75 days of work experience in an approved law office in Australia.  If you are studying online full time, you may undertake your practical experience either before or after, but not concurrently with, the Practical Legal Training component. If you are studying online part time, you may undertake the practical experience before, after or concurrently with the Practical Legal Training component.  The work experience can be undertaken in more than one law office and can be completed prior to or after the Practical Training component. Our law Graduate Placement Manager can assist students in obtaining a placement.

3. Continuing practical training component

This provides students with a further 75 hours of training relevant to the Practical Experience component and is completed online. It is undertaken concurrently with the Practical Experience component.

Teaching approach

Bond Law’s unique personalised approach to teaching allows online students to benefit from one-on-one access to experienced practising legal professionals, PLT legal academics and acknowledged industry experts.



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Why study at Roehampton. You will be taught by a team of lecturers and researchers with ongoing experience as practitioners and consultants within the ministry sector. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • You will be taught by a team of lecturers and researchers with ongoing experience as practitioners and consultants within the ministry sector.
  • The University’s historical roots and links with vibrant congregations provide an excellent context for research into contemporary multi– cultural urban ministry and mission.
  • All Roehampton’s Ministerial Theology provisions are timetabled to fit in with busy ongoing ministry and leadership roles.
  • Roehampton is ranked best modern university in London (Complete University Guide 2018) and the most research-intensive modern university in the UK (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Course summary

The DTh is a professional doctorate programme in practical, ministry–focused theology. This programme offers strategic leadership training to senior level ministry personnel, seeking to broaden their applied theology in pastoral and missiological areas. The programme focuses on using research to develop theological practice.

There are two entry points for this programme. Stage 1A is for those with a good undergraduate degree and professional experience, and initially take a selection of preparatory taught modules. The second route, Stage 1B is for post-Masters applicants, and is an accelerated form of the course.

Regardless of entry point this programme will help those already engaged in Christian Ministry to develop the advanced research, evaluative and reflective skills necessary to further their professional and career profile. Students will prepare for more senior level, national or international roles, as leaders, advisors or consultants in ministry-related fields. As a practitioner of Practical Theology, this course will encourage you to reflect technically and theologically on your ministerial practice, and on the application of scholarship and research to a range of ministerial contexts.

In order to develop your research skills, the programme will provide you will extensive knowledge and understanding of areas of Practical Theology and the critical methods practiced at the forefront of the discipline. Students will then be able to reflect on these research methods in looking at their own practice, and you will be capable of producing findings that satisfy peer scrutiny and are deemed to be of publishable quality, making an original contribution to knowledge.

There is a wide range of areas in which students will develop their skills on this programme. You will enhance and apply your ability to handle written sources and empirical data, using appropriate advanced critical methods and controls. A further key skill is your ability to marshal coherent and effective arguments and communicate conclusions in oral and written form. The programme will moreover enable you to demonstrate a competent grasp of a range of technical skills arising within the discipline, including a range of approaches to textual historical, hermeneutical and cultural issues. You will also look at quantitative and qualitative approaches to the investigation of individual and social experience and behaviour, and be able to respond critically to their use by others.

Content

Throughout the course, you will develop your knowledge and understanding of practical theology, alongside formal academic and practical skills.

Stage 1A: This introductory stage of the course offers a variety of taught modules on topics in contemporary ministry and religious studies taken from our Masters’ programmes in Christian Ministry and Theology and Religious Studies, respectively. Tutors will assist any student taking this phase of the course to make an appropriate selection of modules.

Stage 1B: In the first year of this stage, you will study advanced methods and approaches to practical theology, as well as undertaking a major literature review relevant to your proposed area of research. During this in–depth investigation, you will identify gaps or problems in the literature and identify one or more research questions around which you can structure your research project.

In the second year, you will conduct an in–depth study of a more focused topic, developed to the level of a publishable article, before going on to draft and present a full project proposal which must be approved before transition to the dissertation phase.

Stage 2: The final phase of the course will allow you to work closely with staff members with particular expertise in your chosen research area, developing an original and substantial investigation of potential significance both to academic inquiry and professional practice. The thesis, which will build upon your work in years one and two, will typically run to 50–60,000 words, and will be defended in a viva voce examination. Departmental research strengths include empirical, pastoral and public theology across a range of UK and global church traditions and mission contexts, including Roman Catholic, Anglican, Baptist and Pentecostal. We also have a particular strength in Black Majority Churches.

Modules

Stage 1A: (representative selection)

  • Empirical Research for Christian Ministry
  • Approaches to Biblical Studies
  • Pentecostal Theology and Practice
  • Christian Ethics, Economics and the Environment
  • Christian Spirituality and Ministry Practice
  • Public Theology and Community Engagement

Stage 1B:

  • Practical Theology: Advanced Methods and Approaches
  • Research Design (1): Literature Review & Research Questions
  • Publishable Article
  • Research Design (2): Methodology and Research Proposal

Career options

The DTh is intended to enable existing professionals working in church ministry, mission, education, development or the para–church sector, move into senior or national positions within visionary research–led organisations.

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The PgDip and MSc in Practical Dermatology is for practising General Practitioners or other practising doctors who regularly deal with patients with dermatological problems. Read more
The PgDip and MSc in Practical Dermatology is for practising General Practitioners or other practising doctors who regularly deal with patients with dermatological problems.

The distance learning course aims to enable doctors to successfully manage dermatological problems in patients presenting to their surgeries. It is a highly interactive, online programme designed to equip the general practitioner with a sound understanding of skin disease as it presents in practice.

Students are expected to use their individual study time to complete the modular learning material, which is available online, and complete further reading from dermatology text books and searches for material in journal articles and libraries. The success of the course therefore depends, to a large extent, on the input and enthusiasm of course participants.

