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Masters Degrees (Poverty Reduction)

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Most of the world’s poorest people live in rural areas. These programmes will give you the scientific, technological and economic knowledge and the skills to analyse and tackle the poverty suffered by these people. Read more
Most of the world’s poorest people live in rural areas. These programmes will give you the scientific, technological and economic knowledge and the skills to analyse and tackle the poverty suffered by these people. You will be able to work on real issues, using the specialist expertise gained from your course.

The programmes integrate theory and practice and provide an understanding of how to manage organisations within their own cultural, political, technological, social, and institutional contexts, with the ultimate aim of solving problems of poverty reduction.

Visit the website https://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/programmes/poverty-reduction-policy-and-practice/msc/

Structure

For the MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice students will take:

- 3 core modules
- 4 elective modules*
- 2 research modules

* including one free choice from across all specialisms

- Specialisms:
If you are taking an MSc or a Postgraduate Diploma you may choose elective modules within a particular specialism. Choosing a specialism creates the opportunity for a clear focus in your studies, whereby you can develop understanding and skills relevant to specific professional interests. The name of the specialism will appear on the certificate awarded.

Core modules:

- Economics and Institutions for Development
- Understanding Poverty [compulsory]
- Managing Knowledge and Communication for Development
- Climate Change and Development

Elective Modules:
Specialisms
Development Management:
- Rural Finance
- Rural Development
- NGO Management
- Project Planning and Management
- Gender and Social Inequality
- Management in Rural Development

Inclusive Growth:
- Agricultural Policy and Trade
- Energy and Development
- Food Security and Social Protection
- Political Economy of Public Policy
- Rural Finance

Natural Resource Management:
- Water Resources Management
- Sustainable Land Management
- Environmental Science and Management
- Natural Resource Economics
- Biodiversity, Conservation and Development
- International Environmental Law

Research Modules:
- Research Methods
- Dissertation

Teaching & Learning

1. Academic level

All CeDEP programmes are taught to Master’s (Second Cycle) level, which involves building upon existing knowledge and understanding typically associated with the Bachelor’s (First Cycle) level or its equivalent. Study at Master’s level requires:

- originality in developing and/or applying ideas, and extending or enhancing previous learning

- application of knowledge and understanding, including problem solving in new or unfamiliar environments within broader (or multidisciplinary)contexts

- integration of knowledge and handling of complexity

- formulating judgements with incomplete or limited information, including reflection on social and ethical responsibilities

- clear and unambiguous communication of conclusions, and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- learning skills to study in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous

Prospective students should note that distance education of this kind demands a high degree of commitment, determination and self-discipline. Whilst CeDEP provides significant support through the tutorial system and by other means, students taking on programmes of this nature should possess a strong measure of self-reliance.

2. Study Expectations

- How long will it take?
For students in full time employment, the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma, usually take three or four years to complete and the Certificate 2 years.

- When can I study?
You can begin your studies in either February or June. The examinations for all students are in October. The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June.

- How many hours a week?
For the 30 week study period starting in February, you will need to allocate 5–6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15 week session, 10–12 hours per module, per week is recommended.

- How many modules can I take per study year?
We strongly recommend that students should take only one or two modules in their first year, so that they can adjust to studying at a distance, whilst combining this with work and family life.

Students wishing to complete an MSc in two years they will need to enrol/pay for three core modules and both Research Methods and the Dissertation in the first year although the Dissertation is written and submitted in the second year. Please contact your programme convenor by email.

3. Assessment

- How you will be assessed
For each module you will sit a two-hour unseen examination held on a specific date in October, worth 80% of your total module mark. There is also an Examined Assignment (worth 20% of the total module mark) which is submitted during the study year and marked by your tutor.

- Examination arrangements
Examinations are held in students’ countries of residence, using the University of London’s network of approved Overseas Examination Authorities. Fees for taking examinations at all examination centres other than London are the responsibility of the student.

- Assignments are submitted to CeDEP electronically via the online learning environment.
Assessment of the Research Component

The Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541) are not assessed through final written examinations. These two modules constitute the Research Component of an MSc and are assessed entirely by submitted coursework.

4. Research Component

In order to qualify for an MSc, it is mandatory for CeDEP students to pass the Research Component.

The Research Component comprises two of the nine modules necessary for completion of an MSc. These are a Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541). The modules are assessed as follows:

- P506 through two examined assignments submitted during the study year
- P541 through a 10,000 word dissertation

The Research Component is studied over two consecutive years. The Research Methods module (P506) must be studied and successfully passed before the Dissertation module (P541). This is because it provides skills and techniques which will assist with the subsequent development and conduct of your research and preparation of your dissertation. Students are required to enrol and pay for P506 and P541 at the same time.

The dissertation is usually carried out during the final year of registration with CeDEP. Students conduct desk- or field-based research in a relevant topic of their choice. All research topics are subject to approval and each student is assigned a personal supervisor. Background reading and preparation of the proposal take place between the October exams and commencement of the final study year in February.

Scholarships

For further details and information on external scholarships visit the Scholarships section (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/)

Career prospects for graduates

As with all CeDEP programmes, the Poverty Reduction programme is designed to assist both existing development professionals and people moving into the field of international development. For the former, the programme offers a chance to upgrade and update their expertise, and to reflect systematically and in depth on their accumulated experience in the light of up-to-date theory and literature. It is anticipated that most graduates of this programme will find work in:

- government ministries and other public sector organisations concerned with policy analysis and implementation for poverty reduction

- international and non-governmental organisations concerned with issues of poverty reduction

- consultancies and development projects involved in activities promoting poverty reduction

Particular opportunities may be related to the choice of specialisms in natural resources management, agricultural and rural development, or development management

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/applying/

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This programme allows you to explore in depth the challenges facing developing and developed countries in the fight against global poverty, as well as to understand the promise and problems of proposed approaches to poverty reduction. Read more

This programme allows you to explore in depth the challenges facing developing and developed countries in the fight against global poverty, as well as to understand the promise and problems of proposed approaches to poverty reduction. Issues covered include: theories and history of development; changing approaches to poverty reduction; practical policy, programme and research skills.

