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Reflecting the wide-ranging strengths of Royal Holloway's outstanding English Department, this flexible course gives you the opportunity to tailor your studies from four of our taught postgraduate courses. Read more
Reflecting the wide-ranging strengths of Royal Holloway's outstanding English Department, this flexible course gives you the opportunity to tailor your studies from four of our taught postgraduate courses.

You can choose from a wide range of units from the MAs in Medieval Studies, Shakespeare, Victorian Literature, Art and Culture and Literatures of Modernity. The course is ideal if you are interested in more than one period of English literature, or if you want to combine or juxtapose the literatures and genres of different periods.

At the end of your studies, a dissertation offers you the chance to explore a subject of your choice in depth.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/english/coursefinder/maenglish.aspx

Why choose this course?

- All members of staff are actively engaged in major research projects and the Department was awarded a 4* rating in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). This commitment to scholarly research means all our postgraduate courses are informed by the latest developments in literary studies.

- You will have the opportunity to be taught by world-leading researchers in all aspects of English through the range of course units available to you.

- The Department’s major research strengths span the Renaissance, the nineteenth century and the twentieth century and contemporary critical theory.

- Royal Holloway is home to the Subject Centre for English which drives innovation in the teaching of English in higher education throughout the UK.

- The College provides all the IT facilities and training that students need in order to access the burgeoning resources for study on the Internet.

- Our excellent library resources span the full range of English studies and you will also have access to the University of London Library at Senate House as well as the British Library and the many specialist libraries located in central London.

Course content and structure

You will study the equivalent of two whole course units from those offered on the four MA courses, complete the research methodologies course, and write a dissertation.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- developed a critical understanding of the literature and culture of the main periods the student has chosen to study, and an advanced grounding in the theory and practice of interdisciplinary studies

- the ability to evaluate relevant critical, theoretical and contextual research at the forefront of the field

- skills of independent literary research at an advanced level using traditional and electronic resources

- confidence in deploying the appropriate critical and technological skills as required in analysing a range of visual, historical and literary material.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by essays and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

The Department has an impressive record for placing graduates in academic jobs and in prominent position outside academia. In the field of Shakespeare and Renaissance studies alone, our postgraduates have recently secured positions at the Universities of Edinburgh, Sussex and Leeds, Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre and the National University of Ireland. Recent postgraduates in America literature, modern and contemporary literature and theory have secured prestigious appointments in London.

The English Department also prepares postgraduates for successful careers in a variety of the other areas, such as teaching, writing and journalism, administration and marketing.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Medieval Studies is a well-known and internationally recognised area of expertise at Bangor. Over the decades particular strengths in Arthurian literature, Welsh History and Archaeology and Cymraeg, as well as Music have attracted postgraduates to Bangor to work with experts in each of these areas. Read more
Medieval Studies is a well-known and internationally recognised area of expertise at Bangor. Over the decades particular strengths in Arthurian literature, Welsh History and Archaeology and Cymraeg, as well as Music have attracted postgraduates to Bangor to work with experts in each of these areas. Additional strengths include gender and devotional literature (in the School of English), Anglo-Norman studies, and early sacred music, among others. Interdisciplinary approaches form the core of medieval studies, and the current expertise at Bangor guarantees this approach both through the core module and through the option modules. In addition to this, Bangor can boast a unique combination of modules students can choose from, such as do not normally feature together: Welsh, Arthurian studies and Music form the distinctive core of the provision, alongside our widely recognised expertise in teaching palaeography and codicology.

Course Structure
In Part 1 of the course, students develop skills and acquire subject knowledge by way of preparation for Part Two, a 20,000 word dissertation. The Diploma, which consists of Part One of the MA programme, aims to develop learner autonomy to the point where the student is capable of beginning a scholarly dissertation at MA level.

Part 1: At the beginning of this course, all students must register for the following modules:

Understanding the Middle Ages (semesters 1 and 2)
Manuscripts and Printed Books (1 semester)
In addition to these modules, students may choose from a wide range of modules in this part of the course which may include:

Cymraeg:

CXC4004: Britain’s Celtic Heritage (40 credits)
CXC4005: Medieval Welsh literature (40 credits)

English:

QXE4030: Medieval Arthur (30 credits): This module explores the Arthurian myth from the earliest archaeological evidence to the end of the fifteenth century, with a view to exploring its evolution in a variety of the socio-political contexts, as well as material culture (manuscript and printed editions, artefacts). Focusing on a number of texts in different genres and languages (read in English translation when necessary), the module will offer postgraduates an insight into the origins and development of Arthurian themes in medieval literature (Convener: Dr Raluca Radulescu.)

QXE4029: Women’s Devotional Writing (30 credits)

QXE4016: Pre-Modern Travel (30 credits)

QXE4032: Advanced Latin for Postgraduates (20 credits)

History, Welsh History and Archaeology:

HPH4000: The Age of Llywelyn ap Iorwerth (40 credits)

HPH4002: The Archaeology of the Early Medieval Celtic Churches (40 credits)

HPH4013: The Duke, Duchy and Institutions of Normandy, 942-1135 (40 credits)

HPH4017: Women and Power in the High Middle Ages (40 credits)

HPH4018: Medieval Latin (20 credits)

Music:

General explanation: Modules in Early Music place a thematic focus on music of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. They are intended to broaden the student’s knowledge of different types of music composed during these periods as well as the various contexts within which they were placed. This will include consideration of analytical, repertorial, palaeographic, biographical, institutional, social and cultural aspects. A number of case studies, complemented by directed reading and assignments, will explore the depth of historical and musicological study and understanding and enable a student to address specific, focused periods, topics and/or issues in which they have an interest.

Part 2: Preparation of a 20,000 word dissertation on a subject related to medieval studies agreed by your chosen supervisor. This preparation will involve a series of one-to-one supervisory meetings during the summer, once Part 1 has been completed successfully.

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Research profile. Religious Studies or the Study of Religion/s is a vibrant research cluster, based in theoretically informed and comparative studies of religion. Read more

Research profile

Religious Studies or the Study of Religion/s is a vibrant research cluster, based in theoretically informed and comparative studies of religion.

You can specialise in a variety of areas which include contemporary and historical topics and fields such as Asian Studies, History of Religions/New Religions, and Jewish Studies.

You will be encouraged to frame your research using a range of theoretical and methodological approaches, from the classic to the cutting-edge. You will be able to draw on methodological expertise which includes biographical analysis, discourse analysis, ethnography, historical and textual studies, memory studies and narrative studies. The thematic interests of academic staff include ethnicity, gender, indigeneity, nationalism, textuality and the transnational.

