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The MA in Literary Studies pathway in Postmodern Writing offers students a dynamic engagement with literary responses to postmodernism. Read more
The MA in Literary Studies pathway in Postmodern Writing offers students a dynamic engagement with literary responses to postmodernism. The course provides a firm grounding in the latest developments in the highly topical field of postmodern writing. It also offers the key skills to undertake your own detailed research project successfully. Thus a special feature of the MA pathway in Postmodern Writing is the combination of the study of postmodernism alongside the development of key transferable skills. As a student on this MA scheme, you will have free access to both the University’s superb library and information technology resources and to the unrivalled collections of the National Library of Wales.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/literary-studies-post-modern-writing-masters/

- Assessment:
Assessment takes the form of: a research proposal, including a related bibliographic element; a case study; examined oral presentations; and 6,000-word assignments. In the third semester, each student will complete a MA Dissertation of 15,000 words which deals specifically with an area of Postmodern Writing.

Overview

You will study two core modules, together with two option modules. A specialist MA module in postmodern writing provides a rigorous and detailed interrogation of particular developments in this important area of literature. The course covers a range of research preparation skills including exploiting library resources, using electronic journals and other IT skills, building a bibliography, researching and writing a proposal, structuring a dissertation, developing and sustaining an argument, footnotes and referencing, and oral presentation skills. The course will also ask you to engage with different kinds of 'textuality', or aspects of the literary text, which need to be taken into account in the study of literature at postgraduate level.

An important part of the course is the writing of a 15,000-word Dissertation on an aspect of Postmodern Writing of particular interest to you. Aberystwyth University takes great care in assigning students a supervisor whose interests will be matched as closely as possible to your own.

The department has a proud tradition of research excellence, as demonstrated in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 97% of research assessed was found to be of international standing or higher.

- Application Details
In addition to completing the standard University application package (How to apply), candidates are asked by the Department to supply the following supplementary documents:

1. A letter of application (1 side of A4) that explains why you want to enrol on the Literary Studies (or the particular Literary Studies pathway) MA. It should include a brief account of your academic study to date, touching on relevant literary/critical issues as appropriate – you might mention, for example, the authors to whose work you are particularly drawn, the topics and ideas that are of special significance to you, and the methodologies you have found particularly valuable in your encounter with literary works. The account will be important in helping us to arrive at a decision about your general suitability for the programme.

2. A representative sample of critical work, written during the past three years, of no more than 3000 words. You are allowed to send work submitted as part of a previous degree.

Employability

Qualification: MA in Literary Studies, pathway in Postmodern Writing 

This degree will suit you...
- If you have a specific interest in Post-modern Writing
- If you want rigorous training for future work as a research
- If you are interested in the theoretical and historical debates behind literary studies.

- Employability:
The MA in Literary Studies, pathway in Postmodern Writing provides you with both an in-depth knowledge of Postmodern Writing and key transferrable skills. Thus it provides a natural entry for further academic study for a PhD and to a range of employment opportunities. Specialist modules on research techniques, presentation, analysis, professional standards of writing and oral presentations provide you with core skills that are highly valued by a diverse range of employers. The creative industries are an increasingly important part of the modern economy and this degree is an excellent stepping stone to a career in a broad range of fields in the arts, literature, journalism and many more.

- Key Skills and Competencies:
Study Skills
You will learn how to gain access to the relevant literature and materials in this field and how to use them in critical discussion of the issues covered by this subject and in relation to your own specific needs. Practical advice is given in research methods and sources.

The ability to quickly assemble, assimilate, interpret and present a broad range of information is a skill which is keenly sought by many employers from the civil service to journalism, to industry and commerce.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at MA level is a very disciplined process. You will be guided and aided by expert University staff, but you will be expected to conduct your own scholarly research and work independently. The final Dissertation in particular teaches you how to employ your own skills and knowledge to produce high standards of work. The practice of self-motivation and discipline will prepare you for what will be expected in the working world.

- Transferable Skills:
The MA in Literary Studies, pathway in Postmodern Writing provides you with key skills which are transferable to all areas of employment. When you graduate you will be able to structure and communicate ideas efficiently, write for and speak to a range of audiences, evaluate and organize information, work effectively with others, work within timeframes and to specific deadlines.

Find out how to apply here http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/literary-studies-post-modern-writing-masters/#how-to-apply

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This programme offers you the chance to study a range of theories in depth. It engages with modern literary theory, psychoanalytical theory, political theory and theories of visual and aesthetic experience. Read more
This programme offers you the chance to study a range of theories in depth. It engages with modern literary theory, psychoanalytical theory, political theory and theories of visual and aesthetic experience.

You reflect on these areas of thinking in themselves and as they relate to particular literary texts, to post-enlightenment philosophy and to other relevant areas of culture and experience. It is for those interested in writing, reading, language, art, the self, literature and discovering more about the relations between literature and philosophy.

The MA in Critical Theory offers a choice of two core courses that survey a wide range of modern theoretical approaches, and a range of taught options covering postcolonial theory, theories of art, modern approaches to comparative literature, deconstruction and a chance to work in depth on a single key theoretical text and the writings it refers to.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/216/critical-theory

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You take two modules in the autumn term and two in the spring term; one core module (FR866: Literature and Theory) and three optional modules. You are also expected to attend the Faculty and School Research Methods Programmes.

