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Masters Degrees (Ppe)

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The Faculty of Philosophy offers a high-quality English language master's programme in PPE to national and international students. Read more
The Faculty of Philosophy offers a high-quality English language master's programme in PPE to national and international students. The master’s in PPE at the University of Groningen offers an interdisciplinary degree for ambitious students with diverse interests and backgrounds, providing specialist training in understanding the social world. Public policy as much as commerce increasingly requires broader, more integrated theories and methodologies.

The programme offers systematic training for the development of analytical and quantitative skills as well as a solid background of theoretical and historical knowledge in PPE. It aims to encourage open-mindedness and responsible decision-making, and while it is truly interdisciplinary, it will have a very clear and distinct identity, focusing on methods uniting the three disciplines of philosophy, political science and economics.

The programme is open to students with Bachelor’s degrees in philosophy, political science and economics, as well as to students with Bachelor’s degrees in history, international relations, sociology, psychology, provided they demonstrate sufficient knowledge of at least one of the three core fields (philosophy, political science, economics).

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Before the emergence of economics and politics as distinct disciplines, ‘political economy’ was a discipline in itself. There has been a considerable expansion of research across the three PPE disciplines in recent years, resulting in political economy becoming one of the most exciting areas of study and research. Read more
Before the emergence of economics and politics as distinct disciplines, ‘political economy’ was a discipline in itself. There has been a considerable expansion of research across the three PPE disciplines in recent years, resulting in political economy becoming one of the most exciting areas of study and research.

The flexible structure of this course means it is suitable for a wide range of students with interests in politics and economics.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take one of two 20 credit international political economy modules: either 'Critical Theories of International Political Economy', or 'Contemporary Issues in International Political Economy'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

You will take a further 60 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Politics or Economics departments.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Political Economy prepares you for many careers in economics and politics, ranging from finance to international organisations and development. It also provides training for doctoral research in politics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers. For further information visit the YorkWorks webpages.

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This course allows you to acquire training you will need for political research within an interdisciplinary programme in PPE. It is specifically aimed at students who need appropriate quantitative or qualitative research skills. Read more
This course allows you to acquire training you will need for political research within an interdisciplinary programme in PPE. It is specifically aimed at students who need appropriate quantitative or qualitative research skills. These skills are required for you to be eligible for Research Council funded studentships in Politics and the Social Sciences. The flexibility of the course means you can choose to specialise in specific areas in politics and development studies, such as the politics of development or political economy.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take a 20 credit 'Political Research and Analysis' module, which considers the nature, practice and philosophical underpinnings of political research and analysis. You will also take a further 20 credit political research methods module: either 'Quantitative Methods of Data Analysis', or 'Qualitative Research Methods in Politics'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

You will take a further 40 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Politics and Philosophy departments, including at least 20 credits from Politics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy and Politics by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Political Research is aimed specifically at students who want to go on to pursue further research in the social sciences.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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Focus. Unlike other Master programmes in. Philosophy, Politics and Economics. , the focus in Witten is on the sound academic analysis of real-life problems in an increasingly interconnected world. Read more

Focus

Unlike other Master programmes in Philosophy, Politics and Economics, the focus in Witten is on the sound academic analysis of real-life problems in an increasingly interconnected world. The challenges facing modern society transcend academic disciplines as well as national boundaries. The problem scenarios we observe today are undisciplined in this sense, and therefore require consistently interdisciplinary approaches. In the highly complex society of the 21st century, it will need people with a generalistic background in economics, politics and philosophy to offer sustainable solutions for the future. The Master PPE in Witten is a [tailor-made programme for any career in leading positions] at the interface of politics, economics and (civil) society.

Who should study PPE? And what happens afterwards?

  • You will find career prospects in a range of political and social fields, NGOs, management, further education, personnel and organization development, economic and political consulting.
  • You will have career options in institutions that demand a high level of analytical competence at the interface between economics and politics.
  • The Master programme PPE also provides a basis for academic research on topics at the boundaries between economic and political sciences, as well as in political and economic philosophy.

