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Masters Degrees (Post Harvest)

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Food security is a complex issue of global significance and understanding the role and contribution of seafood within food security is an emerging research area. Read more

Introduction

Food security is a complex issue of global significance and understanding the role and contribution of seafood within food security is an emerging research area. Seafood products are provided by both aquaculture and capture fisheries and are one of the most highly traded food products globally. Including seafood in our daily diet provides an affordable source of macro and micronutrients required for optimal human health and development.
This course is designed to introduce the global issues affecting seafood production and trading, and will promote an understanding of the key factors affecting aquatic food production, post-harvest protocols, post-mortem metabolic events and microbial/chemical processes key for food safety and quality. Sensory assessment and shelf-life extension technologies will also be covered. The course will also examine other key issues in seafood trading such as traceability systems, certifications as well as the impact of governance and legislation on the global seafood sector.
This is the only aquatic food security MSc currently available in the UK. It will comprehensively follow the food chain from production through to consumer health and welfare.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc
- Study methods: Full-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Rachel Norman

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

This course shares some modules with the MSc in Sustainable Aquaculture and there is flexibility within the system to change the degree title depending on what advanced modules are taken. The course is divided into four taught modules, containing 18 subject areas or topics, and a single Research Project module.

Delivery and assessment

In addition to lectures, tutorials and seminars, a number of assignments must be completed. Laboratory-based practical sessions are also important elements of the course. Taught module assessment is continuous, involving short tests, seminars, essays, practical reports, critical and computational analysis, field assignments and set project reports. The Research Project module is examined through written dissertation and seminar presentations by both supervisors and an external examiner.

Modes of study

The course is available on a block-release basis (by selecting individual or a series of modules) over a period not exceeding five academic years.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

The Institute of Aquaculture, with a rating of 2.45 in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), was graded the top aquaculture department in the UK.

Strengths

This MSc brings a unique perspective to the expertise that already exists in Stirling on global seafood production. It is the only MSc in the UK that focusses on how seafood can contribute to global food security.
We have a number of links in the production, processing and retail industries and this will provide students with the opportunity to interact with industry and potentially carry out a project which is of direct relevance to the sector.
We also have links within Asia and Europe which will allow the opportunity to undertake the Research Project overseas.

Academic strengths

The Institute of Aquaculture has been closely associated with the global expansion of aquaculture initially through developing and improving the existing production systems and the development of new farmed species. In recent years our research has focused on increasing the sustainability and reducing the environmental impact of these activities. In addition, we have recently invested in new posts in Aquatic Food Security whose activities also include research into food safety and quality post harvest, aquatic animal nutrition, as well as developing mathematical models of production systems. We therefore have expertise that covers the whole production cycle from farm to fork.
The Institute of Aquaculture is internationally recognised for both research and teaching and is one of only a handful of institutions devoted to aquatic food security. The goal is to develop and promote aquatic food security building on the Institute staff expertise in sustainable aquatic animal production.

Careers and employability

- Career opportunities
Demand for well qualified postgraduates to contribute to food production and the supply chain will continue to increase in line with demand to double food production over the coming decades. This course provides each student with the appropriate knowledge and practical experience important for a career in aquatic food security. The course has been developed to provide students with core knowledge and practical skills on aquaculture, food safety/quality, numerical analysis and legislation appropriate to aquatic food security. These skills will be equally applicable to those wishing to pursue an academic career as well as those seeking employment in Government or industry.

- Employability
This course has been developed to provide students with core knowledge and practical skills on aquaculture, food safety/quality, numerical analysis and legislation appropriate to aquatic food security. These skills will be equally applicable to those wishing to pursue an academic career as well as those seeking employment in Government or industry.

- Industry connections
We have a number of links in the production, processing and retail industries which provides students with the opportunity to interact with industry and potentially carry out a project which is of direct relevance to the sector. We also have links within Asia and Europe which allows the opportunity to undertake the research project overseas.

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Areas of research include, but are not limited to. pre-harvest stress on ascorbic acid content in baby leaf spinach; the impact of post anthesis rainfall on the production and distribution of fusarium mycotoxins in wheat; minimising post-harvest losses in radishes. Read more
Areas of research include, but are not limited to: pre-harvest stress on ascorbic acid content in baby leaf spinach; the impact of post anthesis rainfall on the production and distribution of fusarium mycotoxins in wheat; minimising post-harvest losses in radishes.