The International Development Department is well-regarded internationally by sponsors, donor agencies, governments and NGOs. Study with us to benefit from:

  • Expertise in key issues and skills valued by employers
  • A vibrant, welcoming community
  • Individual overseas fieldwork or study visit included in fees (on-campus programmes)
  • Flexible programmes and a wide choice of modules (part-time students also welcome)
  • A diverse and international student body
  • Strong support in study and English language skills

Each programme is taught by a team of multi-disciplinary specialists who work closely with students to address individual interests and concerns. Every student is allocated an academic tutor to support them in their academic progress throughout the year. The department has a long history of teaching students from across the world, and recent students have come from 99 different countries and a wide variety of professional and academic backgrounds.

Course details

Students will explore theories of development in historical context from (roughly) 1945 up to the present in the single compulsory module. The theories are then applied to contemporary development approaches and issues. Throughout, the emphasis is on you developing a critical understanding of the evolution of development theories over the last half century and its implications for present day thinking about development.

Students can then select the remaining five modules to suit their own needs and interests. They could, for example, take modules or rural and urban poverty reduction, on conflict and development or gender and development. They could also take modules on project management, disaster management or governance. Many other modules are also available to choose from.

Learning and teaching

Teaching takes place over two ten-week terms, utilizing a range of teaching and learning methods, including short lectures, problem solving, role play and group work.

By the end of your study you will gain:

  • An in-depth understanding of competing development theories – their origins, their continuities and their differences – and the ability to critically evaluate their strengths and weaknesses.
  • An understanding and ability to critique the distinctions between economic, social and political approaches to development.
  • An understanding of the role of international institutions (such as the World Bank, International Monetary Fund and the World Trade Organisation) in the processes of development and an ability to critique the theoretical underpinnings of these institutions.
  • The ability to critically appraise the role of the state in the governance of developing countries.
  • Writing skills to produce well structured and coherent essays and reports, making good use of references.
  • Oral presentation skills.
  • Ability to access material from different sources including policy documents and other publications from governments and international organisations, documents from the internet, and from books and academic journals.
  • The capacity to interpret and make use of material from the above sources.

Fieldwork

Gain first-hand experience of development concepts plus valuable work experience without additional costs. This Masters degree enable students either to carry out individual fieldwork in a country and on a topic of their choice or to take part in an organised study visit. Funding for this overseas study is included in the programme fee. 

Enhancing your Student Experience

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Employability

The knowledge and skills gained in the programme will equip graduates for jobs in international, national and local government and non-governmental organizations, think tanks and consultancies.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD.



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Within the travel and tourism industry, there is an increasing focus on the need to adopt responsible business practices that improve the quality of life for communities and conserve the environment and local cultures. Read more

Within the travel and tourism industry, there is an increasing focus on the need to adopt responsible business practices that improve the quality of life for communities and conserve the environment and local cultures. This course helps meet the resulting demand for managers with the ability to implement responsible tourism strategies within marketing, operations and product development.

You will explore domestic and international tourism and you will understand that the principles of responsible tourism are as applicable to the Yorkshire Dales as they are to The Gambia. In addition to developing your subject knowledge, you will learn how to plan, implement and evaluate responsible tourism policies and practices.

This is the only responsible tourism course in the world certified by the UNWTO.TedQual programme established by the United Nations World Tourism Organization. It is taught by staff with first-hand experience in tourism management, research and consultancy, who will share their global expertise with you.

Research Excellence Framework 2014

Research Excellence Framework 2014: 59% of our research submitted was assessed as world leading or internationally excellent.

Course Benefits

To support your studies, you will be assigned a personal industry mentor. Our mentors are experienced tourism professionals and have all graduated from this masters course, so they understand your journey. Your mentor could assist you in a number of possible ways, including discussing career pursuits, giving advice on work placements, helping to improve your CV and providing tips on assignments, course material and work / life balance. We have over 20 mentors from areas as diverse as the Gambia Travel Foundation Programme, TUI UK & Ireland and VisitEngland, so we will attempt to match you with an appropriate mentor.

Our teaching is grounded in industry consultancy and research. The quality of our research is evident in the outstanding results achieved in the Research Assessment Exercise completed in 2014 in which Leeds Beckett came second in the country for sport and exercise science, leisure and tourism.

Staff teaching this course have played a leading role in the responsible tourism and hospitality movement through research and development work with the industry and government which enables our students to also play an important role in this sector. Lucy McCombes is a certified Travelife auditor and Dr Simon Woodward is chair of the ICOMOS-UK Cultural Tourism Committee and a Trustee of the Landscape Research Centre.

PG Cert

Modules

  • Responsible Tourism Theory & Practice
  • Tourism for Local Economic Development & Poverty Reduction
  • Natural Resource & Environmental Management
  • Communities, Culture & Heritage
  • Marketing Responsible Tourism
  • Ethical Tourism Business Management
  • Tourism Destination Management: Planning & Policy
  • Online Marketing - Strategies & Tools

PG Dip

Core modules

  • Responsible Tourism Theory & Practice (Core for part-time & distance learners only)

Option modules

  • Tourism for Local Economic Development & Poverty Reduction
  • Natural Resource & Environmental Management
  • Communities, Culture & Heritage
  • Marketing Responsible Tourism
  • Ethical Tourism Business Management
  • Tourism Destination Management: Planning & Policy
  • Online Marketing - Strategies & Tools

MSc

Core Modules

  • Responsible Tourism Theory & Practice (distance learning only)
  • Tourism Destination Management: Planning & Policy
  • Marketing Responsible Tourism
  • Communities, Culture & Heritage
  • Tourism for Local Economic Development & Poverty Reduction
  • Natural Resource & Environmental Management
  • Masters Research Methods
  • Masters Research Project

Option Modules

  • Ethical Tourism Business Management (full-time only)
  • Online Marketing: Strategies & Tools (full-time only)

Job Prospects

You will enhance your ability to operate effectively at a strategic level within conservation organisations and in both the public and private sectors, and you will have expertise and confidence to devise , implement and manage responsible tourism programmes. Graduates have gone on to work as sustainability and product managers for tour operators and have also taken senior managerial positions in government departments and with international non-governmental organisations.