The course holds both UK and international accreditation, including from the Royal College of General Practitioners, Hong Kong College of Family Physicians and Hong Kong Medical Association. 

Structure

• PgDip:

All students must register initially for the Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip).

The PgDip course lasts for one academic year for full-time students or two years for part-time students, and consists of six 20-credit modules, totalling 120 credits, at Level 7.

Students who have not obtained 120 credits, but have obtained a minimum of 60 credits at Level 7, including any ‘required core modules’, will be eligible for the exit award of Postgraduate Certificate.

Core modules:

Introduction to Practical Dermatology
Skin Lesions
Special Cutaneous Sites
Inflammatory Dermatoses
Environmental Challenges in Practical Dermatology
Demographic Subgroups in Practical Dermatology

• MSc:

The MSc course consists of one (dissertation) stage, lasting for 12 months (part-time).

The MSc dissertation stage will include a formative 10-week block of online study to develop study and research skills, and completion of a dissertation of 60 credits at Level 7, to achieve a total of at least 180 credits, including the 120 credits from the Cardiff University Postgraduate Diploma in Practical Dermatology, to complete the MSc programme.

The dissertation, which will normally be of not more than 20,000 words and supported by such other material as may be considered appropriate to the subject, embodies the results of a period of project work.  The subject of each your dissertation will be approved by the Chair of the Board of Studies concerned or his/her nominee.

Teaching

The course is delivered entirely online via Cardiff University’s virtual learning environment (VLE), Learning Central, allowing regular, rapid and efficient communication between colleagues, tutors and course administrators, reducing the isolation commonly associated with distance learning.

Through dedicated online tutorial support, discussion forums and online assessments, students become members of an enthusiastic and supportive online community of doctors with an interest in dermatology. This environment allows collaboration, both academic and clinical, which can extend beyond the life of the programme.

Assessment

Each module will be assessed by written work, objective structured tests/questions and online activities.

Students are not required to be called for a viva voce examination.

The MSc requires formal assessment in the form of a 20,000 word dissertation to achieve the MSc in Practical Dermatology.

Career Prospects

The Postgraduate Diploma and MSc can form part of the portfolio of a general practitioner wishing to practice as a GPwSI in dermatology.

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Become workplace ready with the Faculty of Law’s accredited Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice (also known as ‘PLT’). Taught by industry professionals, you’ll receive all the practical training and essential skills needed to become a practising lawyer. Read more

Become workplace ready with the Faculty of Law’s accredited Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice (also known as ‘PLT’). Taught by industry professionals, you’ll receive all the practical training and essential skills needed to become a practising lawyer.

About the program

The Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice, also known as Professional Legal Training (PLT), is the link between a student''s law degree and becoming a practising lawyer. The PLT program is a coursework degree that provides structured and supervised legal training, based on the Competency Standards for entry level lawyers developed by the admitting authorities and the Australian Professional Legal Education Council (APLEC). The on campus (full-time) program consists of the following three components: -Practical Legal Training: 1 semester (full-time); -Practical Experience (75 days); and -Continuing Practical Training (75 hours, undertaken concurrently with Practical Experience component). 

Professional outcomes

Successful completion of the Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice will enable you to apply for admission to legal practice in Australia (except South Australia or Northern Territory). Students should contact the relevant admitting authority to ascertain the requirements for admission in specific States or Territories.

Structure and subjects

The Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice program has three components, as follows:

1. Practical Legal Training component

The on campus (full-time) program concentrates on the development of ‘lawyering’ skills such as legal research, analysis and problem solving, legal writing and drafting, interviewing and oral communication, advising, advocacy, dispute resolution and professional ethics and conduct. These skills are taught in a practical context in a simulated office environment.

2. Practical Experience component

Students are required to complete 75 days of work experience in an approved law office in Australia. The work experience can be undertaken in more than one law office and can be completed prior to or after the Practical Legal Training component. Our PLT Coordinator can assist students in obtaining a placement.

3. Continuing Practical Training component

This provides students with a further 75 hours of training relevant to the Practical Experience component and is completed online. It is undertaken concurrently to the Practical Experience component.

Teaching approach

Bond Law’s unique personalised approach to teaching allows on campus students to benefit from one-on-one access to experienced practising legal professionals, PLT legal academics and acknowledged industry experts. Our visiting guest lecture program also gives our students first-hand knowledge from experienced legal professionals on practical legal and advocacy skills.



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The Science Communication Unit at UWE Bristol is renowned for its innovative and diverse range of national and international activities designed to engage the public with science. Read more
The Science Communication Unit at UWE Bristol is renowned for its innovative and diverse range of national and international activities designed to engage the public with science. The Postgraduate Certificate in Practical Science Communication, linked to the world-class MSc Science Communication course, and also designed by the Science Communication Unit, is aimed at students seeking an additional qualification. It is an opportunity to benefit from the Unit's expertise, resources and contacts.

As well as drawing on the academic and practical experience of staff within the Science Communication Unit, the course gives you an opportunity to meet a range of visiting lecturers and benefit from their practical experience. This also provides an excellent networking opportunity for students interested in developing contacts among science communication practitioners.

Course detail

The course focuses on practical skills development, and has excellent links with the sectors and industries it informs, with visiting specialists helping you to understand what they seek in future employees.

Depending on the options you take, you will develop skills in science writing, cutting-edge science communication techniques, and the abilities you'll need to develop and run science communication projects. This includes devising and managing projects, evaluations and funding.