You can find out more and identify a potential supervisor by looking at the School’s staff profiles, which give details of research interests and publications, and email addresses.

You are encouraged to contact a potential supervisor to discuss your research project before making a formal application.

At the School of Divinity you will join a community of around 150 research students, drawn from around the world, and from a variety of religious and non-religious backgrounds.

You will study in a stimulating environment. The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranked the School’s research environment at 100% world-leading / internationally excellent, second in the UK on this front in theology and religion. This outstanding result reflects the vibrancy of the School’s research culture.

Masters by Research

If you have academic training in theology or religious studies (or another relevant subject), and would like to develop your interest with a focus on a particular area, the Masters by Research may interest you.

You can study full-time (one year) or part-time (two years). Your pattern of study can either be three supervised research essays followed by a 15,000 word dissertation, or a 30,000 word dissertation. Most students take the ‘research essays + shorter dissertation’ path. All students receive research training.

Training and support

The ethos of the Graduate School is to promote excellence in postgraduate study, within a stimulating and supportive environment. We value equality and diversity in the School community, and an academic culture that is both critical and constructive.

  • At the start of the academic year, you will be invited to Welcome Week, an intensive introduction to study and life in Edinburgh. Some events are especially for international students new to Scotland and the UK, but everything is open to all.
  • In the first weeks, the School provides a general orientation to research skills and to wider opportunities for training and support.
  • From your first days as a student, you will work one-to-one with your primary research supervisor.
  • Your progress will be tracked, through regular supervisions and milestone reviews, to ensure that you get the support you need to bring your project to fruition.
  • You will be part of the research seminar in Religious Studies, to which visiting speakers are invited and to which postgraduates present work-in-progress.
  • You will be able to follow taught courses that contribute to your interests and research needs, and can also take advantage of opportunities to learn ancient and modern languages.

A University review (2015) commended the Graduate School for providing excellent support: responsive to student feedback; proactive in helping new postgraduates to adjust to their studies and to life in Scotland; enthusiastic and practical in promoting career development. The postgraduate student committee works closely with the School to make the research student experience the best it can be.

Facilities

Resources for research are excellent. You can draw on the outstanding holdings of New College Library, the University of Edinburgh’s main library, and the nearby National Library of Scotland. New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection. The University library exceeds 2.25 million volumes. The National Library of Scotland – a ‘legal deposit’ library like the British Library in London and the university libraries of Oxford and Cambridge – is just around the corner.

The School provides an extensive programme of weekly research seminars and special guest lectures. In addition, three research centres provide a special focus for activity: the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins; the Centre for Theology and Public Issues; the Centre for the Study of World Christianity.

You will have access to excellent study facilities, dedicated to postgraduates. PhD and MPhil students have access 24/7, and can request an allocated desk. Masters by Research students have shared study space. All areas have printing/scanning and computer facilities. The main postgraduate study wing has a kitchen. New College has an on-site cafe that is open during term-time.



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Research profile. The academic staff in this area can offer you research supervision in most areas of study related to the Hebrew Bible. Read more

Research profile

The academic staff in this area can offer you research supervision in most areas of study related to the Hebrew Bible. The research interests of staff and graduate students cover pentateuchal and historical studies, poetry and prophecy, biblical theology and ethics, Hebrew language, Septuagint and targumic studies, and the Dead Sea Scrolls in their Hellenistic context.

You can find out more and identify a potential supervisor by looking at the School’s staff profiles, which give details of research interests and publications, and email addresses.

You are encouraged to contact a potential supervisor to discuss your research project before making a formal application.

At the School of Divinity you will join a community of around 150 research students, drawn from around the world, and from a variety of religious and non-religious backgrounds.

You will study in a stimulating environment. The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranked the School’s research environment at 100% world-leading / internationally excellent, second in the UK on this front in theology and religion. This outstanding result reflects the vibrancy of the School’s research culture.

Training and support

The ethos of the Graduate School is to promote excellence in postgraduate study, within a stimulating and supportive environment. We value equality and diversity in the School community, and an academic culture that is both critical and constructive.

  • At the start of the academic year, you will be invited to Welcome Week, an intensive introduction to study and life in Edinburgh. Some events are especially for international students new to Scotland and the UK, but everything is open to all.
  • In the first weeks, the School provides a general orientation to research skills and to wider opportunities for training and support.
  • From your first days as a PhD or MPhil student, you will work one-to-one with your primary research supervisor.
  • Your progress will be tracked, through regular supervisions and milestone reviews, to ensure that you get the support you need to bring your project to fruition.
  • You will be part of the research seminar in Biblical Studies, to which visiting speakers are invited and to which postgraduates present work-in-progress.
  • You can also engage with the work of OTSEM, an international network of Old Testament researchers.
  • OTSEM
  • You will be able to follow taught courses that contribute to your interests and research needs, and can also take advantage of opportunities to learn ancient and modern languages.
  • If you are a PhD student, after successful completion of your first year, you will be eligible to apply for tutoring opportunities, to gain teaching experience.

A University review (2015) commended the Graduate School for providing excellent support: responsive to student feedback; proactive in helping new postgraduates to adjust to their studies and to life in Scotland; enthusiastic and practical in promoting career development. The postgraduate student committee works closely with the School to make the research student experience the best it can be.

Facilities

The School of Divinity, one of the largest centres for the study of religion in the United Kingdom, is located in the historic setting of New College, close to Edinburgh Castle and overlooking Princes Street.

Resources for research are excellent. You can draw on the outstanding holdings of New College Library, the University of Edinburgh’s main library, and the nearby National Library of Scotland. New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection. The University library exceeds 2.25 million volumes. The National Library of Scotland – a ‘legal deposit’ library like the British Library in London and the university libraries of Oxford and Cambridge – is just around the corner.

The School provides an extensive programme of weekly research seminars and special guest lectures. In addition, three research centres provide a special focus for activity: the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins; the Centre for Theology and Public Issues; the Centre for the Study of World Christianity.

You will have access to excellent study facilities, dedicated to postgraduates. PhD and MPhil students have access 24/7, and can request an allocated desk. Masters by Research students have shared study space. All areas have printing/scanning and computer facilities. The main postgraduate study wing has a kitchen. New College has an on-site cafe that is open during term time.

