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The MA in Post-war Recovery Studies brings together experienced humanitarian professionals and less experienced students, thus creating opportunities for students to share wisdom while being challenged by more theoretically-minded, technologically savvy and idealistic coursemates. Read more
The MA in Post-war Recovery Studies brings together experienced humanitarian professionals and less experienced students, thus creating opportunities for students to share wisdom while being challenged by more theoretically-minded, technologically savvy and idealistic coursemates.

Why York?

Our students choose to study with the Post-war Reconstruction and Development Unit at the University of York for many reasons. Here at the PRDU, we're proud of our location. The University is situated within acres of beautiful parkland, and is only a short walk away from the centre of the historic city of York. Whether it's hustle of the city, or the calmness of campus that you are searching for, it can all be found at the University of York. Here are some of the reasons why our students chose us:
-York is consistently among the top UK universities for the quality of its teaching and research.
-York ranked 1st in the UK and 7th in the world in the Times Higher Education World Rankings of Universities less than 50 years old.
-The PRDU is an internationally recognised teaching and research faculty, with links to other universities and organisations worldwide.
-Eligible students from outside the EU are guaranteed accomodation on or near campus.
-York is easily accessible by air, rail, and road. The city is well connected by major UK railway lines, meaning a travel time of only two hours to London, and two hours fifteen minutes to Edinburgh.
-The cost of living in York is considerably lower than other cities in the UK.

The PRDU offers students the unique chance to study within a research department that is a leader in its field, alongside internationally acclaimed academics and lecturers. The PRDU, like the city of York, is expansive and wide reaching, yet remains personable and friendly despite its cosmopolitan activities.

Teaching

Classes are taught by world renowned academics, policy makers & practitioners. There are five separate class-taught modules, and students are supported throughout the year by the academic staff at the PRDU.

Field Trip

Every year students of the MA in Post-war Recovery Studies undertake a field trip to a post-war region. Led by field-experienced faculty and staff, students gain first hand, ground-level, understandings of recovery and reconstruction in the aftermath of war.

Work Placement

All students undertake a 6-8 week work placement. They are based within an international or national organisation working on an aspect of post-war recovery, humanitarian action or development in a war-affected context.

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With Britain having recently been more heavily involved in overseas wars than at any point in the last half century, the University of Buckingham has launched a Master’s degree in Modern War Studies and Contemporary Military History based at a central London Club. Read more

Course outline

With Britain having recently been more heavily involved in overseas wars than at any point in the last half century, the University of Buckingham has launched a Master’s degree in Modern War Studies and Contemporary Military History based at a central London Club. The course commences in October with a ‘Research Skills Study Day’ and after a year of supervised independent research, culminates with the student’s submission of a dissertation. During the first six months, candidates are encouraged to attend a series of guest seminars and dinners (set out in detail under Teaching & Assessment) at which some of the most eminent names in the field present papers. This series of talks examines why and how modern wars are fought, and the principal influences that will affect the conduct of war – and Britain’s role – in the future. This seminar programme will also be attended by Associate Students who are not degree candidates but wish to attend the talks and enjoy the ensuing discussion.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities.

Teaching methods

For Master’s degree candidates the core of the programme is the writing, under supervision, of the dissertation on a subject chosen by the student in the field of Modern War Studies. Subject to approval by the Course Director, the topic to be examined in the dissertation can address any aspect of warfare since 1945, and the precise topic is usually formulated in a process of discussion with the Course Director and/or the student’s supervisor. The length of the dissertation is not more than 40,000 words and usually not less than 20,000. Research does not have to be confined to British-related subjects. Some of the themes which students may wish to examine include: political decision making; alliances; warfare and faith; the impact of critical strategic thinkers; intelligence gathering; the impact of technology on the battlefield; the development of doctrine; military-media relations; leadership; command and control; the application of force at the strategic, operational and tactical levels of war on land, sea and air; and the influence of war on non-combatants, politics, society, economies and cultures.

Where will you study?

This is a London-based course. The seminars will be held at a central London Club. Seminars begin at 19:00 and are followed by a formal post-seminar dinner at which students can engage in a general discussion with the speaker.

Seminars

There will be a programme of three research skills sessions and ten guest seminars, directed by Professor Lloyd Clark. Running approximately every other week from October ]to March, seminar speakers will include recently serving generals and some of the most distinguished scholars and commentators in the field of modern war studies.

How is the programme assessed?

Examination is by a research dissertation on an approved topic of not less than 20,000 words.

Associate students

For those who wish to attend the seminars and dinners, but do not have time to complete the coursework involved in the MA programme, it is possible to register for the course as an Associate Student. This status enables Associate Students to attend the seminars and to meet the guest lecturers, but not to proceed to the MA degree.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/ma/warstudies.

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This programme provides you with the systematic knowledge and intellectual tools to critically review developments in the theory and practice of international relations. Read more
This programme provides you with the systematic knowledge and intellectual tools to critically review developments in the theory and practice of international relations. It enables you to evaluate in a sophisticated and critical fashion concepts, theories and paradigms within the broad field of international relations, drawing lessons from empirical studies involving both quantitative and qualitative investigations.

Students are able to develop their ability to deploy research strategies and methods in an appropriately advanced fashion to critically evaluate current research and advanced scholarship. Each study route aims to provide advanced knowledge and understanding of the dynamics, including cultural and local political and ideological factors, which shape the contemporary international relations of the area.

The course also provides an opportunity for studying international relations and in comparative and historical perspective taking account of regional specific political and economic factors.