Research Degrees

Strategic and applied research underpins Harper Adams' mission to provide higher education for a sustainable food chain and rural economy. Our research and reach-out strategies are focused to meet the challenge of rural sustainability.

Professor Peter Mills
Deputy Vice-Chancellor

■Choice of one year (MRes), two year (MPhil) or three year (PhD) research degrees
■Excellent completion rates for higher degrees
■Good job prospects for PhD candidates in industry, government organisations and academia
■Accessible academic staff
■Rural location and collegiate atmosphere
■Unique facilities
■Fortnightly research seminar programme

PhD and MPhil research at the University has been developed over the last 20 years to its current position of national and international recognition in a number of areas. There are strong links with agri-business which give postgraduates the chance to develop close contacts with industry and this has led to more than 90 per cent of our PhD graduates getting jobs in their areas of interest.

The MRes is a new, shorter research degree, developed in response to increasing demand.

All MPhil/PhD research students have their own office space and a dedicated personal computer. You will be encouraged to participate in seminars and conferences appropriate to your research.

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Areas of research include, but are not limited to. pre-harvest stress on ascorbic acid content in baby leaf spinach; spatial heterogeneity for the design and layout of experimental sites; improving soil and crop yield sustainability; post-harvest losses in radishes. Read more
Areas of research include, but are not limited to: pre-harvest stress on ascorbic acid content in baby leaf spinach; spatial heterogeneity for the design and layout of experimental sites; improving soil and crop yield sustainability; post-harvest losses in radishes.
Research Degrees




Strategic and applied research underpins Harper Adams' mission to provide higher education for a sustainable food chain and rural economy. Our research and reach-out strategies are focused to meet the challenge of rural sustainability.


Professor Peter Mills
Deputy Vice-Chancellor

■Choice of one year (MRes), two year (MPhil) or three year (PhD) research degrees
■Excellent completion rates for higher degrees
■Good job prospects for PhD candidates in industry, government organisations and academia
■Accessible academic staff
■Rural location and collegiate atmosphere
■Unique facilities
■Fortnightly research seminar programme

PhD and MPhil research at the University has been developed over the last 20 years to its current position of national and international recognition in a number of areas. There are strong links with agri-business which give postgraduates the chance to develop close contacts with industry and this has led to more than 90 per cent of our PhD graduates getting jobs in their areas of interest.

The MRes is a new, shorter research degree, developed in response to increasing demand.

All MPhil/PhD research students have their own office space and a dedicated personal computer. You will be encouraged to participate in seminars and conferences appropriate to your research.

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The Plant Biotechnology programme is the combination of different fields of the classical plant sciences (e.g. plant physiology, plant breeding, plant pathology) working with a whole new range of techniques and possibilities opened up by modern molecular biology. Read more

MSc Plant Biotechnology

The Plant Biotechnology programme is the combination of different fields of the classical plant sciences (e.g. plant physiology, plant breeding, plant pathology) working with a whole new range of techniques and possibilities opened up by modern molecular biology.

Programme summary

Due to rapid technological developments in the genomics, molecular biology and biotechnology, the use of molecular marker technology has accelerated the selection of new plant varieties with many desirable traits. It also facilitates the design, development and management of transgenic plants. At present, plants are increasingly used to produce valuable proteins and secondary metabolites for food and pharmaceutical purposes. New insights into the molecular basis of plant-insect, plant- pathogen and crop-weed relationships enable the development of disease-resistant plants and strategies for integrated pest management. A fundamental approach is combined with the development of tools and technologies to apply in plant breeding, plant pathology, post-harvest quality control, and the production of renewable resources. Besides covering the technological aspects, Plant Biotechnology also deals with the ethical issues and regulatory aspects, including intellectual property rights.

Specialisations

Functional Plant Genomics
Functional genomics aims at understanding the relationship between an organism's genome and its phenotype. The availability of a wide variety of sequenced plant genomes has revolutionised insight into plant genetics. By combining array technology, proteomics, metabolomics and phenomics with bioinformatics, gene expression can be studied to understand the dynamic properties of plants and other organisms.

Plants for Human and Animal Health
Plants are increasingly being used as a safe and inexpensive alternative for the production of valuable proteins and metabolites for food supplements and pharmaceuticals. This specialisation provides a fundamental understanding of how plants can be used for the production of foreign proteins and metabolites. In addition, biomedical aspects such as immunology and food allergy, as well as nutritional genomics and plant metabolomics, can also be studied.