  • Responsible Tourism Adviser
  • Sustainable Product Manager
  • Charity Development Consultant
  • Sustainable Destinations Manager


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Study from anywhere in the world with practitioners in government, civil society and the private sector, as well as with people new to development. Read more

Study from anywhere in the world with practitioners in government, civil society and the private sector, as well as with people new to development.

The broad purpose of this programme is to give those working in the area of poverty reduction and development in developing and transitional countries, or those wishing to work in such areas, a firmer grounding in understanding poverty and inequality, promoting poverty reduction and analysing the performance of major poverty reducing programmes and policies.

Course details

The core module aims to familiarise students with key concepts (eg development and poverty) and theories (eg modernisation, dependency, neo-liberalism and the ‘crisis’ in development theory) and with the changing roles of international development organisations and states in promoting international development (eg through aid, trade and fiscal, monetary and social policies).

The emphasis throughout will be on encouraging students to reflect critically on what has worked well or not and why. Students will select three optional modules (at 20 credits each) based on their individual interests and career aspirations.

More information on: International Development MSc by distance learning

Learning and teaching

The programme is delivered online, using a web communications tools system (Canvas) and this web environment is where students are expected to take part in online discussions and group activities, guided by a tutor. All required reading is provided (either in hard copy or via our extensive electronic library, or via Internet links). Assessment takes the form of 2 items of assessment per module, plus a 10,000 to 15,000 word dissertation for the MSc.

Course structure

In delivering our distance learning programmes, we have drawn on lessons learned by academic institutions about how to provide effective distance learning and use a blended learning approach:

  • An intensive online induction programme is included to familiarise students with the web-based discussion boards, the online library facilities and the requirements of the programme
  • Required reading materials are provided in hard copy
  • Discussions and group activities take place within an online learning environment
  • Students benefit from interacting closely with each other and their tutors even while they are separated by continents and time zones (we have students in Africa, the Caribbean, the US, Eastern Europe, South East Asia and the UK)
  • Whilst discussion groups and access to the electronic library rely on the use of a computer, students are not tied to the computer for other reading materials
  • A short online research methods course is provided prior to starting the dissertation project
  • We pride ourselves on strong administrative, academic and pastoral support for students

Our distance learning courses use a variety of teaching and assessment methods: Hard copy teaching and reading materials

  • Textbooks and CDs / DVDs
  • Electronic access to the University’s extensive elibrary facility containing ejournals, ebooks and databases
  • Group online discussion activities (using Canvas, which is part of our 'virtual learning environment')
  • Dissertation
  • Individual reading and reflection

Each module takes six weeks to complete (with guided online discussions). The MSc does not include any face-to-face element.

The course is assumed to be part time, and students study one module at a time.

Course requirements

IDD has designed its distance learning courses to be accessible for a working professional person and we have kept the technical requirements to a minimum. However, before you commit to distance learning, we recommend that you consider the following:

IT equipment: To complete a distance learning course successfully, you will need:

  • Extended access to a computer with Word, Excel, Internet Explorer, a media player software and a CD-ROM drive.
  • Regular access to the Internet for visiting the web-based discussion boards, email and some online library research (whilst this is obviously easier with broadband, we have many students who participate successfully through a dial-up connection).

IT skills: You will find this course less challenging if you are already a confident Internet user, although we are available extensively to coach you through becoming familiar with the web-based discussion format and to address other IT questions.

Time: This course requires that you read a good deal and regularly check into the web-based discussions during the six 'live' weeks of discussion for each module. If you are forced to miss some of the discussions for work or personal reasons, this can be coped with, but if you are regularly out of touch you will find it hard to complete the assignments to the required standard. Writing the assignments is also time-consuming.

Employability

Career opportunities 

This programme is most relevant for people who have worked in governments, non-governmental organisations (either international, regional, national or local) or on donor-funded projects, as well as for recent graduates wishing to work for such organizations, who have some experience of developing countries.

Alumni

Currently more than 3,800 IDD alumni have taken their knowledge and experience to over 148 countries around the globe and are working in a variety of jobs in the public, private and voluntary sector.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD.



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MSc International Development. Poverty, Conflict and Reconstruction examines contemporary and established analytical and conceptual frameworks relating to poverty, conflict analysis and the reconstruction of conflict and disaster-affected societies. Read more

MSc International Development: Poverty, Conflict and Reconstruction examines contemporary and established analytical and conceptual frameworks relating to poverty, conflict analysis and the reconstruction of conflict and disaster-affected societies.

The course looks at policies and practices, by which individuals, communities and organisations seek to reduce poverty, understand conflict and initiate humanitarian interventions.

It is therefore ideal if you'd like to learn more about poverty and conflict, are intrigued by the reconstruction of conflict- and disaster-affected societies, and are interested in the policies and practices used to reduce poverty.

Informal enquiries, prior to application, are welcomed. Please contact Dr Nicholas Jepson, Deputy Programme Director (  ).

Aims

  • Provide you with an opportunity to deepen your critical understanding of key theoretical and practical issues relating to poverty analysis and reduction, conflict analysis and reconstruction;
  • Provide you with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to critically analyse key theoretical and practical issues relating to poverty, conflict and reconstruction and make judgements about related policies and their implementation;
  • Provide critical insights into the key strategies, policies and practices currently employed to promote development and poverty reduction
  • Develop professionally-oriented skills related to formulating, investigating and implementing different practical approaches to poverty, conflict and reconstruction;
  • Provide a wide range of options for advanced training in areas of specialist expertise relevant to poverty, conflict and reconstruction;
  • Develop advanced competencies in transferable areas, including developing reasoned arguments, gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources, undertaking both team-based and independent work to deadlines, and both written and verbal forms of communication
  • Assist you in developing your specialist area of expertise within the field of poverty, conflict and reconstruction, and applying your understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation.