Training for critical thinkers

  • You start your PPE-studies at one of Germany’s most prestigious departments of economics.
  • You enjoy excellent education and training, personal supervision, freedom and flexibility.
  • You can be certain to be trained in critical thinking.

Our target group:

  • smart minds
  • dedicated personalities
  • original and unconventional thinkers
  • generalists with an interdisciplinary background and specialization competences; future change makers, social entrepreneurs, political consultants, researchers and other problem solvers
  • individuals who strive to grasp complex situations at the theoretical level and find smart and sustainable solutions in practice

The Master programme is suitable for:

  • graduates of economics
  • graduates of political science
  • graduates of humanities
  • graduates of social science
  • graduates of philosophy, politics and economics
  • graduates of related interdisciplinary programmes


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This course explores both the economic and political dimensions of international development - differentiating it from MSc programmes in development economics - as well as the links between social choice and development economics. Read more
This course explores both the economic and political dimensions of international development - differentiating it from MSc programmes in development economics - as well as the links between social choice and development economics.

Course Content

You will take a core 20 credit Development Economics in PPE module, which covers topics such as well-being and human development, growth, poverty, corruption and rent-seeking, child labour, and the environment - at an advanced level. You will also take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted). This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take at least 50 credits of economics modules, including applied microeconomics, macroeconomics, econometrics and Economics of Development: Theory and Practice.

You will also take a further 20 credits of taught modules, from a wide range of options offered by the Politics and Economics departments.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP degrees means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Economics and Development prepares students for careers in economics and development, including careers in international organisations, public life and research. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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Philosophical issues are deeply relevant in many areas of public life and often arise in public discussion. They include issues about ethics, economics and the law, as well as politics. Read more
Philosophical issues are deeply relevant in many areas of public life and often arise in public discussion. They include issues about ethics, economics and the law, as well as politics.

This course covers topics in ethics, political philosophy and social choice, and provides an understanding of economics and research training in philosophy. It allows students to study a range of options at the intersection of philosophy and public affairs.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take two of five 20 credit Philosophy/Political Philosophy modules: 'Topics in Theoretical Philosophy' or 'Analytical Political Philosophy', and 'Topics in Practical Philosophy' or 'The Challenges of Pluralism: Contemporary and Comparative Perspectives' or 'Topics in the History of Political Thought'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

You will take a further 40 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics, Philosophy and Politics departments.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy and Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Philosophy and Public Affairs equips you for a range of careers in research and public life.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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Unlike MA courses which focus narrowly on specific areas relating to the politics of development, this course offers an integrated and interdisciplinary education with a focus on politics and international development. Read more
Unlike MA courses which focus narrowly on specific areas relating to the politics of development, this course offers an integrated and interdisciplinary education with a focus on politics and international development. Building on the range of staff at the University with interests in the area, it covers both the political and economic dimensions of international development, and gives you a foundation in economics. It also provides essential research training in the Social Sciences.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take the 'Theories and Policies of Development Governance' module in your first term, followed by one of three development modules in your second term: 'Development and Conflict', 'Politics of International Trade and Development', or 'Development Economics'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

In addition you will take a further 40 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics or Politics departments, with at least 20 credits being from Politics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Politics and Development prepares you for careers in public life and development, including careers in international organisations, politics and research.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers. For further information visit the YorkWorks webpages.

Read less
This course explores the inter-connections between normative economics and ethics at an advanced level. Read more
This course explores the inter-connections between normative economics and ethics at an advanced level. These connections have been central to the development of modern economics and moral philosophy, and can be found in classic texts in economics and philosophy, including those of Adam Smith, Karl Marx and John Stuart Mill.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take at least 40 credits of economics modules, including 'Applied Microeconomics', 'Macroeconomics' and 'Econometrics'; and 20 credits of philosophy modules in 'Practical philosophy' or 'Analytical political philosophy'.

