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Masters Degrees (Poverty And Development)

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This course provides an understanding of globalisation and development. It places special emphasis on the problem of poverty and its relation to global justice and global politics. Read more
This course provides an understanding of globalisation and development. It places special emphasis on the problem of poverty and its relation to global justice and global politics. You study the political, social and economic causes, consequences and discourses of poverty and development. You also critically analyse these important global currents.

As a student on this course you develop:
-Advanced knowledge and understanding of areas such as globalisation, poverty and development, international relations theory, and international and regional studies themes
-Knowledge of methods in social science research and the techniques required to carry out advanced research
-Theoretical and practical research skills, including the synthesis of materials from a variety of primary and secondary sources

You benefit from rigorous training in globalisation, poverty and development and international relations theory, and in theories and approaches to the study of politics. This helps you to develop the specialist knowledge and research skills from which to embark upon a career with a significant international dimension or pursue a postgraduate research degree in globalisation, development and poverty studies.

We have a student-run Politics Postgraduate Society which brings together MA and PhD students to organise academic and social events. The Society runs:
-Professional development seminars, led by academic staff
-Seminars delivered by fellow postgraduates - round-table discussions with staff and visitors
-The 'New Voices' seminar series, for exciting young external speakers
-A weekly film night during term time

Facilities

You will enjoy the benefit of most teaching taking place in the Politics building with the Robinson Library next door. This space includes a dedicated postgraduate computer room and a postgraduate common room.

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Gain a solid grounding in the concepts and skills needed to engage in debates on poverty and development. You’ll become familiar with the main theories of development and poverty reduction in development. Read more
Gain a solid grounding in the concepts and skills needed to engage in debates on poverty and development. You’ll become familiar with the main theories of development and poverty reduction in development.

Through the interdisciplinary perspective at IDS, you approach these issues with confidence. You’ll gain a practical understanding of how techniques of research and inquiry create and interpret knowledge.

Accreditation

This course is IAC/EADI accredited. Sussex is proud to be the first UK university to gain this accreditation.

The International Accreditation Council for Global Development Studies and Research wishes to influence proactively the process of quality assurance for global development studies and has developed a state-of-the-art accreditation system.

How will I study?

You study a range of modules across the autumn and spring terms. In the spring and summer terms, you’ll take a research module to help you prepare for your dissertation. In the summer term, you work on your dissertation.

Assessment is through:
-Term papers
-Coursework assignments
-Presentations
-Practical exercises
-A 10,000-word dissertation

Some modules have examinations.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

Our graduates go on to work for:
-The UN, including the Population Fund UNAIDS, ILO and UNFPA
-Government departments such as SIDA
-NGOs, including Korea Food for the Hungry (KFH)

Some also go on to work in academic research

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Develop the skills and understanding to tackle the global challenges of poverty, inequality, conflict, sustainability and social justice. Read more

Develop the skills and understanding to tackle the global challenges of poverty, inequality, conflict, sustainability and social justice.

Whether you are a graduate aiming to make a difference in the world, or a professional wishing to deepen your knowledge and critical thinking, our suite of International Development MSc courses is for you.

Engaged with current debates in policy and practice and grounded in interdisciplinary social sciences, you will develop the tools and confidence to work towards creative solutions that address practical problems in strategic ways.

Four distinct pathways provide a choice of flexibility and breadth, or the chance to pursue a particular interest in greater depth.

Innovative learning approaches promote in-depth investigation of particular cases and issues. These will draw out connections and contradictions between different actors and analytical perspectives, across global, regional, national and local scales.

The opportunity of a placement, leading to a work-based project, will provide hands-on experience to complement classroom-based learning.

You will leave the course with:

  • a critical understanding of the concepts and approaches used in international development and humanitarian action, and their strengths and limitations
  • practical skills in research, analysis and communication and an understanding of how these can be applied in work for social, economic and environmental justice in both global North and global South
  • the ability to analyse the complex interaction of social, economic, political and environmental factors in shaping problems and proposed solutions
  • rich experience of working with people from a wide range of disciplinary, professional and national backgrounds

Course pathways

MSc International Development with Conflict and Humanitarian Action

The MSc International Development with Conflict and Humanitarian Action pathway enables you to gain an in-depth and interdisciplinary understanding of the theories and concepts that underpin contemporary humanitarian action and conflict response. You will also form a critical understanding of humanitarian, peacebuilding and development policy and practice. You will learn how to interpret and evaluate research information and evidence on topics related to humanitarianism, conflict and development.

MSc International Development with Economics

The MSc International Development with Economics pathway covers the key economic concepts, theories and tools required to understand development issues, policies and practices, including those of heterodox and social economics. You will learn how to apply them to analyse specific development problems, such as through appropriate combinations of quantitative and qualitative methods.

MSc International Development, Social justice and Sustainability

The MSc International Development, Social justice and Sustainability pathway enables you to gain an interdisciplinary understanding of theories and concepts of social and environmental justice, wellbeing and sustainability. You will develop in-depth knowledge of people’s practical struggles globally and locally for a better life, and the forms of policy and politics that can support or frustrate these. You will also explore how integrated perspectives can capture the complex interactions between social and ecological systems. Additionally, you will consider areas of complementarity and the trade-off between economic development, human wellbeing and environmental sustainability.

Learning and teaching

You will join the Department of Social & Policy Studies here at Bath. We are ranked in the top 50 for Development Studies in the QS World University Rankings 2017.

Our staff are all active in this field, research-led, and united in their commitment to finding better solutions to the world’s development problems.

Graduate prospects

This course provides an excellent background for those wishing to pursue an international development career and improve people’s lives.

You will be qualified to work in a wide variety of roles, including social research, public policy, public information and campaigning.

Many of our graduates from similar courses have found jobs with high profile organisations, including:

  • Economic Development Team Leader for the UK Department for International Development Palestinian programme in Jerusalem
  • Outreach Channel Director at Marie Stopes International
  • Humanitarian Policy Manager at Plan International
  • Microfinance Partnerships Manager at One Acre Fund
  • Regional Projects Manager at International Alert
  • Private Sector Development Adviser at the UK Department for International Development
  • Power Sector Policy Adviser at the UK Department for International Development
  • Chair of the South West International Development Network and Executive Director of the Development Studies Association

Other graduates have chosen to work for themselves and set up their own charities, while others have stayed in academia, to complete doctoral studies.

