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Masters Degrees (Positron Emission Tomography)

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Medical imaging is a rapidly developing field of growing importance both in patient management and clinical decision making and in drug development and evaluation. Read more
Medical imaging is a rapidly developing field of growing importance both in patient management and clinical decision making and in drug development and evaluation. Dramatic developments in imaging both anatomy and molecular processes, especially using Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Research and development in the field is highly multi-disciplinary with key roles played by computing scientists and mathematicians, chemists, pharmacists, physicists, biologists, and of course clinicians. The Division of Imaging Sciences & Biomedical Engineering hosts a multidisciplinary team of academics directing a wide range of cutting-edge research projects, with an emphasis on translation “from bench to bedside”.

Key benefits

- Access to state of the art preclinical and clinical imaging facilities

- Clinically applied modules

- Two 4 month research projects within the Imaging Sciences’ Wellcome/EPSRC Medical Engineering Centre or CRUK/EPSRC Comprehensive Cancer Imaging Centre

- Research facilities based within a hospital environment enabling basic imaging science to be translated quickly into the clinic

- May constitute first year of a 4-year PhD

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/medical-imaging-sciences-mres.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Medical Imaging Sciences aims to provide graduates of chemistry, physics, computing, mathematics, biology, pharmacy or medicine, with advanced training in the imaging field. Intended mainly as preparation for a PhD, but also serves as training for employment in hospitals and industry. Key components are two research projects, which may be linked around different aspects of a single research area in medical imaging.

- Course purpose -

Medical imaging is a rapidly expanding field that needs input from team members with knowledge and skills in these different areas (chemistry, physics, computing, mathematics, biology, pharmacy, medicine) to achieve its promise in improving patient care. The aim of this MRes programme is to provide students who have graduated in any of these subject areas with advanced training to prepare them to apply their specialist graduate skills in the imaging field. The programme is intended mainly as a preparation for a PhD in the field, at King's or elsewhere, but it also serves as training for employment in hospitals and industry.

- Course format and assessment -

Taught modules are presented in a variety of formats, including lectures, workshops, laboratory practicals, site visits etc. Assessment is based on coursework and examination.

Both research projects are carried out under the supervision of academics within the Division’s five departments (Biomedical Engineering; Cancer Imaging; Cardiovascular Imaging; Imaging Chemistry and Biology and Perinatal Imaging and Health). Some research projects may take place in a collaborating laboratory elsewhere in King's or at a collaborating institution.

Career prospects

Expected destinations are study for PhD, employment (research or service) in the NHS and commercial nuclear medicine services, the pharmaceutical or medical engineering industry.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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This course is for therapeutic radiographers and will enable you to develop your professional knowledge and enhance your clinical and research skills. Read more
This course is for therapeutic radiographers and will enable you to develop your professional knowledge and enhance your clinical and research skills. The modules on this course have been selected with the development and progression of the therapeutic radiography profession in mind.

Teaching, learning and assessment

The teaching and assessment strategies will enable you to develop your full potential by recognising and building on prior knowledge and experience and by facilitating development of subject-related and transferable skills. There are various forms of assessment including case study analysis, portfolio of evidence of practice, essays, written examination and a project containing evidence of research methods and analysis will be used to monitor your progress. Class sizes for attendance based modules are normally around 8-10 students. This ensures that students receive excellent support from tutors and benefit from sharing experiences with peers.

Teaching hours and attendance

Each module which you study on campus will require you to attend classes and carry out independent work. Your attendance at QMU will depend on which module you are studying.

Links with industry/professional bodies

On graduation you will be accredited by the Society and College of Radiographers.