You will take a further 30 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics and Philosophy departments, to include at least 10 credits from Economics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Economics and Philosophy prepares students for a wide range of careers, including careers in economics, public life, finance and research. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

Read less
Interconnections between economics and politics are deep and take centre stage in this course. Indeed in the early stages of its development, what we now call ‘economics’ was known as ‘political economy’. Read more
Interconnections between economics and politics are deep and take centre stage in this course. Indeed in the early stages of its development, what we now call ‘economics’ was known as ‘political economy’. This course is tailor-made to suit a wide range of students with interests in the two disciplines and the relation between them.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will also take at least 30 credits of economics modules, including applied microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics.

You will take a further 50-60 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics and Politics departments. These will include at least 20 credits in Politics and 20-30 credits in Economics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The variety of optional modules available on the MA in PPE: Economics and Politics prepares students for a wide range of careers, including careers in economics and politics, finance, international organisations and international development. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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It is impossible to fully understand the modern world without knowledge of politics, philosophy and economics. They have long been recognised as overlapping and informing one other and it was only relatively recently in intellectual history that the three subjects were separated from one another. Read more

It is impossible to fully understand the modern world without knowledge of politics, philosophy and economics. They have long been recognised as overlapping and informing one other and it was only relatively recently in intellectual history that the three subjects were separated from one another. PPE brings together these subjects to help you understand and engage with the world. You will develop essential skills of reasoning, inquiry and analysis that are applicable to a wide range of careers, including banking and finance, law, academia and teaching, journalism and politics. 

Birkbeck's interdisciplinary MSc in PPE introduces you to the basics of the three subjects and it will hone your ability to understand, evaluate and analyse real-world information. The study of philosophy will introduce you to critical reasoning and some of the most profound questions it is possible to ask about humanity. The study of politics will acquaint you with modern governing structures in the UK, EU and further afield and with the concepts and ideas that underpin the theory and practice of politics. The study of economics will help you grasp how business, finance and politics intersect and determine how we live and work. 

You can choose from a wide range of option modules and your learning will be informed by the cutting-edge research and expertise of academics across three distinguished departments at Birkbeck: Economics, Mathematics and Statistics; Philosophy; and Politics. 

You will also receive one-to-one dissertation supervision on a topic of your choosing. 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • This is the only PPE programme available for part-time evening study in the UK. 
  • Our departments of Economics, Mathematics and StatisticsPhilosophy and Politics each have an international research reputation, as recognised by the government’s Research Excellence Framework and other indicators. 
  • The programme is a potential stepping stone to MPhil/PhD research in any of the three departments or in interdisciplinary combinations. 
  • Birkbeck Library has large politics, philosophy and economics collections, including the major specialist journals, and provides you with access to an extensive range of online materials. 
  • You can also take advantage of the rich research collections nearby, including Senate House Library, which is right next door to Birkbeck, the British Library, which is five minutes’ walk away, and the British Library of Political and Economic Science at the London School of Economics, which is walkable from Birkbeck. 


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You are interested in politics and philosophy and the interactions between these disciplines. You want to learn in small, intensive, discussion-based seminar groups. Read more
  • You are interested in politics and philosophy and the interactions between these disciplines
  • You want to learn in small, intensive, discussion-based seminar groups
  • You are interested in opportunities to connect abstract philosophical arguments to concrete political situations

This new pathway offers a specialisation in political theory, while also deepening your knowledge in other areas of philosophy. Students must have some Philosophy in their undergraduate degree. It is particularly suited for students from PPE, Philosophy and Law, or Philosophy and Politics undergraduate programmes. This is a course taught by both philosophy and politics discipline areas for high quality students tapping into the exceptionally large and talented group of staff who work in political theory and in philosophy at The University of Manchester. 

Contact: Dr Stephanie Collins

Tel: +44 (0)161 276 8028

Email:  

Teaching and learning

IMPORTANT NOTE ON PART-TIME STUDY

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.  

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.  

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director

Course unit details

Why is this course for me?