Masters by Research

If you have academic training in theology or religious studies (or another relevant subject), and would like to develop your interest with a focus on a particular area, the Masters by Research may interest you.

This programme can be taken either as a Master of Theology by Research (MTh by Research) or as a Master of Science by Research (MScR); the difference is only in the name.

You can study full-time (one year) or part-time (two years). Your pattern of study can either be three supervised research essays followed by a 15,000 word dissertation, or a 30,000 word dissertation. Most students take the ‘research essays + shorter dissertation’ path. All students receive research training.



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Research profile. Read more

Research profile

You will work under the supervision of specialists whose recent publications have focused on the gospels; Paul; the apocalypse; the apocryphal gospels and early second-century texts and developments; textual criticism; New Testament ethics; Qumran; the historical, religious and literary environment of the New Testament; New Testament Christology.

You can undertake research in exegesis, historical-critical issues, textual and literary criticism, the relation between Christianity and its religious and historical setting, the history of interpretation, and hermeneutical questions.

You can find out more and identify a potential supervisor by looking at the School’s staff profiles, which give details of research interests and publications, and email addresses.

You are encouraged to contact a potential supervisor to discuss your research project before making a formal application.

At the School of Divinity you will join a community of around 150 research students, drawn from around the world, and from a variety of religious and non-religious backgrounds.

You will study in a stimulating environment. The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranked the School’s research environment at 100% world-leading / internationally excellent, second in the UK on this front in theology and religion. This outstanding result reflects the vibrancy of the School’s research culture.

Training and support

The ethos of the Graduate School is to promote excellence in postgraduate study, within a stimulating and supportive environment. We value equality and diversity in the School community, and an academic culture that is both critical and constructive.

  • At the start of the academic year, you will be invited to Welcome Week, an intensive introduction to study and life in Edinburgh. Some events are especially for international students new to Scotland and the UK, but everything is open to all.
  • In the first weeks, the School provides a general orientation to research skills and to wider opportunities for training and support.
  • From your first days as a student, you will work one-to-one with your primary research supervisor.
  • Your progress will be tracked, through regular supervisions and milestone reviews, to ensure that you get the support you need to bring your project to fruition.
  • You will be part of the research seminar in Biblical Studies, to which visiting speakers are invited and to which postgraduates present work-in-progress.
  • You will also be part of the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins.
  • You will be able to follow taught courses that contribute to your interests and research needs, and can also take advantage of opportunities to learn ancient and modern languages.

A University review (2015) commended the Graduate School for providing excellent support: responsive to student feedback; proactive in helping new postgraduates to adjust to their studies and to life in Scotland; enthusiastic and practical in promoting career development. The postgraduate student committee works closely with the School to make the research student experience the best it can be.

Facilities

The School of Divinity, one of the largest centres for the study of religion in the United Kingdom, is located in the historic setting of New College, close to Edinburgh Castle and overlooking Princes Street.

Resources for research are excellent. You can draw on the outstanding holdings of New College Library, the University of Edinburgh’s main library, and the nearby National Library of Scotland. New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection. The University library exceeds 2.25 million volumes. The National Library of Scotland – a ‘legal deposit’ library like the British Library in London and the university libraries of Oxford and Cambridge – is just around the corner.

The School provides an extensive programme of weekly research seminars and special guest lectures. In addition, three research centres provide a special focus for activity: the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins; the Centre for Theology and Public Issues; the Centre for the Study of World Christianity.

You will have access to excellent study facilities, dedicated to postgraduates. PhD and MPhil students have access 24/7, and can request an allocated desk. Masters by Research students have shared study space. All areas have printing/scanning and computer facilities. The main postgraduate study wing has a kitchen. New College has an on-site cafe that is open during term time.



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Research profile. You will join academic staff and graduate students who represent a variety of nationalities and theological perspectives. Read more

Research profile

You will join academic staff and graduate students who represent a variety of nationalities and theological perspectives. This intellectual diversity is strongly encouraged.

Recent projects have included research into Augustine, medieval theology, the history of Reformed theology, Dutch Neo-Calvinism, Edwards, Schleiermacher, Barth, Wittgenstein, Torrance, Levinas, Balthasar, Pannenberg, Adams, contextual theology, theology of religions, providence, theological anthropology, ecclesiology, pneumatology, eschatology and puritan theology. The interests of academic staff range across philosophical, historical and systematic theology.

You can find out more and identify a potential supervisor by looking at the School’s staff profiles, which give details of research interests and publications, and email addresses.

You are encouraged to contact a potential supervisor to discuss your research project before making a formal application.

At the School of Divinity you will join a community of around 150 research students, drawn from around the world, and from a variety of religious and non-religious backgrounds.

You will study in a stimulating environment. The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranked the School’s research environment at 100% world-leading / internationally excellent, second in the UK on this front in theology and religion. This outstanding result reflects the vibrancy of the School’s research culture.

Training and support

The ethos of the Graduate School is to promote excellence in postgraduate study, within a stimulating and supportive environment. We value equality and diversity in the School community, and an academic culture that is both critical and constructive.

  • At the start of the academic year, you will be invited to Welcome Week, an intensive introduction to study and life in Edinburgh. Some events are especially for international students new to Scotland and the UK, but everything is open to all.
  • In the first weeks, the School provides a general orientation to research skills and to wider opportunities for training and support.
  • From your first days as a student, you will work one-to-one with your primary research supervisor.
  • Your progress will be tracked, through regular supervisions and milestone reviews, to ensure that you get the support you need to bring your project to fruition.
  • You will be part of the research seminar in Theology and Ethics, to which visiting speakers are invited and to which postgraduates present work-in-progress.
  • You will be able to follow taught courses that contribute to your interests and research needs, and can also take advantage of opportunities to learn ancient and modern languages.

A University review (2015) commended the Graduate School for providing excellent support: responsive to student feedback; proactive in helping new postgraduates to adjust to their studies and to life in Scotland; enthusiastic and practical in promoting career development. The postgraduate student committee works closely with the School to make the research student experience the best it can be.

Facilities

The School of Divinity, one of the largest centres for the study of religion in the United Kingdom, is located in the historic setting of New College, close to Edinburgh Castle and overlooking Princes Street.

Resources for research are excellent. You can draw on the outstanding holdings of New College Library, the University of Edinburgh’s main library, and the nearby National Library of Scotland. New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection. The University library exceeds 2.25 million volumes. The National Library of Scotland – a ‘legal deposit’ library like the British Library in London and the university libraries of Oxford and Cambridge – is just around the corner.