Molecular Plant Breeding and Pathology
Molecular approaches to analyse and modify qualitative and quantitative traits in crops are highly effective in improving crop yield, food quality, disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance. Molecular plant breeding focuses on the application of genomics and QTL-mapping to enable marker assisted selection of a trait of interest (e.g. productivity, quality). Molecular plant pathology aims to provide a greater understanding of plant-insect, plant-pathogen and crop-weed interactions in addition to developing new technologies for integrated plant health management.These technologies include improved molecular detection of pathogens and transgene methods to introduce resistance genes into crops.

Your future career

The main career focus of graduates in Plant Biotechnology is on research and development positions at universities, research institutes, and biotech- or plant breeding companies. Other job opportunities can be found in the fields of policy, consultancy and communication in agribusiness and both governmental and non-governmental organisations. Over 75% of Plant Biotechnology graduates start their (academic) career with a PhD.

Alumnus Behzad Rashidi.
“I obtained my bachelor degree in the field of agricultural engineering, agronomy and plant breeding, at Isfahan University of Technology, Iran. The curiosity and interest for studying plant biotechnology and great reputation of Wageningen University motivated me to follow the master programme Plant Biotechnology. I got a chance to do my internship at State University of New York at Buffalo, working on biofuel production from microalgae. Working with this small unicellular organism made me even more motivated to continue my research after my master. Now I am doing my PhD in the Plant Breeding department of Wageningen University, working on biorefinery of microalgae.”

Related programmes:
MSc Biotechnology
MSc Molecular Life Sciences
MSc Plant Sciences
MSc Nutrition and Health
MSc Bioinformatics
MSc Biology.

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Food security exists when everybody has access to sufficient, nutritious and safe food at all times. However, various predictable and unpredictable challenges around the globe, including changes in climate (i.e. Read more

Local food security in a globalising world

Food security exists when everybody has access to sufficient, nutritious and safe food at all times. However, various predictable and unpredictable challenges around the globe, including changes in climate (i.e. rising/falling temperatures, droughts and floods, diseases and pests), market tendencies, insufficient access to food for households, unequal distribution of resources and opportunities and inadequate food distribution channels, prevent the realisation of this idealistic and often oversimplified term.

Despite a growing number of large-scale, high-external input farms and enough food production to feed the world, post-harvest losses result in less optimal yields and (locally) produced foods are often used for other purposes, such as animal feed or biofuel. Consequentially, 795 million1 undernourished people around the globe do not have access to this lost and wasted food.

Ensuring access to food for everyone is the key to ending hunger, which will require improved collaboration between various stakeholders - producer (organisations), the private sector, governments, traders and development organisations. Structures, policies and programmes must be continuously adapted to a variety of external factors, such as the economy, environment and current social structures. Rethinking of informal rules and habits is another essential step in attaining food security, considering even members of the same household are not guaranteed equal access to food. In light of these external factors and challenges, this specialisation presents various interventions needed to combat hunger and ensure food security for everyone.

Competences

At graduation, you will have the ability to:
• define the economic, commercial and marketing needs, constraints and opportunities of those in rural communities who produce for local and regional markets
• analyse food security at a local and global level
• apply tools for diagnosing food security
• analyse the livelihoods of farmers who produce for local and regional markets and understand farmers' coping strategies
• select, explain and design an appropriate development intervention leading to food security
• develop support programmes for farmers, producers and other groups
• mainstream food security within Agricultural and rural development programmes
• define the economic, commercoal and marketing needs, constraints and oppertunities for small-scale producers in rural communities
• formulate and recommend any organisational adjustments that are needed within service-delivery organisations.

Career opportunities

Rural Development and Food Security specialists explore effective responses to mal- and undernourishment, by defining needs, constraints, coping strategies and opportunities for small-scale producers in rural communities. In selecting appropriate context-specific interventions, which reflect understanding of the local context in its wider context, they consider stakeholder relationships and how collaboration could be organised to each stakeholder’s benefit while helping farmers to safeguard their ability to ensure local food security. In the face of globalisation, slow economic growth and political instability, specialists may design and implement responses for (non-)governmental organisations or partners in the private sector, in the form of projects, programmes, market structures or policies.