  • You don't want to pick between Politics and Philosophy.
  • You want to focus on analytic political theory -- issues of justice, rights, freedom, and equality -- while also sampling other philosophy courses -- on aesthetics, emotion, action, and science.
  • You want to learn in small, intensive, discussion-based seminar groups.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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This M.A. Read more

Overview

This M.A. brings together at a postgraduate level some of the most important approaches in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics in order to obtain the necessary abilities and understanding to deal with the challenges of globalisation and a globalised economy, democracy and becoming a responsible citizen, by addressing the intrinsic relationships between these subjects. Modules from the Department of Law will also be used, where suitable, to enable the students on an interdisciplinary level to engage with the practical political, social, and economic challenges faced by society today.

Philosophy, Politics and Economics overlap not only in the university, but also in public policy, business and commerce. The intellectual dexterity and versatility that emerges from a training and grounding in these three overlapping and cognate disciplines is an enormous professional, intellectual and vocational asset, valued and recognized by governments, policy makers, enterprises and employers. It enables one to act effectively under guidance in a peer relationship with qualified practitioners; lead multiple, complex and heterogeneous groups.

Course Structure

Candidates take six modules (three in each semester) and write a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words under the supervision of a designated supervisor. The 90 credits for the MA will be made up of 60 credits awarded for taught modules and 30 credits for the dissertation. Candidates are required to take the core module PH636, at least one taught module in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics, and either EC690 (dissertation in Economics) or PH699 (dissertation in Philosophy) or SO690 (Thesis in Politics).

Career Options

Graduates in PPE most commonly chose a career in finance, politics, journalism, law, industry, teaching, social work, accountancy, business management, management consultancy, advertising and the many branches of the public services, including the civil and diplomatic services and local government.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code

MHV64



The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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The Philosophy, Politics and Economics of Health MA aims to equip students with the skills necessary to play an informed role in debates concerning distributive justice and health. Read more

The Philosophy, Politics and Economics of Health MA aims to equip students with the skills necessary to play an informed role in debates concerning distributive justice and health. It explores the central ethical, economic and political problems facing health policy in the UK and globally, especially in relation to social justice.

About this degree

The programme covers relevant areas of moral and political theory, comparative policy analysis, and health economics, to allow students to come to a wide understanding of background issues, history and constraints, in order to be able to make a positive contribution to current debates in this field.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), five optional modules (75 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma of 120 credits is available, consisting of three core modules (45 credits), and five optional modules (75 credits).

Core modules

  • Philosophy Politics and Economics of Health
  • Health Policy and Reform
  • Key Principles of Health Economics

Optional modules

Students may choose from the list of recommended modules below, or other relevant modules in UCL, with the approval of the convenors. Please note that some modules fill up very quickly, so places cannot be guaranteed.

  • Bioethics Governance
  • Comparative Human Rights Law
  • Law and Governance of Global Health
  • Global Justice and Health
  • Illness
  • Madness
  • Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health
  • Ethics and Regulation of Research
  • Contemporary Political Philosophy
  • Normative Ethics
  • Politics and Ethics
  • Health Inequalities over the Life-course
  • From Imperial Medicine to Global Health, 1860s to Present
  • Death, Dying and Consequences
  • Disability and Development
  • Introduction to Deafhood
  • Global Health and Development
  • Anthropology and Psychiatry
  • Medical Anthropology

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of up to 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is taught through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. Student performance is assessed through examinations, presentations and coursework (depending on the options chosen), and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Philosophy, Politics and Economics of Health MA

Funding

Applicants for this programme may be eligible for a number of funding opportunities including UCL graduate scholarships. The Health Humanities Centre can nominate one candidate to apply for a Wellcome Trust Master's Award.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates have gone on to funded research in bioethics and in health policy, and to jobs in the health service, law, journalism, as well as medical education.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Public Health Doctor, NHS (National Health Service)
  • MBBS Medicine (Graduate Entry Programme), Newcastle University
  • Health Policy Adviser, Doctors of the World UK
  • PhD in Critical Theory, University of Brighton
  • Policy Officer, WHO (World Health Organization) and studying Medicine, The University of Western Australia

Employability

The programme equips students with an ability to think precisely and rigorously about complex problems in health systems and beyond; to work with others to explore solutions; and to write cogently and concisely. Public and private sector health employers and NGOs particularly prize these skills in graduates. The skills that the programme teaches also provide an ideal springboard to further academic study.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA is the only Master's programme in the world of its type. The compulsory modules provide necessary core skills, while the wide range of options enables students to further their own particular interests.