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is covered by the course fee. Recent fieldtrip locations have included Uganda, Ghana, Sri Lanka and India.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. We cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. Planning will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

The taught elements of the programme, carrying 120 credits overall is continuously assessed by a variety of methods (project based reports, essays), involving largely individual submissions, but also elements of group work.

Participants must also complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice approved by the Programme Directors. Students are encouraged to base their dissertations on topics of direct professional concern to themselves.

Facilities

The Arthur Lewis Building provides excellent resources including analytical laboratories, studio facilities, workshops, seminar rooms, an on-site cafe and dedicated computer clusters including GIS facilities.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for employment in a range of development-related fields, including research, policy and practice. A wide range of transferable skills will be developed, including analytical and professional skills. Many of our alumni have gone onto careers in public service, the NGO/charitable and private sectors at national and international levels, as policy officers, managers, consultants or development practitioners - while others have pursued further academic study leading to a PhD and academic careers. Since its foundation, the Global Development Institute has trained over 7000 individuals from 170 different countries.



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This programme responds to the growing demands made on the humanitarian and development sectors by intensive urbanisation. This course has been established by the research and consultancy group on International Development, Emergencies and Refugees (IDEARS) - part of the Weeks Centre at LSBU. Read more
This programme responds to the growing demands made on the humanitarian and development sectors by intensive urbanisation. This course has been established by the research and consultancy group on International Development, Emergencies and Refugees (IDEARS) - part of the Weeks Centre at LSBU. If you wish to pursue a career with government, non-governmental organisations, international agencies, public and private organisations and enterprises, this course is for you.

Rapidly urbanising world

Ours is a rapidly urbanising world: by 2010 over half the world's population lived in cities. Urbanization is fastest in the developing world, where both primary and secondary cities are rapidly expanding. It is predicted that by 2020 more Africans will live in urban than in rural areas, and in China, by 2023. Except in countries emerging from war, urbanisation is closely linked to economic growth, although urban poverty levels continue to rise.

This rapid growth, particularly in the light of its links to the flight from rural poverty and the development of a massive informal sector, has posed immense challenges to all urban systems. In many Asian, Latin American and African cities 30-70% of the population lives in slums and more than 90% of new jobs are in the informal sector. In transition countries, already highly urbanised, the changing political and economic framework has led to widespread poverty. Everywhere, urban roads, utilities, education and health services, and governance processes are heavily strained. While cities experience high levels of investment, it is often uneven.

This context is now widely recognised among all major actors, with policy and programmes targeting the urban sector now a growth area. The challenge for development professionals, whether working in donor agencies, NGOs, governments or private practice, is to understand the broad economic and political context of urbanization, develop analyses of complex urban trends, opportunities and problems, and be able to draw on a range of appropriate interventions. People seeking work or progression in development practice will be moving into a growth area if they can demonstrate familiarity with urban issues and policies in developing countries.

Modules

You'll explore urban issues, strongly linked to analyses of broader development issues, which will prepare them for roles in development agencies, NGOs, urban management or community work. It provides a thorough grounding in the broad agendas of poverty reduction and its global context. At the same time it provides a thorough understanding of rapidly changing urban settings and enables students to acquire practical development planning skills for an urban setting. An emphasis on research as well as practical skills allows students to specialise in their particular areas of interest.

Economies in transition
Human development in a globalised world
Urban challenges
Urban project
Research methods
Dissertation

Dissertation and voluntary work placement

Part of the dissertation may be replaced with a voluntary work placement in one of our partner organisations. Through the use of case studies you will analyse a comprehensive range of development issues, such as: markets, trade and the global economy; the role of international institutions and agencies; human development; poverty and poverty reduction; social provision in developing countries; rural development and urbanisation; environmental policies and sustainable development; empowerment and participation; migration.

Through a specialist theoretical module you'll also acquire a thorough grounding in urban development issues and their links to a broad development agenda; and this will be followed by a project module which will enable you to apply the theory and understand the necessary skills to plan, execute and monitor an urban development project. The course also develops the skills required to undertake development research, focusing on appropriate methodologies, data collection, policy design and implementation.

Professional links

The MSc has excellent relations with practicing development urbanists around the country, who provide the course with strong links to current thinking and practice; as well as with Development Agencies and NGO working in the development field. Students from these organisations are regularly enrolled on the course and members of these organisations give regular presentations to MSc students.

Employability

Students on our MSc Development and Urbanisation course will benefit from the renewed international interest in the urban sphere. Previous graduates have entered careers with a wide range of employers, working for international organisations, such as, the United Nations and its constituent organisations, the World Bank, the International Labour Organisation and the World Health Organisation.

Many take up important posts in their home countries within government, non-government and civil society organisations or non-governmental development organisations in the UK, such as Christian Aid and Oxfam, in addition to teaching posts in universities and colleges specialising in Development research and practice.

For students interested in further academic development or mid-career progression, successful completion of the MSc provides eligibility for our large and lively Mphil/PhD programme.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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This programme enables you to study development with a specific focus on poverty and inequality, both key aspects of current development policy discourse. Read more

This programme enables you to study development with a specific focus on poverty and inequality, both key aspects of current development policy discourse. Issues examined include: definitions and indicators of poverty, inequality and development; causes of poverty and inequality; poverty reduction strategies; cross-cutting issues such as gender and conflict; practical policy, programme and research skills. 

The International Development Department is well-regarded internationally by sponsors, donor agencies, governments and NGOs. Study with us to benefit from:

  • Expertise in key issues and skills valued by employers
  • A vibrant, welcoming community
  • Individual overseas fieldwork or study visit included in fees (on-campus programmes)
  • Flexible programmes and a wide choice of modules (part-time students also welcome)
  • A diverse and international student body
  • Strong support in study and English language skills

Each programme is taught by a team of multi-disciplinary specialists who work closely with students to address individual interests and concerns. Every student is allocated an academic tutor to support them in their academic progress throughout the year. The department has a long history of teaching students from across the world, and recent students have come from 99 different countries and a wide variety of professional and academic backgrounds.