Student Profiles

“Attending the Master in International Relations (European) at Durham University has been so far the best experience of my life. Indeed engaging in conversation with colleagues from different nationalities and professors willing to listen to your opinion has helped me analyse the world dynamics from different perspectives. Honestly I have learned more in the last year than throughout any of my academic experience. In sum living and studying at Durham has had a great impact on my life to the extent that it made me realize my real potential and what my future career could be like. Therefore I would certainly recommend studying this course at Durham University as it has positively changed my life and it might have the same effect on you.” Luca Marro, 2015/16

“Undertaking postgraduate study is a huge commitment. Not only is it a period of intensive academic study, it is a financial and time consuming one too. Therefore, I was naturally very thorough when deciding upon which university I wanted to attend. Ultimately, my decision to study at SGIA was based on two factors. Firstly, the reputation of Durham University ensures that I receive a degree which is highly valued and respected by employers. Secondly, by undertaking the MA in International Relations (Europe) I have been able to develop an area specialisation and study a topic which is of immense interest to me. These two points proved fruitful results, when, during my first term at Durham, I was able to secure graduate level employment for when I leave. A high point of this perhaps, was attending the assessment centre for the position only to find three other people from SGIA at the event - you can thus be confident that deciding to undertake an MA puts you in a very good position!” Thomas Knight, 2015/16

As a Master’s student in International Relations (Europe), I have benefitted from the vast knowledge of the academics who are specialised in the European Union. I learnt both technical and theoretical details about the EU. Therefore, as a EU-funded Jean Monnet Scholarship holder, MA in International Relations (Europe) met the aim of my scholarship to develop Turkey’s human resources with trained EU experts for the accession. Not only the vigour of academic staff of the SGIA but also the good research facilities as well as the extremely helpful team of the School Office have made this experience unforgettable and fruitful for me." Asli Kandemir, 2014/15

Course Content

Students will take five core modules to the value of 150 credits and optional modules to the value of 30 credits, 15 of which must be from the regional module list.

Core Modules:
-International Relations Theory
-Model United Nations
-Research Methods and Dissertation Production
-Dissertation

European Route Core Module:
-European Security

Regional Modules:
-European Institutions and the Policy Process
-The European Union as a Global Actor
-Collective Memory & Identity in Post War Europe

Non-regional Modules - In previous years these have included:
-German Foreign Policy
-Collective Identities and Political Thought in Britain
-Contemporary Socio-Political Issues in Muslim Religious Thought
-International Relations and Security in the Middle East
-The Political Economy of Development in the Middle East
-America and the World: The Making of the US Foreign Policy
-Human Rights
-Political Ideology
-Issues in the Politics of Military Occupations
-Just War in Political Theory and Practice
-Nationalism Revolution and Reform in Contemporary China
-Political Economy and Development of Chinese Business
-Political Ideology
-Region, Nation and Citizen in Southeast Asia
-Strategic Asia: Policy and Analysis
-The Contemporary Politics of the Middle East
-A module offered by the School of Modern Languages and Cultures

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through five-day induction events in which they are informed about University, the School, the MA/MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MA degree programme is divided into four core and two optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 75 credits of not more than 15,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Usually a module has 18 contact hours spread over 9 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2 hours sessions which can either take the form of seminars or one hour of lecture and one hour of tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another.

All modules have written exercise for formative assessments. Upon getting feedback on these assignments, students can meet their lecturers to discuss their marks before then eventually completing a summative assessment. Typically summative assessments are 3000 word essays but some modules may be assessed by examination. Students can also meet their module coordinators during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the later half of the year, they meet their assigned supervisors for a minimum of 6 hours. Students also have access to the academic advisors whenever there is a need.

SGIA has a wide variety of resources available to students such as: computer room/work room with networked PC’s, printing facilities including scanner and photocopier, audio system, Wi-Fi and a relaxation area with satellite television system.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. These events provide students the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

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The MA in International Development at Richmond University is grounded in the recognition that development is inherently international, and inherently political. Read more

Programme Overview

The MA in International Development at Richmond University is grounded in the recognition that development is inherently international, and inherently political: a concept that cannot be separated from core questions of global governance, international conflict, attempts at conflict resolution, and post-conflict reconstruction, or from issues of human development and human security.
The programme ensures that students understand the history of international development from post war modernization to the Millennium Development Goals, with particular emphasis on building a conception of the impact of global governance on political and economic processes in the developing world.

Aims of the programme

1. Provide an opportunity for participants to deepen their understanding of global governance
2. Provide participants with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to analyse effectively the relationships between international development within the context of modernization, emergence and economic development
3. Develop research skills and a knowledge base for career development or further academic research with emphasis on developing reasoned arguments, information gathering, organization and using evidence from a wide variety of sources,
4. Assist students in developing their specialist area of expertise within development management, and applying their understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation.

Course Modules

Theories of International Development
Principles of International Law & Institutions
International Flows: Labour, Migration and Development

How to Apply

Apply online using the application form available at http://www.richmond.ac.uk/admissions/postgraduate-admissions/ Please send your completed form to us by email to or by mail to the following address: Admission Office, Richmond, the American University in London, Queens Road, Richmond Upon Thames TW10 6JP, UK.

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During this full-time MA Cultural Management you'll work creatively in a department that offers one of London's richest portfolios of arts and humanities courses, appealing to a range of students who wish to develop their expertise in fields including visual and performing arts, advertising, architecture, crafts,design, fashion, film, publishing, TV and radio, and video games. Read more
During this full-time MA Cultural Management you'll work creatively in a department that offers one of London's richest portfolios of arts and humanities courses, appealing to a range of students who wish to develop their expertise in fields including visual and performing arts, advertising, architecture, crafts,design, fashion, film, publishing, TV and radio, and video games.