You then write a theory-based dissertation between the start of the Summer Term and the end of August.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

FR866 - Literature and Theory (30 credits)
FR807 - Postmodern French Detective Fiction (30 credits)
EN889 - Literary Theory (30 credits)
EN897 - Advanced Critical Reading (30 credits)
FR872 - Theories of Art in Modern French Thought (30 credits)
CP808 - Writing the Self: Autobiography in the Modern Period (30 credits)
CP810 - Comparative Literature in Theory and Practice (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
EN857 - Body and Place in the Postcolonial Text (30 credits)
TH831 - Spirituality and Therapy (30 credits)
TH833 - Contemporary Critical Approaches to the Study of Religion (30 credits)
EN876 - Dickens and the Condition of England (30 credits)
EN888 - Extremes of Feeling: Literature and Empire in the Eighteenth Century (30 credits)
EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)
EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN842 - Reading the Contemporary (30 credits)
EN850 - Centres and Edges: Modernist and PostcolonialQuest Literature (30 credits)
MT864 - Reading the Medieval Town: Canterbury, an International City (30 credits)

Assessment

The course is assessed by coursework for each module and by the dissertation which accounts for a third of the final grade.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- extend and deepen through coursework and research your understanding of modern literary and critical theory

- study the reading-practices, analytic tools and vocabularies of modern critical thought

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- introduce you to the research methods that facilitate advanced theoretical study of literature

- provide a basis in knowledge and skills if you intend to teach critical theory, especially in higher education

- develop your understanding and critical awareness of the expressive and analytical resources of language

- offer scope for the study of critical theory within an interdisciplinary context, notably that provided by philosophy

- develop your ability to argue a point of view with clarity and cogency, both orally and in written form

- examine this writing in the wider context of literature, culture and philosophy

- provide teaching which is informed by current research and scholarship and which requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- develop your research skills to the point where you are ready to undertake a research degree, should you so wish.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This intensive programme is for international students about to start full-time postgraduate study at a UK university. This programme is more than just a language course, which is why it is longer than other pre-sessional courses you might find elsewhere - http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/pre-sessional-english-language/. Read more
This intensive programme is for international students about to start full-time postgraduate study at a UK university.

This programme is more than just a language course, which is why it is longer than other pre-sessional courses you might find elsewhere - http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/pre-sessional-english-language/

It will also familiarise you with the British education system, and will develop your study skills. And it is tailored to the arts and social sciences, so it's ideal if you're planning on studying these subjects in the future.

The course covers:

-English language
-academic study skills
-cultural background studies
-critical analysis

There is continuous assessment through regular assignments, especially listening exercises, presentations and essays. At the end of the programme, you receive a profile of your performance and progress, and recommendations for your future language development. There is an opportunity to take the IELTS exam.

Social programmes

During your time in London, there will be opportunities to visit theatres and galleries. A party is organised at the end of the programme.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Centre for English Language and Academic Writing.

Modules & Structure

This programme consists of several entry points: you start the programme in either May, July or August, and finish in September.

Students who start the programme in May are provided with more general EAP (English for Academic Purposes) modules. This is especially important for students whose previous experience of English learning has focused on IELTS or general English only. However, you will receive classes in critical studies and cultural background.

Renaissance and text analysis

In May the critical studies module introduces you to the Renaissance and introduces you to text analysis: in recent years we have focused on avant-garde British director Derek Jarman’s film Caravaggio, which is thematically related to the Renaissance but also deals with key concerns of postmodern thought. This provides a good preparation for the lectures in Postmodernity in July and August.

Development of critical thinking

From May to June the module involves some reading, writing, and discussion, but the main skills focus is on oral presentations. In the cultural background module, you will learn and write about theories of how world culture began and developed. Crucially, both modules encourage the development of your critical thinking.

Learning language through content

From July the language, skills and ideas introduced earlier are extended, while the focus is very much on teaching language through content. You will have a choice of lectures in either Contemporary Art History or Film Studies and a lecture series in ‘Postmodernities’ where you will be introduced to key postmodern thinkers and their ideas through a series of lectures presented by specialists in the field. These weekly lectures give you excellent practice in the academic language skills of listening to lectures and taking notes. To support the lectures, you will receive classes in writing and presentation skills, vocabulary and grammar development, and listening and speaking skills. The lectures also provide the academic theory on which you must base an extended essay.

Department

Centre for English Language and Academic Writing:

Come and learn from a dedicated team of specialists. Some of our team have worked in this area for over 20 years.

We offer courses for:

students with English as a second language
native English speakers who are keen to develop their skills in academic writing
These courses range from standalone foundation years and pre-sessional courses right through to in-sessional courses that you complete during your degree programme.

It’s also possible to book an appointment with our resident Royal Literary Fund Fellows – professional writers who can help you improve your essay-writing skills.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Contemporary culture is characterised by nothing if not a reawakened interest in the Gothic, be that in the form of the current vogue for horror film, in the heightened preoccupation with terror and monstrosity in the media, the extraordinary success of writers such as Stephen King and Stephenie Meyer, or in manifestations of an alternative Gothic impulse in fashion, music and lifestyle. Read more

Introduction

Contemporary culture is characterised by nothing if not a reawakened interest in the Gothic, be that in the form of the current vogue for horror film, in the heightened preoccupation with terror and monstrosity in the media, the extraordinary success of writers such as Stephen King and Stephenie Meyer, or in manifestations of an alternative Gothic impulse in fashion, music and lifestyle.
As the countless adaptations and retellings of texts such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818; 1831) and Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897) in our own day attest, the Gothic, though once relegated to a dark corner of literary history, has assumed a position of considerable cultural prominence.
The MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at the University of Stirling provides students with the unique opportunity to steep themselves in the scholarly appreciation of this mode, providing a rigorous and intensive historical survey of its literary origins and developments, and charting its dispersal across a broad range of media and national contexts. In so doing, the course equips its graduates with the necessary theoretical vocabulary to address, and critically reflect upon, the Gothic as a complex and multi-faceted cultural phenomenon, while also preparing them for further postgraduate research in the rich and vibrant field of Gothic Studies. In addition to these subject-specific objectives, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination also provides its graduates with several invaluable transferable skills, including critical thinking, theoretical conceptualisation, historical periodization and independent research.