Modules

You will choose two from these three modules (30 credits each):

• Science on Air and on Screen - Build your radio, TV and digital skills by critically exploring the role of broadcast media in the communication of science. You'll also make an 'as live' radio magazine programme about science, and a short film.

• Science in Public Spaces - Develop your own science communication initiative in this hands-on module from developing a creative concept, to seeking funding, and managing and evaluating a project. You'll explore a range of innovative approaches from sci-art, to museums, festivals to theatre.

• Writing Science - Develop journalistic and other writing styles, including writing for news media, public relations and educational purposes, with a view to developing a portfolio, as well as working on a magazine project.

Format

The course comprises short, intensive teaching blocks of three days (Thursday to Saturday) and you'll most likely need to attend three teaching sessions for each 30-credit module. Group sessions are supplemented by directed and independent study, email discussions, and tutorials.

Assessment

We assess modules in a variety of ways, to reflect the practical skills you'll develop. For example, through portfolios, reports and oral presentations - all of which you can use to attract prospective employers.

Careers / Further study

Practical science communication skills are in high demand in a wide range of sectors and industries, such as journalism, public relations, science centres and museums, science education, professional consultancy and Research Council/learned institutions.

Throughout the course, you are encouraged to develop the professional skills that will help you secure employment or research positions in science communication, or to combine it with your existing career.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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Research profile. Read more

Research profile

The research interests of academic staff and graduate students in Ethics and Practical Theology encompass a range of theoretical and practical approaches to ethics, religion and theology, including environmental ethics, peace-building and reconciliation, ethical theory, and pastoral and practical theology.

You can find out more and identify a potential supervisor by looking at the School of Divinity’s * Staff Profiles, which give details of research interests and publications, and email addresses.

You are encouraged to contact a potential supervisor to discuss your research project before making a formal application. In the Ethics and Practical Theology research area, projects are often interdisciplinary. If this is the case, you may be jointly supervised with a subject specialist from another School in the University.

At the School of Divinity you will join a community of around 150 research students, drawn from around the world, and from a variety of religious and non-religious backgrounds.

You will study in a stimulating environment. The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranked the School’s research environment at 100% world-leading / internationally excellent, second in the UK on this front in theology and religion. This outstanding result reflects the vibrancy of the School’s research culture.

Training and support

The ethos of the Graduate School is to promote excellence in postgraduate study, within a stimulating and supportive environment. We value equality and diversity in the School community, and an academic culture that is both critical and constructive.

  • At the start of the academic year, you will be invited to Welcome Week, an intensive introduction to study and life in Edinburgh. Some events are especially for international students new to Scotland and the UK, but everything is open to all.
  • In the first weeks, the School provides a general orientation to research skills and to wider opportunities for training and support.
  • From your first days as a PhD or MPhil student, you will work 1:1 with your primary research supervisor.
  • Your progress will be tracked, through regular supervisions and milestone reviews, to ensure that you get the support you need to bring your project to fruition.
  • You will be part of the research seminar in Theology and Ethics, to which visiting speakers are invited and to which postgraduates present work-in-progress.
  • You can also engage with the work of the * Centre for Theology and Public Issues.
  • You will be able to follow taught courses that contribute to your interests and research needs, and can also take advantage of opportunities to learn ancient and modern languages.
  • If you are a PhD student, after successful completion of your first year, you will be eligible to apply for tutoring opportunities, to gain teaching experience.

A University review (2015) commended the Graduate School for providing excellent support: responsive to student feedback; proactive in helping new postgraduates to adjust to their studies and to life in Scotland; enthusiastic and practical in promoting career development. The postgraduate student committee works closely with the School to make the research student experience the best it can be.

Facilities

The School of Divinity, one of the largest centres for the study of religion in the United Kingdom, is located in the historic setting of New College, close to Edinburgh Castle and overlooking Princes Street.

Resources for research are excellent. You can draw on the outstanding holdings of New College Library, the University of Edinburgh’s main library, and the nearby National Library of Scotland. New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection. The University library exceeds 2.25 million volumes. The National Library of Scotland – a ‘legal deposit’ library like the British Library in London and the university libraries of Oxford and Cambridge – is just around the corner.

The School provides an extensive programme of weekly research seminars and special guest lectures. In addition, three research centres provide a special focus for activity: the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins; the Centre for Theology and Public Issues; the Centre for the Study ofWorld Christianity.

You will have access to excellent study facilities, dedicated to postgraduates. PhD and MPhil students have access 24/7, and can request an allocated desk. Masters by Research students have shared study space. All areas have printing/scanning and computer facilities. The main postgraduate study wing has a kitchen. New College has an on-site cafe that is open during term time.

Research opportunities

If you have academic training in theology or religious studies (or another relevant subject), and would like to develop your interest with a focus on a particular area, the Masters by Research may interest you. This programme can be taken either as a ‘Master of Theology by Research’ or as a ‘Master of Science by Research’ – the difference is only in the name. You can study full-time (one year) or part-time (two years). Your pattern of study can either be three supervised research essays followed by a 15,000 word dissertation, or a 30,000 word dissertation. Most students take the ‘research essays + shorter dissertation’ path. All students receive research training.



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This course is designed to prepare you for a career in conservation, or for further research at PhD level. If you’re already an established conservation professional, our modules provide additional skills to support you to progress in your employment. Read more

This course is designed to prepare you for a career in conservation, or for further research at PhD level. If you’re already an established conservation professional, our modules provide additional skills to support you to progress in your employment.

Distinct from similar courses offered in the UK, the course concentrates on the biological principles underlying biodiversity, its assessment and management. You’ll learn to identify plants and animals, explore the institutional framework underlying biodiversity and conservation and gain key analytical and practical skills for a range of academic and professional careers. You’ll also gain valuable experience in biodiversity and conservation-related research.