The School provides an extensive programme of weekly research seminars and special guest lectures. In addition, three research centres provide a special focus for activity: the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins; the Centre for Theology and Public Issues; the Centre for the Study of World Christianity.

You will have access to excellent study facilities, dedicated to postgraduates. PhD and MPhil students have access 24/7, and can request an allocated desk. Masters by Research students have shared study space. All areas have printing/scanning and computer facilities. The main postgraduate study wing has a kitchen. New College has an on-site cafe that is open during term time.



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Find out more about this programme at our Postgraduate Open Day on Wednesday 22 March 2017. To register, visit. www.liverpool.ac.uk/pg/openday. Read more
Find out more about this programme at our Postgraduate Open Day on Wednesday 22 March 2017. To register, visit: http://www.liverpool.ac.uk/pg/openday

The Eighteenth-Century Worlds pathw will take you on an investigative journey through the history, literature and visual and material culture of Europe and its interactions with the wider world, from the Atlantic to Asia.

This highly original interdisciplinary postgraduate course gives you the opportunity to study in one of Britain’s leading Atlantic ports; a city rich in eighteenth-century history, architecture and culture.

Researching the subject is a real pleasure in Liverpool. The city is home to more national museums and galleries than any other English city outside of London.

The expertise of our research-active tutors and the combination of modules makes this a unique course, following the trajectory to a global world during the eighteenth century.

ERASMUS Exchange with Paris Diderot

There is an opportunity for students to spend semester 2 studying at the University of Paris-Diderot, taking modules there while preparing their feasibility study. Further details will be available in due course. For students who do not choose to go abroad, the course is enhanced by the presence of a visiting lecturer from Paris in each academic year.

Eighteenth-Century Worlds Research Centre

All MA students are encouraged to take part in the activities of the Centre. These include research seminars with invited speakers and workshops and conferences, some designed specifically for postgraduates. Watch this space!

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

The MA programme has as its core one interdisciplinary module in each semester . These modules are team-taught by staff with expertise in British and Continental European literary, cultural and historical studies (including colonial and postcolonial studies) and in Classics. They are designed to introduce postgraduates to the range of disciplines covered by the MA, while raising awareness of methodological and theoretical concerns and some of the key themes in eighteenth-century studies. The other compulsory elements are a module on research methods, the Feasibility Study and the Dissertation. The choice of dissertation topic is up to the student, and the Feasibility Study and Dissertation can be supervised by staff from any of the participating Departments (History; English; Cultures, Languages and Area Studies; Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology).

All studies are co-ordinated by the Eighteenth-Century Worlds Centre at the University of Liverpool. The two core modules are worth 30 credits each, while the research methods module and Feasibility Study are both worth 15 credits. I. In addition to the compulsory modules, students select one 15-credit option in each semester from modules in English literature and the reception of classical antiquity. Over the summer students complete the 15,000-word dissertation which constitutes the final 60 credits of the MA programme.

Why History?

Breadth of expertise

The interests of our staff and PhD students are extremely diverse and span the medieval, early modern and modern periods.

Their work encompasses political, social, cultural, economic, military and diplomatic history, across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas.

Active seminar programmes, linked to our research centres and MA programmes, enable staff and postgraduates to present their work and listen to eminent visiting speakers.

These are our on-going seminar series:

Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
Contemporary Cultural and Social
History
International Slavery
Contemporary History and Policy
New Research (run by our postgraduate students)
Recent conferences and workshops have addressed ‘Religion in the Spanish Baroque’, ‘Text and Place in Medieval and Early Modern Europe’, ‘Re-thinking Post- Slavery’ and ‘British Nuclear Culture’.

Taught programmes that prepare you for future research

By pursuing our programmes you’ll gain the skills and knowledge you need to carry out further research towards a PhD.

Our MA programmes are taught by research-active experts who bring their knowledge of, and passion for, their subjects into the seminar room.

Teaching takes place in small-group seminars or workshops and through one-to-one tutorials, as we believe this leads to the best collaboration between students and staff.

We offer programmes in:-

Cultural History
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
International Slavery Studies
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Twentieth-Century History
You can also pursue an MRes in History or a vocational Masters in Archives and Records Management.

Support and skills training for PhD students

As a postgraduate research student you’ll receive comprehensive skills from the Graduate School, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and History Department.

This will equip you with the research skills you need to successfully complete your PhD.

Our PhD programmes place a strong emphasis on independent research and study, culminating in a 100,000-word dissertation. Two supervisors (normally experts in your chosen field) who will advise and support you through the process.

Our commitment to postgraduate students

We welcome enquiries from all postgraduate students interested in studying here and will give you all the academic, practical and pastoral support we can.

Students have a voice here and are represented on the School Postgraduate Committee. There’s also a dedicated staff – student liaison committee to oversee our MA and PhD programmes.

Postgraduate studentships and bursaries are often available.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Applied Linguistics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Applied Linguistics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Department of English Language and Literature welcomes applications from students wishing to pursue graduate level research at MA level in Applied Linguistics, particularly topics in second language acquisition, bilingualism, vocabulary learning, corpus linguistics and discourse analysis.

MA by Research in Applied Linguistics

The MA by Research in Applied Linguistics would suit those wanting the freedom to explore a topic of their choosing under the close supervision of two experienced academics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes; an MA qualification in niche areas where taught programmes are not offered; the experience of a research degree without committing to a PhD at the outset. Research proposals are invited on any topic in Applied Linguistics for which staff can provide supervision. It is advisable to email a member of academic staff in the appropriate area before applying.

Key Features of Applied Linguistics MA by Research

An MA by Research in Applied Linguistics gives you the chance to pursue a project inspired entirely by your own particular interests in Applied Linguistics. The qualification would be a good preparation for proceeding to doctoral work. Alternatively, the proven ability to conduct independent research in Applied Linguistics will boost employment prospects in the area of English language teaching, but also outside academia (for example, in the media, publishing, the Civil Service, or education).

As a student of the Applied Linguistics programme you will be closely supervised by two experienced academics in your field. Typically, you will meet them fortnightly in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time. All research students in Applied Linguistics are required to attend skills and training courses at College and Institutional level. They give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and the annual departmental postgraduate symposium in June and the College of Arts and Humanities conference in October. MA by Research in Applied Linguistics typically last from one year (full-time study) to two years (part-time study).

