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Masters Degrees (Post-Conflict)

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Post-Conflict Justice and Peace building gives you theoretical, conceptual dimensions of post-conflict and peace building over time. Read more
Post-Conflict Justice and Peace building gives you theoretical, conceptual dimensions of post-conflict and peace building over time. You learn about the boundaries of peace-building, burdens, legal, social and economic justice.

COURSES
Semester 1
Qualitative Sociology: Philosophy and Methods
Advanced Social Theory

Semester 2
Post-Conflict Justice and Peace building

Optional
Religious Belief and Practice in the Modern World
The Comparative Study of European Societies
Dimensions of Globalisation
Sex, Gender, Violence: Critical Approaches
Quantitative Sociology: Philosophy & Methods
Global Conflict and Peace Processes

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This MA addresses the fast-changing 'international' terrain including the 2008 economic crisis, EU fragmentation, questions of migration and human rights around the world. Read more
This MA addresses the fast-changing 'international' terrain including the 2008 economic crisis, EU fragmentation, questions of migration and human rights around the world.

It gives you the opportunity to explore the character of the contemporary world in an interdisciplinary manner, drawing upon a strong theoretical basis as well as an empirical grounding.

The programme offers great diversity in fields of study:
•international relations, post-colonial theory, human rights, international political economy, war, genocide and post-conflict societies
•areas of study – Europe, China, Japan, India, Latin America, Africa, the Middle East
•methodology – empirical analysis and data collection, textual and discourse analysis, hermeneutic and philosophical enquiry

It also offers diverse subjects of study:
•migration
•human rights
•memory and justice
•war and post-conflict
•global political economy
•IR theories
•political theory
•psychoanalysis
•identity politics
•gender, sexuality and the body in non-Western societies.

The MA is especially relevant if you are considering further study at PhD level, or if you want to work in areas where an understanding of international relations is essential (journalism, diplomacy, NGOs, international organisations, for example).

It offers valuable training and analytical skills for those working in non-governmental organisations, international institutions and corporations, diplomatic services, government offices, media industry and teaching.

A wide view of the 'international'

This programme differs from MA degrees in international relations offered elsewhere because it provides a wider view of the ‘international’ that questions its necessary Western focus and looks for alternative ways of ‘knowing’, ‘encountering’ and ‘experiencing’ the world.

It also takes an interdisciplinary approach, allowing you to tailor the degree to your needs, and offers an unusual diversity in the areas of specialty of our staff, many of whom are internationally recognised for their expertise.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Jeremy Larkins

Department

Voted one of the top political universities in the UK by students**

Politics and International Relations

In the Department of Politics and International Relations at Goldsmiths our focus goes beyond voting systems, parliaments and the conventional arenas of power. And it looks beyond the West.

We study politics and international relations for the 21st century, in which anarchism may be as important as liberalism, and in which Asia and Africa are as economically and geopolitically important as Europe and North America.

We also take an unconventional approach. So you may be working on group projects, writing a blog, or submitting a Manga comic instead of an essay.

Find out more about the Department of Politics and International Relations.

**Which? University 2014

Modules & Structure

Core modules

You take the following core modules:

Theories of International Relations (15 credits)
MA in International Relations Dissertation (60 credits)

Option modules:

Students make up their remaining 90 Credits from the following list of options:

An(Other) China: Postcolonial Theory, Postmodern Concerns (30 credits)
Counter-Mapping London: The Politics of Space (15 credits)
Latin American Dictionary: Politics through the Arts (15 credits)
Memory and Justice in Post-Conflict Societies (30 credits)
Politics of Knowledge: Debates in Human Science (15 credits)
Finance in the Global Political Economy (15 credits)
The Political-Economic Governance of the European Union (30 credits)
Politics of Human Rights (15 credits)
Psychopolitics (15 credits)
Visualising Asia: Body, Gender, Politics (30 credits)

Students may choose up to 30 credits of approved options from other departments at Goldsmiths.

Assessment

Essays; coursework; exam; research dissertation. Some modules might involve other forms of assessment such as blogs and policy reports.

Download the programme specification for this degree to find out more about what you'll learn and how you'll be taught and assessed.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Skills & Careers

Skills

You'll develop:
•a critical engagement with the broad field of international studies
•communication skills
•research skills
•presentation skills
•writing skills

Careers

The MA is especially relevant if you are considering further study at PhD level, or if you want to work in areas where an understanding of international relations is essential (journalism, diplomacy, NGOs, international organisations, for example).



It offers valuable training and analytical skills for those working in non-governmental organisations, international institutions and corporations, diplomatic services, government offices, media industry and teaching.

Our graduates go on to work within these areas but many also undertake professional training in law, accountancy, journalism, business administration, teaching, social work or nursing.

If you would like to speak to some of our current students or alumni, please contact Dr Anca Pusca.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths http://www.gold.ac.uk/skills-careers/

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MSc is designed for practitioners looking to enhance their skills in the context of broader theoretical models, as well as graduates with a career in government, the armed forces, inter-governmental organisations, NGOs or academia in mind. Read more
The MSc is designed for practitioners looking to enhance their skills in the context of broader theoretical models, as well as graduates with a career in government, the armed forces, inter-governmental organisations, NGOs or academia in mind.

The intensive professional workshops are open to practitioners who are not on the MSc programmes as Continuing Professional Development courses, enhancing students' opportunities for networking and learning from other practitioners' perspectives.

Courses are taught by a mixture of academics and practitioners, and cover both critical and problem-solving approaches. Conflict dynamics are analysed drawing on multiple disciplines, including security studies, peace studies, anthropology, law, archaeology, history and political theory. Modules include both traditional term-long modules and short, usually more skills-oriented, continuing professional development courses as well as fieldtrips (e.g. past fieldtrips were organised to Labanon, Napal, Kenya, Sri Lanka and Kosovo).