Key information

- Degree type: MLitt, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Duration: Full-time; MLitt-12 months, Part-time: MLitt-27 months,
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Dale Townshend

Course objectives

- The MLitt in the Gothic Imagination consists of four core modules, two option modules, and a dissertation. Across these components, the course aims to provide students with a rigorous grounding in the work and thematic preoccupations of the most influential Gothic writers, both historical and contemporary. Supplemented by relevant historical and theoretical material throughout, the course aims to provide as rich and varied an exposure to the academic study of the Gothic as possible.

- The first two core modules seek to provide a searching historical overview of the genesis and development of the Gothic aesthetic, taking students systematically from the circulation of the term ‘Gothic’ in the political and aesthetic discourses of the late seventeeth and eighteenth centuries, through the late eighteenth-century writings of Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis and Charlotte Dacre, and into the nineteenth-century fictions of writers such as Charles Maturin, Mary Shelley, Charles Dickens, the Brontës, Sheridan Le Fanu, Robert Louis Stevenson, Bram Stoker and Oscar Wilde.

- The second and third core modules, on Gothic in modern, modernist and postmodern writing, include texts by authors such as Gaston Leroux, Algernon Blackwood, H.P. Lovecraft, Djuna Barnes; Mervyn Peake, Shirley Jackson, Stephen King, Anne Rice, Joyce Carol Oates, Toni Morrison and Patrick McGrath.

- Option modules vary from year to year, depending on student interest and demand. Recent option topics have included the Gothic on the Romantic Stage; Nineteenth-century American Gothic; Transmutations of the Vampire; The Gothic in Children’s Literature; Monstrosity; The Female Gothic; Queer Gothic; and Gothic in/and Modern Horror Cinema.

- At the dissertation stage, students are encouraged to undertake independent, supervised research on any particular interest within Gothic studies that they might wish to pursue. Subject to the agreement of the course director, a creative writing dissertation may be undertaken at this stage.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Two hours of seminars per module per week, plus individual consultations and supervisions with members of staff. Assessment is by means of a 4,000-word essay for each core module, and a variety of skills-based assessments (such as presentations; portfolios; blog-entries) for optional modules. All students complete a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic of their choice once optional and core modules have been completed.

Employability

With course-work assessed solely by means of independently devised, researched and executed essays, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination equips students with a number of the skills and abilities that are prized and actively sought after by employers across the private and public sectors. These include the ability to process and reflect critically upon cultural forms; the ability to organise, present and express ideas clearly and logically; the ability to understand complex theoretical ideas; and the ability to undertake extended independent research.
Previous graduates of the course have gone on to pursue successful careers in such fields as teaching, publishing, research, academia, advertising, journalism and the film industry.
The 15,000-word dissertation that is submitted towards the end of the course allows students to devise, develop, support and defend their own academic ideas across an extended piece of written work; addition to the skills of independence, organisation and expression fostered by this exercise, the dissertation also provides an excellent point of entry into more advanced forms of postgraduate research, including the Doctoral degree.

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The Aberystwyth MA in Literary Studies offers you a broad engagement with English literature with the opportunity to develop expertise in one of a number of specialist areas. Read more
The Aberystwyth MA in Literary Studies offers you a broad engagement with English literature with the opportunity to develop expertise in one of a number of specialist areas. By studying the latest developments in critical theory and research methodology you will cultivate the necessary skills to undertake your 15,000 word MA Dissertation – an extensive piece of critical research in your chosen area. You will also develop a host of transferable skills which you may deploy in a range of other academic or employment contexts.

As a student on the MA in Literary Studies at Aberystwyth, you will benefit from the University’s superb library and information technology resources and have access to the unrivaled collections of the National Library of Wales.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/literary-studies-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you are fascinated by particular developments in English Literature
- If you want to contribute to the academic understanding of periods in literary history
- If you wish to cultivate your own skills as a writer
- If you want to develop your research and analysis skills for future work in academia

Course detail

The MA in Literary Studies provides a number of modules in fascinating subject areas, including Romanticism's Radical Cultures, Ethnic American Literature, Postmodern Genres and many more. An important part of the course is the writing of a 15,000-word Dissertation in a field chosen by you in consultation with a specialist supervisor. We will take great care in assigning you a supervisor whose interests match your own as closely as possible.

A substantial part of the course is devoted to research preparation skills including exploiting library resources, using electronic journals and other IT skills, building a bibliography, researching and writing a proposal, structuring your Dissertation, developing and sustaining an argument, footnotes and referencing, and oral presentation skills. You will also be taught to interrogate the different kinds of 'textuality', or aspects of the literary text, which need to be taken into account in the study of literature at postgraduate level and beyond.

The department has a proud tradition of research excellence, as demonstrated in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 97% of research assessed was found to be of international standing or higher.

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of: research proposal, including a related bibliographic element; a case study; examined oral presentations; and 6,000-word assignments. Each student will complete a MA Dissertation of 15,000 words which deals with an area of chosen study in the third semester.

Application Details

In addition to completing the standard University application package (How to apply), candidates are asked by the Department to supply the following supplementary documents:

(1) A letter of application (1 side of A4) that explains why you want to enrol on the Literary Studies (or the particular Literary Studies pathway) MA. It should include a brief account of your academic study to date, touching on relevant literary/critical issues as appropriate – you might mention, for example, the authors to whose work you are particularly drawn, the topics and ideas that are of special significance to you, and the methodologies you have found particularly valuable in your encounter with literary works. The account will be important in helping us to arrive at a decision about your general suitability for the programme.

(2) A representative sample of critical work, written during the past three years, of no more than 3000 words. You are allowed to send work submitted as part of a previous degree.

Employability

Every MA course at Aberystwyth University is specifically designed to enhance your employability. In addition to developing your writing and research skills, this course will help you to master key skills that are required in almost every postgraduate workplace. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation so that you can tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence. Your MA in Literary Studies will place you in the jobs marketplace as a professional writer with highly desirable skills suitable for a career in the arts, literature, journalism and many others.