The University of Leeds has twice been recognised by the European Union as a "centre of excellence" for biodiversity and conservation training. We believe biodiversity can only be managed and conserved when it can be measured and interpreted properly.

Course content

This degree offers you a wide range of options, allowing you to personalise your study in preparation for further academic research or professional development in the field.

We’ll equip you with a diverse set of skills needed for ecological careers and further research. The course combines theory-based modules on the principles of ecology and conservation with a wide range of practical skills-based modules. These include survey, management and identification skills, where the emphasis is on spending time in the field, and analytical skills such as statistics and GIS.

The independent research project is one of the most important and potentially fulfilling parts of the degree. Projects cover a wide range of topics and usually include around six to eight weeks of practical work. A number of our students have been based overseas for their project.

If you study part time, the course will last for two years and you’ll study around half of the total number of modules each year.

MSc or MRes – what’s the difference?

MRes students have fewer taught modules, and carry out two major research projects rather than one. The MSc is the broader course, suitable for both conservation careers and PhD study, while most students taking the MRes are planning to go on to do a PhD. The MSc allows students to widen their skills base through the additional taught elements that are available. An increasing number of students treat the MSc as a conversion course, after having taken degrees in non-biological subjects.

Course structure

The course is made up of modules that add up to 180 credits, with a mix of compulsory and optional modules. These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Biodiversity and Conservation Skills I 10 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation Skills II 10 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation MSc and MRes Summer Project 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Community Ecology 15 credits
  • Conservation Genetics 15 credits
  • Advanced Statistics 10 credits
  • Habitat Management 10 credits
  • Introduction to GIS Skills for Ecologists 10 credits
  • Population Dynamics 10 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation Internships 15 credits
  • Practical Conservation with the National Trust 10 credits
  • Masters Mediterranean Ecology Field Course 15 credits
  • Plant Identification 15 credits
  • Insect Identification Skills 15 credits
  • Conservation Skills 5 credits
  • GIS and Environment 15 credits
  • Environmental Economics and Policy 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Biodiversity and Conservation MSc Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Biodiversity and Conservation MSc Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll have access to the very best learning resources and academic support during your studies. We’ve been awarded a Gold rating in the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF, 2017), demonstrating our commitment to delivering consistently outstanding teaching, learning and outcomes for our students.

Your learning will be heavily influenced by the University’s world-class research as well as our strong links with highly qualified professionals from industry, non-governmental organisations and charities.

You’ll experience a wide range of teaching methods including formal lectures, interactive workshops, problem-solving, practical classes and demonstrations.

Through your research project and biodiversity and conservation modules, you’ll receive substantial subject-specific training. Our teaching and assessment methods are designed to develop you into a professional who is able to think independently, solve problems, communicate effectively and demonstrate a high level of practical ability.

Research projects

As an MSc student, you’ll carry out one research project. The range of project topics is large and diverse, covering applied, empirical and theoretical subjects. Projects can be carried out in the UK or overseas: projects have been carried out in over twenty countries so far, and this year alone we have projects in Belize, Thailand, Greece, Bermuda and Morocco.

Practical skills

There are many opportunities to develop valuable practical skills through modules such as Practical Conservation with the National Trust, Insect Identification, Plant Identification, and by overseas field courses within Europe and Africa (see field courses) and research project work. You can also build your analytical skills, with modules in GIS and statistics.

Leeds is one of the best locations geographically to study Biodiversity and Conservation. You’ll be within easy reach of three areas of great natural beauty and dramatic scenery; Yorkshire Dales, North Yorkshire Moors and the Peak District – providing you with a wide range of project and fieldwork opportunities.

Assessment

We use a variety of assessment methods: practical work, data handling and problem solving exercises, group work, computer-based simulation, essays, posters and oral presentations.

Career opportunities

Specialist and transferable skills are key component of our degrees, opening up diverse opportunities for our graduates. A proportion of both MSc and MRes graduates go on to study for a PhD and enter a research career. Many graduates go on to a career in an applied ecology or conservation-related area. Potential employers look for academic qualifications in combination with practical skills and experience, and a relevant MSc course can give you the edge in a highly competitive field.

Please visit the website for more details regarding career opportunities and support.



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This unique MA programme is based in a university but run by leading film practitioners, ensuring that you not only receive the highest-quality practice-based learning, but you do so in a university research environment where you learn to understand the world we live in. Read more
This unique MA programme is based in a university but run by leading film practitioners, ensuring that you not only receive the highest-quality practice-based learning, but you do so in a university research environment where you learn to understand the world we live in.

Degree information

Students will learn to devise a visual research project; to apply anthropological and social science approaches to documentary film work; to think critically about the relationship between form and content in ethnographic/documentary practice; to master the technical skills needed to produce different kinds of films of different lengths for varied audiences; and to critically view and review film material.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of 1/2 core module(s) (45/60 credits), 2/3 optional /elective modules (30/45 credits) and a project/diary (90 credits).

Core modules
-Practical Ethnographic and Documentary Filming and Editing
-Students without a social science background at either undergraduate or Master's level also take Social Anthropology or another social science foundational module in Term One as agreed with the tutor.

Optional modules - students choose two of the following:
-Anthropology and Photography
-Documentary Film and the Ethnographic Eye
-The Story and I - Finding the Form and/or Time and the Staged Index
-One of the practical film-related options offered as part of Film Studies MA according to provision.
-One of the film history modules taught in the School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES), or Departments of History or English, (for example, Russian Cinema in SSEES), details to be confirmed.
-An Anthropology or other social science module from the Faculties of Social & Historical Sciences, or Arts & Humanities.
-An Anthropology or other social science module from the Faculties of Social & Historical Sciences, or Arts & Humanities.