The course will develop your understanding of the practice and management of the creative and cultural industries, as well as the political, economic and cultural contexts in which these industries operate. You'll develop your skills and critical understanding of the cultural and creative media sector, and the management of cultural organisations in a wide variety of contexts including drama, creative writing, visual arts curation, festival and theatre management. You'll also have hands-on experience of producing or managing a project.

If you want to develop your career in arts, media and cultural organisations then this course is for you. In addition to being taught by a highly experienced and qualified team you will also benefit greatly from the internship element of the course. This mix of practical experience, combined with academic rigour will provide you with a set of applied and transferable skills - critical analysis, problem solving, and research techniques – as well as specific knowledge related to the International cultural and media sector.

Modules

Modules are assessed by essays, dissertation, exam, in-class presentations, blogs/workbooks and practical project work.

Semester 1:

Culture and identity in a globalised world
Creative industries: the cultural context
Practice as research and development: Project initiation
Creative industries placement

Semester 2:

Researching the media industries
Research paper
Practice as research and development: Project production

Timetable

Year 1 class contact time is typically 8 hours per week plus individual tutorial plus independent study.

Teaching and learning

The course offers one-to-one supervisions in three modules.There are regular additional support events, such as visits to galleries and performance viewings. The course now boasts a new shared production office, which allows to you to work on projects collaboratively in an environment similar to that which you could expect after graduation.

Placements

The course offers you the opportunity to take part in significant work experience placements in London, the UK or possibly abroad. Both the preparation for the placement, which we guide you through, and the placement itself are assessed modules as part of the course. Our positioning in Central London, and our developed industry links means that we are exceptionally placed for students taking part on the placements.

Working with an individual experienced mentor on a project is also an alternative to the traditional placement.

Past placements include: Royal National Theatre Archive, Golley Slater Marketing, Saatchi Gallery.

Facilities

Borough Road Gallery

The gallery is a home for visual art and a unique part of the University's heritage. Opened in 2012, the Borough Road Gallery contains valuable and significant works of Post War British Art in a public collection, produced by the celebrated artist and teacher David Bomberg (1890-1957).

Arts, music and cultural events in London

The University couldn't be better located being only a 10-15 minute walk from the Southbank Centre, National Theatre, BFI IMAX, Tate Modern, Royal Festival Hall, The Old Vic Theatre, The Young Vic and therefore the best of London's plays, performances, exhibitions and screenings.

Professional links

In the department we have had recent guest lecturers from the Association of British Orchestras, British Youth Opera, Donmar Warehouse , The Wireless Theatre Company and the National Maritime Museum. In addition many of our modules are taught by practicing professionals from the arts and media.

The Department is also host to the Heritage Lottery Funded, Borough Road Gallery. Students on this course will have the opportunity to take the internships in the gallery and work with the curator to deliver a programme of outreach and interpretation of the collection.

Other industry links include:

• Royal National Theatre
• Greenwich and Docklands Festival
• Tara Arts
• Rockethouse Documentaries
• Met Films
• BushTheatre

Employability

This course is ideal for students who are seeking to develop their career in the arts and creative and cultural industries. The placement module and the Practice as Research and Development module are designed to provide you with the opportunity to improve skills and your contacts.

In recent years students have secured placements at a number of nationally and internationally recognised organisations such as Glastonbury Festival, the O2 Arena, the National Theatre, Sadlers Wells and the Courtauld Institute. The department has links with a wide range of performing arts and contemporary media organisations in London, across the United Kingdom and throughout the world.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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Gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of historical methodology as you explore a range of subjects within British, European and world history, from the 15th century to the present day. Read more
Gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of historical methodology as you explore a range of subjects within British, European and world history, from the 15th century to the present day. Benefit from the history team’s specialist knowledge and links across the global historical community and develop the deep and systematic understanding of historical research to excel in further studies, or begin your career with confidence thanks to the professional-experience opportunities offered.

Key features

-Join a community of student-historians from a variety of backgrounds with a programme designed to appeal to a range of audiences, including recent graduates, teachers looking to enhance their professional qualifications and those in the local community with a long-standing passion for history.
-Explore history through a variety of means – with a combination of taught and self-led learning, regular research seminars run by -Plymouth University’s Centre for Research in Humanities and Performing Arts, and access to Peninsula Art’s history lecture series featuring world-leading academics.
-Work alongside internationally recognised researchers* and experienced professionals as you develop the skills that will allow you to choose how you progress upon graduation: take your studies further with a PhD, or enter the workplace with the confidence and skills to fast-track your career.
-Plot your own course through the centuries as you take the lead in your masters dissertation research project, and choose areas of study from the history team’s range of research specialisms.
-Explore history with your friends and colleagues by joining the History Society, a lively and supportive community hosting educational and social events.
-Discover the most up-to-date ways of studying history through our online resources including a vast eBook library. Build links with local record offices and archives, accessing opportunities to develop your expertise in the local and regional history of Plymouth and the South West.

* In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, 85% of History’s research outputs (primarily books and journal articles) were considered to be internationally recognised in terms of significance, originality and rigour.

Course details

You can study MA History full time over one year, or part time split across two years. Your studies will consist of four modules, two of which are core modules: key debates and research methods in history - an assessment of current trends and methodologies in the discipline of history, and the public history module - an examination of the theory and practice of how the past is presented to public audiences. You’ll supplement these with two option modules, where you select the areas of history that interest you the most as you select from the research specialisms of history team. The group’s areas of expertise include: imperialism, colonialism and de-colonisation in the modern period; the political and social history of 19th century Britain; Ireland since 1900; British military and diplomatic history during the 20th century; European integration; politics and society in the USA since 1900; amongst others. The programme culminates in an independently researched MA History dissertation.