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Areas of research include, but are not limited to. Read more
Areas of research include, but are not limited to: collembola in agricultural ecosystems; effects of pre-harvest stress on ascorbic acid content in baby leaf spinach; evaluation of nematicides for use in the management of the potato cyst nematode; impact of post anthesis rainfall on the production and distribution of fusarium mycotoxins in wheat; outbreaks of oak processionary moth in the UK.
■Choice of one year (MRes), two year (MPhil) or three year (PhD) research degrees
■Excellent completion rates for higher degrees
■Good job prospects for PhD candidates in industry, government organisations and academia
■Accessible academic staff
■Rural location and collegiate atmosphere
■Unique facilities
■Fortnightly research seminar programme

PhD and MPhil research at the University has been developed over the last 20 years to its current position of national and international recognition in a number of areas. There are strong links with agri-business which give postgraduates the chance to develop close contacts with industry and this has led to more than 90 per cent of our PhD graduates getting jobs in their areas of interest.

The MRes is a new, shorter research degree, developed in response to increasing demand.

All MPhil/PhD research students have their own office space and a dedicated personal computer. You will be encouraged to participate in seminars and conferences appropriate to your research.

Read less
Harper Adams is the UK’s only provider of a postgraduate course in plant pathology. There is currently a shortage of expertise in this important topic, which is a key element in the effort to ensure global food security and mitigating the effects of climate change. Read more
Harper Adams is the UK’s only provider of a postgraduate course in plant pathology. There is currently a shortage of expertise in this important topic, which is a key element in the effort to ensure global food security and mitigating the effects of climate change. By successfully completing this course you will develop a range of abilities that will prepare for an interesting and fulfilling career in an area with considerable opportunities.

Although food production has tripled in the last 40 years, approximately 1 billion people still go hungry, with an average of 30 per cent of all available food being wasted during production, processing and distribution. Crop losses through plant disease either pre- or post-harvest are an important component of these losses.

The aim of the course is to provide students with specialized training in plant pathology.

The course will:
◾ prepare students for a career in plant pathology
◾ offer vocational training in the area of applied plant pathology
◾ prepare students for PhD studies

The course is intended to provide a detailed understanding of basic and applied plant pathology and the issues associated with current production systems and control strategies. The course is underpinned by an extensive programme of agri-environment research at Harper Adams and longstanding collaborations with research institutes and other organisations in the UK and overseas.

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The Plant Science Program offers degrees in fundamental and applied topics related to plant production, plant protection, biotechnology, plant physiology and biochemistry, and plant-environment interactions. Read more
The Plant Science Program offers degrees in fundamental and applied topics related to plant production, plant protection, biotechnology, plant physiology and biochemistry, and plant-environment interactions.

Specific areas of specialization include:
- Plant-microbe interaction, bacterial and fungal diseases, plant virology, biological control of pests and diseases, insect physiology, natural insecticides, insect ecology and behaviour, and weed biology, ecology and control;
- Seed physiology, plant nutrition, plant growth analysis, plant-plant interaction, biotic and abiotic stressor resistance, and environmental plant physiology;
- Vegetable culture, ornamental horticulture, plant breeding, and post-harvest physiology;
- Plant biochemistry, tissue culture, genetic engineering, and plant, fungal, and viral molecular genetics;
- Rangeland ecology, and wildlife habitat studies.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Science
- Specialization: Plant Science
- Subject: Agriculture and Forestry
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Land and Food Systems

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One of the most significant challenges currently facing humankind is to make enough food, for an active healthy lifestyle, available to a population which will probably rise beyond nine billion within the next 30 to 40 years. Read more
One of the most significant challenges currently facing humankind is to make enough food, for an active healthy lifestyle, available to a population which will probably rise beyond nine billion within the next 30 to 40 years. There are many factors that combine to impact food availability and the access that people have to food. Food production is prominent among these factors, but we can also feed more people if we distribute food more effectively and waste less food. In addition, other factors such as the state of the economy, climate change and the effects of the food production system on the environment need to be taken into account when considering the future sustainability of our food system.

This PgCert provides an opportunity for flexible and accessible postgraduate learning and professional development, for those who are unable to commit to full-time study. It is delivered by blended learning, which consists largely of online material to allow flexible working, together with short residential schools.

Modules on offer include:
• Consumers and Retailing
• Crop Production and Supply
• Economics and Logistics of the Food Chain
• Food Quality, Nutrition and Food Safety, Post-Harvest Management
• Food Security: The Impending Storm
• Food Waste, Supply Chain Management and Consumer Behaviour
• Pests and Diseases, Pest Management and Pesticides
• Soils, Natural Capital and Sustainable Resource Management

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In this course you will take a range of specialised coursework units complemented by laboratory classes and industry site visits. Read more
In this course you will take a range of specialised coursework units complemented by laboratory classes and industry site visits. You’ll not only gain considerable knowledge, but essential hands-on experience. You’ll study a variety of food science topics, including food engineering, food processing and preservation, food microbiology, functional foods containing bioactive components, analytical food chemistry, post-harvest handling and processing and packaging of foods from the farm to the consumer’s plate (including meats, dairy, eggs and cereals).