Course structure

This course lasts 1 year. Occasionally we make changes to our programmes in response to, for example, feedback from students, developments in research and the field of studies, and the requirements of accrediting bodies. You will be advised of any significant changes to the advertised programme, in accordance with our Terms and Conditions.

The total number of credits for the taught-stage is 60 credits, with most units being 12 Credits. A typical week would approximately average between 6-10 hours of classes or seminars a week depending on options taken. The dissertation or practicum are 30 credits.

Units

Compulsory course units

These compulsory units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

Semester 1

  • Doing research for international development
  • History and theory of international development
  • Plus one optional unit

Semester 2

  • Doing research for international development
  • Management of international development
  • Plus one optional unit

Summer

  • Either Dissertation or Practicum

Optional course units

These optional units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

Semester 1

  • Economics for development
  • Social and environmental justice
  • Conflict, development and peacebuilding

Semester 2

  • Global political economy
  • Sustainability and wellbeing
  • Humanitarianism
  • International development policy analysis and evaluation
  • Education and international development

Placement

As an alternative to writing a dissertation, you’ll have the opportunity to undertake a six-week placement (practicum), working with an organisation involved in international development. You'll write a report reflecting on a particular area of professional practice.



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Would you like to develop the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector?. Read more
Would you like to develop the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector?

The MSc International Development course will equip you with a critical and up-to-date understanding of this broad sector.

You will engage with contemporary debates on the issues that are currently defining the sector, whilst critically examining key international development policies, theories, strategies and practices. You will also analyse the operation of development organisations, and the ways in which individuals and communities experience and challenge poverty and marginalisation.

As part of your dissertation, you will have the opportunity to undertake a research placement to allow you to apply your knowledge in a real-world environment.

This course is delivered by our specialist teaching team, who draw on their extensive experience to ensure that you graduate with knowledge that is at the forefront of the sector.

Our relationship with the MSc International Development programme at Northumbria University gives COCO the opportunity to tap into the minds of students who are up to speed on current development thinking and possess the drive and determination to help us expand our research. The findings from university research projects are invaluable, allowing us to monitor and evaluate our work, learn from each project and put this learning into action to deliver more robust and effective programmes year on year. - Lucy Philipson, CEO COCO

This course has several available start dates and learning methods - for more information, please view the relevant web-page:
January full time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/msc-international-development-dtfitd6/

September part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/international-development-dtpitz6/

January part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/msc-international-development-dtpitd6/

Learn From The Best

This course is delivered by a team of internationally-recognised academics with extensive experience in international development research and practice across the global south.

Our staff research specialisms and diverse range of national and international practitioner links will further enhance your learning experience.

In addition to the teaching delivered by our team, you will have the opportunity to attend enhancement sessions on ‘Working in International Development’, where experts who are currently working within the industry will share their first-hand experience of what it’s like to work in the sector.

We also work with the Centre for International Development to provide additional opportunities for real-world engagement with key organisations and individuals.

Teaching And Assessment

This course examines a wide range of subjects such as conflict and security, civil society and non-government organisations (NGOs), the impacts of China and India’s rising economic power, gender, the environment and resource conflicts, advocacy and citizenship.

On graduation you will be able to understand and critically engage with key development theories, tools and techniques, including participatory methodologies, rights-based approaches and monitoring and evaluation strategies.

This course is delivered via interactive workshops, involving a mixture of small group discussion, lectures, and seminar activities, which are further supported by networking and placement opportunities.

The assessment methods utilised on this course have been specifically developed to prepare you for employment, and incorporate the writing of funding bids, policy briefs, stakeholder statements and academic poster presentations. Traditional essays and a dissertation also form part of the assessment process.

If you choose to do a placement, you will have the opportunity to develop your own real-world research project.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
SO7001 - Advanced Study Skills (Core, 0 Credits)
SO7002 - Social Sciences Postgraduate Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)
SO7005 - Development Research, Management and Practice (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7006 - Critical Development Thinking (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7007 - Changing Geopolitics and New Development Actors (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7008 - Contemporary Development Challenges (Core, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

When studying the MSc International Development course you will be part of the Centre for International Development – a vibrant, multidisciplinary virtual research centre that provides an engaging, supportive and research-rich learning environment.

The Centre brings together academics, practitioners and students to promote research, consultancy, teaching, training and public engagement on issues of global poverty and inequality, the communities and individuals who experience this, and the policies, practices and approaches that seek to address it.

Technology is embedded throughout all areas of this course. Learning materials such as module handbooks, assessment information, lecture presentation slides and reading lists are available via our innovative e-learning platform, Blackboard. You can also access student support and other key University systems through your personal account.

Research-Rich Learning

When studying the MSc International Development course you will benefit from our multidisciplinary teaching team’s cutting-edge research experience which they bring into the classroom through case studies, problem-solving activities and group discussion.

Research is integrated into all aspects of teaching and each member of our team boasts their own individual specialisms, in subjects such as environmental governance and development; natural resource conflicts, including anti-mining activism; public engagement and development education; cosmopolitanism and global citizenship; wellbeing and development; international volunteering; transnationalism, migrant mobilities and their impacts on development. Staff research expertise spans Africa, Asia and Latin America.

All members of the MSc International Development teaching team are internationally recognised academics who publish in high impact international journals and regularly receive research funding from prestigious organisations such as the ESRC, the British Academy, the Leverhulme Trust and the Newton Fund.

You are also encouraged to undertake your own research projects to further aid your learning and will have the opportunity to engage with development organisations such as Traidcraft, Lifeworlds Learning, Shared Interest Foundation, and COCO, as well as development NGOs working in India and Latin America.

Give Your Career An Edge

This course has been designed to enhance your employability in international development practice and research thanks to the diverse range of knowledge and skills you will acquire whilst you study.

You will regularly engage in real-world research and problem-solving, in addition to developing the practical skills required to successfully pursue a career in this sector.

Core employability skills are also embedded throughout all aspects of this degree, ensuring you leave with skills that can be transferred to a broad spectrum of organisations.