Dissertation/report
A major practical film project and diary allowing the students to demonstrate their mastery of the skills of documentary film-making in a film of 20–35 minutes.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of practical tutorials, seminars and masterclasses and assessed by camera and editing exercises and a written piece.

Placement
We facilitate two types of placements. Firstly, we will enable short-term internships at the film companies with whom we already have relationships through Open City Docs. Secondly, we will offer all our students the opportunity to work on the collaborative film-making projects linked to MyStreet Films, such as the Doc in a Day workshops that have proved so successful.

Careers

The programme equips students for careers in:
-Mass media including broadcast, cinematic and web-based moving image.
-Film and TV industry as camera operators, producers, directors, editors, researchers.
-Academia – ethnographic research, visual media and culture.
-Marketing and research.
-Communication and other media.
-Archives, as well as cultural heritage organisations.

Employability
The increasing demand for social and scientifically trained moving image specialists in the years ahead will continue, if not accelerate. Many of the graduates of our existing programmes now work in organisations such as Ipsos Mori film unit, BBC World Service and BBC Education.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA will allow you to benefit from UCL’s unique position in the heart of London, and from the many activities in film within the Department of Anthropology. The programme is unique in using professional film-makers to teach within a truly pan-disciplinary university research environment.

UCL now houses London’s Global Documentary Film Festival, Open City Docs Fest, created by Professor Michael Stewart. You can participate in the curation and delivery of this festival; gain experience in the delivery of a major public arts event; and benefit from established partnerships with world-famous institutions such as the the Science Museum and the British Film Institute.

This degree will from 2017 provide three strands: the existing non-fiction cinema and reportage based documentary will be joined by a 'Future Docs' strand (including VR and interactive documentary production).

Other admission requirements

Applicants with prior technical knowledge of film making are asked to send a video portfolio of up to 20’ duration (Vimeo link recommended). Applicants without a video portfolio are asked to complete a photo essay. Please see our guidelines on how to make a visual essay. You can submit either by post - a maximum of twenty 20cm x 25cm (8'x10”) stills – or by link to an external site.

All shortlisted applicants will be asked to submit a proposal for a film or video project - to consist of no more than four sides of A4, typed and double-spaced. This should include: an outline of what the film is about; the characters and other elements crucial to the narrative and the film structure/narrative. (You are not committed to the proposal for the final project.)

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This Master's course will give you a completely new insight into how language really works and the way people use words to create meaning. Read more

Course description

This Master's course will give you a completely new insight into how language really works and the way people use words to create meaning.

If you would like to learn how to explore language using innovative techniques and computer tools, then our course will offer you cutting-edge, research-led training of the highest quality, taught by leading researchers in the fields of linguistics and computer science.

You will have options enabling you to study:
• How people use words to make meanings;
• How to analyse real language usage;
• The role of phraseology, metaphor, and idioms;
• Creative and poetic uses of language;
• New approaches to language teaching;
• Translation tools such as translation memory systems;
• Creating dictionaries using new kinds of evidence;
• Using computer tools for teaching and translation.

For further information, please download our flyer here: http://rgcl.wlv.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/MA-Practical-Corpus-Linguistics-for-ELT-Lexicography-and-Translation.pdf

Why choose Wolverhampton?

MA Practical Corpus Linguistics for ELT, Lexicography and Translation is an innovative, unique, and up-to-date course based on high-quality interdisciplinary research, with a selection of modules that is unparalleled both on a national and international level. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field. As a result, the knowledge and practical skills developed on the course will allow you to meet the most recent and relevant demands of the industry.

You will become proficient in the use of sophisticated corpus tools such as the Sketch Engine (https://www.sketchengine.co.uk), as well as state-of-the-art specialist software for professional translators and lexicographers. You will also be given an option to learn basic computer programming in Python, which is one of the most robust, popular, and widely used programming languages in the field. By the end of the course, you will have developed a unique set of transferrable skills that will make you highly competitive in the marketplace and allow you to find employment as a language professional in industry or in academia.

Figures speak louder than words: the University of Wolverhampton boasts an outstanding graduate employability rate – 98% of our postgraduate students are in work or further training six months after graduation!

What will I learn?

This course will introduce you to the use of corpora – large electronic collections of written and/or spoken text that serve as a reliable source of evidence in linguistic analysis. (‘Corpora’ is the plural of ‘corpus’.) You will learn how to design, analyse, and exploit corpora in language teaching, dictionary writing, and translation for English or any other language.

You will be given freedom and flexibility to tailor the course content to your needs and research interests as we offer a unique selection of general and specialized elective modules from which to choose. Our teaching staff will provide you with support and guidance in selecting the most suitable combination for your research topic.

Semester I will focus on developing general linguistic knowledge and research skills, which you will be able to apply to your chosen area of expertise in Semester II. You will learn about words, meanings, and linguistic creativity, broaden your knowledge of grammar, and acquire basic research and professional skills. You will also have an opportunity to learn the essentials of computer programming by attending our elective module in Python.

Semester II will introduce you to corpus linguistic methods and their application to three areas of research: language teaching, lexicography, and translation. You will start planning your dissertation and engage in one-on-one consultations with your supervisor.
For further information on modules and assessments, please visit our website: http://rgcl.wlv.ac.uk/macorling

Opportunities

As a Master's student on this course, you will be part of our Research Institute of Information and Language Processing (RIILP), an independent, research-driven University unit specializing in linguistics and natural language processing.
• You will be taught by leading researchers in the field: http://rgcl.wlv.ac.uk/macorling/who-will-teach-you-on-this-course/; our teaching staff at RIILP are engaged in high-quality research, as evidenced by the latest RAE 2008 and REF 2014 results;
• We offer an exciting programme of invited lectures and research seminars, attended by both students and staff;
• The institute has a wide network of contacts in academia and in the industry which you will be able to benefit from;
• You will also have an opportunity to travel the world – Malaga, Valencia, Besançon, Naples, Alicante, and Plovdiv are just a few of the many possible destinations covered by our institute’s Erasmus agreements.