Student Profiles

“Doing MSc Defence, Development and Diplomacy was an enriching experience for me mainly because of a huge diversity of students participating from all corners of the world having their own unique views on contemporary issues, academically engaged professors with profound knowledge and experience and equally stimulating academic environment of Durham. I was particularly amazed at how professors always motivated us to think critically on contemporary issues and existing knowledge system dealing with them, develop extended understanding of pressing issues that we are facing today, and offer innovative solutions to those problems.” Salina Chaulagain, 2015/16

“Complementing my background in Middle Eastern Studies and Political Science, the MSc DDD has equipped me with tools used by practitioners and taught me to problematise, analyse and empathise with people in a conflict-ridden world.” Clemens Chay, 2014/15

“This programme uniquely addresses the issue of siloed thinking present in the interwoven sectors of defence, development, and diplomacy. The course is grounded on a “critical thinking” versus “problem solving” approach, and unswervingly focuses on the theory-practice connection. Most importantly, though, I cannot say enough about the caliber of my DGSi peer group. I am thankful not only for their friendship, but for the professional insights they will be able to offer in years to come. As a military officer, I am grateful for the ability to pick up the phone and gain a better understanding of the dynamics of a conflict or an operation from one of my former Durham peers.” Eric Davids, 2014/15

Course Structure

With conflicts becoming either increasingly drawn-out, asymmetric wars of attrition or normalise into states of no peace – no war, our understanding of conflict and conflict intervention is shifting. Conflicts are rarely determined by military victory, diplomacy or long-term development, but require to securing populations through a comprehensive approach that sees to their political, and economic, as well as their security-related needs. Their outcome will be determined by how well the different arms of government and civil society, both locally and internationally, can work together and how well they understand each others' perspectives.

This inter-disciplinary and custom designed MSc offers the unique opportunity to look at conflict, conflict intervention and post-conflict reconstruction through the lenses of defence, development and diplomacy.

The MSc is designed for graduates with a career in government, the armed forces, inter-governmental organisations, NGOs or academia in mind, and for practitioners looking to enhance their practical skills while placing these within a broader theoretical perspective.

Five core modules worth 75 credits plus a Dissertation worth 60 credits plus three optional modules to the value of 45 credits.

Core Modules
-Defence, Development and Diplomacy in Conflict: Evolving Actors, Factors and Paradigms
-Conflict Prevention and Sustainable Peace
-Conflict Intervention: International Law, Counter-Insurgency and Conflict Diplomacy
-Post-Conflict Reconstruction: Stabilisation, Development and State-Building
-Capstone Exercise: Humanitarian Intervention Simulation (in MSc-specific roles)
-Dissertation

Optional Modules - Optional module in previous years have included:
-Religion, Culture and Conflict
-Conflict Mediation
-Fieldtrip
-Conflict Sensitive Programme Management
-Re-thinking Counter Terrorism
-Conflict Analysis
-Urban Violence - Urban Peacebuilding
-International Negotiation as Instrument in Conflict Management
-Policing Post-Conflict Cities

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through two-day induction events in which they are informed about the University, the School, the MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MSc degree programme is divided into five core and three optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 60 credits of not more than15,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Although all modules have 18/19 contact hours, the core modules are spread over 9/10 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2-hour sessions which take the form of a one hour lecture and a one hour tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another. The optional modules of the programme are delivered over two full days, through a mixture of lectures, Q&A sessions, seminar discussions, and role plays.

Formative assessment is given on seminar contributions, role plays, and formative essays. Students have the opportunity to meet their lecturers to discuss their marks and other issues arising from their course performance. Students also have the opportunity to attend ‘essay surgeries’ in which they can discuss the structure and content of their essays early in the course.

Students can also meet their module coordinators or programme coordinator during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the latter half of the year, they are required to attend two 4-hour workshops. In addition, they have the opportunity to meet their assigned supervisors for an average of 6 meetings. Students also have access to the MSc Programme Director and the School’s Director of Taught Post Graduate Studies whenever there is a need.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. Students are also fully integrated into the Durham Global Security Institute, which delivers this MSc programme and hosts guest lectures and seminars throughout the year. These events provide students with the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies, and in conflict, peace and security studies.

Throughout the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

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The focus of governments and humanitarian NGOs has progressively shifted towards conflict prevention and building sustainable peace. Read more
The focus of governments and humanitarian NGOs has progressively shifted towards conflict prevention and building sustainable peace. Yet to prevent conflict or to build a secure and inclusive state and society after conflict involves a complex set of skills straddling conflict analysis, conflict mediation and negotiation, peace processes, state stabilisation, post-conflict reconstruction, peace building and early warning.

This inter-disciplinary, custom-designed MSc offers the opportunity to develop operational and vocational skills for conflict prevention and peacebuilding within the context of the latest theories on conflict and conflict prevention. Students will acquire the analytical skills to map conflict dynamics, design conflict sensitive projects and develop early warning mechanisms, enabling them to better predict, and so avoid, the outbreak of violent conflicts. They will also gain the skills necessary to assess and evaluate the impact and outcomes of interventions.

The MSc is designed for practitioners looking to enhance their existing skills, as well as graduates with a career in conflict prevention, conflict mediation, or post-conflict reconstruction in mind. It is particularly aimed at those seeking to work or already working in the (I)NGO sector, governmental departments or inter-governmental organisations.

While rooted in peace and conflict studies, the MSc draws on strategic and security studies as well as development studies, enabling much needed cross-fertilisation between these traditionally divergent perspectives. It draws on real-life case studies as well as interactive role plays, and exposes students to both cutting-edge academic developments and the latest practitioner experience, with a particular focus on bottom-up approaches.

Courses are taught by a mixture of academics and practitioners, and cover both critical and problem-solving approaches. Conflict dynamics are analysed drawing on multiple disciplines, including security studies, peace studies, anthropology, law, archaeology, history and political theory. Modules include both traditional, term-long modules and short, usually more skills-oriented continuing professional development courses as well as fieldtrips (e.g. fieldtrips have been organised to Nepal, Kenya, Lebanon, Sri Lanka and Kosovo).

Student Profiles

"What I really like about DGSi programs is that they are able to match a great theoretical understanding of the issues I am interested in with a clear focus on the practical skills that are required for working in the field." Lianne Vostermans, 2013/14

“Having co-sponsorship from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office of the UK and Durham University, I was able to accomplish my Chevening scholarship doing MSc Conflict Prevention and Peacebuilding (CPP) at Durham Global Security Institute (DGSi). Although it was found to be quite intensive and intellectually challenging, I have no doubt that this master programme will equip junior diplomats like me with necessary knowledge and skills, especially in security and peacebuilding domains, so that we can contribute our best capacities in the making of the world a more peaceful home to the whole mankind.” Chan Aye, 2015/16

“I chose the Conflict Prevention and Peacebuilding Master because of its interdisciplinary character, topics and the combination between theory and practice. During the course I have had the opportunity to meet very many interesting scholars, practitioners and very intelligent and diverse fellow students, from different cultural and academic backgrounds. The course gave me insight in things I had only read about in books before by confronting us with people who have actually been in the field, and by taking us there ourselves through the study trip and fieldwork opportunities for our dissertations. I have learned to look at conflict situations from new perspectives, something I hope to use in future employment in order to help create a more peaceful world.” Marit Jansen, 2014/15