Course details

Students will explore theories of development in historical context from (roughly) 1945 up to the present in the core compulsory module. The theories are then applied to contemporary development approaches and issues. Throughout, the emphasis is on you developing a critical understanding of the evolution of development theories over the last half century and its implications for present day thinking about development.

The relevance of sociological categories of class, religion, ethnicity and gender in both disaggregating levels of poverty and inequality, and in understanding the processes which foster poverty and inequality in development will be explored in one of the two modules which give this programme its particular identity and focus.

The aim of the other programme specific compulsory module is to examine different approaches to defining and measuring poverty and inequality, to understand the impact of global and national systems on poverty and inequality, to reflect on the potential and limitations of some useful analytical frameworks and methodologies, and to consider some interesting approaches to project and policy led development.

Learning and teaching

Teaching takes place over two ten-week terms, utilising a range of teaching and learning methods, including short lectures, problem solving, role play and group work.

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Employability

The knowledge and skills gained in the programme will equip graduates for jobs in international, national and local government and non-governmental organizations, think tanks and consultancies.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD.



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MSc International Development. Poverty, Inequality and Development is designed to help you understand and tackle the problems of poverty and inequality in a critical and constructive way. Read more

MSc International Development: Poverty, Inequality and Development is designed to help you understand and tackle the problems of poverty and inequality in a critical and constructive way.

The current impoverishment of more than 1.4 billion people, plus the growing levels of inequality at national and international levels, present the world with its greatest moral challenge.

You will learn about the different conceptualisations and characteristics of poverty and inequality through high-level academic training from leading academics, in a vibrant and stimulating environment.

Informal enquiries, prior to application, are welcomed. Please contact Dr Nicholas Jepson, Deputy Programme Director (  ).

Aims

  • Provide critical insights into different theoretical and disciplinary perspectives on how poverty, inequality and development can be understood, measured and explained
  • Provide you with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to critically analyse key theoretical and practical issues relating to poverty, inequality and development;
  • Provide critical insights into the key strategies, policies and practices currently employed to promote development, equality and poverty reduction
  • Provide a wide range of options for advanced training in areas of specialist expertise relevant to poverty, inequality and development;
  • Develop advanced competencies in transferable areas, including developing reasoned arguments, gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources, undertaking both team-based and independent work to deadlines, and both written and verbal forms of communication
  • Assist you in developing your specialist area of expertise within the field of poverty, inequality and development, and applying your understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation.

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is covered by the course fee. Recent fieldtrip locations have included Uganda, Ghana, Sri Lanka and India.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. We cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. Planning will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

Part-time Study

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

The taught elements of the programme, carrying 120 credits overall is continuously assessed by a variety of methods (project based reports, essays), involving largely individual submissions, but also elements of group work.

Participants must also complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice approved by the Programme Directors. Students are encouraged to base their dissertations on topics of direct professional concern to themselves.

Facilities

The Arthur Lewis Building provides excellent resources including analytical laboratories, studio facilities, workshops, seminar rooms, an on-site cafe and dedicated computer clusters including GIS facilities.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for employment in a range of development-related fields, including research, policy and practice. A wide range of transferable skills will be developed, including analytical and professional skills. Many of our alumni have gone onto careers in public service, the NGO/charitable and private sectors at national and international levels, as policy officers, managers, consultants or development practitioners - while others have pursued further academic study leading to a PhD and academic careers. Since its foundation, GDI has trained over 7000 individuals from 170 different countries.



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COURSE OVERVIEW. Learn to identify solutions to complex global problems. Develop management skills with a consideration of cross-cultural issues. Read more

COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Learn to identify solutions to complex global problems
  • Develop management skills with a consideration of cross-cultural issues
  • Choose a specialism such as climate change or poverty reduction
  • Prepare for a range of careers including work in politics or NGOs 

Applied Global Practice (Management) at Winchester is an exciting course addressing important global issues from a management perspective. How should we be working internationally to combat climate change, food insecurity, energy insecurity, and poverty? How can international businesses, organisations, charities, and public and voluntary bodies apply management skills to these problems? 

Explore a range of global issues covering the world economy, international institutions (such as the UN System), development, security, markets, the environment, aid, peacekeeping, diplomacy, and corporate social responsibility. You can specialise in climate change, country risk analysis, economic development, or regeneration and poverty reduction, for example, by choosing one of these topics as your particular focus. 

Increase your expertise in your fields of interest with modules such as Managing in a Global Environment, Health of Nations: International Health Policy and Systems, and Growth, Development and Inequality. Subject specialisms are also available, including Health and/or Environment, Growth and/or Development, Commercial Diplomacy and/or Country Risk Analysis. 

Complete projects on the management of global issues – such as international aid relief, conflict resolution and regeneration projects. Produce management reports, project reports, and participate in presentations, role-play debates and panel discussions. Choose between a 20,000-word dissertation, an international project management report or a professional portfolio. 

The programme is taught by a globally experienced team, and contributions from a variety of guest speakers, professionals and practitioners add to the range of expertise available. 

A wide range of career opportunities are open to our graduates. Course alumni work in international commercial companies, international development organisations, non-governmental organisations, government departments, embassies, the entertainment industry, charities, consultancy, and international development teams.

Careers

Graduates have secured positions in international commercial companies, international development organisations, Non-Governmental

Organisations, government departments, embassies, the entertainments industry, charities, consultancy, and international development teams.

Pre-approved for a Masters

If you study a Bachelor Honours degrees with us, you will be pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible, you will need to apply by the end of March in the final year of your degree and meet the entry requirements of your chosen Masters degree.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Learning and teaching

Start dates: September and January

Teaching takes place: Evenings and the occasional Friday/Saturday (one per semester). 