- Key Skills and Competencies Study Skills:
You will learn how to identify and interrogate the most relevant materials and literature in your field. You will be taught to master a range of investigative methodologies and, importantly, you will learn to justify your preferred methodological approach to your subject. You will learn how to deploy your research and analysis in critical discussion to assert your expertise and build your academic argument. You will learn to quickly assemble, assimilate, interpret and present a broad range of information regarding your specialism, a set of skills keenly sought by many employers from the civil service and journalism to industry and commerce.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at MA level requires high levels of discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of Departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your MA degree. This process will strengthen your skills in planning, executing and analysing work projects in ways that reflect standard practice in the world of employed work.

- Transferable Skills:
The MA is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of research interests and employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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This exciting programme, offered as a one or two year course, will examine the role of contemporary literature in a number of different contexts. Read more
This exciting programme, offered as a one or two year course, will examine the role of contemporary literature in a number of different contexts. You will have an opportunity to explore a diverse range of texts from Modernists such as Samuel Beckett through to popular narrative mediums including film and comic books.

Course content

You need 180 credits to gain the award of MA. Taught modules are 20 credits while the dissertation accounts for 60 credits. Taught modules are as follows:

Course modules (16/17)

-Critical Theory & Methodologies
-Pulp Visions
-Literary Modernism in the Postmodern World
-Contemporary British Gothic
-Gender and Writing
-Narrative and the Deviant Body
-Brave New Worlds
-Postcolonial Literatures
-Trauma Fiction
-Down to Earth: Contemporary Poetry
-Dissertation
-Twenty-First Century Storytelling
-Telefantasy
-Adaptations

Opportunities Abroad

You can elect to spend your second term with one of our Erasmus partners as part of the funded Erasmus scheme. We have agreements with the University of Zaragoza, Spain and the University of Muenster, Germany.

Information about the Erasmus scheme can be found on the British Council page.

Methods of Learning

Taught modules are normally timetabled on Tuesdays 6pm-9pm and Thursdays 10am-1pm. Both one year full-time and two year part-time routes are available.

Assessments

The final assessment consists of a presentation on the research proposal (10%) and submission of a 15-18,000 word dissertation (90%).

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The MA in Fine Art enables artists to evaluate and develop their creative practice to the highest of standards. It develops theoretical awareness, critical thinking and independent arts practice to a professional level. Read more
The MA in Fine Art enables artists to evaluate and develop their creative practice to the highest of standards. It develops theoretical awareness, critical thinking and independent arts practice to a professional level.

The course facilitates critical debate between artists working both within and across media areas including painting, photography, digital imaging, printmaking, sculpture, installation and site-specific art. Alongside their studio-based enquiry, students undertake related research into the broader context of contemporary art practices and theoretical debates.

The course offers access to comprehensive specialist resources with technical instruction and support. Students are continually mentored by research-active staff to position their practice within professional cultural environments, arts-related employment or higher-level academic research.

Both full time and part time students benefit from spacious and well-equipped facilities and external links with galleries, which have included the Milton Keynes Gallery, NN Contemporary (Northampton), Corby Cube Gallery and Rugby Museum and Art Gallery. The course often offers international study trips, typically one European option (recent visits have been to France, Italy and Spain) and one long-haul destination (recent visits have been to India, Vietnam and the USA) each year.

In addition to the course having very good links with regional galleries and arts organisations, students are encouraged to engage with external activities and events, both national and international. A group of MA Fine Art students recently attended a printmaking residency at the world-renowned Frans Masereel Centrum in Belgium.

Our teaching staff have a broad range of research interests reflecting the disciplines available on the course, and all staff are practicing artists who publish and exhibit both nationally and internationally. Visiting speakers have included the internationally known artists Richard Long, Marcus Harvey, Simon Callery, Ian Davenport, Mark Francis, Lisa Milroy, David Batchelor, Richard Deacon, Svetlana Fialova, Richard Patterson, Ian McKeever, Dan Hays and Richard Wilson along with innovative arts organisations such as Artangel.

Course content

Upon commencing the Masters programme, students undertake the module ‘Extended Fine Art Practice and Research Methodologies’ (20 credits). This provides a grounding in different research-based methods and methodologies in Fine Art.

During the first trimester students also undertake the 20 credit studio-based module ‘Fine Art Practice’ wherein students begin to critically re-appraise and position their creative practice. Full-time students will also be enrolled on ‘Interfacings,’ a 20 credit module that considers a set of theoretical debates, issues and contexts that are pertinent to an interdisciplinary approach to artistic practice.

During the second trimester students enrol on the 40 credit module ‘Fine Art Practice and Context.’ This module culminates in a public developmental exhibition of their work. Alongside this module, full-time students can opt to take either the project-based ‘Independent Study’ module or the 20 credit module ‘Creative Practice and Enterprise.’

The final stage of the MA Fine Art course entails the student producing and exhibiting a body of creative work or completing a 15-18,000 word dissertation.

Course modules (16/17)

-Fine Art Practice and Documentation
-Interfacings: Fine Art and Postmodern Practice
-Creative Practice and Enterprise
-Fine Art Practice and Context
-Independent Study in the Arts
-Research project
-Extended Fine Art Practice and Research Methodologies

Opportunities Abroad

International study trips, typically one European option (recent visits have been to France, Italy and Spain) and one long-haul destination (recent visits have been to India, Vietnam and the USA) each year.

Methods of Learning

The MA Fine Art course supports all learners’ experience and development through a breadth of regular tutorial approaches. Tutor and learner contact is additionally enriched through a host of visiting artists of international stature. Modes of teaching delivery encompass tutorials, group crits, research supervision, lectures and seminars.

Schedule

During the first and second trimester specific modules are delivered usually on Mondays 9:30-12:30 and 13:00 – 16:00.

Assessments

The course is assessed in both theory and practice by assignment, examination, portfolio submission and exhibition.

In addition to an ongoing series of formative assessment points, the MA Fine Art course has three formal assessment periods that occur at the end of each trimester in February, May and September respectively.