Course Structure

The MSc will provide students with advanced knowledge of the complex and specialised areas of peacebuilding, among it conflict analysis, conflict prevention, conflict resolution and conflict transformation, community driven reconstruction, peace processes within the context of contemporary conflicts and in the context of broader international (humanitarian) interventions. Integrated into the MSc structure are opportunities to develop operational and vocational skills for example in negotiations, conflict mediation, conflict sensitive programme design and programme management, or urban peacebuilding. Students are provided with theoretical and empirical knowledge and with practical skills that are helpful for current and future employment opportunities. The courses are thus attractive to both graduates and mid-career practitioners. Whilst the academic and applied focus of the MSc comes through a peace and conflict studies analytic lens, course material will also draw from traditional strategic/security and development studies, enabling cross fertilisation between different perspectives. It allows the exploration of unique and new paradigms and practices in the fields of conflict, peace, security, defence, diplomacy, development and humanitarian intervention.

Five core modules worth 75 credits plus a Dissertation worth 60 credits plus three optional modules to the value of 45 credits.

Core Modules
-Defence, Development and Diplomacy in Conflict: Evolving Actors, Factors and Paradigms
-Conflict Prevention and Sustainable Peace
-Responses: Peace Processes and Political Negotiation
-Recovery and Reconstruction: Consolidating Peace after Violence
-Capstone Exercise: Humanitarian Intervention Simulation (in MSc-specific roles)

Dissertation.
Optional Modules - Optional modules in previous years have included:
-Religion, Culture and Conflict
-Conflict Mediation
-Fieldtrip
-Conflict Sensitive Programme Management
-Re-thinking Counter Terrorism
-Urban Violence - Urban Peacebuilding
-International Negotiation as Instrument in Conflict Management
-Policing Post-Conflict Cities
-Conflict Analysis

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, as well as the general induction programme offered by the School and the university, Durham Global Security Institute (DGSi) students are invited to a programme specific induction. This induction provides an overview of the programme an opportunity to meet members of the team and an opportunity to discuss optional module choices.

The 180 credits one-year MSc degree programme is divided into five core and three optional modules of 15 credits each. Students also have to submit a dissertation (60 credits) of not more than15,000 words. Practitioners have the option of writing an in-depth policy document as their dissertation.

Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation. Assessment methods include: an examination, essays, presentations, reflective journal, reports, article reviews and policy briefs.

Although all modules have 18/19 contact hours, the core modules are spread over 9/10 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2-hour sessions which take the form of a one hour lecture and a one hour tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another. The optional modules of the programme are either delivered over two full days, through a mixture of lectures, Q&A sessions, seminar discussions, and role plays or over a single term in 2-hour seminar sessions. There is also the opportunity to participate in a study visit which provides an opportunity to investigate issues ‘in the field’ concerned with conflict prevention, conflict resolution, state and peace-building. Of particular interest is the theory-practice linkage

Students can also meet their module coordinators or programme coordinator during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the latter half of the year, they are required to attend two 4-hour workshops. In addition, they have the opportunity to meet their assigned supervisors for an average of 6 meetings. Students also have access to the MSc Programme Director and the School’s Director of Taught Post Graduate Studies whenever there is a need.

The School hosts events throughout the year which all postgraduate students are invited to attend. Students are also fully integrated into the Durham Global Security Institute which also hosts guest lectures and seminars throughout the year. These events provide students with the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies, and in conflict, peace and security studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

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We are world leaders in political science, asking difficult questions to find important answers. How do you put an end to armed conflict? What are the benefits and consequences of intervention? What role do national and international non-governmental organisations play in the prevention and resolution of conflict?. Read more
We are world leaders in political science, asking difficult questions to find important answers. How do you put an end to armed conflict? What are the benefits and consequences of intervention? What role do national and international non-governmental organisations play in the prevention and resolution of conflict?

Our course helps you to understand the evolving field of conflict resolution, exploring the causes and effects of destructive conflict across the world, and scrutinising the theory and practice of how this can be managed peacefully. We provide you with a framework for understanding conflict resolution in inter- and intra-state issues, focusing on topics including:
-Mediation, negotiation, and collaborative problem solving
-Using conflict data sets and drawing geographical maps
-International development and human rights
-International relations and security studies
-Global and comparative politics

You additionally might have the option of studying an extracurricular module on non-violent movements, offered in collaboration with Slobdan Djinovic and Srdja Popovic of the Centre for Nonviolent Action and Strategies in Belgrade. This exciting course, previously offered at many US universities including Colorado College, Harvard University and New York University, has never been offered anywhere else in Europe.

Our dynamic, interdisciplinary approach combines traditional methods with contemporary theory and practices of non-violent movements, and we encourage you to experience the practical as well as the theoretical application of these topics through examining real case studies of international conflict.

Our Department of Government is one of the most prestigious in Europe, with an outstanding record of teaching, research and publication. We are rated top in the UK for research (REF 2014), and have consistently been the highest-rated politics department in the country since national assessments began. Ranked top 10 in the world for political science and international relations according to the Centre for World University Rankings (2017)

Our expert staff

Some of the biggest names in the field work at Essex, giving you unparalleled access to some of the best minds in politics. You benefit from staff expertise in both conflict studies and international relations, with conflict and cooperation forming a core part of our Department of Government.

Our key teaching staff for this course are Professor Han Dorussen, Professor Ismene Gizelis, and Professor Kristian Gleditsch.

Professor Dorussen is Associate Editor for the Journal of Peace Research, and specialises in the relationship between trade and conflict, the use of economic policies in international politics, the governance of post-conflict societies, and policy convergence in the European Union. He has recently completed fieldwork examining the impact of the UN mission on the perception of security in Timor Leste.

Professor Gizelis specialises in conflict dynamics, peacekeeping, gender equality and post-conflict reconstruction, and communicable diseases. In addition, Professor Gizelis is acting as Core Investigator on a new research project, ‘Armed Conflict and Maternal Health in Sub-Saharan Africa’ (2014-16), with the innovative aim of going beyond consideration of the direct effect of interventions to also consider relevant political, socioeconomic and cultural factors.

Professor Gleditsch’s research focuses on conflict and cooperation, democratisation, and spatial dimensions of social and political processes. He is the director of a large EU-funded research project on non-violent actions. He is also the director of the Michael Nicholson Centre of Conflict and Cooperation.

