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Masters Degrees (Popular Literature)

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This course offers an opportunity for the advanced study of popular literature. In recent years a body of theoretical and cultural historical material has developed that attempts to define what 'the popular' means now, and what it has meant historically. Read more
This course offers an opportunity for the advanced study of popular literature. In recent years a body of theoretical and cultural historical material has developed that attempts to define what 'the popular' means now, and what it has meant historically. At the same time texts that do not seem to belong to traditional canons increasingly attract critical attention, and have come to be taught at university level alongside more canonical texts. In this light the course will cover such popular genres as adventure fiction, children's literature, horror, detective fiction, romance, pornography and science fiction, as well as offering an advanced introduction to such topics as the bestseller, genre theory, print culture and readership.

The course comprises two elements:

A core course meeting twice a week for 2 hours over 2 terms
Option courses meeting once a week for 2 hours - students take one per term

This creates a total of 6 contact hours per week. Students are also expected to spend a substantial amount of time in library research. Assessment is a combination of four 5,000 word essays and a 15,000 word dissertation to be supervised by a member of staff.

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This new taught-Masters degree offers a deep insight into the Arab world through its literatures. It is an advanced programme designed for students with a good first degree in Arabic or with a good university degree who also know Arabic. Read more
This new taught-Masters degree offers a deep insight into the Arab world through its literatures. It is an advanced programme designed for students with a good first degree in Arabic or with a good university degree who also know Arabic. The fundamental objective is to make Arabic culture and literature accessible to a wider body of postgraduate students and to provide them with training in the study of literature. Students develop an advanced understanding of Arabic literature and gain detailed knowledge of its past and present. The syllabus combines the literary approaches of comparative literature with in-depth study of Arabic literature. Students have the opportunity to become familiar with, among other things, literary theory, translation techniques, the sociology of literature, the social and political dimensions of modern Arabic literature, and different genres and themes of classical, medieval and modern Arabic literature.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maarablit/

Structure

Students take modules to the value of three units from the lists of options below, and write a 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic.

Options List:
Theory and techniques of Comparative Literature - 15PCSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Social and Political Dimensions of Modern Arabic Literature - 15PNMC347 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Arabic Women's Writing: Theories and Practices - 15PNMC411 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Early and Medieval Arabic Linguistic Thought: Scholarship and Literature - 15PNMC410 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
A Modern Arabic Literary Genre: Themes and Techniques - 15PNMC046 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Arabic Poetry and Criticism - 15PNMC048 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Arabic Popular Literature: Themes, Genres & Theory - 15PNMC045 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Modern Palestinian Literature (PG) - 15PNMC379 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Classical Arabic Prose Literature and Adab - 15PNMC047 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Reading Classical Arabic Historians: Themes and Trends in Islamic Historiography - 15PNMC378 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Arabic Critical Theory and Thought - 15PNMC403 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Culture, Society and Politics in Classical Arabic Literature - 15PNMC426 (1 Unit) - Full Year

MA Arabic Literature- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 34kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maarablit/file80795.pdf

Teaching & Learning

All courses are taught in English, and essays and presentations are also done in English. All courses apart from "Theories and Techniques of Comparative Literature" involve reading some original Arabic texts.

Most courses are taught in seminar groups. These demand active participation by students, e.g. by giving presentations and by discussion with other students in the class, in order to develop research potential, original thinking and, by the tutor's direction, structured knowledge of the topic.

Classes are one two-hour session each week; in some cases an additional tutorial hour is added. In addition students are encouraged to attend lectures and seminars organised by the AHRB Centre for Asian and African Literature and the London Middle East Institute.

Destinations

A postgraduate degree in MA Arabic Literature from SOAS provides students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, history, cinema, politics, economics or law. Graduates of this programme will develop their ability to engage with and explore relationships between indigenous aesthetics of the region and contemporary literary theories. Some graduates leave SOAS to pursue careers directly related to their study area, while others have made use of the intellectual training for involvement in analysing and solving many of the problems that contemporary societies now face.

Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in the business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. Graduates can use their skills in Arabic and literary study in a variety of occupations, particularly those in which deep knowledge of Arabic intellectual culture and a trained mind are an advantage.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Study from anywhere in the world at times that suit you. This MA is taught by children’s literature specialists from the award-winning National Centre for Research in Children’s Literature. Read more
  • Study from anywhere in the world at times that suit you
  • This MA is taught by children’s literature specialists from the award-winning National Centre for Research in Children’s Literature
  • A Creative Writing Pathway allows you to study writing for a child audience from a practitioner’s perspective
  • We provide a supportive online learning environment

Summary

This unique course allows you to study children’s literature in a flexible, part-time format from wherever you are in the world.