Facilities and Special Features

The Fine Art subject is enriched through a spectrum of professional specialist spaces including: Fine Art New Media Space, Photographic Studio, Photographic Dark Room, Wood Workshop, Metal Workshop, Plaster and Resin Workshop, Etching Printroom, Screen Printing Room (including laser cutting), The Drawing Lab (Drawing research space and life room), Canvas Preparation Room and bookable installation spaces.

Careers

The course prepares students for the professional cultural environment and higher research study. PhDs at the University of Northampton can be pursued through traditional or practice led methodologies and this course provides a comprehensive and relevant foundation.

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This MA addresses the fast-changing 'international' terrain including the 2008 economic crisis, EU fragmentation, questions of migration and human rights around the world. Read more
This MA addresses the fast-changing 'international' terrain including the 2008 economic crisis, EU fragmentation, questions of migration and human rights around the world.

It gives you the opportunity to explore the character of the contemporary world in an interdisciplinary manner, drawing upon a strong theoretical basis as well as an empirical grounding.

The programme offers great diversity in fields of study:
•international relations, post-colonial theory, human rights, international political economy, war, genocide and post-conflict societies
•areas of study – Europe, China, Japan, India, Latin America, Africa, the Middle East
•methodology – empirical analysis and data collection, textual and discourse analysis, hermeneutic and philosophical enquiry

It also offers diverse subjects of study:
•migration
•human rights
•memory and justice
•war and post-conflict
•global political economy
•IR theories
•political theory
•psychoanalysis
•identity politics
•gender, sexuality and the body in non-Western societies.

The MA is especially relevant if you are considering further study at PhD level, or if you want to work in areas where an understanding of international relations is essential (journalism, diplomacy, NGOs, international organisations, for example).

It offers valuable training and analytical skills for those working in non-governmental organisations, international institutions and corporations, diplomatic services, government offices, media industry and teaching.

A wide view of the 'international'

This programme differs from MA degrees in international relations offered elsewhere because it provides a wider view of the ‘international’ that questions its necessary Western focus and looks for alternative ways of ‘knowing’, ‘encountering’ and ‘experiencing’ the world.

It also takes an interdisciplinary approach, allowing you to tailor the degree to your needs, and offers an unusual diversity in the areas of specialty of our staff, many of whom are internationally recognised for their expertise.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Jeremy Larkins

Department

Voted one of the top political universities in the UK by students**

Politics and International Relations

In the Department of Politics and International Relations at Goldsmiths our focus goes beyond voting systems, parliaments and the conventional arenas of power. And it looks beyond the West.

We study politics and international relations for the 21st century, in which anarchism may be as important as liberalism, and in which Asia and Africa are as economically and geopolitically important as Europe and North America.

We also take an unconventional approach. So you may be working on group projects, writing a blog, or submitting a Manga comic instead of an essay.

Find out more about the Department of Politics and International Relations.

**Which? University 2014

Modules & Structure

Core modules

You take the following core modules:

Theories of International Relations (15 credits)
MA in International Relations Dissertation (60 credits)

Option modules:

Students make up their remaining 90 Credits from the following list of options:

An(Other) China: Postcolonial Theory, Postmodern Concerns (30 credits)
Counter-Mapping London: The Politics of Space (15 credits)
Latin American Dictionary: Politics through the Arts (15 credits)
Memory and Justice in Post-Conflict Societies (30 credits)
Politics of Knowledge: Debates in Human Science (15 credits)
Finance in the Global Political Economy (15 credits)
The Political-Economic Governance of the European Union (30 credits)
Politics of Human Rights (15 credits)
Psychopolitics (15 credits)
Visualising Asia: Body, Gender, Politics (30 credits)

Students may choose up to 30 credits of approved options from other departments at Goldsmiths.

Assessment

Essays; coursework; exam; research dissertation. Some modules might involve other forms of assessment such as blogs and policy reports.

Download the programme specification for this degree to find out more about what you'll learn and how you'll be taught and assessed.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Skills & Careers

Skills

You'll develop:
•a critical engagement with the broad field of international studies
•communication skills
•research skills
•presentation skills
•writing skills

Careers

The MA is especially relevant if you are considering further study at PhD level, or if you want to work in areas where an understanding of international relations is essential (journalism, diplomacy, NGOs, international organisations, for example).



It offers valuable training and analytical skills for those working in non-governmental organisations, international institutions and corporations, diplomatic services, government offices, media industry and teaching.

Our graduates go on to work within these areas but many also undertake professional training in law, accountancy, journalism, business administration, teaching, social work or nursing.

If you would like to speak to some of our current students or alumni, please contact Dr Anca Pusca.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths http://www.gold.ac.uk/skills-careers/

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This course in Modern and Contemporary Art is your entrance into the art world. Our unique programme thrives in the heart of London's international art scene, offering unrivalled access to works of art and professional practice. Read more
This course in Modern and Contemporary Art is your entrance into the art world. Our unique programme thrives in the heart of London's international art scene, offering unrivalled access to works of art and professional practice. Working with both twentieth century and contemporary art, you will move between the lecture and seminar room and gain first-hand experience of exhibitions, auction previews, artists’ studios, art fairs, museums and private collections. Sessions are led by a wide range of art world professionals and include extensive object handling, cataloguing training, study of the practices of auction houses and galleries, curating workshops, and conversations with contemporary artists. With integral study trips abroad, work experience at Christie’s London and many networking opportunities, the programme aims to provide you with the depth of knowledge, practical and interpretive tools and confidence necessary to be able to imagine and develop your career working with art and artists in the international art world.