Distance learning available: For some modules, with extensive use of a programme blog for the Professional Practice modules. 

Fact: The programme enables students to focus on specific areas to increase expertise, through supportive taught class modules. 

The teaching team has wide-ranging experience of working both in the UK and overseas. In addition, a variety of guest speakers, professionals and practitioners contribute to the delivery of the modules. 

Location 

Taught elements of the course take place on our King Alfred Campus (Winchester) or at our West Downs Campus (Winchester).  

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information 

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures



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COURSE OVERVIEW . Learn to identify solutions to complex global problems. Develop management skills with a consideration of cross-cultural issues. Read more

COURSE OVERVIEW 

  • Learn to identify solutions to complex global problems
  • Develop management skills with a consideration of cross-cultural issues
  • Choose a specialism such as climate change or poverty reduction
  • Prepare for a range of careers including work in politics or NGOs 

Applied Global Practice (Management) at Winchester is an exciting course addressing important global issues from a management perspective. How should we be working internationally to combat climate change, food insecurity, energy insecurity, and poverty? How can international businesses, organisations, charities, and public and voluntary bodies apply management skills to these problems? 

Explore a range of global issues covering the world economy, international institutions (such as the UN System), development, security, markets, the environment, aid, peacekeeping, diplomacy, and corporate social responsibility. You can specialise in climate change, country risk analysis, economic development, or regeneration and poverty reduction, for example, by choosing one of these topics as your particular focus. 

Increase your expertise in your fields of interest with modules such as Managing in a Global Environment, Health of Nations: International Health Policy and Systems, and Growth, Development and Inequality. Subject specialisms are also available, including Health and/or Environment, Growth and/or Development, Commercial Diplomacy and/or Country Risk Analysis. 

Complete projects on the management of global issues – such as international aid relief, conflict resolution and regeneration projects. Produce management reports, project reports, and participate in presentations, role-play debates and panel discussions. Choose between a 20,000-word dissertation, an international project management report or a professional portfolio. 

The programme is taught by a globally experienced team, and contributions from a variety of guest speakers, professionals and practitioners add to the range of expertise available. 

A wide range of career opportunities are open to our graduates. Course alumni work in international commercial companies, international development organisations, non-governmental organisations, government departments, embassies, the entertainment industry, charities, consultancy, and international development teams.

Careers

Graduates have secured positions in international commercial companies, international development organisations, Non-Governmental

Organisations, government departments, embassies, the entertainments industry, charities, consultancy, and international development teams.

Pre-approved for a Masters

If you study a Bachelor Honours degrees with us, you will be pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible, you will need to apply by the end of March in the final year of your degree and meet the entry requirements of your chosen Masters degree.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Learning and teaching

Teaching takes place: Evenings and the occasional Friday/Saturday (one per semester). 

Distance learning available: For some modules, with extensive use of a programme blog for the Professional Practice modules.

Fact: The programme enables students to focus on specific areas to increase expertise, through supportive taught class modules. 

Please note in order to achieve a Master of Science (MSc) students are required to write a science based dissertation, consistent with the QAA benchmark.

The programme enables students to focus on specific areas to increase expertise, through supportive taught class modules. The teaching team has wide-ranging expertise of working both in the UK and overseas. In addition, a variety of guest speakers, professionals and practitioners contribute to the delivery of the modules. 

Location 

Taught elements of the course take place on our King Alfred Campus (Winchester) or at our West Downs Campus (Winchester). 

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

A range of assessment methods is used including management reports, project reports, software analysis, essays, presentations, role-play debate and panel viva. Students can undertake a traditional dissertation of 20,000 words, an international project management report or a professional portfolio.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information 

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures



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The Natural Resources Institute (NRI) is a specialised multidisciplinary organisation within the University of Greenwich. The NRI provides research and consultancy in support of sustainable development, economic growth and poverty reduction, principally, but not solely, in the natural resources sector. Read more

The Natural Resources Institute (NRI) is a specialised multidisciplinary organisation within the University of Greenwich. The NRI provides research and consultancy in support of sustainable development, economic growth and poverty reduction, principally, but not solely, in the natural resources sector. It has a rapidly growing programme of research at MPhil and PhD level on social-scientific and interdisciplinary topics relating to development in the South and in Europe.

The institute provides a vibrant research environment for MPhil and PhD students in development studies with students from a number of countries and a variety of backgrounds in research, government and non-governmental organisations. Students are also actively encouraged to network with peers from other universities in the UK.

Research specialisms

The Livelihoods and Institutions Department works on a number of themes related to natural resources, environment and development. Particular interests include:

  • Participatory and client-oriented methods of agricultural research and their institutionalisation
  • Agricultural service delivery
  • Performance and impact assessment methodologies
  • Community based natural resource management
  • Land tenure
  • Urban agriculture and rural-urban linkages
  • Pastoralism
  • Vulnerability to disasters
  • Climate change.

The Food and Markets Department works on many economics-based development issues. Important themes include the performance of agricultural markets, value chains, international standards and agricultural trade, micro-finance, enterprise development and poverty reduction, ethical trade and corporate social responsibility.

Attendance

We welcome applications from potential students from either a social or natural science background. We can offer full-time or part-time registration, with students based on our campus in Medway or in their home countries, or some combination of the two.

Recent research projects

Recent research project topics include:

  • Forbidden (sacred) lakes and conservation: the role of indigenous beliefs in the management of wetland resources in the Niger Delta, Nigeria
  • Farmer organisations and their impacts for pro-poor growth among smallholder farmers in Malawi
  • Understanding the influence of livelihood features on cassava value chains
  • Rural territorial dynamics in North East Brazil: the Jiquiriçá Valley in Bahia
  • Pro-poor market-based approaches for economic recovery in post-conflict countries: the case of Liberia
  • Cross-borrowing and its impact on microentrepreneurs' repayment performance and well-being in Peru.