Modules

The full MSc Radiotherapy award of 180 credits will require study of two modules of 90 credits - Research Methods (30 credits), a project (60 credits), and the remaining 90 credits to be taken from the following modules:

30 credits (distance learning): Emerging Technologies in Radiotherapy/ Management of Prostate Cancer/ Management of Breast Cancer

30 credits: Radiotherapy Verification and Analysis/Decision Taking in Radiotherapy Planning for Palliative Cancers/Decision Taking in Radiotherapy Planning for Breast Cancer/ The Principles of Gynaecological Brachytherapy/ The Clinical Practice of Vaginal Vault Brachytherapy/Planning and Delivery of Gynaecological Brachytherapy/ Ultrasound Localisation Procedures for Intrauterine Brachytherapy Insertions/ 3-D Computerised Tomography (CT) Treatment Planning for Vaginal Vault Brachytherapy/ Imaging Modalities (Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Positron Emission Tomography for Therapeutic Radiographers/Image Interpretation and Pattern Recognition for Therapeutic Radiographers (choice of Abdomen/Pelvis – Thorax/CNS-Head/ Neck)/Independent Study/ Current Developments

15 credits : The Principals of Gynaecological Brachytherapy/Leading in Healthcare/Managing Change in Healthcare/Independent Study

Careers

This course is part of continuing professional development and is designed to improve the delivery of the service. Gaining this qualification may enhance your career prospects within the profession of radiography.

Quick Facts

- This course is accredited by the Society and College of Radiographers.
- The course offers advanced practice modules.
- The course offers a flexible approach to learning.

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Bioimaging sciences have played a vital role in improving human life. Read more
Bioimaging sciences have played a vital role in improving human life. A wide range of imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), ultrasound and optical imaging are now important tools for the early detection of disease, understanding basic molecular aspects of living organisms and the evaluation of medical treatment.

This one-year MRes course covers the fundamentals of modern imaging methodologies, including their techniques and application within medicine and the pharmaceutical industry, along with the chemistry behind imaging agents and biomarkers.

Imperial's research strength in imaging sciences is recognised both nationally and internationally, as exemplified by the creation of Imperial's Imaging Sciences Centre (ISC).

The course will progress interdisciplinary development in imaging sciences and create a multidisciplinary team involving chemists, immunologists, radiologists, image scientists, physicists, biomedical scientists and computer scientists.

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As well as giving a solid scientific understanding, the course also addresses commercial, ethical, legal and regulatory requirements, aided by extensive industrial contacts. Read more
As well as giving a solid scientific understanding, the course also addresses commercial, ethical, legal and regulatory requirements, aided by extensive industrial contacts.

Programme Structure

The MSc programmes in Biomedical Engineering are full-time, one academic year (12 consecutive months). The programmes consist of 4 core taught modules and two optional streams. Biomedical, Genetics and Tissue Engineering stream has 3 modules, all compulsory (individual course pages). The second option, Biomedical, Biomechanics and Bioelectronics Engineering stream consists of 5 modules. Students choosing this option will be required to choose 60 credit worth of modules.

The taught modules are delivered to students over two terms of each academic year. The taught modules are examined at the end of each term, and the students begin working on their dissertations on a part-time basis in term 2, then full-time during the months of May to September.

Core Modules
Biomechanics and Biomaterials (15 credit)
Design and Manufacture (15 credit)
Biomedical Engineering Principles (15 credit)
Innovation, Management and Research Methods (15 credit)
Plus: Dissertation (60 credit)

Optional Modules

60 credit to be selected from the following optional modules:
Design of Mechatronic Systems (15 credit)
Biomedical Imaging (15 credit)
Biofluid Mechanics (15 credit)
Artificial Organs and Biomedical Applications (15 credit)
Applied Sensors Instrumentation and Control (30 credit)

Module Descriptions

Applied Sensors Instrumentation and Control

Main topics:

Sensors and instrumentation – Sensor characteristics and the principles of sensing; electronic interfacing with sensors; sensor technologies – physical, chemical and biosensors; sensor examples – position, displacement, velocity, acceleration, force, strain, pressure, temperature; distributed sensor networks; instrumentation for imaging, spectroscopy and ionising radiation detection; 'lab-on-a-chip'.

Control – Control theory and matrix/vector operations; state-space systems, multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) systems, nonlinear systems and linearization. Recurrence relations, discrete time state-space representation, controllability and observability, pole-placement for both continuous and discrete time systems, Luenberger observer. Optimal control systems, Stochastic systems: random variable theory; recursive estimation; introduction to Kalman filtering (KF); brief look at KF for non-linear systems and new results in KF theory.