Completion of an optional research placement will also help to further enhance your career edge by providing you with industry contacts and experience of international development in a real-world environment. You will also benefit from bespoke careers development support throughout the programme.

Your Future

On graduation you will possess the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector.

Our graduates are able to work in a broad range organisations such as charities and third sector organisations, UK and international government agencies, NGOs and international organisations. They may also wish to pursue careers in research, consultancy or to launch their own NGO.

The MSc International Development course will also prepare you for doctoral study should you wish to further advance your learning.

Former graduates have gone on to work for national and international organisations including Barnardo’s, Leprosy Mission, and International Service.

The MSc International Development course regularly attracts students from a wide variety of professional and disciplinary backgrounds including government, the private sector and NGOs. It is also popular with continuing students who have just graduated from a wide range of undergraduate programmes, including Social Sciences, Law, Human Geography and Business.

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The MSc in Human Resource Development (International Development) enables you to critically understand the role of human resource development (HRD) in enhancing performance within your own institutions and societies. Read more
The MSc in Human Resource Development (International Development) enables you to critically understand the role of human resource development (HRD) in enhancing performance within your own institutions and societies. Emphasis is placed on how HRD can support economic and social advancement by improving public services, and in building capabilities within individuals, organisations and communities to effectively cope with social change. The programme aims to develop students' critical appreciation of globalisation processes, policy initiatives and development management plans to support skills development, competitiveness and human capabilities, including development issues associated with eradicating gender inequalities, fostering human well being and maintaining sustainable livelihoods.

The course aims to develop your professional understanding of HRD strategies and development tools to support skill and knowledge acquisition, and build organization and community capabilities. A focus on developing human knowledge and skills enables you to appreciate how education supports skills development. Students also acquire knowledge of the role of International Organizations (through governments and MNCs) such as the World Bank and the UN in supporting education and development initiatives. There is a strong emphasis on acquiring cross cultural leadership knowledge, relevant for many social change and development projects in the public sector, or in the private sector, MNCs, NGOs or international organizations like the World Bank The objectives are that, by the end of the programme, participants will have:
-Knowledge and understanding of the linkage between international development, education and HRD practices and policies

-Knowledge of how approaches to national human resource development affect organisation and societal performance in developing and transitional economies

-Knowledge and understanding of comparative education policy and governance frameworks, for capacity building, the political economy of skills formation and how national HRD training systems affect organization, industrial and societal development, including gender national planning

-Knowledge of globalisation and cross-cultural factors affecting the application of HRD theories and methods in developing, transitional and newly industrialised countries

-An understanding of HRD and development policies in diverse geographic regions and how they enhance human capabilities and support poverty reduction, empowerment, help eradicate gender inequality and advance human well being especially within transitional and developing country contexts

-A critical understanding of cutting edge international HRD policies including talent management, knowledge management, private sector management and entrepreneurship, corporate social responsibility (CSR), social justice and ethics, social capital, and strategies for managing inequality including gender and other differences

-Knowledge of leadership for development (lead4dev) and different HRD strategies for the building of leadership skills in the workplace/society, especially those from disadvantaged/marginalized groups including the poor and women

-An understanding of how to analyse and design HRD strategies at societal and organisational level, including gender national planning and empowerment

The programme is designed for individuals of any professional background in international organisations, public administration, transnational organisations and private sector companies who are involved in the HRD, leadership and capacity planning aspects of organisations in developing and transitional countries. These may include managers/leaders of HRD/training/learning, HRD and education in government administration; direct trainers, staff of training centres, staff involved in human development planning in governments; HRD and Leadership consultants involved in change projects, change consultants involved in community development; NGO managers and line managers concerned with the development of their staff.

Aims

You will gain:
-Knowledge and understanding of the linkage between international development and HRD practices and policies
-Knowledge of globalisation and cross-cultural actors affecting the application of HRD and education theories and methods in developing, transitional and newly industrialised countries
-Knowledge of education and HRD interventions and their role in building leadership skills and capacity
-Knowledge of how approaches to national human resource development (NHRD) affect organisation and societal performance in developing and transitional economies
-Knowledge of how new approaches to HRD strategies including private sector management and development, social capital, knowledge management, gender planning affect the context for competence and performance enhancement in organisations and societies
-Understanding of how to analyse and design HRD strategies at societal and organisational level
-Understanding of your own learning and leadership skills and how they may be improved

Special features

The course usually includes a field visit to a UK or overseas destination, enabling you to visit public sector organisations, companies and agencies to learn about HRD systems and practices. The cost of the visit is included in the course fee.

Career opportunities

Graduates acquire a range of skills and knowledge valuable in the global economy and relevant for a variety of professional careers in international development. Recent graduates have gained positions including: HRD consultants/managers/directors in Ministries of HRD or Ministries of Education and as NGO Leaders (Middle East, Thailand, Indonesia, Latin America); Knowledge Management Consultants (Middle East, Canada); university HRD and training directors (Middle East, Africa); leadership and capacity development advisors in the public sector (Africa, Asia), education and HRD leadership consultants (Pakistan, Middle East). Some go on to work for the UN or World Bank, for example, gender and HRD specialist, or capacity building advisers (Kazakhstan, India, USA, China) and development project leaders (Nigeria). Some students progress to PhD study and a career in academia.

The course is unique as it demonstrates understanding of institutional HRD practices within the context of globalisation, social change and economic development so graduates acquire relevant development, HRD, leadership and education knowledge for directing culture and social change.

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MSc International Development. Poverty, Inequality and Development is designed to help you understand and tackle the problems of poverty and inequality in a critical and constructive way. Read more

MSc International Development: Poverty, Inequality and Development is designed to help you understand and tackle the problems of poverty and inequality in a critical and constructive way.

The current impoverishment of more than 1.4 billion people, plus the growing levels of inequality at national and international levels, present the world with its greatest moral challenge.

You will learn about the different conceptualisations and characteristics of poverty and inequality through high-level academic training from leading academics, in a vibrant and stimulating environment.

Informal enquiries, prior to application, are welcomed. Please contact Dr Nicholas Jepson, Deputy Programme Director (  ).