You will explore the exciting and varied world of children’s literature, and to examine how texts aimed at young people convey and challenge ideas about childhood. You will work with staff who have international reputations in areas such as philosophy in children's literature, popular fiction, adolescence and young adult fiction, early children's books, and writing for young people. 

 As a distance learner you will have support from the Department, regular contact with your tutors, access to specialist services, and a wide range of e-books and digitised items from the Children’s Literature Collection at the University Library which contains 3,000 critical, theoretical, bibliographical and reference works and approximately 40 specialist children's literature journals. 

Through this programme you will become a member of the National Centre for Research in Children’s Literature (NCRCL), regarded as the premier institution for children’s literature research in Britain. The NCRCL has close links with organisations that work to further the study and teaching of children's literature, including The International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY), Seven Stories (The National Centre for Children’s Books), and Booktrust. The University is also the exclusive Creative Partner of Barnes Children’s Literature Festival, London’s largest event dedicated to children’s writing. You can stay up-to-date with the NCRCL by following their blog.

Content

The Distance Learning MA is taught through a mixture of independent study, tutor feedback, and peer support. You will have access to an online learning environment, allowing you to work with digital materials, watch video lectures, and engage in learning activities. You will have the chance to discuss ideas with other students through discussion boards and interact with your tutor in online seminars. At the end of each module, you will complete a piece of coursework, usually an essay, to demonstrate your understanding of the subject.

This programme asks you to think about children’s literature in new ways. In your first year you will be introduced to essential critical approaches, from postcolonial theory, psychoanalysis, and reader-response criticism, to new ideas about the child, power and ethics. Using these tools, you’ll study a selection of fairy tales, picture books and short stories, including classics and contemporary and innovative texts.

In optional modules you can study the history of British children’s literature from its origins to the present day, as well as texts in translation, and elements of form and genre. Throughout the course you will gain knowledge of literary works produced for children, and the social, cultural and historical contexts of their production. The eclectic and rigorous nature of the programme allows you to contribute original work from a variety of perspectives, particularly in the extended critical Dissertation. The creative writing modules, ‘Writing for a Child Audience’ and ‘Creative Dissertation’ represent exciting additions to the programme, recognising the fact that many of our students have ambitions to write for children. 

This MA can also be studied on-site.

Modules

Here are some of the modules we offer:

Compulsory

Optional

Compulsory (MA students only)

Compulsory and Required modules

Compulsory and/or required modules may change when we review and update programmes. Above is a list of modules offered this academic year.

Optional modules

Optional modules, when offered as part of a programme, may vary from year to year and are subject to viability.

Career options

Possible careers include teaching and librarianship, children’s publishing and arts management.



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Work with internationally-renowned scholars at the National Centre of Research in Children's Literature and Roehampton's Chancellor, Professor Dame Jacqueline Wilson. Read more
  • Work with internationally-renowned scholars at the National Centre of Research in Children's Literature and Roehampton's Chancellor, Professor Dame Jacqueline Wilson.
  • Access to Roehampton's special Children's Literature collection and archive
  • On-going relationships with arts organisations and other literary employers in London

Summary

This degree provides a rigorous course that interrogates the literary, creative, social, cultural, political and historical contexts in the field of children's literature. You will explore landmark books such as The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe or The Railway Children, alongside the contemporary innovations of Patrick Ness or Emily Gravett.

You will work with staff who have international reputations in areas such as philosophy in children's literature, popular fiction, adolescence and Young Adult, early children's books, and writing for young people. You will also benefit from a series of guest speakers, extra-curricular activities and field trips that will enhance your student experience and ensure you get the most out of your studies, and you will have the chance of working with Roehampton's Chancellor and renowned author Professor Dame Jacqueline Wilson.

As a Children's Literature student you will become a member of the National Centre for Research in Children's Literature (NCRCL), regarded as the premier institution for children's literature research in Britain. The NCRCL has close links with organisations that work to further the study and teaching of children's literature, including The International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY), Seven Stories (The National Centre for Children's Books) and Booktrust. The centre also hosts and co-organises an annual one-day British IBBY/NCRCL MA Conference and runs a regular NCRCL Conference, showcasing themes from members' research interests. Keynote speakers have included Michael Rosen, Matthew Grenby, Emer O'Sullivan, Neil Gaiman, and Julia Eccleshare.