Core modules
-MAHI700 Key Debates and Research Methods in History
-MAHI701 Public History
-MAHI702 MA History Dissertation

Optional modules
-MAHI703 Britain in the Sixties
-MAHI710 The Irish Revolution 1912-37
-MAHI718 Independent Research Project in History
-MAHI704 Piracy and Privateering, 1560-1816
-MAHI706 The Civil Rights Movement
-MAHI712 Empire of Law. Ruling the British Empire 1760-1960
-MAHI705 The African American Experience
-MAHI709 The French Wars of Religion 1558-1598
-MAHI714 Culture and Society. Britain c 1760-1914
-MAHI716 America and the United Nations 1945 to the present
-MAHI720 Key Debates in Post War Japanese History
-MAHI721 From Unification to Reunification: Key Themes in Modern German History

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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This innovative MA programme combines a range of diverse approaches to making performance, drawing on devising, physical theatre, directing, socially engaged practice, solo work and live art. Read more
This innovative MA programme combines a range of diverse approaches to making performance, drawing on devising, physical theatre, directing, socially engaged practice, solo work and live art.

The MA will be delivered in partnership with major London cultural institutions, including the Lyric Hammersmith, where you'll take part in a low-residency intensive program of work at their impressive facilities.

The course is offered through a low residency model that makes it unique in the country, and particularly attractive if you wish to further your studies and enhance your career opportunities but cannot commit to a traditional full-time offering.

The course entails:

• Intensive practical modules, masterclasses and workshops led by industry professionals and delivered during residency weeks, when all the cohort comes together as a community
• Theoretical and critical e-learning and blended learning modules that run throughout the year, and which can be completed at a time to suit your particular needs.

Course content

The MA is made up of...

2 x 40 credit practical modules/intensive residencies
Residencies are delivered collaboratively with partner organisations

2 x 20 credit practical modules/intensive residencies
Residencies delivered collaboratively with a well known and respected industry professional from the UK or abroad, such as: Reckless Theatre, Little Bulb Theatre. Each practical residency module will be focusing on one specific area of contemporary performance practice as follows:

• Directing
• Devising and /or physical theatre
• Socially-engaged arts and/or collaborative practice
• Solo work and/or live art

2 x 20 credit theoretical modules
Creative research methodologies: an e-learning module where you'll be introduced to both traditional and non-traditional approaches to research including practice as research in performance
Research Project: you'll be supported to develop a 4,000-5,000 word written essay on a subject of your interest.

2 x 10 credit professional practice modules
Enterprise and new business models in the creative industries
The survivor’s guide to the creative industries: including sessions on skills in areas such as: fundraising, copyright, IP, developing and monetising cross/multi-platform work.

Modules:

Collaborative residency 1: Directing (20 credits)
Collaborative residency 2: Socially Engaged Arts (40 credits)
Creative performance making (40 credits)
Creative Research Methodologies (20 credits)
Research Project (20 credits)
Enterprise and New Business Models in the Creative Industries (10 credits)
The Survivor’s Guide to the Creative Industries (10 credits)

Plus a choice of either:

Creative Practice as Research Project (40 credits)
Creative Placement (40 credits)

Assessment

Methods of assessment are both practical and written. They reflect professional working methods (e.g. a professional performance outcomes) as well as critical responses to the course content (e.g. through essays, reflective journals and research projects).

Teaching and learning

The low residency MA in Contemporary Performance Making is following the model based on the Visitors and Residents theory by David White (2015), which describes a continuum of modes of online engagement and learning. This has proven to be a useful way towards understanding individuals’ motivations when they use the web in differing contexts. We are proposing that no mode of engagement is better than another, so we offer a blended approach that includes intensive face to face residencies, alongside online meetings and content delivery. We want to acknowledge that in today’s fast-changing world it is important to employ different modes of learning that allow for flexibility and can support individual learners’ context, circumstances and preferences.

The innovative low residency model, which is currently unlike any other offerings in the UK within the field of Drama and Performance, entails short intensive practical modules, masterclasses and workshops led by industry professionals during the residency weeks, alongside theoretical and critical e-learning and blended learning modules that run throughout the year.

The collaborative aspect of this programme makes it unique in the market and particularly attractive to those who wish to expand their professional networks and diversify their techniques.

Between the intensive residencies you'll maintain contact with the University through monthly supervisory meetings with your personal adviser (either face to face or online), and through completing the online and blended learning modules.

Facilities

• Edric Theatre

A dedicated performance and rehearsal space with a 90-seat capacity that can be set up in numerous configurations. The main auditorium, 30-seat studio and backstage facilities are used by drama, performance and technical theatre students. Facilities are available for commercial hire.

• Borough Road Gallery

The gallery is a home for visual art and a unique part of the University's heritage. Opened in 2012, the Borough Road Gallery contains valuable and significant works of Post War British Art in a public collection, produced by the celebrated artist and teacher David Bomberg (1890-1957).

• Arts, music and cultural events in London

The University couldn't be better located being only a 10-15 minute walk from the Southbank Centre, National Theatre, BFI IMAX, Tate Modern, Royal Festival Hall, The Old Vic Theatre, The Young Vic and therefore the best of London's plays, performances, exhibitions and screenings.

Employability

You'll have the opportunity to develop your practice in a rich environment of practices and discourses, in an environment that exposes you to diverse feedback sources, and a genuine immersion in professional practice of an international standing.

You'll be presented with opportunities to develop skills not only in the areas of directing, socially engaged arts and so on, but also in your professional practice, including current areas such as creative methodologies, copyright, use of multi-platform content, and resilience in the creative industries market.