Aims

  • Provide critical insights into different theoretical and disciplinary perspectives on how poverty, inequality and development can be understood, measured and explained
  • Provide you with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to critically analyse key theoretical and practical issues relating to poverty, inequality and development;
  • Provide critical insights into the key strategies, policies and practices currently employed to promote development, equality and poverty reduction
  • Provide a wide range of options for advanced training in areas of specialist expertise relevant to poverty, inequality and development;
  • Develop advanced competencies in transferable areas, including developing reasoned arguments, gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources, undertaking both team-based and independent work to deadlines, and both written and verbal forms of communication
  • Assist you in developing your specialist area of expertise within the field of poverty, inequality and development, and applying your understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation.

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is covered by the course fee. Recent fieldtrip locations have included Uganda, Ghana, Sri Lanka and India.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. We cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. Planning will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

Part-time Study

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

The taught elements of the programme, carrying 120 credits overall is continuously assessed by a variety of methods (project based reports, essays), involving largely individual submissions, but also elements of group work.

Participants must also complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice approved by the Programme Directors. Students are encouraged to base their dissertations on topics of direct professional concern to themselves.

Facilities

The Arthur Lewis Building provides excellent resources including analytical laboratories, studio facilities, workshops, seminar rooms, an on-site cafe and dedicated computer clusters including GIS facilities.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for employment in a range of development-related fields, including research, policy and practice. A wide range of transferable skills will be developed, including analytical and professional skills. Many of our alumni have gone onto careers in public service, the NGO/charitable and private sectors at national and international levels, as policy officers, managers, consultants or development practitioners - while others have pursued further academic study leading to a PhD and academic careers. Since its foundation, GDI has trained over 7000 individuals from 170 different countries.



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This programme responds to the growing demands made on the humanitarian and development sectors by intensive urbanisation. This course has been established by the research and consultancy group on International Development, Emergencies and Refugees (IDEARS) - part of the Weeks Centre at LSBU. Read more
This programme responds to the growing demands made on the humanitarian and development sectors by intensive urbanisation. This course has been established by the research and consultancy group on International Development, Emergencies and Refugees (IDEARS) - part of the Weeks Centre at LSBU. If you wish to pursue a career with government, non-governmental organisations, international agencies, public and private organisations and enterprises, this course is for you.

Rapidly urbanising world

Ours is a rapidly urbanising world: by 2010 over half the world's population lived in cities. Urbanization is fastest in the developing world, where both primary and secondary cities are rapidly expanding. It is predicted that by 2020 more Africans will live in urban than in rural areas, and in China, by 2023. Except in countries emerging from war, urbanisation is closely linked to economic growth, although urban poverty levels continue to rise.

This rapid growth, particularly in the light of its links to the flight from rural poverty and the development of a massive informal sector, has posed immense challenges to all urban systems. In many Asian, Latin American and African cities 30-70% of the population lives in slums and more than 90% of new jobs are in the informal sector. In transition countries, already highly urbanised, the changing political and economic framework has led to widespread poverty. Everywhere, urban roads, utilities, education and health services, and governance processes are heavily strained. While cities experience high levels of investment, it is often uneven.

This context is now widely recognised among all major actors, with policy and programmes targeting the urban sector now a growth area. The challenge for development professionals, whether working in donor agencies, NGOs, governments or private practice, is to understand the broad economic and political context of urbanization, develop analyses of complex urban trends, opportunities and problems, and be able to draw on a range of appropriate interventions. People seeking work or progression in development practice will be moving into a growth area if they can demonstrate familiarity with urban issues and policies in developing countries.

Modules

You'll explore urban issues, strongly linked to analyses of broader development issues, which will prepare them for roles in development agencies, NGOs, urban management or community work. It provides a thorough grounding in the broad agendas of poverty reduction and its global context. At the same time it provides a thorough understanding of rapidly changing urban settings and enables students to acquire practical development planning skills for an urban setting. An emphasis on research as well as practical skills allows students to specialise in their particular areas of interest.

Economies in transition
Human development in a globalised world
Urban challenges
Urban project
Research methods
Dissertation

Dissertation and voluntary work placement

Part of the dissertation may be replaced with a voluntary work placement in one of our partner organisations. Through the use of case studies you will analyse a comprehensive range of development issues, such as: markets, trade and the global economy; the role of international institutions and agencies; human development; poverty and poverty reduction; social provision in developing countries; rural development and urbanisation; environmental policies and sustainable development; empowerment and participation; migration.

Through a specialist theoretical module you'll also acquire a thorough grounding in urban development issues and their links to a broad development agenda; and this will be followed by a project module which will enable you to apply the theory and understand the necessary skills to plan, execute and monitor an urban development project. The course also develops the skills required to undertake development research, focusing on appropriate methodologies, data collection, policy design and implementation.

Professional links

The MSc has excellent relations with practicing development urbanists around the country, who provide the course with strong links to current thinking and practice; as well as with Development Agencies and NGO working in the development field. Students from these organisations are regularly enrolled on the course and members of these organisations give regular presentations to MSc students.

Employability

Students on our MSc Development and Urbanisation course will benefit from the renewed international interest in the urban sphere. Previous graduates have entered careers with a wide range of employers, working for international organisations, such as, the United Nations and its constituent organisations, the World Bank, the International Labour Organisation and the World Health Organisation.

Many take up important posts in their home countries within government, non-government and civil society organisations or non-governmental development organisations in the UK, such as Christian Aid and Oxfam, in addition to teaching posts in universities and colleges specialising in Development research and practice.

For students interested in further academic development or mid-career progression, successful completion of the MSc provides eligibility for our large and lively Mphil/PhD programme.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. It is highly relevant to anyone working or intending to work on labour and labour-related social movements in development agencies and NGOs, labour and solidarity movements, corporate social responsibility initiatives, and to activists in both developed and developing countries. We welcome students with a strong background in the social sciences in their first degree, as well as practitioners and professionals working in the areas of development, labour and employment relations, social movements and other related fields.