Postgraduate Research

About 70 of the postgraduates currently studying at Swansea University’s Department of English Language and Literature [ELL] are researchers working on an MA, MPhil or PhD thesis. Each is supervised by two members of staff, 60% of whose own research publications were rated ‘internationally excellent’ or ‘world-leading’ in the 2008 REF exercise. We supervise interdisciplinary projects as well as traditional areas of the discipline - in language studies, creative writing, literature (from medieval to the present) and critical and cultural theory. If you have an idea for a research project in Applied Linguistics, do get in touch and discuss it with us informally before applying.

Postgraduates often join a research centre, e.g. the Centre for Research into Gender and Culture (GENCAS) or the Centre for Research into Welsh Writing in English (CREW) where they work alongside other students and staff in dedicated research rooms. As a student of the Applied Linguistics programme you will present your work in the friendly environment of our Research Institute’s annual postgraduate conference, ELL’s fortnightly research seminars, and the monthly workshop of the Creative Writing Programme. Our research environment was judged 100% ‘internationally excellent’ by the 2008 REF, and research students help staff organise a lively programme of conferences, readings and performances on campus and in the city’s arts centres. As well as being inducted into academic research and dissemination, doctoral students have the opportunity to undertake undergraduate teaching to prepare them for an academic career. We provide study stations with computers and postgraduate common-rooms, research training and the services of a research officer and subject librarian.

REF 2014

What the Research Excellence Framework 2014 had to say about Postgraduate research in the Swansea Department of English Language and Literature …

The environment in the Department is conducive to producing research of mostly at least internationally excellent and at its best world-leading quality’…

‘Arrangements for postgraduates were deemed of world-leading quality’

‘There is clear evidence of the development of a research culture into which research students are fully integrated’

‘Recruitment is strong’

‘There are excellent arrangements for support, training and employability’.

Summing up: ‘The unit makes an outstanding contribution to the health of the discipline’.



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Medieval Studies is a well-known and internationally recognised area of expertise at Bangor. Over the decades particular strengths in Arthurian literature, Welsh History and Archaeology and Cymraeg, as well as Music have attracted postgraduates to Bangor to work with experts in each of these areas. Read more
Medieval Studies is a well-known and internationally recognised area of expertise at Bangor. Over the decades particular strengths in Arthurian literature, Welsh History and Archaeology and Cymraeg, as well as Music have attracted postgraduates to Bangor to work with experts in each of these areas. Additional strengths include gender and devotional literature (in the School of English), Anglo-Norman studies, and early sacred music, among others. Interdisciplinary approaches form the core of medieval studies, and the current expertise at Bangor guarantees this approach both through the core module and through the option modules. In addition to this, Bangor can boast a unique combination of modules students can choose from, such as do not normally feature together: Welsh, Arthurian studies and Music form the distinctive core of the provision, alongside our widely recognised expertise in teaching palaeography and codicology.

Course Structure
In Part 1 of the course, students develop skills and acquire subject knowledge by way of preparation for Part Two, a 20,000 word dissertation. The Diploma, which consists of Part One of the MA programme, aims to develop learner autonomy to the point where the student is capable of beginning a scholarly dissertation at MA level.

Part 1: At the beginning of this course, all students must register for the following modules:

Understanding the Middle Ages (semesters 1 and 2)
Manuscripts and Printed Books (1 semester)
In addition to these modules, students may choose from a wide range of modules in this part of the course which may include:

Cymraeg:

CXC4004: Britain’s Celtic Heritage (40 credits)
CXC4005: Medieval Welsh literature (40 credits)
English:

QXE4030: Medieval Arthur (30 credits)

QXE4029: Women’s Devotional Writing (30 credits)

QXE4016: Pre-Modern Travel (30 credits)

QXE4032: Advanced Latin for Postgraduates (20 credits)

History, Welsh History and Archaeology:

HPH4000: The Age of Llywelyn ap Iorwerth (40 credits) (English: HPW-4000; Welsh: HPC-4000)

HPH4002: The Archaeology of the Early Medieval Celtic Churches (40 credits)

HPH4013: The Duke, Duchy and Institutions of Normandy, 942-1135 (40 credits)

HPH4017: Women and Power in the High Middle Ages (40 credits)

HPH4018: Medieval Latin (20 credits)

Music:

General explanation: Modules in Early Music place a thematic focus on music of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. They are intended to broaden the student’s knowledge of different types of music composed during these periods as well as the various contexts within which they were placed. This will include consideration of analytical, repertorial, palaeographic, biographical, institutional, social and cultural aspects. A number of case studies, complemented by directed reading and assignments, will explore the depth of historical and musicological study and understanding and enable a student to address specific, focused periods, topics and/or issues in which they have an interest.

Major (40 credits) and Minor (20 credits) Submissions are different in scope.

The choice of Early Music a s Principal Subject entails that students make their Part II submission in the area of Early Music as well.

WMM4044: Principal Subject: Early Music (40 credits)
WMM4046: Major Open Submission: Early Music (40 credits)
WMM4047 and WMM4048: Minor Open Submission: Early Music (20 credits)
WMM4050: Preparing for the Part II project (20 credits)
Students may also select relevant modules also on offer by the Graduate School of the College of Arts and Humanities which include:

QXE4032: Advanced Latin for Postgraduates
QXE4033: Postgraduate Portfolio
Further information about the above modules is available directly from the Directors of Graduate Studies in each contributing schools. Module availability depends on yearly internal arrangements in each contributing school. For further details, contact the School of History, Welsh History and Archaeology, the School of Music, and School of Welsh.

Part 2: Preparation of a 20,000 word dissertation on a subject related to medieval studies agreed by your chosen supervisor. This preparation will involve a series of one-to-one supervisory meetings during the summer, once Part 1 has been completed successfully.

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Research profile. If you would like to undertake research in the History of Christianity, you will find excellent specialist supervision and library resources. Read more

Research profile

If you would like to undertake research in the History of Christianity, you will find excellent specialist supervision and library resources. Areas of particular research strength are patristics and early Christian history; the reformation in Britain and on the continent; puritanism; the history of British and European Christianity from the 18th century; and the history of Christian missions, especially in Africa, from the 18th century.

You can find out more and identify a potential supervisor by looking at the School’s Staff Profiles, which give details of research interests and publications, and email addresses.

You are encouraged to contact a potential supervisor to discuss your research project before making a formal application.

At the School of Divinity you will join a community of around 150 research students, drawn from around the world, and from a variety of religious and non-religious backgrounds.