The part-time offering is suitable for mature students and professionals who wish to return to education in order to enhance their skills and career prospects.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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This degree will provide a comprehensive analysis of contemporary international relations in the post-Cold War period. Read more

Course Description

This degree will provide a comprehensive analysis of contemporary international relations in the post-Cold War period. By taking this course you will have the opportunity to study a range of international issues but especially to investigate whether international relations in the post-Cold War period has been founded upon a Western model of 'World Order'.

The course will introduce you to differing concepts of order in the post-Cold War world. It will enable you to think critically about the nature of international relations: about the extent to which Western interests, institutions and culture dominate the world system and the challenges and responses generated by that dominance. The course focuses on both theoretical and empirical approaches to this subject.

You will complete one core module which will critically examine the means by which the West maintains its concept of 'Order'. You can then choose three option modules which, along with your dissertation, allow you to specialise in areas that interest you or complement your professional goals.

As well as equipping you with a detailed understanding of contemporary international relations, this degree will develop your ability to think both analytically and critically and to produce reasoned arguments encompassing your increased knowledge and understanding of the issues.

Distance learning gives you the flexibility to fit your study around existing commitments and enhance your career prospects without having to leave employment.

If you have any questions about this course, join us for a live online chat with academic tutors and admissions staff.

Course Structire

Current students take 1 core module, Post-Cold War World Order, choose 3 option modules (from about 19) and complete a 12-15,000 word dissertation.

(Please note: due to regular enhancement of the University’s courses, please refer to Leicester’s own website (http://www.le.ac.uk) or/and Terms and Conditions (http://www2.le.ac.uk/legal) for the most accurate and up-to-date course information. We recommend that you familiarise yourself with this information prior to submitting an application.)

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Explore the critical events influencing International Relations and obtain a prestigious postgraduate degree from one of the top universities in the UK in the heart of Paris. Read more

The Programme

Explore the critical events influencing International Relations and obtain a prestigious postgraduate degree from one of the top universities in the UK in the heart of Paris. The MA in International Relations (Paris) - offered jointly by the University of London Institute in Paris and Queen Mary University of London - is concerned with analysing the key issues and concepts in world politics. The programme will provide you with a sophisticated theoretical and applied understanding of international relations including areas of expertise such as war and security, globalization and development, and US foreign policy. It will enable you to develop a set of analytical skills and knowledge that will allow you to think, talk and write critically about contemporary international issues, as well as building a firm foundation for further study.

This programme will focus on the traditional geographic areas of international relations as well as emerging areas of interest in the developing world. You will be given the opportunity to discuss the historical significance of globalisation and how it relates to a number of key issues in international relations including state sovereignty and international order, conflict and war, human rights and the political economy of North-South relations.

Structure

Students benefit from an integrated and flexible approach when it comes to teaching. The programme will be delivered through a combination of workshops, guest lectures and Masterclasses based at the University of London Institute in Paris and online teaching by a dedicated tutor via a sophisticated e-learning platform.

You will be taught by staff who have internationally recognised research strengths in the politics of the developing world, globalisation and development, conflict and war, and critical theory, as well as regional expertise in South America, South East Asia, the Middle East and SubSaharan Africa.

Why study International Relations with us?

The University of London Institute in Paris (ULIP) is an institute of the University of London based in the heart of Paris. Established in the 19th century, it became a full part of the University of London in 1969. The Institute offers a range of undergraduate and postgraduate studies with a focus on French Studies, Law and International Relations. Its research priorities include French and European history, post-colonial studies and urbanism. Studying at ULIP offers you unique access to France, the Francophone world and Europe, along with all of the benefits of studying at one of the UK’s leading universities.

Queen Mary University of London is one of the UK’s leading research focused higher education institutions. Queen Mary offers outstanding students a stimulating, supportive and high-quality learning experience, with teaching inspired by our world leading research across a wide range of subjects. Queen Mary University of London is one of 24 leading UK universities represented by the Russell Group, that are committed to maintaining the very best research, an outstanding teaching and learning experience, excellent graduate employability and unrivalled links with business and the public sector. Queen Mary University of London is in the top 100 universities in the Times Higher Education World University Ranking.

The School of Politics and International Relations has particular strengths in international security, conflict and war, the political economy of North South relations, international political theory, Middle East politics, and the transition from the Cold War to the contemporary post-Cold War world. This programme is led by research -active staff, who are responding to the very latest global events.

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This master's provides a focused understanding of the interrelationships between the history, theory, and contemporary practice of security-led issues in South Asia. Read more
This master's provides a focused understanding of the interrelationships between the history, theory, and contemporary practice of security-led issues in South Asia. It incorporates history, thematic analysis, and case studies taught by academics from War Studies and the King's India Institute. It draws on policy leaders, military professionals, and experts in the private sector involved in security management.

Key benefits

• The Department of War Studies is unique in the UK and one of very few university departments in the world devoted exclusively to the study of war as a human phenomenon.

• The Department has an excellent reputation as a graduate training institution and is recognised by the British Academy, the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Economic and Social Research council as a training institution for War Studies.

• The Department places great emphasis on recruiting leading experts who bring with them not only a wealth of knowledge and ideas but an extensive and continually growing network of links with other departments, think-tanks, organisations, policy-making bodies and institutions.

• The unrivalled location in the heart of London beside the River Thames brings outstanding advantages. Students enjoy excellent academic, social and cultural opportunities.