Course components

The core lecture series – organized around a thematic of Modern, Anti-Modern, and Postmodern – underpins all components of the programme

Object-based study is central to our teaching and will provide you with the opportunity to study in direct contact with works of art through museum and gallery-based classes, specialist-led handling sessions, studio visits and conservation sessions. You will be trained in cataloguing to auction house and museum standards through detailed case studies, assessing issues that affect market value. You will ll learn to analyse the different processes of assessment, classification and interpretation used by art institutions

Being engaged with current debates about curating will enable you to devise fresh approaches to the display of art works. You will explore practices in art criticism, developing skills to review exhibitions and produce reports

Our Culture and Ideology Seminars will teach you the in-depth analysis of relationships between art practices, cultural contexts and critical debates. You will develop skills to deliver presentations and generate seminar discussion. You will be involved in Methodology Seminars – the analysis of technical, art-historical and interpretative texts – that provide transferable skills for independent research and individual development

Your thesis, produced at the end of the year, follows a professional and creative model of research and presentation that takes the form of an exhibition catalogue carried out to museum/gallery standards. You will evolve a topic through discussion, workshops and presentational work to outside curators. Your primary research skills with works of art, theoretical models and knowledge of art history will come together in this exciting summative project that represents a synthesis of the key academic and professional skills learned on the programme.

Study Abroad and follow the Contemporary Art Scene in Europe. You will participate in two study trips a year to major events in Europe as key elements of a course that keeps pace with a fast-moving art world. These include visits to international events such as the Venice Biennale, Berlin Biennale and Documenta.

Venice Biennale
Christie's Education was once again an educational partner in the Biennale Sessions accompanying the 56th Venice Biennale, Okwei Enwezor's All The World's Futures..

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Working from a strong theoretical basis, this programme will help you to understand a range of empirical, aesthetic and conceptual issues which traverse and exceed both 'art' and 'international' politics. Read more
Working from a strong theoretical basis, this programme will help you to understand a range of empirical, aesthetic and conceptual issues which traverse and exceed both 'art' and 'international' politics.

We will explore practices and issues related to public space, democracy, equality, participation, justice and affect. By shuttling across art and politics, rather than seeking to produce a synthesis between the two, we probe a range of practices and strategies which, in the encounter between art and politics, play out in numerous forms and very different kinds of social spaces.

You will work alongside a mixed constituency of students from Art, Politics, International Studies, Philosophy, Cultural Studies as well as numerous other disciplines, which means we can take up the challenge to develop frameworks and spaces that are mixed and mobile, and which can operate in trans-disciplinary settings. In such a mixed context, questions about ‘autonomy’ and the political character of art take on renewed vigour and urgency.

Similarly we are able to probe art’s potential in times of political and cultural crisis. Why for instance, do contemporary arts practices increasingly claim ‘political’ origins and motivations, while political parties seek the involvement of art and artists of all kinds? Or, what good are practices that are neither art nor politics?

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Bernadette Buckley

Department

Voted one of the top political universities in the UK by students**

Politics and International Relations

In the Department of Politics and International Relations at Goldsmiths our focus goes beyond voting systems, parliaments and the conventional arenas of power. And it looks beyond the West.

We study politics and international relations for the 21st century, in which anarchism may be as important as liberalism, and in which Asia and Africa are as economically and geopolitically important as Europe and North America.

We also take an unconventional approach. So you may be working on group projects, writing a blog, or submitting a Manga comic instead of an essay.

Find out more about the Department of Politics and International Relations.

**Which? University 2014

Modules & Structure

Core modules

You take the following three core modules:

Art and Politics: Theory History Event (30 credits)
Group Project (MA in Art and Politics) (30 credits)
MA in Art & Politics Dissertation (60 credits)


Option modules

Students make up their remaining 60 Credits from the following list of options:

An(Other) China: Postcolonial Theory, Postmodern Concerns (30 credits)
Counter-Mapping London: The Politics of Space (15 credits)
Latin American Dictionary: Politics through the Arts (15 credits)
Memory and Justice in Post-Conflict Societies (30 credits)
Politics of Knowledge: Debates in Human Science (15 credits)
Finance in the Global Political Economy (15 credits)
The Political-Economic Governance of the European Union (30 credits)
Politics of Human Rights (15 credits)
Psychopolitics (15 credits)
Theories of International Relations (15 credits)
Visualising Asia: Body, Gender, Politics (30 credits)

Students may choose up to 30 credits of approved options from other departments at Goldsmiths.


Project work

You are required to undertake project-based work in accordance with your own political and aesthetic interests. The purpose of this project-work is to find ways of ‘doing’ politics which employ ‘artistic’ strategies and interventions in their realisation.

Projects have a student-centred material focus, complementing the theoretical emphasis of core and optional modules, and will seek to raise awareness of particular issues and draw attention to their position in the public arena. They may be written, broadcast, performed, curated, made, or involve any other kind of appropriately documented submission.

Training in digital and genetic media will be provided where necessary. Project training is monitored and co-ordinated by the artist-in-residence in the Department of Politics – who will oversee students’ individual needs while ensuring that there is continuity of support and opportunities to identify and build upon individual strengths and weaknesses.

Download the programme specification for this degree to find out more about what you'll learn and how you'll be taught and assessed.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Skills & Careers

Careers

Our graduates come from diverse disciplinary backgrounds and embark on highly contrasting career paths. These include careers in curating (both independent and embedded); art practice (both collaborative and individual); journalism (radio, web and print journalism); performing arts; central and local government; work with NGOs (national and international); research (academic and professional); project development, administration and management. Some of our graduates undertake further professional training in law; journalism; education and social work.

Skills

You'll develop: a critical engagement with the broad field of international studies, communication skills, research skills, presentation skills.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths http://www.gold.ac.uk/skills-careers/

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This programme examines a range of literary and theoretical contexts, introducing ways that writing and imagination shape and share in cultural and political processes. Read more

Programme description

This programme examines a range of literary and theoretical contexts, introducing ways that writing and imagination shape and share in cultural and political processes.

You will explore the ways literature since 1900 has sought to change and modernise itself, in the context of wider developments of modernity characterising the age.

Your studies will take you through a broad and fascinating field, from the originators of literary ‘modernity’ – including TS Eliot, Ezra Pound, James Joyce and Virginia Woolf – to the present day and the continuing impact of their innovations.