Specialist facilities

-The Michael Nicholson Centre for Conflict and Cooperation is distinctive in its scientific approach to the study of conflict, emphasising rigorous formal theory and the development of systematic data and statistical methods for evaluating theory
-Laboratories of networked computers featuring extensive software for political analysis
-Make use of web-assisted learning, simulations, and challenging role-playing exercises
-The ESSEXLab provides opportunities for experimental lab research
-Student societies for politics, debating, and Model UN
-We organise the Essex Summer School in Social Science Data Analysis
-A programme of seminars and events run by the department

Your future

All Essex politics graduates have the distinction of a qualification from one of the world’s leading politics departments.

Our MA Conflict Resolution will prepare you for a career in areas such as non-governmental organisations, international and national government, or the private sector.

Recent graduates have gone on to work for the following high-profile organisations:
-The Civil Service
-Local government
-The World Bank
-The United Nations
-NATO
-YouGov and YouGov America

We also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil in the following fields: government; ideology and discourse analysis; international relations; political behaviour; and politics.

Our academic reputation is illustrated by the fact that many of our graduates now teach or research at universities, colleges of higher education and schools. For example, recent graduates are now research fellows and academic staff at: Mannheim, Germany; ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Duke University, USA; NATO/SHAPE, Belgium; and University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.

We also work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-MA Dissertation
-Conflict Resolution
-Political Explanation (optional)
-Advanced Research Methods (optional)
-International Security Studies (optional)
-Political Parties in Britain and Europe (optional)
-Contemporary Theories of Justice (optional)
-Environmental Politics (optional)
-Theories of International Relations (optional)
-Political Economy (optional)
-Political Theory (optional)
-Research Seminar in Political Theory and Methods (optional)
-Research Design (optional)
-Public Opinion and Political Behaviour (optional)
-Comparative European Politics (optional)
-Theory and Explanation in Political Science (optional)
-Ideology and Political Discourse (optional)
-Macroeconomics (Advanced)
-Economics of the European Union
-Economics of Transition
-Market Structure and Strategic Behaviour
-Environmental Economics
-Psycho Analytic Theory
-Psychoanalysis of Groups and Organisations (optional)
-Thinking Psychoanalytically (optional)
-Introduction to Quantitative Analysis (optional)
-Digital Economy (optional)
-Media Theory (optional)
-Advertising: Commerce and Creativity (optional)
-Interviewing and Qualitative Data Analysis (optional)
-Texts and Documents (optional)
-Ethnography (optional)
-Dynamics of Home and Work (optional)
-Formative Debates in Criminology (optional)
-Organised Crime: Global and Local (optional)
-Critical Perspectives on Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism (optional)
-Current Controversies in Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy (optional)
-Topics in Contemporary Social Theory (optional)
-Sociological Research Design (optional)
-Panel Data Methods (optional)
-Introduction to Survey Design and Management (optional)
-Applied Sampling (optional)
-Dealing with Survey Non-response (optional)
-Survey Measurement and Question Design (optional)
-Work-Based Project

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Make a positive difference to the lives of people around the world, addressing the global challenges of poverty and violence by linking theory and practice. Read more
Make a positive difference to the lives of people around the world, addressing the global challenges of poverty and violence by linking theory and practice. This is your opportunity to develop your awareness of the relationships between peace, conflict resolution and development, both nationally and internationally.

You will consider issues such as gender, poverty, livelihoods, human rights, the role of civil society and community participation in decisionmaking and governance. From security threats and terrorism to the arms trade and non-violent social movements, you will acquire an in-depth insight into global issues. You will study the political, economic, cultural, environmental and technological changes that influence development decisions.

Our teaching is delivered in small groups of students from around the world. We place a real emphasis on international debate, giving you access to a range of cultural perspectives, and we will provide you with skills in project management and funding, essential for working in the field.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including social work and social policy.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/peaceanddvp_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

You will find employment opportunities in the UK and overseas working for non-governmental organisations, the public sector and the media. Previous graduates from our University have gone on to work as teachers, social workers, journalists, development workers, university lecturers, government consultants and business managers, or have pursued their research interests and taken on PhDs.

- Charity/ Aid Worker
- Government Advisor
- Journalist

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will benefit by being taught by our highly qualified team of academics who are renowned in their fields of research. Our research in peace and development keeps our curriculum fresh and cutting edge.

Staff members have close working links with organisations such as, Oxfam, Amnesty International, Pugwash, The Swiss Small Arms Survey, The Omega Foundation, The Mines Advisory Group, CND, Aegis, Huridocs and the Department for International Development (DfID), and we encourage students to engage with relevant external organisations and conferences.

Core Modules

Critical Perspectives on Peace and War
This provides an introduction to the core theories of war, peace and conflict reconstruction and an analysis of the major drivers, key theorists and practitioners.

Post-conflict Reconstruction and Peace Building
Critically examines and integrates peace and development discourses around post-conflict reconstruction and considers recovery from major disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis.

Global Perspectives on Development
This module critically examines the conceptual framework of international development in a global context, introducing a variety of different perspectives. You will become familiar with 'development orthodoxy' and critiques of it.

Security Paradigms
Deconstructs the truth content of contrasting and often contradictory models of key security issues from the competing state power and human security perspectives.

Developing and Managing Projects
Allows you to apply your learning to an in-depth investigation of a research question of your choice. This might be related to interests you develop during the course or to a topic related to your existing work or career aspirations. You will be supervised by an experienced member of staff who is also an active researcher, and produce a 12-15000 word thesis.

Research Methods
This develops your ability to design suitable research questions, match them to appropriate research methods and apply these in a reflective and ethical way.

Dissertation
Engage in critical depth with a research-based project aligned to your personal interests and professional aspirations.

Dr Rachel Julian

Course Leader

"My previous experience has allowed me to build international professional networks that provide me with insights into the challenges and solutions for a more peaceful and just world, which I thoroughly enjoy sharing with my students. Teaching is exciting because I get to work with courageous people who are changing their communities for the better."

Rachel has been working in peace and conflict resolution for twenty years. Her roles have included peace education, organisation building and non-violence training, and she's been awarded for her work in community activism.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Clinical Skills Suite
The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Taught by internationally recognised members of staff with a range of innovative research experiences, the course is interdisciplinary. Read more
Taught by internationally recognised members of staff with a range of innovative research experiences, the course is interdisciplinary. It requires the use of theoretical and methodological insights, knowledge and perspectives of different disciplines. This provides opportunities for in-depth understanding and explanation of the problem of Forced Migration and its interface with other social science disciplines, such as development studies, law, sociology, anthropology, political science and psychology.