• The department is close to the seat of Government, the City, the Imperial War Museum, the National Maritime Museum, the Royal Courts of Justice and the Inns of Court.Students have access to visiting academics, serving officers, government ministers and other experts who give regular public lectures and seminars.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/south-asia-and-global-security-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The programme incorporates history, thematic analysis, and case studies taught by a cross-section of academics from War Studies and the King's India Institute. It also draws on policy leaders, military professionals, and experts in the private sector involved in 'security management' to examine practical challenges. Graduating students are thus prepared for further research in academia, or for careers in policy, government, and international agencies

- Course purpose -

Provides a focused understanding of the interrelationships between the history, theory, and contemporary practice of security-led issues in South Asia (including Afghanistan) post 1947.

- Course format and assessment -

Core module: Two essays of 4500 words each.

Optional module: varies – essays and exams.

Dissertation: 15,000 words.

Career prospects

Graduating students are thus prepared for further research in academia, or for careers in policy, government, and international agencies.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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This course has been established in recognition of the way that concerns about the relationship between security and development have increasingly guided policy action and academic analysis on a range of issues in the post-Cold War era. Read more
This course has been established in recognition of the way that concerns about the relationship between security and development have increasingly guided policy action and academic analysis on a range of issues in the post-Cold War era. Indeed, the merger of security and development is generally considered to be one of the defining features of the post-Cold War security debate.

Indeed, the merger of security and development is generally considered to be one of the defining features of the post-Cold War security debate. For supporters, this conceptual merger has been central to the success of recent campaigns to raise aid, eliminate debt, address global ills such as landmines and promote human security inside weak and post-conflict states in particular. For critics, the linking of development and security has unduly securitised the representation of a range of developing world actors and has legitimised a variety of quasi-imperial Western interventions ranging from the invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan to pervasive programmes of economic, political and societal reform inside formerly sovereign states.

This course draws on the work of Peace Studies staff who have made important contributions to the academic and policy debates on the securitisation of development, the relationship between intervention, peacebuilding and the liberal peace and explored alternative models of both security and development. The course is particularly distinctive because it reflects both the critical approach to analysis of the security-development nexus adopted by staff involved in delivering this programme whilst also drawing on the extensive experience of staff in providing policy advice to a range of governments and other agencies.

For more information about the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/conflict-security-and-development-ma-part-time

Why Bradford?

The MA is located in Peace Studies, a Rotary International recognised centre of expertise for teaching and research on peace and conflict issues.

Modules

Core modules
-Fragile States and the Security-Development Nexus
-Introduction to Peace Studies
-Natural Resource Governance, Conflict and Co-operation
-Dissertation project in a topic of your (choice related to Conflict, Security and Development)

Option modules
-Conflict Resolution Theory
-International Politics and Security Studies
-Introduction to African Politics
-Gender, Conflict and Development
-Africa Study Visit
-African Security Studies
-Cities in Conflict
-Peacekeeping, Peacebuilding and Statebuilding
-Regional and Global Security Politics
-The Authoritarian Challenge to Democracy
-Framing the Middle East
-Sustainable Tourism Development

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Graduates typically follow careers in education, diplomacy, government, work with non-governmental organisations, in journalism and in peace-related work.

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How is the global financial crisis affecting international politics?. Do foreign military interventions in civil wars help or hinder peace-making?. Read more
How is the global financial crisis affecting international politics?

Do foreign military interventions in civil wars help or hinder peace-making?

Why are economic resources so unevenly spread across the world, and what are the prospects for global justice?

If you are interested in these questions, and want to know more, then the PGCert in International Relations is the programme for you. Staff in the School have internationally recognised research strengths in the politics of the developing world, globalisation and development, conflict and war, and critical theory, as well as regional expertise in South America, South East Asia, the Middle East, and Sub-Saharan Africa.

This programme:

Will provide you with a set of cutting-edge analytical skills and knowledge that will allow you to think talk and write critically about contemporary international issues, as well as providing a firm foundation for further study
Is concerned with analysing the key theoretical and empirical issues in international relations
Will discuss the historical significance of globalisation and how it relates to a number of key issues in international relations, including state sovereignty and international order, conflict and war, human rights and the political economy of North-South relations
Will undertake a critical survey of the main theories and concepts associated with the study of international politics.

Why study with us?

The School of Politics and International Relations at Queen Mary was rated amongst the top 20 Politics departments in the UK in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise.

The MA in International Relations will be of particular interest to students looking for a course on contemporary global issues. The school has particular strengths in international security, conflict and war, the political economy of North-South relations, international political theory, Middle East politics, and the transition from the Cold War to the contemporary post-Cold War world.

"...The knowledge gained here will give me the required grounding to excel in my chosen field"
Gloria Caleb

* Cutting-edge critical programme � theory included, with a real focus on developing students' critical thinking and analytical skills
* A focus on the traditional geographic areas of international relations as well as emerging areas of interest in the developing world
* This programme is led by research active staff, who are responding to the very latest global events, so content is very timely
* The diversity of our staff and students, and the local area, mean that Queen Mary is a great place to study International Relations
* The programme is very flexible, so you can choose from a large number of modules, depending on your interests

Facilities

You will have access to postgraduate only facilities which include the Lock-keeper's Cottage Graduate Centre dedicated solely to the use of graduate students in the faculty of Humanity and Social Sciences, with the use of a common room and interdisciplinary training workshops. The Learning Resource centre has 200 networked PCs and is open to students round the clock, there are dedicated workstations for postgraduate students.

You will also have access to Queen Mary's comprehensive libraries, including the Postgraduate Reading Room, and The British Library can also be accessed as a research resource.

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This MA addresses the fast-changing 'international' terrain including the 2008 economic crisis, EU fragmentation, questions of migration and human rights around the world. Read more
This MA addresses the fast-changing 'international' terrain including the 2008 economic crisis, EU fragmentation, questions of migration and human rights around the world.