UCL is at the forefront of research in interdisciplinary research and teaching in philosophy, health humanities and global health through units such as the Health Humanities Centre, the Institute for Global Health and the Institute of Health Equity. The programme draws on highly regarded researchers in a range of UCL departments, and students benefit by instruction from some of the leaders in their fields.

Students further benefit from UCL's location in London, which is one of the world centres of philosophical activity, home of a number of internationally renowned journals - Philosophy; Mind & Language; Mind - and which enjoys regular visiting speakers from across the world. London has over 60 active philosophers making it one of the largest and most varied philosophical communities in the world.



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Adult Nursing is an exciting and rewarding career choice. It's one in which you can make a real and positive contribution to people with long and short-term health problems who are facing some of the most challenging experiences of their lives. Read more
Adult Nursing is an exciting and rewarding career choice. It's one in which you can make a real and positive contribution to people with long and short-term health problems who are facing some of the most challenging experiences of their lives.

If you have a relevant bachelor's degree, this three-year pre-registration master's degree gives you the chance to undertake an Adult Nursing course leading to registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council. The course is available part-time and full-time on both the Oxford and Swindon campuses.

If you are interested in this course, you should consider attending an Undergraduate Open Day.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/adult-nursing-pre-registration/

Why choose this course?

- We have a large and dedicated building in Oxford (Marston Road) and a campus in Swindon (Ferndale), equipped with state-of-the-art classroom and clinical skills simulation suites and resources.

- Throughout the course, you will benefit from an interprofessional approach to learning in which you will study with other health and social care students. This will help to prepare you for work in the current health care environment.

- Our courses are open to a wide range of health and social care professionals providing highly flexible continuing professional development (CPD) study opportunities with part-time, full-time and mixed-mode options (including opportunities for e-learning, blended and distance learning).

- We support multi and interprofessional learning and teaching, and many of our courses are either fully multiprofessional or offer excellent opportunities for shared learning.

- Our lecturers maintain excellent practice links in their specialist areas locally or across the region.

- Many of our lecturers have reputations for excellence and have established links with colleagues, organisations and institutions at national and international levels.

- We have a strong research profile, with experienced researchers working in established areas of cancer care, children and families, drug and alcohol, physical rehabilitation and enablement, and interprofessional education and collaborative practice.

- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, 98% of our research in Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy was rated as internationally recognised, with 82% being world leading or internationally excellent.

- We are a student-centred institution that is fully committed to each individual achieving their potential. To support this, we offer a broad range of student support schemes to facilitate learning and development.

- We have an excellent track record of high levels of student satisfaction, low student attrition rates and high employability.

Teaching and learning

We teach a very wide range of pre-qualification and foundation courses including health and social care, nursing, midwifery, occupational therapy, osteopathy, operating department practice, paramedic emergency care, physiotherapy and social work. You will share your learning with these other health care students. This is a key component of the course as it is essential in developing your teamwork skills and your understanding of the other roles you will encounter in practice.

We offer a very friendly and supportive environment in which to learn; we consistently receive very high satisfaction ratings for our student support and learning resources in student surveys. We have excellent teaching facilities including classrooms and a lecture theatre, dedicated clinical skills suites and simulation resources, featuring a very well-equipped movement laboratory, a family of computerised simulation manikins (including a simman, simbaby and birthing mother), an extensive range of anatomy models and fully networked computer rooms.

We have excellent library resources, accessible both through the web and through a range of locally based facilities on university and NHS sites.

Information technology plays an important role in health care courses and an extensive range of learning resources can be accessed through ‘Brookes Virtual', an online repository of lectures, handouts, information and learning exercises.