Starting in either January or September this programme aims to develop your critical engagement with the theories and practices of forced migration and development studies. In-depth knowledge of both disciplines is critical to understand and explain the causes and consequences of forced migration, analyse, critique and evaluate host governments, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNCHR) and NGO's policies on protection, reception and settlement strategies, as well as the short and long-term responses of inter and non-governmental organisations.

MSc Refugee Studies is led by Professor Gaim Kibreab, an internationally recognised expert on forced migration, resettlement, repatriation and development, conflict, environment, water resources governance, post-conflict reconstruction, gender and development, livelihoods, governance and civil society.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/refugee-studies-msc

Modules

- International refugee law

- Asylum policy in the EU and member states
This module begins with a brief history of the EU and traces trends and transformations in the post-war period, before focusing on five case studies and then examining of the different but related processes of harmonisation and convergence between EU member states. The links between sending and receiving counties and new initiatives linking development (aid) and asylum policy will also be considered. The course will also spend several weeks examining the asylum policies of the Americas and Africa. We will look into the differences between the systems and the causes behind those differences. Are those systems better than the Common European Asylum System? If so, why? Can we learn from other systems or are there too many fundamental differences.

- Forced migration and human rights
This module examines the inter-relationship between international human rights standards and forced migration. It will familiarise the student both with internationally and regionally protected human rights standards (civil and political, economic social and cultural) whose violation gives rise to forced migration and with the human rights issues in the host states to which the forced migrants move. It will introduce students to the UN and regional systems governing these issues and to specific themes which bring human rights and forced migration together.

- Forced migration and development
The module introduces the key concepts in Forced Migration and Development and different categories of forced migrants--asylum-seekers, refugees, IDPs, oustees and disaster victims. It examines the multiple and complex nature of Forced Migration, evaluates the responses of the international, inter-governmental, non-governmental and governmental responses to the short-medium and long-term needs of forced migrants and the poor sections of the host population. It critically analyses and evaluates the positive and negative impacts of forced migrants on host commmoduleies. How forced migrants (re)-construct their commmoduleies and livelihoods in countries of asylum and places of destination, as well in countries and places of origin in the context of post-conflict reconstruction are also examined in detail.

- Contemporary issues in development
The module aims to provide a comprehensive and detailed introduction to the contemporary challenges facing developing countries in the coming years. Topics vary from one year to the next, but currently the focus is on issues of poverty and poverty reduction; aid and its effectiveness; debt and debt servicing; governance and transparency; the environmental impact of development; patterns of inequality; the impact of urbanisation; and more generally, on changing economic relations within the world economy following the 2008-9 global crisis and subsequent events. The module also assesses the main developing strategies followed by selected middle and low-income countries, with detailed case studies drawn from Asia, Africa and Latin America. It also examines these topics from a gender perspective.

- Research methods for development
A series of lectures introduces students to the main epistemological approaches to research and key research strategies, and focuses on mixed-methods research (MMR). In parallel, students will participate in tutor-led workshops to develop data summary and analysis skills with specific computer-based packages.

- Dissertation (triple module)

Employability

The course is interdisciplinary and designed for graduates who wish to pursue careers with governments (eg immigration authorities), immigration lawyers, lobbying groups, national and international NGOs, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, and other international humanitarian and development organisations.

Some graduates of the MSc Refugee Studies programme have established their own NGOs and are serving asylum seekers, refugees and internally displaced persons in their countries of origin.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

You'll be taught by academic staff with a wide range of theoretical, practical and research experiences of refugee studies in the EU, Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean.

Teaching and learning

Study hours:
Year 1 class contact time is typically 16 hours per week plus individual tutorial time and independent study. This accumulates to typically two days and two evenings a week.

Assessment

All modules apart from the dissertation are assessed by 5,000 word pieces of coursework.

Read less
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event. Read more
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event.

This exciting and timely multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programme examines the role of global law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts, and disasters. You will consider the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and explore all types of crisis and conflict (civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, and terrorism) as well as disasters, both man-made (pollution and contamination) and natural (earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics).

The programme reflects on current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The aim of this programme is to equip you with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environments.

A number of schools will collaborate on the delivery of this programme: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will also be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

As well as Law graduates, this programme will appeal to early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deepen their existing areas of expertise. It will be also be suitable for recent graduates of any subject, those on career breaks, and career changers.

It is possible to take either an LLM or MSc pathway. Both are framed around the global architecture of crisis, conflict and disaster management with embedded multidisciplinarity. The key distinction is that an LLM route takes more optional law modules, whereas optional modules for the MSc are more multidisciplinary in nature.

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Planned Law modules include:
-Global Architecture of Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Management
-Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice
-Disaster Management
-Hazard, Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience
-Public International Law
-International Refugee Law
-International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict
-International Criminal Justice and Post-Conflict Peace-building
-Climate Change Disasters
-Technologies and Weaponry
-Research project
-Professional placement

Non-law modules are expected to span such topics as:
-Development (including, foundational concepts, food security, gender)
-Political (including, contemporary diplomacy, conflict in the Middle East, terrorism)
-Economic (including, macro/micro-economics for developing countries, economics of public/social policy, climate change and economics) (MSc pathway only)
-Preparing for Floods

(MSc students will have economics modules and a broader selection of politics modules to choose from).

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

A series of non-assessed, employability orientated, practical training events, inside and outside the classroom, will take place throughout the programme aimed at consolidating and applying substantive knowledge learnt as well as developing transferable professional and personal skills. This will include the opportunity to undertake a fantastic and unique practical ‘fragile/hostile environment training’ package delivered by external professional trainers*.

*Subject to payment of an additional fee, and a minimum number of students wishing to take this element.

EMPLOYABILITY

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law programme are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting), and academia (with further postgraduate study).

Graduates of this programme will be uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. In addition to acquiring knowledge of the key principles and topics associated with a traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes or a master's degree in crisis, conflict and/or disaster management issues, graduates of this programme will also develop a unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy, become more multidisciplinary conversant and therefore better equipped to work in inherently multidisciplinary environments.

The flexible nature of this programme allows students to select the degree qualification which best suits their background or area of expertise.

Read less
The International and Transnational Policing MSc from LJMU looks at the implications of policing across geographical and political boundaries. Read more
The International and Transnational Policing MSc from LJMU looks at the implications of policing across geographical and political boundaries.