Artificial Organs and Biomedical Applications

Main topics include: audiology and cochlear implants; prostheses; artificial limbs and rehabilitation engineering; life support systems; robotic surgical assistance; telemedicine; nanotechnology.

Biofluid Mechanics

Main topics include: review of the cardiovascular system; the cardiac cycle and cardiac performance, models of the cardiac system, respiratory system and respiratory performance, lung models, physiological effects of exercise, trauma and disease; blood structure and composition, blood gases. oxygenation, effect of implants and prostheses, blood damage and repair, viscometry of blood, measurement of blood pressure and flow; urinary system: anatomy and physiology, fluid and waste transfer mechanisms, urinary performance and control, effects of trauma, ageing and disease; modelling of biofluid systems, review of mass, momentum and energy transfers related to biological flow systems, fluid mechanics in selected topics relating to the cardiovascular and respiratory systems; measurements in biomedical flows.

Biomechanics and Biomaterials

Main topics include: review of biomechanical principles; introduction to biomedical materials; stability of biomedical materials; biocompatibility; materials for adhesion and joining; applications of biomedical materials; implant design.

Biomedical Engineering Principles

Main topics include: bone structure and composition; the mechanical properties of bone, cartilage and tendon; the cardiovascular function and the cardiac cycle; body fluids and organs; organisation of the nervous system; sensory systems; biomechanical principles; biomedical materials; biofluid mechanics principles, the cardiovascular system, blood structure and composition, modelling of biofluid systems.

Biomedical Imaging

Principle and applications of medical image processing – Basic image processing operations, Advanced edge-detection techniques and image segmentation, Flexible shape extraction, Image restoration, 3D image reconstruction, image guided surgery

Introduction of modern medical imaging techniques – Computerized tomography imaging (principle, image reconstruction with nondiffracting sources, artifacts, clinical applications)

Magnetic resonance imaging (principle, image contrast and measurement of MR related phenomena, examples of contrast changes with changes of instrumental parameters and medical applications)

Ultrasound imaging (description of ultrasound radiation, transducers, basic imaging techniques: A-scan, B-scan and Doppler technique; clinical application)

Positron emission tomography (PET imaging) (principle, radioactive substance, major clinical applications)

Design and Manufacture

Main topics include: design and materials optimisation; management and manufacturing strategies; improving clinical medical and industrial interaction; meeting product liability, ethical, legal and commercial needs.

Design of Mechatronic Systems

Microcontroller technologies. Data acquisition. Interfacing to power devices. Sensors (Infrared, Ultrasonic, etc.). Optoelectronic devices and signal conditioning circuits. Pulse and timing-control circuits. Drive circuits. Electrical motor types: Stepper, Servo. Electronic Circuits. Power devices. Power conversion and power electronics. Line filters and protective devices. Industrial applications of digital devices.

Innovation and Management and Research Methods

Main topics include: company structure and organisation will be considered (with particular reference to the United Kingdom), together with the interfacing between hospital, clinical and healthcare sectors; review of existing practice: examination of existing equipment and devices; consideration of current procedures for integrating engineering expertise into the biomedical environment. Discussion of management techniques; design of biomedical equipment: statistical Procedures and Data Handling; matching of equipment to biomedical systems; quality assurance requirements in clinical technology; patient safety requirements and protection; sterilisation procedures and infection control; failure criteria and fail-safe design; maintainability and whole life provision; public and environmental considerations: environmental and hygenic topics in the provision of hospital services; legal and ethical requirements; product development: innovation in the company environment, innovation in the clinical environment; cash flow and capital provision; testing and validation; product development criteria and strategies.

Dissertation

The choice of Dissertation topic will be made by the student in consultation with academic staff and (where applicable) with the sponsoring company. The topic agreed is also subject to approval by the Module Co-ordinator. The primary requirement for the topic is that it must have sufficient scope to allow the student to demonstrate his or her ability to conduct a well-founded programme of investigation and research. It is not only the outcome that is important since the topic chosen must be such that the whole process of investigation can be clearly demonstrated throughout the project. In industrially sponsored projects the potential differences between industrial and academic expectations must be clearly understood.

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