Approach to assessment

You will be asked to produce a number of different types of written work throughout your study, including critical appraisals, reflective work and case studies. Some assignments will also require you to present work to faculty staff and peers.

Assessment of practice learning occurs both within the 'practice modules' - Professional Practice Experience (PPE) modules - and also in the 'practice-related' modules. All students have a Practice Assessment Document which contains a competency framework to assess practice.

As a postgraduate student with more highly developed academic skills and a self-directed approach, you are expected to work to produce material that is creative and original. You will be encouraged to try out the creative application of new or existing ideas or theory to address contemporary practice problems, health and social care policy or health and social care needs.

Careers

When you qualify there is a very wide range of specialist options and lifelong learning opportunities you can pursue, whether you choose to work in the NHS in hospital, or the community, or in the independent sector with private or voluntary organisations. UK-trained nurses are also highly valued throughout the world and there are many opportunities to work overseas.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses

Research highlights

We have a number of both promising and experienced researchers working in established areas including cancer care, children and families, drugs and alcohol, physical rehabilitation and enablement, and interprofessional education and collaborative practice. Over the past few years, these researchers have won external research and consultancy contracts including grants, fellowships and studentships for NHS staff. Our research staff collaborate with researchers from across Oxford Brookes University and from the Institute of Health Sciences at Oxford University, and with research teams from many other UK and international centres.

Our academic staff have extensive experience of NHS and general management at both senior and director level, with a significant record of research and publications. The currency of the course is also assured by the lecturers' close involvement in the health and social care sector.

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, 98% of our research in Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy was rated as internationally recognised, with 82% being world leading or internationally excellent. The University has been careful to nurture emerging research strengths, and the international standing achieved by subjects allied to health demonstrates significant progress since 2008.

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Our Postgraduate Certificate in Primary Physical Education course will extend your knowledge, understanding and teaching skills to deliver high-quality physical education in a primary school setting. Read more

Our Postgraduate Certificate in Primary Physical Education course will extend your knowledge, understanding and teaching skills to deliver high-quality physical education in a primary school setting.

Our course, which is delivered on a part-time basis will:

  • support you to think critically about your knowledge, understanding and teaching skills to enhance delivery of quality physical education
  • help you support the ongoing development of physical education within your primary school, local cluster or education authority
  • enhance your ability to critically reflect in an informed way on your own practice in primary physical education

This course has received GTC Scotland’s Professional Recognition award which aims to support teachers to engage in high-quality professional learning and recognises accomplished teaching practice. GTC Scotland accredits a professional learning course after assessing that it meets the standards expected of the award of Professional Recognition. The course does not include qualified teacher status.

Course Details

You will study the following three modules run over the three trimesters within one academic year:

  • Pedagogy of Primary Physical Education
  • Developing Quality Physical Education
  • Aspects of Learning in Primary Physical Education

Upon successful completion of all three modules you will be awarded the Postgraduate Certificate.

Modules

  • Pedagogy of Primary Physical Education gives you the opportunity to critically reflect on your current practice. It explores sport education, teaching games for understanding and current national and international trends within primary physical education.
  • Developing Quality Physical Education will develop your knowledge and understanding of developing quality physical education and enhance your teaching skills in delivering primary physical education.
  • Aspects of Learning in Primary Physical Education will consider the significant aspects of learning within physical education, supporting your understanding of these and how they can be used to provide a broad range of relevant and realistic learning experiences.

Teaching & Assessment

You will be introduced to a range of learning environments. These include: An online induction to the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) to familiarise yourself with the online activities embedded within the modules.

A range of activities will be used to encourage interaction with your fellow students and our course tutors, including:

  • discussion boards
  • creating a PG Cert PPE blog
  • creating an e-portfolio
  • chat rooms

You will be assessed using a combination of the following methods:

  • short activities
  • assignments
  • self-assessment questions

There are no formal exams; you are assessed on the coursework of each module and are normally expected to demonstrate your overall competence in the area covered by one module before proceeding to the next.

Course Structure

Find out more about the structure, learning outcomes, compulsory and optional modules in this course.

Course Structure (17/18)



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