This course is designed to accommodate the needs of students from varying backgrounds. The flexible course structure will give you the opportunity to choose from a range of professional development units to complement your core studies.

Professional recognition

This course is recognised by the Australian Institute of Food Science and Technology.

Career opportunities

The food industry can offer a range of diverse and challenging careers. Upon graduation you may qualify for entry to the master degree that could allow you to work in professional areas, such as food quality assurance, research and development of new products and processing technologies, microbiology, technical consulting, and sales and marketing.

Credit for previous study

Applications for credit for recognised learning (CRL) are assessed on an individual basis.

2016 Curtin International Scholarships: Merit Scholarship

Curtin University is an inspiring, vibrant, international organisation, committed to making tomorrow better. It is a beacon for innovation, driving advances in technology through high-impact research and offering more than 100 practical, industry-aligned courses connecting to workplaces of tomorrow.

Ranked in the top two per cent of universities worldwide in the Academic Ranking of World Universities 2015, the University is also ranked 25th in the world for universities under the age of 50 in the QS World University Rankings 2015 Curtin also received an overall five-star excellence rating in the QS stars rating.

Curtin University strives to give high achieving international students the opportunity to gain an internationally recognised education through offering the Merit Scholarship. The Merit Scholarship will give you up to 25 per cent of your first year tuition fees and if you enrol in an ELB program at Curtin English before studying at Curtin, you will also receive a 10 per cent discount on your Curtin English fees.

For full details and terms and conditions of this scholarship, please visit: curtin.edu/int-scholarships and click on Merit.

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The Natural Resources Institute (NRI) is a specialised multidisciplinary research organisation within the University of Greenwich. Read more
The Natural Resources Institute (NRI) is a specialised multidisciplinary research organisation within the University of Greenwich. The Institute received the Queen's Anniversary Prize for its research activities on food security in the developing world. Much of NRI's research work is concerned with natural resources, agriculture and social development in developing countries, although it has an expanding portfolio of activities in Europe and other industrialised countries.

NRI provides a thriving environment for MPhil and PhD students working in agricultural and food sciences. Each of NRI's departments has a strong portfolio of research activities, of which students form an important and integral part.

The Agriculture, Health & Environment Department works on the worldwide development of appropriate cost-effective and sustainable approaches to controlling pests, diseases and weeds that affect crop production. Use of biocontrol and control methods involving no (or very low) conventional pesticides are increasing in importance in our work, especially for export crops.

The Department also has researchers who share a common interest in the many species of insects, ticks and rodents that cause injury to their hosts and transmit diseases to both humans and animals. Research is undertaken in the UK, using NRI's state-of-the-art laboratories, insectaries and glasshouses, and also overseas. Particularly strong areas of research include the epidemiology of insect-borne virus diseases, molecular diagnostics, pest and disease modelling, aerobiology and biometeorology, migrant pests, medical and veterinary entomology and integrated pest management.

The Food and Markets Department works on commodity management and food safety of cereals, grains, root crops, perishables and other crops. The Department works with all aspects of the operations of the food industry, including, for example, storage, post-harvest technology, quality analysis and management, compliance with food standards, food processing and value addition, value chains, private and public sector standards and market development. NRI's work provides many opportunities for postgraduates to be involved in multidisciplinary projects.

We offer full-time or part-time attendance, with students based on our campus or in their home countries, or some combination.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/res/afs

What you'll study

Recent research project topics include:

- The impact of host plants on the efficacy of nucleopolyhedrovirus as a biopesticide

- Reasons for multiple loans in microfinance and their effect on the repayment performance

- Evaluating the impact of climate change on postharvest quality of perishables

- Laboratory based investigation of the sensory cues used by vector mosquitoes to locate host animals

- Dormancy and sprout control in root and tuber crops

- Investigations into the oviposition behaviour of Anopheles gambiae

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed through their thesis and oral examination.

Career options

Postgraduate research students from NRI have a good record of finding employment within their specific technical discipline or in the field of international development.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/research/study/apply/application_process

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