Outcomes

The aims of the programme are to:

  • Provide an environment for innovative, intellectually rigorous and developmentally significant research, primarily on developing countries
  • Strengthen the research capacity of students from a variety of intellectual and professional backgrounds.

Assessment

Students are assessed through their thesis and oral examination.

Careers

Postgraduate research students from the NRI have a good record of finding employment within their specific technical discipline or in the field of international development.



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Gain a solid grounding in the concepts and skills needed to engage in debates on poverty and development. You’ll become familiar with the main theories of development and poverty reduction in development. Read more
Gain a solid grounding in the concepts and skills needed to engage in debates on poverty and development. You’ll become familiar with the main theories of development and poverty reduction in development.

Through the interdisciplinary perspective at IDS, you approach these issues with confidence. You’ll gain a practical understanding of how techniques of research and inquiry create and interpret knowledge.

Accreditation

This course is IAC/EADI accredited. Sussex is proud to be the first UK university to gain this accreditation.

The International Accreditation Council for Global Development Studies and Research wishes to influence proactively the process of quality assurance for global development studies and has developed a state-of-the-art accreditation system.

How will I study?

You study a range of modules across the autumn and spring terms. In the spring and summer terms, you’ll take a research module to help you prepare for your dissertation. In the summer term, you work on your dissertation.

Assessment is through:
-Term papers
-Coursework assignments
-Presentations
-Practical exercises
-A 10,000-word dissertation

Some modules have examinations.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

Our graduates go on to work for:
-The UN, including the Population Fund UNAIDS, ILO and UNFPA
-Government departments such as SIDA
-NGOs, including Korea Food for the Hungry (KFH)

Some also go on to work in academic research

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Development Studies is a dynamic field concerned with processes of change in the South - social and economic, political and cultural - and the major policy challenges they present to efforts to overcome poverty and insecurity. Read more
Development Studies is a dynamic field concerned with processes of change in the South - social and economic, political and cultural - and the major policy challenges they present to efforts to overcome poverty and insecurity. At SOAS, we seek not only to understand the major drivers of development, but also to critically evaluate them with a view towards informing more just and equitable approaches.

Course detail

This programme will provide you with a solid interdisciplinary social science formation in development theory and practice and will develop your capacity for independent and critical analysis. The emphasis on transferable analytical skills has been of great benefit to the many graduates who have returned to, or taken up, professional careers in development in international organisations, government agencies and NGOs.

You will also have access to a wealth of study resources including the SOAS Library, one of the world's most important academic libraries, attracting scholars from across the globe.

A global perspective

Studying at SOAS University of London enhances your learning experience by giving you a global perspective on issues such as: neoliberalism and its critiques, industrialisation, labour and capital, state failure, poverty and insecurity, gender and class analysis, and commodity chains and trade.

You will join a worldwide network of people who are passionate about thinking about and working towards development and equality for all.

Expert at where the world is changing

Many of our staff come from development practitioner backgrounds and this informs what we teach. We are all engaged in field research, which routinely sends us to places where development policies and approaches touch people’s lives in direct ways, and we draw on this experience in the classroom.

We regularly engage in a wide range of research with international development institutions, including United Nations agencies and NGOs, on crucial topics such as labour, violence, neoliberalism, peace and development, migration, development policy, aid and poverty reduction.

Format and assessment

The MSc Development Studies has four components: two compulsory modules (Political Economy of Development and Theory, and Policy and Practice of Development); one full-module option or two half-module options; and a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Please see Postgraduate Modules for details on core and optional modules taught within the Department. For a full list of modules offered, please see the Postgraduate Handbook, available on the Development Studies homepage (http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/).

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

Careers

A postgraduate degree from the Department of Development Studies at SOAS will further develop your understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised, with an emphasis on transferable analytical skill. These skills have been of great benefit to the many graduates who have taken up professional careers in development in international organisations, government agencies and non-government organisations. This, in addition to your detailed subject knowledge, will also equip you with a set of other specific skills, including: critical skills; the ability to research extensively; a high level of cultural awareness; and the ability to solve problems.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Postgraduate Open Evenings

You’ll be able to have one-to-one discussions with academics and current students. You can also attend specialist subject talks and take a tour of our campus.

Book now: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/openevenings/

Webinars

Our webinars give you an opportunity to hear and ask questions about the subject you’re interested in studying. We also cover topics such as making an application, Tier 4 Visa entry, fees and funding, scholarships, accommodation options as well as career related information.

Book now: https://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/webinars/

How to apply

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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It is now recognised that the level of greenhouse gas emissions that have already accumulated in the atmosphere means some climate change is inevitable, meaning that effectiveness in dealing with climate impacts is critical for the prospects of development. Read more

It is now recognised that the level of greenhouse gas emissions that have already accumulated in the atmosphere means some climate change is inevitable, meaning that effectiveness in dealing with climate impacts is critical for the prospects of development. Climate change is the foremost challenge of the 21st century and is now being prioritised by governments, donor/development agencies and NGOs around the world. As such, the people working in them need a thorough grounding in the conceptual and practical dimensions both of adaptation to and mitigation of climate change, as well as the interlinkages between them.

The Climate Change and Development programme is designed to meet these needs so that organisations can be more effective in their efforts towards change. The modules in this programme draw from a wide range of disciplinary perspectives, concepts and methods including economics, environmental science, human geography, social development, political economy and environmental law. The programmes cover key issues within climate change and development such as gender, social justice, energy access, poverty and social protection.

The core aims of this programme are to:

  • Offer critical insight into how current development models produce environmental problems, like (but not limited to) climate change, which themselves threaten the objectives of development
  • Pose the question of what magnitude of change is required to confront the problems of climate change: do we need reform or revolution?
  • Help you develop the analytical skills to solve adaptation problems and identify low carbon development options
  • Contribute to producing the next generation of environment and development professionals working on climate policy and practice
  • Provide the most academically gifted students with a route into PhD studies on climate change and development.