A unique Programme

This innovative new programme offers students the opportunity to study labour conditions and relations, social movements of labour and their contributions to development processes and changes in the South. It is the first and only MSc programme in the UK dedicated to Labour, Social Movements and Development. It provides a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty. It investigates labour in contemporary social and economic development of the South as well as classic and newly emerging social movements of labour in local, national and international spaces. Students will also have the opportunity to experience labour campaigns and policy-making in practice by participating in our interactive sessions on designing and implementing international, regional and national labour campaigns and policies. The MSc draws on the expertise of Department of Development Studies staff in labour, social movements and development in Latin America, Africa and Asia, and on our contacts within such movements, as well as with NGOs and international organisations.

The MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development explores different theories and methods for the study of the working poor in the South, and offers a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty, and of the role of social movements and international initiatives for labour.

Highlights include:

- Labour process and organisations: development trajectories and divisions in the South

- A comparative history of labour and social movements in countries such as China, Korea, India, South Africa, Brazil and the Middle East

- Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives, codes of conduct and anti-sweatshop campaigning

- The impact of neoliberalism and globalisation on workers in the South

- Informalisation of labour, casualization and precarious work

- Feminisation of labour

- The worst forms of exploitation: forced labour and child labour

- Rural labour, migrant labour and labour in Export Processing Zones

- Household and reproductive labour

- The International Labour Organisation, international labour standards and decent work

- Practices and theories of local, national and international labour campaigns.

The unique regional expertise at SOAS allows students of the MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development to specialise in some of the most dynamic parts of the developing world. The programme’s emphasis on transferable analytical skills will be of great benefit to graduates who return to, or take up, professional careers in international organisations, government agencies and non-governmental organisations and movements. Students also benefit from the wide range of modules on offer, both within the department and across the School, allowing them to create individualised interdisciplinary programmes.

The department has a Labour, Movements and Development research cluster (http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/research/labour/) which carries out research activities linked to labour, social movements and development.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Labour, Social Movements and Development. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and potentially to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 79kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/file101781.pdf

Materials

- SOAS Library
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Labour, Social Movements and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions.

An MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This programme enables you to study development with a specific focus on poverty and inequality, both key aspects of current development policy discourse. Read more

This programme enables you to study development with a specific focus on poverty and inequality, both key aspects of current development policy discourse. Issues examined include: definitions and indicators of poverty, inequality and development; causes of poverty and inequality; poverty reduction strategies; cross-cutting issues such as gender and conflict; practical policy, programme and research skills. 

The International Development Department is well-regarded internationally by sponsors, donor agencies, governments and NGOs. Study with us to benefit from:

  • Expertise in key issues and skills valued by employers
  • A vibrant, welcoming community
  • Individual overseas fieldwork or study visit included in fees (on-campus programmes)
  • Flexible programmes and a wide choice of modules (part-time students also welcome)
  • A diverse and international student body
  • Strong support in study and English language skills

Each programme is taught by a team of multi-disciplinary specialists who work closely with students to address individual interests and concerns. Every student is allocated an academic tutor to support them in their academic progress throughout the year. The department has a long history of teaching students from across the world, and recent students have come from 99 different countries and a wide variety of professional and academic backgrounds.

Course details

Students will explore theories of development in historical context from (roughly) 1945 up to the present in the core compulsory module. The theories are then applied to contemporary development approaches and issues. Throughout, the emphasis is on you developing a critical understanding of the evolution of development theories over the last half century and its implications for present day thinking about development.

The relevance of sociological categories of class, religion, ethnicity and gender in both disaggregating levels of poverty and inequality, and in understanding the processes which foster poverty and inequality in development will be explored in one of the two modules which give this programme its particular identity and focus.

The aim of the other programme specific compulsory module is to examine different approaches to defining and measuring poverty and inequality, to understand the impact of global and national systems on poverty and inequality, to reflect on the potential and limitations of some useful analytical frameworks and methodologies, and to consider some interesting approaches to project and policy led development.

Learning and teaching

Teaching takes place over two ten-week terms, utilising a range of teaching and learning methods, including short lectures, problem solving, role play and group work.

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Employability

The knowledge and skills gained in the programme will equip graduates for jobs in international, national and local government and non-governmental organizations, think tanks and consultancies.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD.



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The MSc Development Studies course is interdisciplinary and innovatory. It is designed for those who wish to pursue careers with governments, non-governmental organisations, international agencies, public and private organisations and enterprises. Read more
The MSc Development Studies course is interdisciplinary and innovatory. It is designed for those who wish to pursue careers with governments, non-governmental organisations, international agencies, public and private organisations and enterprises. It provides a thorough grounding in the development field, and its emphasis on research enables students to specialise in their particular areas of interest.

The MSc Development Studies is led by Professor Gaim Kibreab and taught by excellent research-active lecturers who specialise in social and economic development, as forced migration. See the current research projects tied to the International Development, Emergencies and Refugee Studies (IDEARS) Research Group.

Through the use of case studies you'll analyse a range of issues, crucial for Development policy and practice, such as:

• Globalisation: markets, trade and the global economy;
• Trade and Aid: the role of international institutions and agencies;
• Strategies for Industrialisation: economic growth and human development;
• Social Development: livelihoods, poverty and poverty reduction;
• Developing the Rural Sector: Agrarian Policies, migration and urbanisation;
• Environmental policies and sustainable development;
• Political empowerment, participation, and human rights.

The course develops the skills required to undertake development research, focusing on appropriate methodologies, data collection, policy and project design and implementation. A research dissertation forms a central part of your work on the course.

Modules

Contemporary issues in development
Human development in a globalised world
Research methods for development
Economies in transition: strategies for industrialisation
Forced migration and development
Human rights and development
Research dissertation (triple module)

The MSc also offers a series of workshops in project design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation, providing these essential skills for student's Development careers

Teaching and learning

Class contact time is typically 12 hours per week on the full-time mode of the MSc, and six hours on the part-time mode plus individual tutorial and independent study. This accumulates to typically two days a week, afternoons and evenings typically two evenings a week.

All staff members teaching on the course have considerable experience of working and conducting research in developing countries. They have all published work on Development issues and are well known in their respective fields.