-Commences January 2017
-Discover how policing is carried out across geographical boundaries
-Explore policing issues arising from differing jurisdictions, policies and procedures
-Ideal for serving officers and those about to embark on their policing or academic career
-Excellent career opportunities across the criminal justice system and international policing organisations
-A valuable foundation for progression to PhD

his MSc gives you the rare opportunity to pursue academic interests in policing from an international and transnational perspective in a nurturing and multi-disciplinary environment.

​Under the guidance of specialist supervision and among a diverse community of fellow researchers, you will gain a valuable foundation, building skills in research, analysis, conceptualisation, argument and presentation – all highly prized in many areas of employment.

The programme combines supervised independent research with specialist training in research methods and academic skills, while also helping students become aware of emerging approaches currently practiced in the discipline.

Over the course of the programme you will be introduced to key developments in policing studies and given the skills necessary to produce a successful postgraduate research project. You will work individually with a supervisor throughout the year, as well as taking part in taught modules with fellow Policing Studies students and/or students from other disciplines/Faculties. In addition, you will be part of the wider research activities of the Liverpool Centre for Advanced Policing Studies.

You will receive specialist supervision and study within a diverse community of fellow researchers. Staff are active in a wide range of fields including: Crime Prevention, GIS, People Trafficking, Public Order, Mental Health, Multi Agency and Partnership Working in the Public Sector, Computer Crime, Investigation, Terrorism and Counter-terrorism, Port Security, Risk Management and Education.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core modules:

Policing in Context

Gain insights into current policing, community safety and criminal justice priorities by exploring different perspectives that relate to policing, regulatory processes, professional values and ethics

Advanced Research Skills

In preparation for your dissertation, this module introduces key epistemological and methodological issues that impact upon research into crime, security, community safety and criminal justice

International and Transnational Policing

Develop your critical understanding of different policing jurisdictions and the agencies that work within them by examining International Legal Instruments and broader issues, including Human Rights

Transnational and Organised Crime

Identify the origin and development of internal and transnational policing cooperation, and examine the impacts of organised crime in areas such as human trafficking, modern slavery, drugs and corruption

Policing in Conflict and Post-Conflict Zones

Critically examine and develop an understanding of the key strategies that are current and relevant in the policing of conflict/post-conflict zones

Terrorism

Understand key concepts in relation to terrorism by exploring a number of issues including, definitions of terrorism, ideologies, typology, methods of operation, state response and impact of the media

Dissertation

Analyse and interpret an issue in your chosen field

​Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled 'What you will study' is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

Read less
This programme is designed to deliver a substantial theoretical and practical understanding of the role and contribution of the tourism industry in the context of international development. Read more
This programme is designed to deliver a substantial theoretical and practical understanding of the role and contribution of the tourism industry in the context of international development. You will gain the skills required to manage sustainable tourism businesses, alongside the specialisms of strategic destination management and marketing. You will explore tourism’s relationship with the socio-economic and political contexts within international development, tourism disasters affecting tourist destinations, and the role of tourism in the development of countries that have experienced conflict. An emphasis upon the micro-economic contribution of enterprise projects to support development and sustainability also features within the curriculum; delivered through the Ashoka Changemaker philosophy.

Upon completion of the programme, you may wish to progress your studies through a doctoral qualification.

Course content

The programme encourages you to analyse and evaluate the relationship between sustainable development principles and the management of destinations to achieve long-term viability of resources; and the role of event tourism in destination development as a catalyst for physical, economic and socio-cultural regeneration. In addition, the programme provides insight into the political economies surrounding development and the contribution that tourism makes to a destination’s risk mitigation, social renewal and recovery after disasters and post conflict scenarios.

Drawing on a variety of case studies and projects, the programme explores the global scope of tourism, the policies and strategies associated with successful management, the role the industry plays in international development, and the stakeholders involved in its development. The programme will also prepare students for the practical, project based, and customer focused characteristics of the tourism industry.

Semester 1

From the beginning of the programme, you will be introduced to some of the main themes in destination and tourism management, to enable you to analyse the strategic and dynamic nature of international tourist destinations and issues facing managers of such destinations. Modules in semester one will highlight the need to ensure long-term viability of destination resources through themes such as sustainable development and political economies of international development.

Semester 2

You will examine the vulnerability of destinations and the strategies and approaches needed by managers to develop and recover, particularly post-conflict. The strategic use of events in both the public and private sectors will be examined, particularly their use as a catalyst for physical, economic and socio-cultural regeneration. There is a strong emphasis on developing personal adaptability in cross cultural (work) environments as Master graduates can be expected to, and will have the expectation to – lead and manage other people internationally. You will also begin to prepare for the completion of a dissertation through a series of taught research methods sessions, during which a research proposal is produced.

Semester 3

The research proposal produced in Semester two will guide the development of a clearly defined and evidenced study purpose, a critical review of the extant literature, and a robust methodology. Data is then collected, analysed, interpreted and applied to the study purpose, and a 15-20,000 word research report (dissertation) is produced, with the support of a dissertation supervisor.

For further information on course content and modules please refer to the award map: http://oldweb.northampton.ac.uk/caf/pgmsaward/international-tourism-development-ma

Course modules (16/17)

-Political Economies of International Development
-International Sustainable Tourism
-Strategic Destination Management
-Risk, Crisis and Post-conflict Management in Tourism
-Strategic Events Management
-Managing Across Cultures
-Dissertation​ and Research Methods

Opportunities Abroad

In previous years students have participated in an optional study trip to an international destination. The cost of this optional trip would not normally exceed £500 for flights and accommodation. Students normally allow an additional £100 for their expenses.

The programme team also aims to provide a regional or national study trip annually to a tourism attraction or exhibition. In some cases students are required to contribute to the cost of entry; this would normally not exceed £50.00.

Methods of Learning

Typically you will have nine hours (approximately) of contact time with your tutor in the first semester and eleven hours (approximately) in the second. Overall you will spend 108 hours per module in self-directed study (reading and research).

Assessments

A variety of individual and group based assessments are used including reports, presentations, posters, e-portfolios, projects, client briefs, multiple choice tests and examinations.

Facilities and Special Features

Ashoka U is the global association of the world’s leading universities supporting social entrepreneurs; those working together to create solutions for the world’s most urgent social problems. The programme emphasises this philosophy, through Ashoka Changemaker projects.

Careers

The programme will interest students wishing to pursue a specialist career in destination management, sustainable tourism management or international development, with an emphasis on employment within development organisations, NGOs, aid organisations, post conflict and disaster charities, as well as public and private sector tourism organisations.