Career path

Graduates will be able to pursue a career path in language teaching, translation, lexicography, editing, and human language technology, working either as freelancers or in a variety of industry locations, including publishing houses, translation agencies and IT companies that specialize in the development of language resources and tools (e.g. language learning applications, CAT tools). English language teachers will benefit greatly from the course, as they will develop knowledge and practical skills in using modern lexical resources, corpus data and tools in the preparation of teaching material and in the classroom, which will significantly improve their chances of securing a job in the ELT sector.

The course will also provide a sound intellectual platform for students to progress onto doctorate level study and a career in higher education. As the teaching on the course is based on research carried out within the Research Institute of Information and Language Processing (RIILP), graduates will be well-placed to continue their academic careers by applying for PhD positions within our institute or at other leading centres specializing in Corpus Linguistics, ELT/TESOL, Lexicography, Translation Studies, or Natural Language Processing.

Contact us

• Dr Sara Moze (course leader):
• April Harper (admin office):
• Research Group website: http://rgcl.wlv.ac.uk/
• Twitter: @RGCL_WLV


*Subject to approval

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This innovative professional doctorate programme offers you the opportunity to pursue a programme of advanced research while remaining rooted in your professional or organisational context. Read more
This innovative professional doctorate programme offers you the opportunity to pursue a programme of advanced research while remaining rooted in your professional or organisational context.

Why Study DProf in Practical Theology with us?

Our course combines the flexibility of a portfolio approach, the freedom to research your own professional context, and the rigour of undertaking a doctoral course.

Theology and Religious Studies at Chester is an internationally renowned centre of excellence for Practical and Contextual Theology, with a longstanding track record of expertise in teaching, research and supervision at the interface of higher education and the faith communities.

From its foundation as a teacher training college in 1839, the University of Chester has placed a premium on work-related study and vocational training. With the establishment of professional doctorates across the University, beginning with the DProf in Practical Theology in 2009, we continue to be committed to supporting students undertaking practice- and work-based research.

What will I learn?

The elements of the DProf course cover all aspects of advanced research at doctoral level. You will progress through a range of assessed modules dealing with different aspects of the research journey, from an initial foundation in literature in practical theology and a grounding in advanced research methods, to a publishable article and research proposal.

You will then undertake an extended dissertation which will enable you to explore your chosen research topic in greater detail.

How will I be taught?

Our DProf course is delivered via a mixture of independent study, one-to-one supervision and three (24- or 48-hour) residential research training events per year. You will also have access to our comprehensive online learning facilities.

How will I be assessed?

Assessment takes place via submission of a modular research portfolio, with structured written assignments and deadlines.

We recommend that candidates should commit to a minimum of eight to ten hours’ study per week on a regular basis throughout the academic year.

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In recent years the study of plant sciences has been revolutionised by the development of new tools and technologies which have allowed unprecedented progress in the study of plant biology – knowledge which is being applied to develop sustainable solutions to some of the major challenges of the 21st century. Read more

In recent years the study of plant sciences has been revolutionised by the development of new tools and technologies which have allowed unprecedented progress in the study of plant biology – knowledge which is being applied to develop sustainable solutions to some of the major challenges of the 21st century.

This course will give you specialist training in the modern molecular aspects of plant science. A large part of your teaching will be delivered by academics from the University’s Centre for Plant Sciences (CPS) linked to the latest research in their areas of expertise.

You’ll explore the wide ranges of approaches used in biomolecular sciences as applied to plant science. This will cover theory and practice of recombinant DNA and protein production, bioimaging using our confocal microscope suite, practical bioinformatics and theories behind ‘omic technologies.

You’ll also learn how to design a programme of research and write a research proposal, read and critically analyse scientific papers in plant science and biotechnology and present the findings. A highlight of the course is your individual 80 credit practical research project.

The course is 100% coursework assessed (although some modules have small in course tests). Our teaching and assessment methods are designed to develop your independent thinking, problem solving, communication skills and practical ability, making you attractive to employers or providing an excellent foundation for further study (eg PhD).

You’ll study in a faculty ranked 6th in the UK for its research impact in the recent Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014).

Our Facilities

You’ll study in a stimulating environment which houses extensive facilities developed to support and enhance our faculty’s pioneering research. As well as Faculty operated facilities, the CPS laboratories are well equipped for general plant research. There is also a plant growth unit, including tissue culture suites with culture rooms, growth rooms and flow cabinets alongside transgenic glass-houses to meet a range of growth requirements.

Course content

On this course you’ll gain an overview of a range of modern techniques and methodologies that underpin contemporary biomolecular plant sciences.

You’ll also apply your knowledge to an extended practical investigation in the form of a laboratory-based mini project, involving practical training in a range of modern molecular biology and protein engineering techniques such as gene cloning, PCR, mutagenesis, protein expression, protein purification and analysis.

A module on plant biotechnology will address current topics such as the engineering of plants, development of stress-tolerant crop varieties and techniques for gene expression and gene silencing through reading discussion and critical analysis of recent research papers.

You’ll learn from the research of international experts in DNA recombination and repair mechanisms and their importance for transgene integration and biotechnological applications; plant nutrition and intracellular communication; and the biosynthesis, structure and function of plant cell walls.