Due to the reputation of our long-standing programme, our graduates are very attractive to employers, particularly publishers who have previously offered internships to our students and graduates. The University is the exclusive Creative Partner of Barnes Children's Literature Festival, London's largest event dedicated to children's writing. The partnership provides paid and voluntary work experience opportunities for students at the festival, as well as opportunities to attend events for free. We also have an on-going relationship with Hodder Children's Books and connections with other literary employers in the local community, including Wimbledon Bookfest, and Battersea Arts Centre.

Roehampton hosts a number of Children's' Literature collections in our library containing 6,000 critical, theoretical, bibliographical and reference works and approximately 40 specialist children's literature journals. We are also home to the Richmal Crompton Collection. This includes her personal library, editions and translations of her famous Just William stories and scripts including short stories and radio plays.

Content

This stimulating programme allows for the exploration of a range of literary texts from medieval learning materials, through landmark books such as Treasure Island, The Tale of Peter Rabbit or The Eagle of the Ninth, to the contemporary innovations of Mark Haddon, Shaun Tan or Jackie Kay. You will examine the dynamic relationship between children's books, other media, and social constructions of childhood.

You will study a range of critical and theoretical approaches and learn about key ideas that have shaped literary criticism, particularly those that resonate with children's literature studies. You will pay special attention to archives, and what impact they have on textual culture, and will be trained in using them as a resource.

If you have the ambition to write for children, you will have the opportunity to take creative writing modules as part of your degree. MA students will complete the course by undertaking either a dissertation or creative dissertation. The dissertation is a supervised research project involving an in-depth study of an aspect of children's literature that interests you. For the creative dissertation, you will produce a creative portfolio that could include short stories, picturebook scripts, poems, or a novella, alongside a critical reflections of your work.

Children's literature can also be studied by distance learning.

Modules

Here are some of the modules we offer:

Compulsory

Optional

Compulsory (MA students only)

Compulsory and Required modules

Compulsory and/or required modules may change when we review and update programmes. Above is a list of modules offered this academic year.

Optional modules

Optional modules, when offered as part of a programme, may vary from year to year and are subject to viability.

Career options

Teaching, children’s publishing and arts management.



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Staff supervise research in the following areas. Read more
Staff supervise research in the following areas: African literature in English and in translation, Caribbean literature, African-American and Native American literatures, Australian literature, New Zealand and South Pacific literature since 1800, Indian and South-East Asian literature in English and in translation, middle-eastern literature and mediterranean literature, postcolonial women writers, theory, and travel writing.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/236/postcolonial-studies

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

As a research student, you meet regularly with your supervisor, and have the opportunity to take part in informal reading groups and research seminars to which students, staff and visiting speakers contribute papers. You also benefit from a series of research skills seminars that run in the spring term, which gives you a chance to share the research expertise of staff and postdoctoral members of the department.

As a basis for advanced research, you must take the School and Faculty research methods programmes.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

The Templeman Library is well stocked with excellent research resources, as are Canterbury Cathedral Archives and Library. There are a number of special collections: the John Crow Collection of Elizabethan and other early printed texts; the Reading/Raynor Collection of theatre history (over 7,000 texts or manuscripts); ECCO (Eighteenth-Century Collections Online); the Melville manuscripts relating to popular culture in the 19th and early 20th centuries; the Pettingell Collection (over 7,500 items) of 19th-century drama; the Eliot Collection; children’s literature; and popular literature. A gift from Mrs Valerie Eliot has increased the Library’s already extensive holdings in modern poetry. The British Library in London is also within easy reach.

Besides the Templeman Library, School resources include photocopying, fax and telephone access, support for attending and organising conferences, and a dedicated postgraduate study space equipped with computer terminals and a printer.

- Conferences and seminars

Our research centres organise many international conferences, symposia and workshops. The School also plays a pivotal role in the Kent Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, of which all graduates are associate members. The Institute hosts interdisciplinary conferences, colloquia, and other events, and establishes international links for all Kent graduates through its network with other advanced institutes worldwide.

School of English postgraduate students are encouraged to organise and participate in a conference which takes place in the summer term. This provides students with the invaluable experience of presenting their work to their peers.