Read less
This unique, multi-disciplinary programme is concerned with the ways in which women and gender are understood in relation to, and affected by, regional, national and global peace and security processes in conflict and post-conflict settings. Read more

About the MSc programme

This unique, multi-disciplinary programme is concerned with the ways in which women and gender are understood in relation to, and affected by, regional, national and global peace and security processes in conflict and post-conflict settings.

Located in the Centre for Women Peace and Security and administered through the LSE Gender Institute, students will fully participate in its cross-sectoral community of scholars, activists and practitioners from around the world. In addition to regular lectures, students will benefit from guest practitioner seminars, workshops and classes led by experts in the field - Visiting Fellows and Professors, Activists in Residence and other members of the Centre, as well as by faculty from other departments at LSE. The programme will make use of empirical material and case studies that are national and transnational in scope, and will incorporate interdisciplinary texts and perspectives from theory, policy, and practice.

This programme will be suitable for mid-career professionals working in conflict and post-conflict settings; in humanitarian assistance; UN field offices; and peace governance roles. It will also be suitable for early-career students who would like to work in the field, in any number of roles.

Graduate destinations

Gender Institute students go on to work in varied career paths: research and consultancy for government and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in developed and less developed countries, international organisations, humanitarian and charity work, personnel work, civil and diplomatic services, representative politics, advocacy, the legal profession, academia, media and communication and in education.

Read less
We are world leaders in political science, asking difficult questions to find important answers. How do you put an end to armed conflict? What are the benefits and consequences of intervention? What role do national and international non-governmental organisations play in the prevention and resolution of conflict?. Read more
We are world leaders in political science, asking difficult questions to find important answers. How do you put an end to armed conflict? What are the benefits and consequences of intervention? What role do national and international non-governmental organisations play in the prevention and resolution of conflict?

Our course helps you to understand the evolving field of conflict resolution, exploring the causes and effects of destructive conflict across the world, and scrutinising the theory and practice of how this can be managed peacefully. We provide you with a framework for understanding conflict resolution in inter- and intra-state issues, focusing on topics including:
-Mediation, negotiation, and collaborative problem solving
-Using conflict data sets and drawing geographical maps
-International development and human rights
-International relations and security studies
-Global and comparative politics

You additionally might have the option of studying an extracurricular module on non-violent movements, offered in collaboration with Slobdan Djinovic and Srdja Popovic of the Centre for Nonviolent Action and Strategies in Belgrade. This exciting course, previously offered at many US universities including Colorado College, Harvard University and New York University, has never been offered anywhere else in Europe.

Our dynamic, interdisciplinary approach combines traditional methods with contemporary theory and practices of non-violent movements, and we encourage you to experience the practical as well as the theoretical application of these topics through examining real case studies of international conflict.

Our Department of Government is one of the most prestigious in Europe, with an outstanding record of teaching, research and publication. We are rated top in the UK for research (REF 2014), and have consistently been the highest-rated politics department in the country since national assessments began. Ranked top 10 in the world for political science and international relations according to the Centre for World University Rankings (2017)

Our expert staff

Some of the biggest names in the field work at Essex, giving you unparalleled access to some of the best minds in politics. You benefit from staff expertise in both conflict studies and international relations, with conflict and cooperation forming a core part of our Department of Government.

Our key teaching staff for this course are Professor Han Dorussen, Professor Ismene Gizelis, and Professor Kristian Gleditsch.

Professor Dorussen is Associate Editor for the Journal of Peace Research, and specialises in the relationship between trade and conflict, the use of economic policies in international politics, the governance of post-conflict societies, and policy convergence in the European Union. He has recently completed fieldwork examining the impact of the UN mission on the perception of security in Timor Leste.

Professor Gizelis specialises in conflict dynamics, peacekeeping, gender equality and post-conflict reconstruction, and communicable diseases. In addition, Professor Gizelis is acting as Core Investigator on a new research project, ‘Armed Conflict and Maternal Health in Sub-Saharan Africa’ (2014-16), with the innovative aim of going beyond consideration of the direct effect of interventions to also consider relevant political, socioeconomic and cultural factors.

Professor Gleditsch’s research focuses on conflict and cooperation, democratisation, and spatial dimensions of social and political processes. He is the director of a large EU-funded research project on non-violent actions. He is also the director of the Michael Nicholson Centre of Conflict and Cooperation.

Specialist facilities

-The Michael Nicholson Centre for Conflict and Cooperation is distinctive in its scientific approach to the study of conflict, emphasising rigorous formal theory and the development of systematic data and statistical methods for evaluating theory
-Laboratories of networked computers featuring extensive software for political analysis
-Make use of web-assisted learning, simulations, and challenging role-playing exercises
-The ESSEXLab provides opportunities for experimental lab research
-Student societies for politics, debating, and Model UN
-We organise the Essex Summer School in Social Science Data Analysis
-A programme of seminars and events run by the department

Your future

All Essex politics graduates have the distinction of a qualification from one of the world’s leading politics departments.

Our MSc Conflict Resolution will prepare you for a career in areas such as non-governmental organisations, international and national government, or the private sector.

Recent graduates have gone on to work for the following high-profile organisations:
-The Civil Service
-Local government
-The World Bank
-The United Nations
-NATO
-YouGov and YouGov America

We also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil in the following fields: government; ideology and discourse analysis; international relations; political behaviour; and politics.

Our academic reputation is illustrated by the fact that many of our graduates now teach or research at universities, colleges of higher education and schools. For example, recent graduates are now research fellows and academic staff at: Mannheim, Germany; ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Duke University, USA; NATO/SHAPE, Belgium; and University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.

We also work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-MA Dissertation
-Conflict Resolution
-Advanced Research Methods
-International Security Studies (optional)
-Political Parties in Britain and Europe (optional)
-Contemporary Theories of Justice (optional)
-Environmental Politics (optional)
-Political Explanation (optional)
-Theories of International Relations (optional)
-Political Economy (optional)
-Political Theory (optional)
-Research Seminar in Political Theory and Methods (optional)
-Research Design (optional)
-Public Opinion and Political Behaviour (optional)
-Comparative European Politics (optional)
-Theory and Explanation in Political Science (optional)
-Ideology and Political Discourse (optional)
-Macroeconomics (Advanced)
-Economics of the European Union
-Economics of Transition
-Market Structure and Strategic Behaviour
-Environmental Economics
-Psycho Analytic Theory
-Psychoanalysis of Groups and Organisations (optional)
-Thinking Psychoanalytically (optional)
-Introduction to Quantitative Analysis (optional)
-Digital Economy (optional)
-Media Theory (optional)
-Advertising: Commerce and Creativity (optional)
-Interviewing and Qualitative Data Analysis (optional)
-Texts and Documents (optional)
-Ethnography (optional)
-Dynamics of Home and Work (optional)
-Formative Debates in Criminology (optional)
-Organised Crime: Global and Local (optional)
-Critical Perspectives on Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism (optional)
-Current Controversies in Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy (optional)
-Topics in Contemporary Social Theory (optional)
-Sociological Research Design (optional)
-Finance, Globalisation and the Crash of 2008 (optional)
-Colonialism, Cultural Diversity and Human Rights (optional)
-Panel Data Methods (optional)
-Introduction to Survey Design and Management (optional)
-Applied Sampling (optional)

Read less
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event. Read more
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event.