You will study in a stimulating environment. The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranked the School’s research environment at 100% world-leading / internationally excellent, second in the UK on this front in theology and religion. This outstanding result reflects the vibrancy of the School’s research culture.

Masters by Research

If you have academic training in theology or religious studies (or another relevant subject), and would like to develop your interest with a focus on a particular area, the Masters by Research may interest you.

This programme can be taken either as a ‘Master of Theology by Research’ or as a ‘Master of Science by Research’ – the difference is only in the name.

You can study full-time (one year) or part-time (two years). Your pattern of study can either be three supervised research essays followed by a 15,000 word dissertation, or a 30,000 word dissertation. Most students take the ‘research essays + shorter dissertation’ path. All students receive research training.

Training and support

The ethos of the Graduate School is to promote excellence in postgraduate study, within a stimulating and supportive environment. We value equality and diversity in the School community, and an academic culture that is both critical and constructive.

  • At the start of the academic year, you will be invited to Welcome Week, an intensive introduction to study and life in Edinburgh. Some events are especially for international students new to Scotland and the UK, but everything is open to all.
  • In the first weeks, the School provides a general orientation to research skills and to wider opportunities for training and support.
  • From your first days as a PhD or MPhil student, you will work one-to-one with your primary research supervisor.
  • Your progress will be tracked, through regular supervisions and milestone reviews, to ensure that you get the support you need to bring your project to fruition.
  • You will be part of the research seminar in the History of Christianity, to which visiting speakers are invited and to which postgraduates present work-in-progress.
  • If your interest is in Patristics, you can engage with the work of the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins.
  • You will be able to follow taught courses that contribute to your interests and research needs, and can also take advantage of opportunities to learn ancient and modern languages.
  • If you are a PhD student, after successful completion of your first year, you will be eligible to apply for tutoring opportunities, to gain teaching experience.

A University review (2015) commended the Graduate School for providing excellent support: responsive to student feedback; proactive in helping new postgraduates to adjust to their studies and to life in Scotland; enthusiastic and practical in promoting career development. The postgraduate student committee works closely with the School to make the research student experience the best it can be.

Facilities

The School of Divinity, one of the largest centres for the study of religion in the United Kingdom, is located in the historic setting of New College, close to Edinburgh Castle and overlooking Princes Street.

Resources for research are excellent. You can draw on the outstanding holdings of New College Library, the University of Edinburgh’s main library, and the nearby National Library of Scotland. New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection. The University library exceeds 2.25 million volumes. The National Library of Scotland – a ‘legal deposit’ library like the British Library in London and the university libraries of Oxford and Cambridge – is just around the corner.

The School provides an extensive programme of weekly research seminars and special guest lectures. In addition, three research centres provide a special focus for activity: the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins; the Centre for Theology and Public Issues; the Centre for the Study of World Christianity.

You will have access to excellent study facilities, dedicated to postgraduates. PhD and MPhil students have access 24/7, and can request an allocated desk. Masters by Research students have shared study space. All areas have printing/scanning and computer facilities. The main postgraduate study wing has a kitchen. New College has an on-site cafe that is open during term time.



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We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methods and analytic techniques. Read more

We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methods and analytic techniques.

Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity.

During your first year you may take a range of taught modules including research methods, theory, and statistics; requirements will vary depending on any postgraduate training you have already undertaken.

You will attend and contribute to research seminars, and through departmental and Goldsmiths-wide modules you will also be encouraged to develop practical skills such as public speaking, poster preparation, scientific writing, and how to interact with the media.

You will meet regularly with your supervisor, and develop a structured approach to designing, executing, analysing and writing up your research.

You will have access to the Department of Psychology's range of laboratories, testing rooms and research equipment. You will also have an annual allowance to contribute towards your research expenses and/or conference attendance.

Find out more about research degrees at Goldsmiths

Structure

Our postgraduate students are offered a stimulating study environment in which to research their higher degree. We have a thriving postgraduate school with some 50 current students on full-time and part-time programmes, including mature students and students from the EU and overseas.

Training and support

All our MPhil students are assigned a specific research supervisor (or sometimes joint supervisors).

Students undergo comprehensive training in psychological research methods (unless they already hold an MSc approved by the ESRC) in line with current ESRC training guidelines, including quantitative and qualitative research methods. This is mainly during the first year of registration (or first two years for part-time students. Students also attend various short generic research skills and methods training modules run by the College.

Students have full access to the Department's excellent facilities for lab and field research, and first-rate technical support is available from the Department's team of full-time technical staff.

Progress and assessment

Students initially register for an MPhil until they achieve satisfactory upgrading to PhD status. This is dependent upon satisfactory progress reports, an upgrading report and a viva. The upgrading report is usually completed after 12 months full-time, or 24 months part-time. The report will include a plan of the thesis, a timetable, and one draft thesis chapter (or equivalent) and will be discussed at a presentation to the Departmental Postgraduate Committee.

Students will also be required to present their work at the Postgraduate symposium. Submission of the thesis is the final stage of the work, when your completed thesis is presented for examination (viva voce).

Postgraduate facilities

All full-time students have their own workplace and a networked computer with access to relevant software. Part-time students also have access to a networked computer, generally shared between two or three students. We also run a psychological test library for staff and students.

Seminars and presentations

Our postgraduates have regular opportunities to meet with other students and to make contact with staff. The Department runs a number of active visiting lecturer seminar series. There are also several specialised research groups that hold regular meetings and talks that are open to staff, researchers and postgraduate students. Postgraduates are also strongly encouraged to present their work as a paper or poster at national or international conferences and financial support is set aside for this.



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Research profile. If you join this research area, you will work with the academic specialists who form the Centre for the Study of World Christianity, which focuses on Christianity in and from all parts of the majority world, and also on the growing presence of African and Asian churches in the northern hemisphere. Read more

Research profile

If you join this research area, you will work with the academic specialists who form the Centre for the Study of World Christianity, which focuses on Christianity in and from all parts of the majority world, and also on the growing presence of African and Asian churches in the northern hemisphere.

The research interests of academic staff include Asian and African Christian theologies and history; the history of Christian missions; new missionary movements from the global south; Pentecostalism; current missiological issues such as inculturation, ethnicity, gender, and inter-faith relations.

You can find out more and identify a potential supervisor by looking at the School’s staff profiles, which give details of research interests and publications, and email addresses.

You are encouraged to contact a potential supervisor to discuss your research project before making a formal application.