The School runs several series of seminars, lectures and readings throughout the academic year. Our weekly research seminars are organised collaboratively by staff and graduates in the School. Speakers range from our own postgraduate students, to members of staff, to distinguished lecturers who are at the forefront of contemporary research nationally and internationally.

The Centre for Creative Writing hosts a very popular and successful weekly reading series; guests have included poets Katherine Pierpoint, Tony Lopez, Christopher Reid and George Szirtes, and novelists Abdulrazak Gurnah, Ali Smith, Marina Warner and Will Self.

The University of Kent is now in partnership with the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA). Benefits from this affiliation include free membership for incoming students; embedded seminar opportunities at the ICA and a small number of internships for our students. The School of English also runs an interdisciplinary MA programme in the Contemporary which offers students an internship at the Institute of Contemporary Arts.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. They also edit several periodicals including: Angelaki: Journal of the Theoretical Humanities; The Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature: 600-1500; The Dickensian; Literature Compass; Oxford Literary Review; Theatre Notebook and Wasafiri.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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An MA in English is increasingly regarded as a valuable extension from undergraduate study in that it goes beyond a “baseline” BA qualification by. Read more
An MA in English is increasingly regarded as a valuable extension from undergraduate study in that it goes beyond a “baseline” BA qualification by:

--offering students an anticipated edge in the professional job market;

--enhancing applications for teacher training where advanced specialist knowledge can be an asset;

--providing necessary postgraduate experience for students who intend to continue their study of literature at MPhil/PhD level;

--providing a year of literary study for those who wish to take a career break.

Intended to meet the needs of students who have a passion for English literature and wish to extend their undergraduate study by engaging in further fast-track study leading to a Master’s qualification, our MA is designed as a one-year full-time programme. (In some years a part-time route may be available-please check our website for details).

The MA timetable has been designed to enable concentration of seminars within two days (Monday and Tuesday) to offer flexibility with students’ other commitments.

Our MA offers opportunities to those who wish to pursue an eclectic generalist programme of modules and to those who seek specialisation in particular areas of literary study. Students, therefore, enrol on one of three pathways.

MA IN ENGLISH LITERATURE
The MA in English Literature pathway enables students to select from a range of modules and work in a variety of areas either not covered in their undergraduate choices, or which they desire more deeply to examine. Contributing tutors are acknowledged experts in their specialisms.

MA IN ENGLISH: CHILDREN'S LITERATURE
The MA in English: Children's Literature focuses on key areas within children’s literature and draws on the department’s long-established reputation in this field. Our 1981 introduction of an undergraduate module in Children’s Literature made us one of the earliest English departments, nationally or internationally, to offer modules in this rapidly expanding and popular field of study.

MA IN ENGLISH: LITERATURES VICTORIAN AND MODERN
The MA in English: Literatures Victorian and Modern attends to specific genres, types, and sub-periods of literature within the consistently popular Victorian and Modern periods. It differs from period-based MAs in other institutions by offering modules in specific literary types rather than generalist or panoramic treatments of period.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
All MA students complete “Issues, Scholarship and Method in Literary Research” 1 and 2, four option modules, and produce a 15,000-word dissertation. Taught modules run for one term each. The dissertation is completed during Term 3 and the summer.

MANDATORY ELEMENTS:

MLS4ISM1: Issues, Scholarship and Method in Literary Research 1

MLS4ISM2: Issues, Scholarship and Method in Literary Research 2

MLS4DIS: Dissertation

OPTION MODULES:

MLS4CMCL: Classics of Modern Children’s Literature *#

MLS4NCCL: Nineteenth-century Children’s Literature *#

MLS4VCF: Victorian Crime Fiction #

MLS4LFS: Literature of the Fin de Siècle #

MLS4LWTC: Literature and War in the Twentieth Century #

MLS4LYAF: Young Adult Fiction *#

PATHWAY REQUIREMENTS
Students taking the MA in English Literature pathway can choose any four options and may write their dissertation on an approved topic in any area of English literature.

Students taking the MA in English: Children's Literature pathway must take at least two of the modules marked * over the course of the year and complete their dissertation on an approved topic in children’s literature.

Students taking the MA in English: Literatures Victorian and Modern pathway must take at least two of the modules marked # over the course of the year and complete their dissertation on an approved topic in Victorian and/or Modern literatures.

Please see our website for further details. The Programme Convenor welcomes enquiries about any aspect of the programme.