Teaching & Learning

Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)

This programme is taught 100% online through our VLE. In the VLE you will have access to learning materials and module resources anytime so you can fit your studies around your existing commitments. For each module, students will be provided with access, through the online Library, to all necessary materials from a range of appropriate sources.

Developed by subject experts, the module materials are designed to meet all your study requirements. We encourage you to follow up further interests and explore other information more widely, but the material we provide is comprehensive and sufficient for the required elements of each module.

The details will vary from module to module, but a typical set of materials will include:

  1. A detailed study guide:
  • All of our modules use a core text which is specially written and this will take you through your self-directed study. Exercises, assignments and other activities, such as self-assessment questions, film clips and animations are included to help you with learning.
  1. E-books and key readings
  • Most modules also draw upon textbooks, key extracts and articles, which accompany the core text, to be accessed via the online library. A wide range of sources are provided as required readings. Information is also supplied suggesting sources of further reading as well as links to relevant web pages.
  1. Supplementary study materials
  • These are included where appropriate, and include items such as computer software.

Tutoring

Each module has a dedicated tutor who is a subject specialist . The tutor will guide the students through the units of the module and prepare them for the examination, using the module discussion forum and other learning activities, depending on the module, on the virtual learning environment. Tutors are also in email contact with their students.

When can I study?

You can begin your studies in April or October. Students take one module per study session. Study sessions are 16 weeks in duration.

How many hours a week?

Each module runs over a 16-week study term, and we recommend studying, on average, 15 hours per week during this time. These hours can be broken down into three main tasks:

Reading the unit materials and key readings on each of the 15 topics covered in the unit

Preparing for and submitting the written assignment, worth 40-50% of the module mark

Contributing to online discussion and activities.

Additional time is then required for exam revision, which happens after the 16-week study term is completed.

Assessment

Each module will be assessed on one written assignment (40-50 % of the module mark), a hand-written examination (40-50 % of the module mark), and in some modules, online participation in regular learning and discussion exercises (10-20% of the module mark).

Employment

This programme is designed to assist both existing professionals working within environment and development spheres, and people moving into these fields.

For existing professionals, the programme provides the opportunity to upgrade and update their expertise, and to reflect systematically and in depth on their accumulated experience in the light of up-to-date theory and literature.

Graduates of Climate Change and Development will be prepared for roles in the public sector, international organisations, NGO's, consultancies and development projects involved in:

  • policy analysis and implementation for disaster risk reduction
  • climate and broader environmental issues
  • local and national climate change strategies
  • energy and development
  • poverty reduction.

You will also be prepared for roles within social enterprise and corporate social responsibility organisations and departments whose area of focus encompasses environment and development.



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This MSc explores how urban economies can contribute to urban sustainability, social justice and wellbeing. Bringing economic analysis to city planning and management, it aims to nurture future professionals who are equipped to engage in city management and development programmes. Read more

This MSc explores how urban economies can contribute to urban sustainability, social justice and wellbeing. Bringing economic analysis to city planning and management, it aims to nurture future professionals who are equipped to engage in city management and development programmes. A unique focus on the city economy and an extensive alumni network make graduates of this programme highly employable.

About this degree

The programme focuses on identifying methods of enhancing urban productivity and structural change while promoting sustainability and equity through public intervention at the city level. Students gain a critical understanding of the political economy of urban development and urban policy-making, the ability to analyse a city economy and its performance, and numerous opportunities to learn from policy experiences across the world.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (90 credits), one or two optional modules (30 credits) and a development and planning report (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, four core modules (90 credits), one or two optional modules (30 credits), full-time nine months, is offered.

Core modules

  • Cost-Benefit Analysis: Theory and Practice
  • Managing the City Economy
  • Practice in Urban Economic Development
  • Either An Introduction to Public Economics and Public Policy or Urbanisation and Development

Optional modules

  • Transforming Local Areas: Urban Design for Development
  • Housing Policies: Practical Dimensions and Alternative Options
  • Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
  • The City and its Relations
  • Urban Development Policy, Planning and Management
  • Gender in Policy and Planning
  • Socially Sensitive Development in Practice
  • Social Development and Poverty Reduction
  • Urban Environmental Planning and Management in Development
  • Urban Agriculture
  • Adapting Cities to Climate Change in the Global South
  • Management and Planning for Development
  • The Urban Informal Economy
  • Public Economics

Dissertation/report

Guided by individual supervisors, all MSc students submit a 10,000-word dissertation on a topic related to the main themes of the programme. The topic can be chosen to enhance career development or for its inherent interest.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a series of lectures, seminars, workshops, case studies and fieldwork related to cities in different parts of the world, and includes an overseas field trip. Students are assessed through unseen examinations, individual essays, coursework, team work reports, oral presentations and a dissertation.

Careers

Graduates pursue a variety of careers, predominantly: private consultancies and think tanks; public sector (including government careers at different levels and international organisations); academia and research.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Administrator and Research Associate, Al-Khoei Foundation
  • Economic Research Consultant, Regeneris Consulting
  • Government Economist, Greater London Authority
  • Economic Research Consultant, Nathaniel Lichfield & Partners
  • Policy Research Analyst, PRS Legislative Research

Employability

Graduates of this programme enjoy a high level of employability. Students develop an integrated approach towards efficiency, sustainability, social justice and wellbeing and acquire crucial skills in tackling the significant task of economic management of cities. They also have the opportunity to strengthen their CV while on the programme by participating in numerous practice-oriented assignments, both in the UK and abroad. Past graduates have found employment in a variety of fields, ranging from working with UK-based organisations in public, private and community sectors that focus on either local or international development, to employment with governmental, inter-governmental and non-governmental agencies in the Global South.

Why study this degree at UCL?

In addition to strong theoretical teaching, this MSc involves practical fieldwork abroad and in the UK that allows students to put into practice the tools and techniques acquired in the classroom. Characterised by a strong emphasis on international experiences and analytical approaches, this programme will be of benefit to students from both developed and developing countries.



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