It gives you the opportunity to explore the character of the contemporary world in an interdisciplinary manner, drawing upon a strong theoretical basis as well as an empirical grounding.

The programme offers great diversity in fields of study:
•international relations, post-colonial theory, human rights, international political economy, war, genocide and post-conflict societies
•areas of study – Europe, China, Japan, India, Latin America, Africa, the Middle East
•methodology – empirical analysis and data collection, textual and discourse analysis, hermeneutic and philosophical enquiry

It also offers diverse subjects of study:
•migration
•human rights
•memory and justice
•war and post-conflict
•global political economy
•IR theories
•political theory
•psychoanalysis
•identity politics
•gender, sexuality and the body in non-Western societies.

The MA is especially relevant if you are considering further study at PhD level, or if you want to work in areas where an understanding of international relations is essential (journalism, diplomacy, NGOs, international organisations, for example).

It offers valuable training and analytical skills for those working in non-governmental organisations, international institutions and corporations, diplomatic services, government offices, media industry and teaching.

A wide view of the 'international'

This programme differs from MA degrees in international relations offered elsewhere because it provides a wider view of the ‘international’ that questions its necessary Western focus and looks for alternative ways of ‘knowing’, ‘encountering’ and ‘experiencing’ the world.

It also takes an interdisciplinary approach, allowing you to tailor the degree to your needs, and offers an unusual diversity in the areas of specialty of our staff, many of whom are internationally recognised for their expertise.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Jeremy Larkins

Department

Voted one of the top political universities in the UK by students**

Politics and International Relations

In the Department of Politics and International Relations at Goldsmiths our focus goes beyond voting systems, parliaments and the conventional arenas of power. And it looks beyond the West.

We study politics and international relations for the 21st century, in which anarchism may be as important as liberalism, and in which Asia and Africa are as economically and geopolitically important as Europe and North America.

We also take an unconventional approach. So you may be working on group projects, writing a blog, or submitting a Manga comic instead of an essay.

Find out more about the Department of Politics and International Relations.

**Which? University 2014

Modules & Structure

Core modules

You take the following core modules:

Theories of International Relations (15 credits)
MA in International Relations Dissertation (60 credits)

Option modules:

Students make up their remaining 90 Credits from the following list of options:

An(Other) China: Postcolonial Theory, Postmodern Concerns (30 credits)
Counter-Mapping London: The Politics of Space (15 credits)
Latin American Dictionary: Politics through the Arts (15 credits)
Memory and Justice in Post-Conflict Societies (30 credits)
Politics of Knowledge: Debates in Human Science (15 credits)
Finance in the Global Political Economy (15 credits)
The Political-Economic Governance of the European Union (30 credits)
Politics of Human Rights (15 credits)
Psychopolitics (15 credits)
Visualising Asia: Body, Gender, Politics (30 credits)

Students may choose up to 30 credits of approved options from other departments at Goldsmiths.

Assessment

Essays; coursework; exam; research dissertation. Some modules might involve other forms of assessment such as blogs and policy reports.

Download the programme specification for this degree to find out more about what you'll learn and how you'll be taught and assessed.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Skills & Careers

Skills

You'll develop:
•a critical engagement with the broad field of international studies
•communication skills
•research skills
•presentation skills
•writing skills

Careers

The MA is especially relevant if you are considering further study at PhD level, or if you want to work in areas where an understanding of international relations is essential (journalism, diplomacy, NGOs, international organisations, for example).



It offers valuable training and analytical skills for those working in non-governmental organisations, international institutions and corporations, diplomatic services, government offices, media industry and teaching.

Our graduates go on to work within these areas but many also undertake professional training in law, accountancy, journalism, business administration, teaching, social work or nursing.

If you would like to speak to some of our current students or alumni, please contact Dr Anca Pusca.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths http://www.gold.ac.uk/skills-careers/

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including. Read more
At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including: international and global politics, governance and political organisations, and political theory.

We can offer you excellent supervision for your Politics MPhil, in a vibrant and supportive research environment.

We have a Politics Postgraduate Society, which organises:
-The 'New Voices' seminar series, with both internal and external presenters
-Round table discussions on topical issues
-Professional development workshops led by politics staff

You are encouraged to attend conferences to present papers, partial funding for this is available from the School.

Our main research themes are:

The politics of difference

We examine the issues thrown up by the social and political differences of humanity from a variety of perspectives including: analytical and continental political philosophy; comparative politics and international politics; post-colonialism. Our work includes research on:
-Multiculturalism and issues of identity
-Inequality and social justice
-Disability
-Competing discourses of national identity
-Ethnic-nationalism
-Political violence
-Socio-political exclusion and discrimination
-Global norms and cultural difference
-Free speech - toleration and recognition

Popular culture and political communication

Our research addresses various key issues including:
-Representation
-Aesthetics
-Identity
-Cultural political economy
-Memory
-Control

We also assess the processes and depiction of political struggles, such as:
-Armed conflict
-Everyday life
-Political organising and identity formation
-Elections

Political participation and elections

We examine the differing forms of political participation that link society to the political systems of the world. We look at both the formal electoral process and non-electoral politics (social movements, protest groups etc). Our research on the emergence of virtual political participation means that some of our work intersects with popular culture and political communication. We investigate:
-Citizen involvement and (dis)engagement
-Social capital
-Non-participation
-The role of civil society

Political ideologies and political thought

We focus on the history of political thought as well as how these ideas are embedded in programmes for political action. Our research incorporates both historical and contemporary political thought prominent in the Western tradition as well as Asian philosophy and post-colonial thinking. This is an interdisciplinary theme, serving as a bridge between empirical political science and political theory.