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Children's literature is recognised as a remarkable and dynamic part of literary and social culture. This course, the first full-time one year taught Masters programme in an Irish university, offers graduates in English or related disciplines the opportunity to study a broad range of children's literature in English. Read more
Children's literature is recognised as a remarkable and dynamic part of literary and social culture. This course, the first full-time one year taught Masters programme in an Irish university, offers graduates in English or related disciplines the opportunity to study a broad range of children's literature in English. It addresses chronologies, genres, modes of criticism, publishing trends and the full apparatus of literary investigation across four centuries, while addressing the unique power dynamics that arise from adult authors writing for child readers. It is particularly concerned with multidisciplinary study because of the unique integration of words and images through the medium of picture books and graphic novels, and because its readership is more likely than any other to be 'technological natives' to have grown up taking multimedia approaches to texts for granted. Complete in itself, the course may also serve as preparation for those intending to proceed to further research in the field. Unique opportunities exist to work with the Pollard Collection, the bequest of more than 10,000 children's books left to the College by Mary 'Paul' Pollard, one time keeper of Early Printed Books, in 2005.

Course Content:

There are three elements:

i) Perspectives and case studies in children's literature (core module),

ii) Optional modules:
The child and Victorian literature,
Tolkien: books for children and children's literature,
Historical novels,
Young Adult fiction,
'Be Merry and Wise': the rise of children's literature.

Students choose one optional module in Michaelmas term and a second in Hilary term. Some of the options are shared with the MPhil in Popular Literature.

iii) Dissertation

Assessment is through four 5,000-7,000 word essays and a 15,000 word dissertation.

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This programme allows you to engage with texts and writers from across the 20th and 21st century as well as the cultural, critical, conceptual and political contexts that have shaped them. Read more

This programme allows you to engage with texts and writers from across the 20th and 21st century as well as the cultural, critical, conceptual and political contexts that have shaped them.

You’ll have the chance to study major canonical and lesser-known authors as well as popular literature and film adaptation, engaging with some of the defining and urgent cultural issues and legacies of this period. This may include psychoanalysis, post-war writing, postcolonial literatures, mass and popular culture and eco-criticism and the environment. You could even select modules from other periods to broaden your knowledge.

At the same time, you’ll develop your understanding of research methods in literary studies, preparing for further study or a career in a range of different sectors. Taught by leading researchers and using our impressive library resources and Special Collections, you’ll explore how writers have responded to the complexities of the modern world.

You’ll learn in a stimulating environment with access to excellent resources for your research. The world-class Brotherton Library has extensive holdings to support the highest levels of academic study of theliteratures of these periods, and our Special Collections are full of archive and manuscript material as well as correspondence, notes, lectures and other papers from writers and poets from Simon Armitage to Tony Harrison, Geoffrey Hill to Stan Barstow, Sophie Hannah to Arthur Ransome and the critic George Wilson-Knight. The University Library offers full training to help you make the most of them, equipping you with valuable skills in the process.

Course content

You’ll begin the programme with a core module that develops your knowledge of research methods and approaches in literary studies, helping you prepare for the rest of your studies.

At the same time you’ll take the first of your three optional modules, allowing you to pursue topics that interest you in particular. You may focus entirely on modern and contemporary literature, or you can choose to take up to two from the full range of options across the School of English. You’ll take two optional modules in Semester Two.

Throughout the year, you’ll develop your high-level skills in research and analysis while developing specialist knowledge of your chosen topics. You’ll expand on this in your dissertation or research project, where you’ll research a topic of your choice in British or Irish modern and contemporary literature and submit your work by the end of the programme in September.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll take fewer modules in each year and study over a 24 month period.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Studying English: Research Methods 30 credits
  • Research Project 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Caribbean and Black British Writing 30 credits
  • Reading (with) Psychoanalysis 30 credits
  • The Enigmatic Body of Modernism 30 credits
  • Global Indigeneity 30 credits
  • Culture and Anarchy: 1945-1965 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read English Literature (Modern and Contemporary pathway) MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read English Literature (Modern and Contemporary pathway) MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Most of our MA modules are taught in two-hour weekly seminars, where you’ll discuss issues arising from your reading with a small group of students and your tutor. You’ll also have the chance to expand your learning by making the most of the range of visiting speakers and research seminars that we run throughout the year. You’ll also benefit from supervisions throughout semester 2 with your dissertation supervisor.

However, independent study is still crucial to this degree, allowing you to pursue your interests and build your skills.