At the School of Divinity you will join a community of around 150 research students, drawn from around the world, and from a variety of religious and non-religious backgrounds.

You will study in a stimulating environment. The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranked the School’s research environment at 100% world-leading / internationally excellent, second in the UK on this front in theology and religion. This outstanding result reflects the vibrancy of the School’s research culture.

Training and support

The ethos of the Graduate School is to promote excellence in postgraduate study, within a stimulating and supportive environment. We value equality and diversity in the School community, and an academic culture that is both critical and constructive.

  • At the start of the academic year, you will be invited to Welcome Week, an intensive introduction to study and life in Edinburgh. Some events are especially for international students new to Scotland and the UK, but everything is open to all.
  • In the first weeks, the School provides a general orientation to research skills and to wider opportunities for training and support.
  • From your first days as a PhD or MPhil student, you will work one-to-one with your primary research supervisor.
  • Your progress will be tracked, through regular supervisions and milestone reviews, to ensure that you get the support you need to bring your project to fruition.
  • You will be part of the research seminar in World Christianity, to which visiting speakers are invited and to which postgraduates present work-in-progress.
  • You will also be part of the Centre for World Christianity.
  • You will be able to follow taught courses that contribute to your interests and research needs, and can also take advantage of opportunities to learn ancient and modern languages.

A University review (2015) commended the Graduate School for providing excellent support: responsive to student feedback; proactive in helping new postgraduates to adjust to their studies and to life in Scotland; enthusiastic and practical in promoting career development. The postgraduate student committee works closely with the School to make the research student experience the best it can be.

Facilities

The School of Divinity, one of the largest centres for the study of religion in the United Kingdom, is located in the historic setting of New College, close to Edinburgh Castle and overlooking Princes Street.

Resources for research are excellent. You can draw on the outstanding holdings of New College Library, the University of Edinburgh’s main library, and the nearby National Library of Scotland. New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection. The University library exceeds 2.25 million volumes. The National Library of Scotland – a ‘legal deposit’ library like the British Library in London and the university libraries of Oxford and Cambridge – is just around the corner.

The School provides an extensive programme of weekly research seminars and special guest lectures. In addition, three research centres provide a special focus for activity: the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins; the Centre for Theology and Public Issues; the Centre for the Study of World Christianity.

You will have access to excellent study facilities, dedicated to postgraduates. PhD and MPhil students have access 24/7, and can request an allocated desk. Masters by Research students have shared study space. All areas have printing/scanning and computer facilities. The main postgraduate study wing has a kitchen. New College has an on-site cafe that is open during term time.



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The course begins by teaching key pedagogies for supporting academic writing for both study and professional writing purposes. It also provides grounding in the theories and practices of how to set up and manage a writing centre, programme, or initiative. Read more

The course begins by teaching key pedagogies for supporting academic writing for both study and professional writing purposes.

It also provides grounding in the theories and practices of how to set up and manage a writing centre, programme, or initiative. The course then offers in-depth learning about how to support postgraduates, academics, and researchers in writing for publication in English, and about how to develop students’ writing in the disciplines. Importantly, you will also learn how to research academic writing.

Students in the final term of the MA will write a dissertation or portfolio based on an individually chosen research project, to inform their professional development.

Why choose this course?

  • Innovative degree course (unique in Europe) exploring the fast-expanding field of Academic Writing Development
  • Focuses on academic writing development for university students (undergraduate through doctoral level) and professional development in writing for publication
  • Provides essential training in how to set up and manage a writing centre or writing programme
  • Analyses the academic writing needs and practices of both native and non-native English speakers
  • Teaches how to conduct research into Academic Writing (the MA course supports students in conducting an Academic Writing research project)

What will I learn?

The course aims to give you the opportunity to:

  • Learn about student and professional academic writing pedagogies and research
  • Learn how to apply writing pedagogy and research to support both native and non-native English-speaking students
  • Learn how to develop and manage a writing programme, writing tutoring programme, or writing centre
  • Learn how to assess the writing needs of academics, postgraduates and professionals
  • Learn how to develop academics’, postgraduates’ and professionals’ ability to write for publication
  • Develop your own research project on student or professional academic writing (MA)

How you'll be taught

The programme is delivered through a combination of online module materials, optional face-to-face teaching, and independent study, allowing you to fit your studies around other commitments. A wide variety of resources is made available via the online study platform, including: lecture notes, videos, specialist resources from the Centre for Academic Writing library collection, and discussion forums, as well as information on the academic writing research projects and findings produced by members of teaching staff.

Module lecturers will be available to address your questions and to offer guidance relating to your studies. As a student on this course, you will also be allocated a Personal Tutor, who will provide pastoral care and support.

Starting in September each year, the MA is designed to be studied over 2 years either by blended learning or distance learning.

At each stage of the programme, you will have the opportunity to attend a short, residential workshop (up to 5 days) to provide core learning. Although these workshops are optional, we strongly encourage attendance to underpin your learning, to meet your cohort and teachers, and to build your professional network. Workshops may be held at Coventry University’s main campus in Coventry, or in another location. (Please note: There is no additional teaching fee for the optional workshops. However, you will need to organise and pay for your own accommodation, food, and travel, including any visa costs). Students who are unable to attend the workshops can study independently using online materials.



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The Scottish Centre for Excellence in Computer Games Education at the University of Abertay Dundee offers a unique postgraduate experience. Read more
The Scottish Centre for Excellence in Computer Games Education at the University of Abertay Dundee offers a unique postgraduate experience.

Postgraduate funding (tuition fee and living cost loan) may be available from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland for those who meet the eligibility criteria.

Why choose this course?

-Develop core development skills through applied project work, supported by experienced industry practitioners
-Enhance skills in interdisciplinary communication and collaboration through team work with students and practitioners from other areas of games development
-Apply developing technologies and practices to your own projects, and demonstrate your work to leading industry figures
-Nurture relationships with fellow developers, industry professionals and companies through your demonstrable skill in the creation of games, industrial mentorships and published research.
-The Scottish Centre for Excellence in Computer Games Education at Abertay University offers a unique postgraduate experience, specifically designed in discussion with game industry partners, and identified by one leading CEO as, ‘The course the Games Industry has been waiting for!’.

As postgraduate students, highly-talented individuals work within games development teams towards the production of innovative computer games solutions. Working closely with a team of full-time staff who are highly-experienced in both the games industry and in academic teaching, and under the guidance and mentorship of computer games industry representatives, you will develop professional skills and knowledge relevant to identified development roles within the industry.