Placements

Our social policy students have taken up work placements at the following organisations:

• Chance UK, a unique early intervention mentoring organisation who provide adult volunteer mentors to work with children aged 5-11 years at risk of developing anti-social behaviour in later life)
• Kairos in Soho (a pan-London LGBT Community Development Organisation)
• Naz Project London (a sexual health organisation that works to mobilise Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) communities in relation to HIV and other sexual health concerns)
• Richmond Advice and Information on Disability (RAID)
• Women's Royal Voluntary Service (WRVS) one of the UK's largest charities and voluntary organisations who aim to give older people the opportunity and choice to get more out of life

Professional links

The MSc has excellent relations with Development Agencies and NGO working in the development field. Students from these organisations are regularly enrolled on the course and members of these organisations gave regular presentations to MSc students.

Research in the Development field

Recent and current research by staff includes projects funded by the World Health Organisation, the World Bank, the United Nations Children's Fund, the United Nations Development Programme, the UK Department for International Development, and the Economic and Social Research Council.

In recent years, staff members have conducted research in Bangladesh, Brazil, China, East Timor, Eritrea, Ethiopia, the Gambia, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan, Somalia, Sudan, Uganda and Zambia. Staff teaching on the MSc regularly publish books and articles both on development issues, and on the countries in which they have expertise.

Employability

A humanities masters has the real advantage of opening up careers in a number of professions such as teaching, social work, administration and higher level education. Graduates have forged exciting careers in research-related work, public relations, advertising, retail, management and media-related work.

Previous students have entered careers in many fields working for international organisations such as the United Nations and its constituent organisations, the World Bank, the International Labour Organisation and the World Health Organisation. Many students take up posts in their home countries within government, non-government and civil society organisations, or with non-governmental development organisations in the UK, in addition to teaching posts in universities and colleges specialising in Development research and practice.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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The notion that “politics matters” has increasingly become the mantra of development policy-makers and practitioners – as well as development scholars - and there is now a growing recognition that international development is inherently political. Read more

The notion that “politics matters” has increasingly become the mantra of development policy-makers and practitioners – as well as development scholars - and there is now a growing recognition that international development is inherently political. Development agencies want staff trained in political economy analysis skills while academics and governments now focus more than ever on the political underpinnings of global development challenges.

This MSc makes a direct link between academic and practical policy approaches to international development, with an emphasis on exploring and understanding the politics of developing countries and the relationship between politics and development. Issues examined include: the impact of political systems, governance and political actors on developmental successes and failures; the relationships between global, regional, national and local organisations, networks and institutions and the driving of developmental change and the politics of aid and international donors.

The programme is designed for recent graduates preparing to work in international development and for professionals working for NGOs, donor agencies or development projects.

The International Development Department is well-regarded internationally by sponsors, donor agencies, governments and NGOs. Study with us to benefit from:

  • Expertise in key issues and skills valued by employers
  • A vibrant, welcoming community
  • Individual overseas fieldwork or study visit included in fees (on-campus programmes)
  • Flexible programmes and a wide choice of modules (part-time students also welcome)
  • A diverse and international student body
  • Strong support in study and English language skills

Each programme is taught by a team of multi-disciplinary specialists who work closely with students to address individual interests and concerns. Every student is allocated an academic tutor to support them in their academic progress throughout the year. The department has a long history of teaching students from across the world, and recent students have come from 99 different countries and a wide variety of professional and academic backgrounds.

Course details

It is now clearer than ever before that the greatest development challenges of our time – poverty, conflict, famine, poor governance etc. – are driven primarily by political, not technical, factors. The aim of this programme is to provide theoretical and empirical training to students to enable them to understand the role that politics plays in both facilitating and undermining development, in both the North and the South.

The programme is aimed at recent graduates preparing to work in international development and for professionals working for NGOs, donor agencies or development projects and focuses on a range of key questions, including:

  •  are democracy and development intrinsically linked?
  • how do theories of development link to development practice?
  • what is the ‘developmental state’?
  • how do historical and structural factors play into developmental change, or failure?

The programme is taught by some of the leading thinkers on the relationship between politics and development, each of whom work closely with policy-makers in the UK and internationally. Students will also benefit from engagement with major research programmes focused on the politics of development based in IDD, including theGovernance and Social Development Resource Centre.

Learning and teaching

Teaching takes place over two ten-week terms, utilising a range of teaching and learning methods, including short lectures, problem solving, role play and group work. In the summer term, students complete assignments and focus on their 12,000 word dissertation.

By the end of your study you will gain:

  • An in-depth understanding of competing development theories and approaches and the ability to critically evaluate their strengths and weaknesses.
  • The different political systems operating in developing countries and how and why such systems have come about.
  • The complex relationship between politics and development
  • The impact of political systems and political actors on developmental success and failure.
  • The impact of the political economy in developing countries and globally on aid and donor policies 
  • The ability to critically analyse and understand complex political and economic relationships and events.
  • The ability to understand in-depth and critically evaluate approaches to political analysis in developing countries.
  • The ability to critically, clearly and concisely argue the case for and against a range of development strategies.
  • The ability to interpret, explain and critically evaluate approaches to the political economy of development.
  • The ability to make presentations and write in a well argued, well-structured and readable manner, making good use of a wide range of references.

Enhancing your Student Experience

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Employability

The knowledge and skills gained in the programme will equip graduates for jobs in international, national and local government and non-governmental organisations, think tanks and consultancies.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD.



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Study from anywhere in the world with practitioners in government, civil society and the private sector, as well as with people new to development. Read more

Study from anywhere in the world with practitioners in government, civil society and the private sector, as well as with people new to development.

The broad purpose of this programme is to give those working in the area of poverty reduction and development in developing and transitional countries, or those wishing to work in such areas, a firmer grounding in understanding poverty and inequality, promoting poverty reduction and analysing the performance of major poverty reducing programmes and policies.

Course details

The core module aims to familiarise students with key concepts (eg development and poverty) and theories (eg modernisation, dependency, neo-liberalism and the ‘crisis’ in development theory) and with the changing roles of international development organisations and states in promoting international development (eg through aid, trade and fiscal, monetary and social policies).

The emphasis throughout will be on encouraging students to reflect critically on what has worked well or not and why. Students will select three optional modules (at 20 credits each) based on their individual interests and career aspirations.

More information on: International Development MSc by distance learning

Learning and teaching

The programme is delivered online, using a web communications tools system (Canvas) and this web environment is where students are expected to take part in online discussions and group activities, guided by a tutor. All required reading is provided (either in hard copy or via our extensive electronic library, or via Internet links). Assessment takes the form of 2 items of assessment per module, plus a 10,000 to 15,000 word dissertation for the MSc.