Assessment

We use different assessment methods, but most of your modules will be assessed by a single 4,000 word essay, which you submit at the end of the semester. Your research project or dissertation is usually between 12,000 and 15,000 words. During the year you may also be expected to give presentations on your reading during seminars, or submit unassessed essays to get feedback on your work.

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with a wide range of advanced transferable skills which are valuable in a wide range of careers.

You’ll be a confident researcher who can work independently as well as within a team. You’ll be a strong communicator, both verbally and in writing, and be able to think critically and analytically. In addition, you’ll have a strong level of cultural and critical awareness, and you’ll be able to look at a situation from different points of view.

All of these qualities are attractive to employers across sectors, and you’ll be well equipped to pursue a career in a wide range of fields depending on your interests. These could include teaching, journalism, publishing, advertising, broadcasting and law. Many of our graduates also progress to PhD-level study and you’ll be in a good position to develop a career in academia.

Careers support

Leeds for Life is our unique approach to helping you make the most of University by supporting your academic and personal development. Find out more at the Leeds for Life website.

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Whether undertaken for the continued love of literature, or for personal or professional development, studying our MA English Literature will help you gain a more confident critical voice and advanced analytical and research skills. Read more
Whether undertaken for the continued love of literature, or for personal or professional development, studying our MA English Literature will help you gain a more confident critical voice and advanced analytical and research skills.

This course is taught by internationally recognised scholars who are at the cutting-edge of their areas of research. You will work with us on the latest developments in literary criticism.

The Humanities department runs a number of exciting research groups, many of which are interdisciplinary in method and scope. The English division has particular strengths in the Early Modern period, the Long Eighteenth Century, Modernism, Gender, and Popular Culture.

This course has several available start dates and learning methods - for more information, please view the relevant web-page below:
2 years part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/english-literature-dtpegl6/

1 year distance learning - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/english-literature-dtdegl6/

2 years distance learning - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/english-literature-dtpegld6/

Learn From The Best

This MA reflects – and is informed by – staff interests across periods, locations, and theoretical approaches: from the Early Modern period to contemporary writing; British, American and transnational literature; sexuality; and cultural heritage.

Each MA module is reflective of areas of staff expertise, ranging from the gory delights of the Gothic to how associations between authors and locations lead to the development of literary heritage sites, such as Dove Cottage.

Northumbria’s Humanities department works with a range of cultural partners including New Writing North, the co-operative movement, Tyne & Wear Archives and Museums and Shandy Hall, providing students with direct industry exposure and live project opportunities.

Teaching And Assessment

During the English Literature MA you will be encouraged to become more aware of the production and determination of meaning by historical, social, political, stylistic, ethnic, gender, geographical and other contexts.

This heightened awareness is facilitated through examining literature produced within a wide range of contexts: different periods; geographical locations; as well as a variety of social backgrounds (institutional, gendered, private, public, domestic). This wide-ranging critical examination opens up new perspectives on literary texts and provides you with the strategies needed to discuss literature in expert and critically informed ways.

You will choose your non-core modules from a pool while the core modules Critical Contexts and Research Methods: Traditional and Digital will run in all years. You conceive your dissertation topic individually in conjunction with a supervisor of similar research interests.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
EL7016 - Dark Tourism: Urban Underworlds and Modern City Spaces (Core, 30 Credits)
EL7018 - Final Frontiers: future worlds, cyberspace and alternative realities (Optional, 30 Credits)
EL7019 - Research Methods: Traditional and Digital (Core, 30 Credits)
EL7021 - Critical Contexts (Core, 30 Credits)
EL7022 - MA English Literature Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)
EL7027 - Writers in their Place: Literature and Heritage (Optional, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

The delivery of the MA offers a degree of flexibility by allowing you to choose your learning environment. The MA in English Literature is offered in a traditional classroom setting with regular face-to-face supervision, or alternatively you can complete the course via distance learning through a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

The Humanities department is made up of a community of learners all the way through from first year undergraduate to final year PhD level. All Humanities staff are engaged in research and actively create the knowledge that is taught in the department.

English Literature MA students, as part of Northumbria’s Humanities department, will have access to the new Institute for Humanities which houses a range of specialist research resources.

Research-Rich Learning

The subject area of English and Creative Writing produces high quality research and has been successful in securing external funding for research projects from the British Academy, the Arts and Humanities Research Council, and the Leverhulme Trust.

Northumbria is rated in the UK top 15 for the quality of its English Literature, Language and Creative Writing publications. You can explore some of the key themes here.