During the course of your studies you will ultimately be expected to demonstrate applied excellence in your specialist area, as well as professionalism, flexibility, the ability to adapt in team working situations, and creativity and innovation towards product development.

Join our Graduate School

Our Graduate School is a dedicated facility providing support, training and professional development opportunities to our vibrant postgraduate community. Specially designed to promote integration and inculcation of interdisciplinary working in our next generation of researchers, postgraduates study and learn together at Abertay - from Environmental Management to Law, Psychology, Bioscience, Economics and Business, Cybersecurity and Computer Games Development.

When you join us as a postgraduate student or researcher, you’ll be joining a community of creative like-minded scholars and will automatically be provided with access to our dedicated study and social spaces – a forum in which you can meet, work and learn with other researchers and postgraduates from across the University. You’ll benefit from training and professional development opportunities as well as support with funding applications, placement opportunities, teaching support, public engagement and outreach activity.

What you study

The goal of the MProf in Games Development is to turn graduates into professional developers by placing them into development teams, with industry-relevant project goals and deliverables. The teams enjoy a high level of independence in how they meet the game design briefs and approach the development process.

Supervision, mentorship and academic support look to emphasise the consequences of their decisions and processes, allowing the students to experience an organic and logical development and evolution of best practices. In addition, students develop their awareness in areas of potential innovation and research, and are encouraged to publish their work.

The remaining core elements of the course seek to separate the myths from the realities of working in the games industry, and expand students’ awareness of design considerations with regards to the comparative importance and impact of narrative and gameplay theories. Uniquely, students select optional modules from across the entire university, allowing further development of their core skills if required, but more specifically allowing for a more individual and tailored learning experience through the additional study of areas of personal interest such as business, marketing, psychology and perception.

Open, flexible working spaces

We have developed a unique concept of learning environment and creative incubator, encompassing ways of teaching that focus on building general skills alongside the subject-specific knowledge to support your career and life objectives. It is designed to give you the edge in the global knowledge economy when you graduate.

This White Space environment is a thriving hub of activity, mixing the talents of undergraduates, postgraduates, lecturers, business people, artists and broadcasters, surrounding our students with the buzz of a real working environment, allowing them to share real-world knowledge and experience.

How you learn and are assessed

Assessment methods throughout the core modules focus on formative (constant) assessment through regular meetings and discussion sessions, rather than exams. This is to allow students to improve in confidence, communication skills and core discipline skills as they progress, allowing them to try new working practices and approaches as and when they may be required. An emphasis is placed on effective participation as a team player, and in correctly identifying and prioritising a project’s key requirements and challenges.

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Research profile. Read more

Research profile

The research interests of academic staff and graduate students in Ethics and Practical Theology encompass a range of theoretical and practical approaches to ethics, religion and theology, including environmental ethics, peace-building and reconciliation, ethical theory, and pastoral and practical theology.

You can find out more and identify a potential supervisor by looking at the School of Divinity’s * Staff Profiles, which give details of research interests and publications, and email addresses.

You are encouraged to contact a potential supervisor to discuss your research project before making a formal application. In the Ethics and Practical Theology research area, projects are often interdisciplinary. If this is the case, you may be jointly supervised with a subject specialist from another School in the University.

At the School of Divinity you will join a community of around 150 research students, drawn from around the world, and from a variety of religious and non-religious backgrounds.

You will study in a stimulating environment. The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranked the School’s research environment at 100% world-leading / internationally excellent, second in the UK on this front in theology and religion. This outstanding result reflects the vibrancy of the School’s research culture.

Training and support

The ethos of the Graduate School is to promote excellence in postgraduate study, within a stimulating and supportive environment. We value equality and diversity in the School community, and an academic culture that is both critical and constructive.

  • At the start of the academic year, you will be invited to Welcome Week, an intensive introduction to study and life in Edinburgh. Some events are especially for international students new to Scotland and the UK, but everything is open to all.
  • In the first weeks, the School provides a general orientation to research skills and to wider opportunities for training and support.
  • From your first days as a PhD or MPhil student, you will work 1:1 with your primary research supervisor.
  • Your progress will be tracked, through regular supervisions and milestone reviews, to ensure that you get the support you need to bring your project to fruition.
  • You will be part of the research seminar in Theology and Ethics, to which visiting speakers are invited and to which postgraduates present work-in-progress.
  • You can also engage with the work of the * Centre for Theology and Public Issues.
  • You will be able to follow taught courses that contribute to your interests and research needs, and can also take advantage of opportunities to learn ancient and modern languages.
  • If you are a PhD student, after successful completion of your first year, you will be eligible to apply for tutoring opportunities, to gain teaching experience.

A University review (2015) commended the Graduate School for providing excellent support: responsive to student feedback; proactive in helping new postgraduates to adjust to their studies and to life in Scotland; enthusiastic and practical in promoting career development. The postgraduate student committee works closely with the School to make the research student experience the best it can be.

Facilities

The School of Divinity, one of the largest centres for the study of religion in the United Kingdom, is located in the historic setting of New College, close to Edinburgh Castle and overlooking Princes Street.

Resources for research are excellent. You can draw on the outstanding holdings of New College Library, the University of Edinburgh’s main library, and the nearby National Library of Scotland. New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection. The University library exceeds 2.25 million volumes. The National Library of Scotland – a ‘legal deposit’ library like the British Library in London and the university libraries of Oxford and Cambridge – is just around the corner.

The School provides an extensive programme of weekly research seminars and special guest lectures. In addition, three research centres provide a special focus for activity: the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins; the Centre for Theology and Public Issues; the Centre for the Study ofWorld Christianity.

You will have access to excellent study facilities, dedicated to postgraduates. PhD and MPhil students have access 24/7, and can request an allocated desk. Masters by Research students have shared study space. All areas have printing/scanning and computer facilities. The main postgraduate study wing has a kitchen. New College has an on-site cafe that is open during term time.

Research opportunities

If you have academic training in theology or religious studies (or another relevant subject), and would like to develop your interest with a focus on a particular area, the Masters by Research may interest you. This programme can be taken either as a ‘Master of Theology by Research’ or as a ‘Master of Science by Research’ – the difference is only in the name. You can study full-time (one year) or part-time (two years). Your pattern of study can either be three supervised research essays followed by a 15,000 word dissertation, or a 30,000 word dissertation. Most students take the ‘research essays + shorter dissertation’ path. All students receive research training.



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