Global economic and environmental challenges

We study the importance of political ideas such as sustainable development and globalisation, as well as the struggle to define the core problems that society faces. These challenges pose questions to the nature and reform of global governance, and generate tensions between the state and transnationalising forces in global politics and political economy. Our work has already led to findings on:
-The implications for global justice
-The policy challenge for governments and non-governmental actors
-The empowerment of various actors

Democracy, the modern state and political organisations

Our work examines the role of interest groups, social movements, political parties, third-sector actors and charities, community organisations and postcolonial nationalism in relation to the modern state. We draw from ancient and modern political thought to understand the interpretation of democracy (including democratic rights and the foundations of democracy). Our research interrogates the forms democracy takes, including:
-Elite theories of democracy
-Deliberative democracy
-Cosmopolitan democracy
-Democracy in divided societies

Political economy of development

Our research focuses on the interaction of economic forces and principles with political power in the development of societal economics and welfare, as well as on theories of development and post-development. We cover a range of geographic areas in Africa, the Americas, Europe and Asia. We explore questions such as:
-The impact of the ongoing financial and economic crisis
-The role of communities and individuals in the face of global political economic forces
-The impact of the emerging economies (for example Brazil and China) on the global political economy

Critical geopolitics and security

Our research focuses on thinking critically about the political dynamics, consequences and discourses of historical and contemporary geopolitics. We cover both historical and contemporary questions of security, including:
-The territorialisation/de-territorialisation of identity and political agency
-Political cartography
-The role of fear and identity in shaping geopolitics
-Sovereignty and nationalism - the role and impact of the military
-Notions of terrorism and the war on terror
-The geographies of international boundaries
-The war on the trade in illegal substances
-The city and security
-The threat of biological weapons and infectious disease
-The vertical dimension in geopolitical and security studies
-Visual culture and world politics
-Technologies and architectures of security and insecurity
-The human body and security

Theory of international relations

We take an active role in the global debate on the units, actors and structures that shape the dynamics of international politics. Our research covers the political consequences of the constitution of the international as a distinct kind of relation. We examine political concepts including:
-The world system
-International diplomacy
-Networks
-Notions of empire
-Regional integration
-Non-governmental actors
-The (nation) state

Governance in Britain and wider Europe

Our research investigates the dynamics driving public policy-making at national, EU and international levels. We focus on the challenges multi-level governance offers for concerns about legitimacy and accountability. This includes the changing relationship between the governing and the governed over matters of politics and policy. Our geographic scope includes the United Kingdom, Western Europe, Eastern Europe and Russia, and the Mediterranean

Global justice and human rights

Our work in political philosophy reflects the increasing need to tackle issues at a global rather than a state-only level. We cover issues such as:
-The formulation and justification of human rights
-The competing claims of relativism, particularism, and cultural diversity
-The extension of ideas of distributive justice from states to humanity as a whole
-Proposals to secure global democracy
-The application of just war theory to modern conflicts and to humanitarian intervention
-Environmental justice, especially climate change

We tackle questions of justice from an issue perspective as well as surveys of nationalism, statism, and various non-cosmopolitan theories of global justice.

Political research and methods

We conduct qualitative and quantitative research reflecting both empirical and critical political methodologies. We use quantitative methods, including rational choice theory and experiments, to make sense of topics as diverse as party systems and transitional justice. Our aim is to push innovation in research methods in ethnography, hermeneutics and discourse analysis. We use concepts that challenge traditional notions of politics to investigate methods for research into new challenges, including:
-The rise of life sciences
-The focus on the relationship between the human body and security
-Emergent forms of subjectivity and politics

Research skills development

The University's Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate School provides a full range of research training in the social sciences, which meets the requirements of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This training includes:
-Bibliographical techniques
-Philosophy of social science
-Quantitative and qualitative methods

The Graduate School also hosts postgraduate events, including open days, and supports personal development.

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After the financial crisis, are there new fault-lines emerging in international relations? What is/was the war on terror? Is there any prospect of global justice? Has globalisation rendered nation states less relevant?. Read more

OVERVIEW

After the financial crisis, are there new fault-lines emerging in international relations? What is/was the war on terror? Is there any prospect of global justice? Has globalisation rendered nation states less relevant?

If you are interested in finding answers to the big global questions, then this is the programme for you

o The MA in International Relations is concerned with analysing the key theoretical and empirical issues in international relations
o You will discuss the historical significance of globalisation and how it relates to a number of key issues in international relations, including state sovereignty and international order, conflict and war, human rights and the political economy of North-South relations
o You will also undertake a critical survey of the main theories and concepts associated with the study of international politics
o The programme will provide you with a set of cutting-edge analytical skills and knowledge that will allow you to think, talk and write critically about contemporary international issues, as well as providing a firm foundation for further study

Why study with us?

The School of Politics and International Relations at Queen Mary was rated amongst the top 20 Politics departments in the UK in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise.

The school has particular strengths in international security, conflict and war, the political economy of North-South relations, international political theory, Middle East politics, and the transition from the Cold War to the contemporary post-Cold War world.

Key features of this programme

o Cutting-edge critical programme - theory included, with a real focus on developing students' critical thinking and analytical skills
o A focus on the traditional geographic areas of international relations as well as emerging areas of interest in the developing world
o This programme is led by research active staff, who are responding to the very latest global events, so content is very timely
o The diversity of our staff and students mean that Queen Mary is a great place to study International Relations


You will undertake your degree through our cutting-edge online learning platform, QMPLUS. You will also have access to Queen Mary's online libraries and databases.

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