Furthermore, as an MA student in English Literature you will engage with the activities of the Institute for Humanities, which is home to five international journals in English studies and which regularly hosts an exciting range of seminars, symposia and conferences on topics as varied as Memory, Heritage and Identity; Transnationalism and Societal Change; Digital Humanities; Medical Humanities; and American Studies.

Give Your Career An Edge

On completion of the MA, you will have improved your employability through enhancing your critical skills and attitudes, presentation skills, and reflective and evaluative abilities. You will be self-motivating, be capable of making decisions in complex situations, and possess a thirst for independent learning.

In addition to these personal skills, you will have demonstrated a critical awareness of the current research and scholarship within your discipline, facilitating your ability to interpret knowledge in a variety of professional fields.

The MA builds on undergraduate skills, distinguished by the level of intensity, complexity, and density of study. Advanced communication skills and media literacy must be demonstrated along with exceptional ability for time management, ethical and professional understanding, and highly developed research and inquiry skills.

From the start of the course you are encouraged to access the central university Careers and Employment Service, and to use this service regularly to seek advice on areas such as career guidance.

Your Future

There are considerable opportunities for you to advance your studies further, and advice in writing PhD and funding applications is available. The course offers a qualification that may enhance promotion prospects in some professions – most notably teaching, professional research, museums/archives, public policy, and project management.

Julie Orme came to Northumbria as a mature student and achieved a distinction in the English Literature MA. She says:

“Studying at Northumbria allowed me to develop good analytical and research skills and to attain the grades and display the work ethos necessary for becoming a good prospect for employers. It has also opened the door to further, vocational study.

The best thing about my MA was the way that one's critical skills were developed to the point of autonomous study whereby, one graduated from being a student to being a literary critic."

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Explore Emerson's Graduate Programs. Fantasy. Science fiction. Horror. Mystery. Young adult. Become a genre fiction author with our . Read more

Explore Emerson's Graduate Programs

Fantasy. Science fiction. Horror. Mystery. Young adult. Become a genre fiction author with our Online Master of Fine Arts in Popular Fiction Writing and Publishing. Our flexible graduate program allows you to work on your writing from anywhere in the world, with online workshops, literature seminars, and publishing courses that fit your schedule. Become a better writer, explore the history of your genre, and learn how to take the first steps toward publishing. 

In this program, you'll have the chance to:

  • Develop your skills and focus on creating plot and character-driven stories,
  • Learn how books are published and marketed from trade publishing professionals, 
  • Connect with a network of renowned writers, publishers, and academics, and
  • Craft a thesis to submit to agents or self-publish, with one-on-one support from your advisor

Why Popular Fiction?

The MFA in Popular Fiction Writing and Publishing is one of the first online writing programs to prepare students to write professional-level stories and novels in the genres of fantasy, science fiction, horror, mystery, thrillers, and young adult. The program is an opportunity for students to read deeply, think critically, and discuss popular fiction with peers from various professional perspectives. Students will strengthen their writing and editing skills and learn contemporary practices for publishing their work or finding and working with literary agents, professional editors, and marketers to bring their vision to a wide readership. The program, which draws on the expertise of writers, literary scholars, and publishers, offers students the unique experience to take creative workshops and literature courses as well as hands-on publishing courses aimed at teaching them how to turn a completed manuscript into a polished, publishable work.

Why Online?

The online MFA program provides a chance to understand the nature of story-telling from a personal, historical and market perspective. Online writing workshops serve as the core of the curriculum and are designed to allow writers of different genres to work together to gain a deeper understanding of the art and craft of writing popular fiction. To complement the workshop experience, our online program also requires you to take literature courses on the history and current trends in specific genres as well as publishing course that explore the different paths to publications.

The online program is convenient and flexible, allowing students from anywhere in the world to work on their fiction writing, including working adults, parents, or those who are unable to attend a traditional college. The program is designed to work around students’ schedules, and there are no residency requirements. Our online workshops, literature seminars, and publishing courses give students the ability to participate in class discussions with ease and to plan their study time around family, work, or other life commitments. The program provides a comfortable learning environment for writers.

What Unique Opportunities does the online MFA in Popular Fiction Writing and Publishing Provide?

  • A focus on developing plot and character-driven stories in genres of speculative fiction, thriller, and young adult
  • A chance to learn from professionals from trade publishing on how books are published and marketed
  • A network of writers, publishers, and academics
  • The ability to take classes from anywhere in the world
  • Courses that fit your busy schedule

Why Emerson College?