You’ll also explore the wide range of approaches used in bio-imaging and their relative advantages and disadvantages for analysing protein and cellular function. Bioinformatics and high throughput omic technologies are crucial to plant science research and you will take modules introducing you to these disciplines.

In the final part of the course you'll work on an independent laboratory-based research project related to your course options. You’ll receive extensive training in experimental design, the practical use of advanced techniques and technologies, data analysis and interpretation, and will be assigned a research project supervisor who will support and guide you through your project.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Bioimaging 10 credits
  • Topics in Plant Science 10 credits
  • Practical Bioinformatics 10 credits
  • Plant Biotechnology 10 credits
  • High-throughput Technologies 10 credits
  • MSc Bioscience Research Project Proposal 5 credits
  • Research Planning and Scientific Communication 10 credits
  • Advanced Biomolecular Technologies 20 credits
  • Protein Engineering Laboratory Project 15 credits
  • Bioscience MSc Research Project 80 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Plant Science and Biotechnology MSc in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll have access to the very best learning resources and academic support during your studies. We’ve been awarded a Gold rating in the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF, 2017), demonstrating our commitment to delivering consistently outstanding teaching, learning and outcomes for our students.

Your learning will be heavily influenced by the University’s world-class research as well as our strong links with highly qualified professionals from industry, non-governmental organisations and charities.

You’ll experience a wide range of teaching methods including formal lectures, interactive workshops, problem-solving, practical classes and demonstrations.

Through your research project and specialist plant science modules, you’ll receive substantial subject-specific training. Our teaching and assessment methods are designed to develop you into a scientist who is able to think independently, solve problems, communicate effectively and demonstrate a high level of practical ability.

Assessment

We use a variety of assessment methods: multiple-choice testing, practical work, data handling and problem solving exercises, group work, discussion groups (face-to-face and online), computer-based simulation, essays, posters and oral presentations.

Career opportunities

The strong research element of the Plant Science and Biotechmology MSc, along with the specialist and generic skills you develop, mean you’ll graduate equipped for a wide range of careers.

Our graduates work in a diverse range of areas, ranging from bioscience-related research through to scientific publication, teacher training, health and safety and pharmaceutical market research.

Links with industry

We have a proactive Industrial Advisory Board who advise us on what they look for in graduates and on employability-related skills within our courses.

We collaborate with a wide range of organisations in the public and commercial sectors. Many of these are represented on our Industrial Advisory Board. They include:

  • GlaxoSmithKline
  • Ernst and Young
  • The Food and Environment Research Agency
  • The Health Protection Agency
  • MedImmune
  • Thermofisher Scientific
  • Hays Life Sciences
  • European Bioinformatics Institute
  • Smaller University spin-out companies, such as Lumora.

Industrial research placements

Some of our partners offer MSc research projects in their organisations, allowing students to develop their commercial awareness and build their network of contacts.



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This MA offers a distinctive combination of analytical and practical methods for the creative investigation of plays and performance texts. Read more
This MA offers a distinctive combination of analytical and practical methods for the creative investigation of plays and performance texts. Its historical range is wide and students should be ready to research and trouble-shoot plays from different eras, whether classical Greek and Roman, medieval, early modern or contemporary.

Traditional formats of discussion groups and seminars are coupled with workshops and problem-solving sessions which address all the negotiations involved in transferring words on the page into a fully realised performance. The main emphasis of the MA is on the interpretation of text through the consideration of acting and directing processes, production conditions, historical context, and institutional and cultural politics. The MA incorporates masterclasses by leading theatre professionals which are part of an integrated visitor programme.

The MA in Theatre: Writing, Directing and Performance is unique in that it is designed to accommodate both students who may wish to pursue further academic study and students who wish to go into the theatre or media industries. We aim to produce graduates with a sophisticated understanding of how plays in performance work, and to develop high-quality researchers and theatre practitioners who understand the practical dynamics of process and production. Applicants may have a range of academic backgrounds and extensive practical experience is not a prerequisite for the course, but students must be willing to enter into the spirit of practical experiment whatever their particular strengths.

Aims

-To promote cutting-edge interdisciplinary thinking and collaboration
-To provide analytical and practical methods for the creative investigation of play and performance texts
-To offer in-depth analysis of the dynamics of the processes of writing, acting and directing
-To provide an understanding of the need to conduct investigation within historical, political, institutional and cultural frames
-To develop high-quality theatre researchers and practitioners

Teaching and assessment

Seminars and workshops
In terms 1 and 2 Directing Early Modern Plays and Case Studies in Writing, Directing and Performance are examined by 2,500 word essays. In Term 1 Writing into Performance is examined by a scriptwriting assignment. In term 2 Directing Modern Plays is examined by a combination of seminar performance and a 3,000 word essay. Storytelling for Theatre, Film and Television is examined by a 3,000 word project in each term. An ambitious programme of masterclasses given by leading practitioners is an important part of the MA.

Screenings
During terms 1 and 2 there will be screenings of relevant film and television material relating to specific performances, plays and productions under discussion.

Dissertation or practical project
In term 3 students prepare for their dissertation or practical project work. Students are assigned dissertation/project supervisors and receive individual supervision through the period of research. Assessment is by 20,000 word dissertation or by a substantial practical project such as a production, performance or piece of creative writing, supported by a 4,000 word essay mapping the project's planning and evolution. All final projects are subject to the approval of the convenors of the MA.

Careers

Because of the innovative emphasis on acquiring a wide range of analytical and practical skills centred around the performance and production of theatre texts, students are highly employable.