This new and innovative multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programme examines the role of global law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts, and disasters. You will consider the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and explore all types of crisis and conflict (civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, and terrorism) as well as disasters, both man-made (pollution and contamination) and natural (earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics).

The programme reflects on current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The aim of this programme is to equip you with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environments.

A number of schools will collaborate on the delivery of this programme: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will also be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

As well as Law graduates, this programme will appeal to early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deepen their existing areas of expertise. It will be also be suitable for recent graduates of any subject, those on career breaks, and career changers.

It is possible to take either an LLM or MSc pathway on the PGDip. Both are framed around the global architecture of crisis, conflict and disaster management with embedded multidisciplinarity. The key distinction is that an LLM route takes more optional law modules, whereas optional modules for the MSc are more multidisciplinary in nature.

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Planned Law modules include:
-Global Architecture of Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Management
-Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice
-Disaster Management
-Hazard, Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience
-Public International Law
-International Refugee Law
-International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict
-International Criminal Justice and Post-Conflict Peace-building
-Climate Change Disasters
-Technologies and Weaponry

Non-law modules are expected to span such topics as:
-Development (eg foundational concepts, food security, gender)
-Political (eg contemporary diplomacy, conflict in the Middle East, terrorism)
-Economic (eg macro/micro-economics for developing countries, economics of public/social policy, climate change and economics) (MSc pathway only)
-Preparing for Floods

(MSc students will have economics modules and a broader selection of politics modules to choose from).

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

A series of non-assessed, employability orientated, practical training events, inside and outside the classroom, will take place throughout the programme aimed at consolidating and applying substantive knowledge learnt as well as developing transferable professional and personal skills. This will include the opportunity to undertake a fantastic and unique practical ‘fragile/hostile environment training’ package delivered by external professional trainers*.

*Subject to payment of an additional fee, and a minimum number of students wishing to take this element.

EMPLOYABILITY

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law programme are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting), and academia (with further postgraduate study).

Graduates of this programme will be uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. In addition to acquiring knowledge of the key principles and topics associated with a traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes or a master's degree in crisis, conflict and/or disaster management issues, graduates of this programme will also develop a unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy, become more multidisciplinary conversant and therefore better equipped to work in inherently multidisciplinary environments.

The flexible nature of this programme allows students to select the degree qualification which best suits their background or area of expertise.

Read less
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event. Read more
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event.

This new and innovative multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programme examines the role of global law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts, and disasters. You will consider the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and explore all types of crisis and conflict (civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, and terrorism) as well as disasters, both man-made (pollution and contamination) and natural (earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics).

The programme reflects on current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The aim of this programme is to equip you with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environments.

A number of schools will collaborate on the delivery of this programme: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will also be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

As well as Law graduates, this programme will appeal to early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deepen their existing areas of expertise. It will be also be suitable for recent graduates of any subject, those on career breaks, and career changers.

It is possible to take either an LLM or MSc pathway on the PGCert. Both are framed around the global architecture of crisis, conflict and disaster management with embedded multidisciplinarity. The key distinction is that an LLM route takes more optional law modules, whereas optional modules for the MSc are more multidisciplinary in nature.

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Planned Law modules include:
-Global Architecture of Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Management
-Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice
-Disaster Management
-Hazard, Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience
-Public International Law
-International Refugee Law
-International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict
-International Criminal Justice and Post-Conflict Peace-building
-Climate Change Disasters
-Technologies and Weaponry

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

A series of non-assessed, employability orientated, practical training events, inside and outside the classroom, will take place throughout the programme aimed at consolidating and applying substantive knowledge learnt as well as developing transferable professional and personal skills. This will include the opportunity to undertake a fantastic and unique practical ‘fragile/hostile environment training’ package delivered by external professional trainers*.

*Subject to payment of an additional fee, and a minimum number of students wishing to take this element.

EMPLOYABILITY

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law programme are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting), and academia (with further postgraduate study).

Graduates of this programme will be uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. In addition to acquiring knowledge of the key principles and topics associated with a traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes or a master's degree in crisis, conflict and/or disaster management issues, graduates of this programme will also develop a unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy, become more multidisciplinary conversant and therefore better equipped to work in inherently multidisciplinary environments.

The flexible nature of this programme allows students to select the degree qualification which best suits their background or area of expertise.

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The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event. Read more
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event.

This new and innovative multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programme examines the role of global law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts, and disasters. You will consider the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and explore all types of crisis and conflict (civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, and terrorism) as well as disasters, both man-made (pollution and contamination) and natural (earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics).

The programme reflects on current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The aim of this programme is to equip you with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environments.

A number of schools will collaborate on the delivery of this programme: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will also be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

As well as Law graduates, this programme will appeal to early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deepen their existing areas of expertise. It will be also be suitable for recent graduates of any subject, those on career breaks, and career changers.

Please note that the Certificate of Credit option is only suitable for students who do not require a visa to study in the UK, and who live close enough to the University to attend each seminar in person. We regret, but no distance learning option is available.

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Planned Law modules include:
-Foundational Concepts, Principles, and Actors
-Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice
-Public International Law
-International Refugee Law
-International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict
-Disaster Management
-Morality and Governance
-Conflict and Disaster Case Studies
-International Criminal Justice and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding
-Climate Change Disasters
-Technologies and Weaponry

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

EMPLOYABILITY

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law programme are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting), and academia (with further postgraduate study).

Graduates of this programme will be uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. In addition to acquiring knowledge of the key principles and topics associated with a traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes or a master's degree in crisis, conflict and/or disaster management issues, graduates of this programme will also develop a unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy, become more multidisciplinary conversant and therefore better equipped to work in inherently multidisciplinary environments.

Read less

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