Studying in the world’s first UNESCO City of Literature, you will analyse the most challenging and exciting literature written in English since 1900, and explore the range of historical, intellectual, cultural, political and philosophical factors informing the period’s writing – particularly in its highly innovative modernist and postmodernist phases.

Programme structure

The programme will be taught through a combination of seminars and tutorials. You take one compulsory and one option course in each of two semesters, along with a course in research methods. You will then complete an independently researched dissertation.

Compulsory courses:

Literature and Modernity I: Modernist Aesthetics
Literature and Modernity II: Late Modernism and Beyond
Option courses may include:

Critical Theory: Issues and Debates
Green Thoughts: Landscape, Environment and Literature
Poet-Critics
Modernism and Empire
Contemporary Post-Colonial Writing
Theatre, Performance, Performativity
Queering Fictions in the Twentieth Century
Contemporary American Fiction

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this programme you will have gained:

practical knowledge of the range of theoretical and philosophical ideas informing modern and postmodern literary criticism
knowledge and understanding of the role of literary writing in the formation of contemporary culture
a grounding in the research methods of literary studies

Career opportunities

Graduates of this programme will acquire a thorough knowledge and understanding of literary history and culture post-1900, and a range of transferable skills in research and enquiry, critical thinking and evaluation, and varieties of written and oral communication. This programme will also provide you with research and analytical skills that can be extended into future advanced study in the subject area.

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A Masters degree in English is a qualification that employers understand and respect. It is powerful testimony to your intellectual competence. Read more
A Masters degree in English is a qualification that employers understand and respect. It is powerful testimony to your intellectual competence.

Course overview

English MA combines the study of literatures, linguistics, critical theory and creative writing. The course is incredibly flexible and you can pursue your personal goals for intellectual enquiry and literary exploration, with inspiration and encouragement from our widely-published lecturers.

There is a very clear link between teaching and research on the degree with all the modules above drawing on publications by the module leaders (all of whom were recognised as ‘Internationally Excellent’ or ‘Internationally Recognised’ in the recent REF).

You will first undertake an innovative introductory module called ‘Approaching Literature’ which allows you to study applied literary, critical and linguistic theory as a basis to your whole degree. There is then a wide choice of modules based on the research specialisms of the staff including: 'Gothic', 'Late Victorian Gothic', 'Writing the Borders', ‘Language and Ideology in Children’s Fictions’, 'Early Humans in Fiction', ‘Irish Literature 1790 to 1831’, ‘Critical Theory and Creative Writing’ and 'Language and Ideology in Children’s Fictions’.

You will negotiate the topic of your Masters dissertation to reflect your personal interests. We like to push boundaries and develop modules that combine our research expertise with an awareness of your future career prospects.

The market for places on postgraduate teaching qualifications is becoming increasingly competitive. Many of our students enrol on the MA to improve their subject specialism, thereby giving them a greater chance of success at securing a place on one of these courses. With this in mind, we are attentive to developments in the GSCE and A Level curriculums, in order that our students have relevant, research led subject knowledge to bring to bear on applications.

Through the channels of Spectral Visions Press students are invited to submit their work for publication. If selected original work will be published in one of our professionally assembled annual anthologies the last two of which are currently available on Amazon. Furthermore, many of our students have written articles, reviews and interviews for organisations such as the International Gothic Association; An International Community of Gothic Scholars; and other scholarly networks such as the Open Graves; Open Minds project, Sibeal, and Feminist Studies. These networking opportunities give our students valuable access to the wider academic community, and aid in employment and progression opportunities.

Your training in research skills, together with Masters-level critical thinking, will be transferable to many different types of employment.

We also offer a part-time English MA of this course, which may suit you if you want to combine studying for a Masters degree with other commitments. For more information, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/educationandsociety/postgraduate/english-part-time/

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with independent research and supportive supervision. At MA level, responsibility for learning lies as much with you as with your tutor. Modules on this course include:
Core modules
-Approaching Literature (30 Credits)

Choose three optional modules from a list that may include the following modules
-Gothic (30 Credits)
-The 1790s (30 Credits)
-Late Victorian Gothic (30 Credits)
-‘What Ish My Nation?’: Postcolonial Irish Literatures (30 Credits)
-Language and Ideology in Children’s Fictions (30 Credits)
-Reading ‘Ulysses’ (30 Credits)
-The Global City: Modern to Postmodern (30 Credits)
-Orientalism: Representations of the East in Western Travel Literature and Arab and Iranian Novels (30 Credits)
-‘Strange Country’: Irish Literature 1790 to 1831 (30 Credits)
-Critical Theory and Creative Writing (30 Credits)
-Early Humans in Fiction (30 Credits)
-Reading the Anglo-Scots Borders (30 Credits)
-Reading and Writing the Fantastic, the Marvellous and the Gothic (30 Credits)
-Irish Literature and the Supernatural (30 Credits)

Plus the compulsory dissertation
-Dissertation on a topic that you negotiate with your supervisor (60 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include seminars and discussion groups. We often have visiting speakers and a range of research seminars to enhance your learning opportunities. This includes our widely acclaimed Spectral Visions event, held annually at the University.

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters course requires a higher level of independent working. Assessment methods include mainly essays. Some options require oral presentations.

Facilities & location

The University of Sunderland has excellent facilities that have been boosted by multi-million pound redevelopments.

Course location
The course is based at the Priestman Building on City Campus, just a few minutes from the main Murray Library and close to Sunderland city centre. It’s a very vibrant and supportive environment with excellent resources for teaching and learning.