Course structure

In delivering our distance learning programmes, we have drawn on lessons learned by academic institutions about how to provide effective distance learning and use a blended learning approach:

  • An intensive online induction programme is included to familiarise students with the web-based discussion boards, the online library facilities and the requirements of the programme
  • Required reading materials are provided in hard copy
  • Discussions and group activities take place within an online learning environment
  • Students benefit from interacting closely with each other and their tutors even while they are separated by continents and time zones (we have students in Africa, the Caribbean, the US, Eastern Europe, South East Asia and the UK)
  • Whilst discussion groups and access to the electronic library rely on the use of a computer, students are not tied to the computer for other reading materials
  • A short online research methods course is provided prior to starting the dissertation project
  • We pride ourselves on strong administrative, academic and pastoral support for students

Our distance learning courses use a variety of teaching and assessment methods: Hard copy teaching and reading materials

  • Textbooks and CDs / DVDs
  • Electronic access to the University’s extensive elibrary facility containing ejournals, ebooks and databases
  • Group online discussion activities (using Canvas, which is part of our 'virtual learning environment')
  • Dissertation
  • Individual reading and reflection

Each module takes six weeks to complete (with guided online discussions). The MSc does not include any face-to-face element.

The course is assumed to be part time, and students study one module at a time.

Course requirements

IDD has designed its distance learning courses to be accessible for a working professional person and we have kept the technical requirements to a minimum. However, before you commit to distance learning, we recommend that you consider the following:

IT equipment: To complete a distance learning course successfully, you will need:

  • Extended access to a computer with Word, Excel, Internet Explorer, a media player software and a CD-ROM drive.
  • Regular access to the Internet for visiting the web-based discussion boards, email and some online library research (whilst this is obviously easier with broadband, we have many students who participate successfully through a dial-up connection).

IT skills: You will find this course less challenging if you are already a confident Internet user, although we are available extensively to coach you through becoming familiar with the web-based discussion format and to address other IT questions.

Time: This course requires that you read a good deal and regularly check into the web-based discussions during the six 'live' weeks of discussion for each module. If you are forced to miss some of the discussions for work or personal reasons, this can be coped with, but if you are regularly out of touch you will find it hard to complete the assignments to the required standard. Writing the assignments is also time-consuming.

Employability

Career opportunities 

This programme is most relevant for people who have worked in governments, non-governmental organisations (either international, regional, national or local) or on donor-funded projects, as well as for recent graduates wishing to work for such organizations, who have some experience of developing countries.

Alumni

Currently more than 3,800 IDD alumni have taken their knowledge and experience to over 148 countries around the globe and are working in a variety of jobs in the public, private and voluntary sector.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD.



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This MSc offers a critical approach to 'people-centred' development, addressing the challenges for equitable citizenship in the context of social diversity and globalisation, particularly in urban contexts. Read more

This MSc offers a critical approach to 'people-centred' development, addressing the challenges for equitable citizenship in the context of social diversity and globalisation, particularly in urban contexts. Participants engage in a critical analysis of the theory and practice of social development alongside gaining the skills required to be a reflective social development practitioner.

About this degree

The programme objectives are to give participants a solid grounding in social analysis skills and perspectives, rooted in social theory around identity, inequality, and social change processes. Students learn how development interventions can best support the citizenship claims of diverse groups of women and men, and girls and boys living in the Global South, and consider the role of the social development practitioner in this endeavour.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), either one or two optional modules (totalling 30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (full-time nine months) is offered, comprising three core modules (90 credits) and one or two optional modules (30 credits).

Core modules

All three of the following:

  • Social Policy and Citizenship
  • Social Diversity, Inequality, and Poverty
  • Social Development in Practice

Optional modules

One or two optional modules, totalling 30 credits, usually including the following, among others:

  • NGOs and Social Transformation
  • Communication, Technologies and Social Power
  • Gender in Policy and Planning
  • Participatory Processes: Building for Development
  • Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
  • Post Disaster Recovery: Policies, Practices and Alternatives
  • Critical Urbanism Studio I and II
  • Housing as Urbanism: Housing Policy and the Search for Scale
  • Housing Policies: Practical Dimensions and Alternative Options
  • Neo-Structuralism and the Developmental State
  • Political Economy of Development: Land, Food and Agriculture
  • Political Economy of Development: Industrialisation and Infrastructure
  • Adapting Cities to Climate Change in the Global South
  • Sustainable Infrastructure and Services in Development
  • Urban Water and Sanitation, Planning and Politics
  • Transport Equity and Urban Mobility
  • Urban and Peri-Urban Agriculture: Knowledge Systems in the Global South
  • The City and Its Relations: Context, Institutions and Actors in Urban Development Planning
  • Managing the City Economy
  • An Introduction to Public Economics and Public Policy

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project related to the main themes of the programme, culminating in a dissertation report of 10,000 words (60 credits). Topics may be chosen to enhance career development or for their inherent interest.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical classroom exercises, and fieldwork within the UK and abroad. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations, and a dissertation report as well as an assessment of practical work, including the international fieldwork group report.

Fieldwork

The programme incorporates group fieldwork in London and in a selected country of the Global South.

The cost of flights, visas, necessary vaccinations, accommodation, and fieldwork-related travel and facilitations costs, are incorporated within the programme fees. Meals and other expenditure must be covered by the student.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Social Development Practice MSc

Funding

Candidates for the MSc in Social Development Practice may be eligible for the Swarovski Foundation scholarship. Details of this scholarship will be published on The Bartlett Development Planning Unit website in autumn 2017.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates of this Master's programme are likely to find employment as officers for local and international NGOs, as officers for international organisations, as officers in local or national government departments and as consultants. Some graduates pursue an academic career, either through doctoral studies or through teaching and research in a number of prestigious universities.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Institutional Capacity Building Programme Professional, International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)
  • Project Officer, Korea Development Bank
  • Corporate Responsibility Manager, Odebrecht
  • Development Consultant, World Bank Group

Employability

Graduates of this programme are able to link theory to practice, critically reflect, and negotiate complex social relations as well as facilitate social processes in a context of diversity - all key transferable skills in the job market. Graduates have secured jobs in a variety of sectors and countries and built fulfilling careers in social development.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The programme introduces students to critical, analytical and practical skills that will be of use in their future careers, whether as academics, social development practitioners or advocates for the need to place the 'social' at the centre of development. Students have an opportunity to critically examine relevant bodies of knowledge, current debates and field experience in primarily urban contexts, and to consider the challenges of making development policy, planning and practice more socially responsive.