An in-depth understanding of narrative structures and their visual, technical, performative and political dimensions is of paramount importance to the entertainment industry and a significant number at the top of these businesses support this programme because it plugs an increasingly serious gap in the skills market. Recent students from the BA and MA Writing and Performance (a forerunner of this MA) have benefited from placements with theatre, film and television companies, and the MA in Theatre: Writing, Directing and Performance builds on that ethos. Placements have been informally arranged subject to student interest and industry availability from year to year.

Past graduates have gone on to study PhDs and also to conservatoires to continue their practical training. Many are now working as screenwriters, playwrights, actors, directors, designers, producers, technicians, literary managers, dramaturges, and literary agents. A significant number of graduates have set up their own theatre companies. Others work in theatre-in-education initiatives, arts funding organisations, youth theatre, journalism, publishing, and dramatherapy. Past students are also employed by major animation companies, and have gained work as script editors and production assistants.

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WHAT YOU WILL GAIN. - Skills and know-how in the latest technologies in all aspects of plant engineering. - Guidance from practicing plant engineering experts in the field. Read more
WHAT YOU WILL GAIN:

- Skills and know-how in the latest technologies in all aspects of plant engineering
- Guidance from practicing plant engineering experts in the field
- Knowledge from the extensive experience of instructors, rather than from clinical information gained from books and college
- Improved career prospects and income
- An EIT Advanced Diploma of Plant Engineering

Start Date: September 18, 2017.

INTRODUCTION

This practical course avoids over emphasis on theory. This is rarely needed in the real industrial world where time is short and immediate results are required. Hard-hitting and useful know-how, are needed as minimum requirements. The instructors presenting this advanced diploma are highly experienced engineers from industry who have many years of real-life experience as Plant Engineers. The format of presentation - live, interactive distance learning with the use of remote labs means that you can hit the ground running and be of immediate benefit to your company or future employer.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

Anyone who wants to gain solid knowledge of the key elements of Plant Engineering to improve their work skills and to further their job prospects:

- Electrical Engineers who need an overall Plant Engineering appreciation
- Electricians
- Maintenance Engineers and Supervisors
- Automation and Process Engineers
- Design Engineers
- Project Managers
- Consulting Engineers
- Production Managers
- Chemical and Mechanical Engineers
- Instrument and Process Control Technicians

Even those who are highly experienced in Plant Engineering may find it useful to follow some of the topics to gain know-how in a very concentrated but practical format.

COURSE STRUCTURE

The course follows six engineering threads to provide you with maximum practical coverage in the field of Plant Engineering:

- Overview and where the Plant Engineer fits into the 21st century production sphere
- Engineering technologies in detail
- Skills for project, process, environmental and energy management
- Maintenance management
- Safety management; with corresponding legal knowledge
- Other necessary skills to master

The course is composed 19 modules. These modules cover a range of aspects to provide you with maximum practical coverage in the field of Plant Engineering.

The modules are:

- Introduction to Plant Engineering
- Plant Operations and Facility Management
- Electrical Equipment and Technology
- Pressure Vessels and Boilers
- Fundamentals of Professional Engineering
- Mechanical Equipment and Technology
- Fluid Power Systems and Components
- Pumps and Seals
- Thermodynamics, Compressors, Fans and Blowers
- Process Plant Layout and Piping Design
- Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning
- Noise and Vibration
- Structural and Civil Engineering Concepts
- Process Management
- Energy Management
- Instrumentation and Control Engineering
- Maintenance Management
- Environmental Engineering
- Safety Management

PRESENTATION FORMAT

The programme features real-world applications and uses a multi-pronged approach involving interactive on-line webinars, simulation software and self-study assignments with a mentor on call. The course consists of 72 topics delivered over a period of 18 months. Presentations and group discussions will be conducted using a live, interactive software system. For each topic you will have an initial reading assignment (which will be delivered to you in electronic format in advance of the online presentations). There will be coursework or problems to be submitted and in some cases there will be practical exercises, using simulation software and remote labs that you can easily do from your home or office. You will have ongoing support from the instructors via phone, fax and e-mail.

LIVE WEBINARS

The webinar schedule is not put together until after registrations close. The reason for this is that the program is promoted globally and we often have participants from several time zones. When you enrol you will receive a questionnaire which will help us determine your availability. When all questionnaires are returned we create a schedule which will endeavour to meet everyone’s requirements. Each webinar runs 2 or 3 times during each presentation day and we try our best to ensure that at least one session falls into your requested time frames. This is not always possible, however, due to the range of locations of both presenters and students. If you are unable to attend the webinars scheduled, we do have some options available. Contact the EIT for more details.

PRACTICAL EXERCISES AND REMOTE LABORATORIES

As part of the groundbreaking new way of teaching, we will be using a series of remote laboratories (labs) and simulation software, to facilitate your learning and to test the knowledge you gain during the course. These involve complete working labs set up at various locations of the world into which you will be able to log and proceed through the various practical sessions. These will be supplemented by simulation software, running either remotely or on your computer, to ensure you gain the requisite handson experience. No one can learn much solely from lectures, the labs and simulation software are designed to increase the absorption of the materials and to give you a practical orientation of the learning experience. All this will give you a solid, practical exposure to the key principles covered in the course and will Practical Exercises and Remote Laboratories ensure that you obtain maximum benefit from the course to succeed in your future career in Industrial Automation.

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located almost anywhere in the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. A full list of fees in a currency appropriate for every country would be complex to navigate and, with today’s exchange rate fluctuations, difficult to maintain. Instead we aim to give you a rapid response regarding fees that is customised to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student commences study. For a rapid reply to your enquiry regarding courses fees and payment options, please enquire via the below button and we will respond within 2 business days.

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