University Library Services
We’ve got thousands of books and e-books on topics related to English and literature, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date academic and industry articles. Some of the most important sources for your course include:
-Early English Books Online, which provides digital images of virtually every work printed in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland and British North America during 1473-1800
-Eighteenth Century Collections Online, which provides 136,000 full-text publications from 1701-1800
-Periodicals Archive Online, which provides digitised literary journals
-Project Muse, which provides over 180 full-text humanities and social sciences journals

IT provision
When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from hundreds of PCs as well as Apple Macs in the David Goldman Informatics Centre and St Peter’s Library. There are also free WiFi zones throughout the campus. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Employment & careers

This course is relevant to a wide range of occupations because it sharpens your skills of analysis and persuasive communication. At the same time it advances your intellectual development. A Masters degree in English is a qualification that is well-recognised by employers across all sectors. Past graduates have gained employment in areas such as:
-Teaching
-Media and journalism
-Civil Service
-Publishing
-Communications
-Freelance writing
-Arts and creative industries

A Masters degree will also enhance opportunities in academic roles or further study towards a PhD.

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Our MA in English Literary Studies is the most flexible of all our MAs and the only one that allows you to select modules from across the whole range offered by the Department. Read more
Our MA in English Literary Studies is the most flexible of all our MAs and the only one that allows you to select modules from across the whole range offered by the Department.

There are no compulsory modules on this MA: you simply choose the four modules which interest you most. It thus provides exceptional opportunities if you want to work across different literary periods and genres.

Options range from modules on poetry or drama from the medieval to the modern, to modules on gender or space from the Renaissance through to the postmodern. You could choose some of our modules on film or postcolonial studies, or, in some cases, select an option module from another department - such as History, Politics or Philosophy - and enrich your options even further.

You will develop an understanding of:
-The engagement of English literature with a range of political, social and aesthetic issues
-The cultural meanings and associations of the variety of styles, genres and media in which English literature was produced
-A range of different critical and theoretical perspectives on advanced literary study

Assessment

-Four assessed essays of approximately 4,500 words each
-A 14,000-16,000 word dissertation, written in consultation with a supervisor on an agreed topic

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The study of identity is a burgeoning area of sociological and cultural studies. Over a range of units, this programme provides an introduction to key themes in this field, with identity explored in both theoretical and substantive ways. Read more
The study of identity is a burgeoning area of sociological and cultural studies. Over a range of units, this programme provides an introduction to key themes in this field, with identity explored in both theoretical and substantive ways.

On the one hand, there has been an exciting and innovative strand of work to explore and re-theorise the ideas of subjectivity and selfhood in the context of changes brought about by late modern and postmodern society. On the other, the question of identity has come under scrutiny from within substantive areas of sociology, such as the sociology of race and ethnicity, the sociology of religion and the sociology of gender relations. There are also important discussions concerning the ways in which identities are recorded and observed, including debates over new narrative and other qualitative methodologies.

Programme structure

The MSc programme comprises six 12-week taught units and six assessed essays, followed by a dissertation.

Core units
-Contemporary Identities and Inequalities
-Dissertation

Optional units
You will also choose at least four further units from a list of sociology units. Options vary each year but may include:
-Contemporary Sociological Theory
-Theories of Ethnicity and Racism
-Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods
-Philosophy and Research Design
-Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
-Understanding Culture
-Narrating the Self
-The Theory and Politics of Multiculturalism
-Interpreting Gender
-Advanced Qualitative Research
-Advanced Quantitative Research
-Popular Music and Society
-Nations and Nationalism
-Care, Labour and Gender
-Religion and Politics in the West
-Understanding Risk

A maximum of one unit can be chosen from the other optional units that are offered by the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies in the academic year.

Third term
Independent study for dissertation.

Careers

Bristol graduates are in high demand and have an excellent record of employment following graduation. Students of our MSc programmes go on to pursue varied and interesting careers.

Many sectors - such as the civil service, NGO and charity work - require an MSc and some volunteer/internship experience. Graduates from our programmes have gone on to work for Refugee UK, Shelter, Barnardos, Oxfam, Amnesty International, government departments and the European Parliament, among others. Further details can be found on our careers and alumni website: http://www.bris.ac.uk/spais/prospective/prospectivepgt/ppgtcareersandalumni/

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This programme is principally concerned with explaining the importance of ethnicity and multiculturalism, race, racism, diaspora and communalism in contemporary societies. Read more
This programme is principally concerned with explaining the importance of ethnicity and multiculturalism, race, racism, diaspora and communalism in contemporary societies. It has a particular focus on the nature of multicultural and multi-ethnic societies, the issues surrounding culture in a modern and postmodern world, and the growing public policy implications of addressing ethnic, cultural, linguistic and religious diversity within modern nation-states.

It also examines the discrimination, exclusion, marginality and unfair treatment of minority groups, and the violation of their civil rights in different societies.

Programme structure

The MSc programme comprises six 12-week taught units and six assessed essays, followed by a dissertation.

Core units
-Theories of Ethnicity and Racism
-Dissertation

Optional units - You will choose at least four further units from a list of sociology units. Options vary each year but may include:
-Contemporary Sociological Theory
-Theories of Ethnicity and Racism
-Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods
-Philosophy and Research Design
-Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
-Understanding Culture
-Narrating the Self
-The Theory and Politics of Multiculturalism
-Interpreting Gender
-Advanced Qualitative Research
-Advanced Quantitative Research
-Popular Music and Society
-Nations and Nationalism
-Care, Labour and Gender
-Religion and Politics in the West
-Understanding Risk

A maximum of one unit can be chosen from the other optional units that are offered by the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies in the academic year.

Third term
Independent study for dissertation.

Careers

Bristol graduates are in high demand and have an excellent record of employment following graduation. Students from our MSc programmes go on to pursue varied and interesting careers.

Many sectors - such as the civil service, NGO and charity work - require an MSc and some volunteer/internship experience. Graduates from our programmes have gone on to work for Refugee UK, Shelter, Barnardos, Oxfam, Amnesty International, government departments and the European Parliament, among others. Further details can be found on our careers and alumni website: http://www.bris.ac.uk/spais/prospective/prospectivepgt/ppgtcareersandalumni/

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