Students on this MSc benefit from the strong practical component, which includes fieldwork assignments in London and an international field trip to a city in the Global South. This trip provides the opportunity to develop practical skills, use tools for participatory action research, and reflect on the roles and responsibilities of social development practitioners.

The practice-based components of the programme also provide students with the opportunity to network with organisations and professionals working in the social development sector. In a complementary series of careers sessions, students can network with Development Planning Unit alumni and partners who are working in relevant fields.



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The Master of Development Studies equips students with knowledge and tools for understanding and researching today’s development issues. Read more
The Master of Development Studies equips students with knowledge and tools for understanding and researching today’s development issues. The coursework of this programme lays the foundation for studying development in multidisciplinary perspective, covering theoretical and practical aspects. We address contemporary challenges arising from globalization, and transition students to the dissertation portion of the program through training in research methodology. Elective courses focus on major issues in development: poverty and inequality, industrialization, the role of institutions, sustainable development, and entrepreneurship.

INTRODUCTION

The Master of Development Studies is a multidisciplinary programme that sets to provide solid grounding in development from theoretical, conceptual, historical and contemporary perspectives, as well as a good grasp of empirical research, policy analysis, and development in practice particularly applicable to development scholars, practitioners and policymakers. The programme exposes students to development theories and a wide range of topics related to development. The students are also trained to conduct research in development studies.



ENTRY REQUIREMENT

A Bachelor degree with a minimum of CGPA 3.0 or equivalent and sufficient knowledge of development studies or relevant field.



PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

CORE COURSES (24 Credits)

- Philosophy and Methodology of Research

- Research Project

- Development Theory and Practice

- Globalization and Development



OPTIONAL COURSES (A+B)



(A) AT LEAST 3 OPTIONAL COURSES (9 Credits)

- Poverty and Inequality

- Sustainable Development and Environmental Management

- Entrepreneurship and Development

- Institutions, Industrial Development and Economic Growth

- Economics of Education

- Gender and Development Issues



(B) NOT MORE THAN 3 OPTIONAL COURSES (9 Credits)

- The Malaysian Economy

- Economic Development and Planning

- Public Economics

- Islamic Banking and Finance

- Public Policy Analysis

- Social Policy and Development

- Planning Community and Development



PROGRAMME DURATION

Minimum: 2 Semesters

Maximum: 8 Semesters



LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS (For International Applicants)

Minimum TOEFL score of 550 or;

Minimum IELTS overall band score of 5.5



FEES STRUCTURE

AVERAGE FEES*

MALAYSIAN

RM 14,130.00*

INTERNATIONAL

RM 27,867.50*

*Subject to change

Facilities

The faculty is equipped with state-of-the-art facilities such as two computer teaching laboratories equipped with LCD and statistical software with a total capacity for 105 students, a student computer laboratory for 51 students and five lecture theatres.

In addition, the beautiful new building for postgraduate studies, houses 15 seminar rooms, a computer laboratory with a capacity for 54 computer workstations, 2 conference halls with a capacity of 100 persons each and 3 wireless LAN coverage (WiFi) zones within the faculty.

Indeed, FEA is one of the few premier institutions that can provide such quality, in terms of facilities.

Career Opportunity

- Government agencies ( federal, state, local and others)
- International development agencies
- Non-governmental organizations (NGOs)
- Non-profit organizations
- Educational services (universities, colleges and others)
- Policy and research bodies

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Help solve the world’s development problems. Broaden your knowledge of the world’s key development issues to shape a positive future for those in need. Read more

Help solve the world’s development problems

Broaden your knowledge of the world’s key development issues to shape a positive future for those in need.

Development studies at Massey is ranked in the top 100 in the world in the QS World University Rankings 2017.

Advance straight from your bachelor’s degree

The Master of International Development is a 180-credit course that can follow on immediately from your bachelor’s degree.

Deepen your understanding to effect change

You will gain an advanced understanding of how global economic, social, political and environmental forces affect people and shape different parts of the world. These insights will allow you to recognise where inequalities lie and identify strategies to help overcome poverty and enhance human wellbeing.

Learn from experts in the field

Massey University was, in 1989, the first university in New Zealand to offer postgraduate qualifications in development studies. We’ve built on that reputation by developing world-class courses in international development. 

Our professors and lecturers are scholars and active researchers, but are also people with experience in development policy and practice in diverse contexts including the Pacific, Asia and Africa.

Get great career skills

Graduates of the Master of International Development will be able to:

  • demonstrate knowledge and skills that can be applied in developing policy and strategies, and in managing and evaluating international development programmes
  • critically and rigorously evaluate contemporary international development theories, policies and approaches
  • conduct independent research and analysis of international development issues, collect relevant data, and be able to write persuasively about this
  • demonstrate mastery of social science research approaches and techniques and be able to undertake independent research in a well-planned and ethical manner
  • interpret research findings and draw out relevant implications for development theory, policy and practice

Careers

A career in international development means providing others with the tools they need to enhance their quality of life, bringing happiness to communities in poverty.

Graduates work all over the world for organisations like Red Cross, World Vision and Caritas to provide humanitarian assistance, sustainable development, and peacekeeping. You could work as a development officer, foreign diplomat, development policy analyst, advisor in tourism, health, education, or agriculture, community affairs officer, monitoring and evaluation officer, human rights advisor or advocacy officer.

Postgraduate education will give you the skills you need for a satisfying and rewarding career.

A Ministry of Education report found that:

  • Earnings and employment rates increase with the level of qualification completed
  • Five years after leaving study, most young domestic graduates will be earning above the national median earnings
  • Young masters graduates earn 86 per cent more than the national median
  • Good careers are associated with better health, better wellbeing and more satisfying lives


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