The Department of Writing, Literature and Publishing at Emerson College is home to one of the longest running creative writing MFA programs in the country and one of the only Masters programs in publishing in North America. Based in the heart of downtown Boston, Emerson sits at the crossroads of intellectual inquiry, creative endeavor, and innovation. The College has fostered a community of writers, editors, publishers, and teachers for several decades. The online program in Popular Fiction Writing and Publishing promotes a space for fiction writers who want to focus on working in the areas of speculative fiction, crime novels, or young adult literature.

The MFA at a Glance

With rolling admissions in Fall, Spring, and Summer, our online program offers students online workshops where they can learn how to build their worlds and develop their skills. Students will take writing workshops, literature classes that will provide a framework for understanding the tradition of their genre, and publishing courses that will instruct them on the various options for publishing genre fiction. Students will also work one-on-one with a faculty advisor to craft a thesis to send out to agents or be self-published.



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This interdisciplinary MA is taught on an interdepartmental basis by staff who cover an exceptionally wide range of expertise. The flexible nature of the programme enables students to develop their own interests whilst gaining a thorough understanding of modern literary theory and comparative literature. Read more

This interdisciplinary MA is taught on an interdepartmental basis by staff who cover an exceptionally wide range of expertise. The flexible nature of the programme enables students to develop their own interests whilst gaining a thorough understanding of modern literary theory and comparative literature.

About this degree

Students develop a thorough understanding of modern theories of literature, the contexts of literature and the interaction between literatures, and gain practical experience in comparative literary studies. The programme also develops the critical and analytical skills necessary for research in this field.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. There are two pathways through the programme: taught and research.

Taught: two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). Research: two core modules (60 credits), one optional module (30 credits), and a dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

  • Modern Literary Theory
  • Comparative Literary Studies

Optional modules

  • Revolutions in Literature: Writing China's Twenthieth Century
  • Apocalypse Literature
  • Consumer Culture in Literature
  • Readings in Twentieth Century Chinese Literature and Culture: Family, Childhood, Gender
  • Performance, Visual Media and Popular Culture in Africa
  • Theoretical Issues in history and Literature
  • Language, Culture & History
  • Topics in Cultural Studies
  • Translation Studies
  • Comparative Medieval literature
  • Literary and Cultural Theory
  • All Quiet on the Eastern Front: Culture, Politics, and Everyday Life in Central and Eastern Europe from Stalin to Present
  • Literatures of Rupture: Modernism in Russia and Eastern Europe
  • Modern Chinese Literature in Translation
  • Introduction to Hermeneutics: How to Read and Interpret Texts

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words (taught pathway) or 18,000 words (research pathway).

Teaching and learning

Teaching and supervision are organised on an interdepartmental basis. Teaching sessions are envisaged as interactive, with a limited amount of lecturing and an emphasis on student participation and critical discussion. Assessment is based on a combination of shorter and longer essays and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Comparative Literature MA

Careers

Publishing, academic teaching, research and journalism are the most common destinations for graduates with an MA in Comparative Literature but the civil service, teaching or employment as a translator or copywriter are becoming increasingly attractive alternatives.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Digital Co-ordinator, Institute of Contemporary Arts
  • Children's Books Editor, Hachette-Phoenix
  • Junior Copywriter, J. Walter Thompson, Athens
  • Freelance Journalist, CNN
  • PhD in French, University of Oxford

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

With its exceptional range of modern and ancient languages and cultures, UCL provides a comprehensive environment for comparative literary study.

Departments housed in the Faculty of Arts & Humanities cover Danish, Dutch, English, French, German, Ancient Greek, Hebrew, Icelandic, Italian, Latin, Norwegian, Spanish, Swedish and Yiddish. The School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES) deals with all the major languages, literatures and cultures of Central and Eastern Europe. A co-operation agreement with SOAS, University of London, covers teaching as well as research and ensures global coverage.

Many UCL staff have comparative and interdisciplinary research interests in addition to their subject specialism. We are particularly interested in innovative approaches to literary and cultural studies, and in research with a comparative, cross-cultural, and interdisciplinary focus, including research in the following fields: literary and cultural theory, material and visual cultures, reception studies, themes and genres, cultural history, comparative gender and performance studies, translation studies, diaspora and migration studies, and new media.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The course furnishes the student with the opportunity to pursue English literary studies at an advanced level, developing the skills and knowledge required for textual, theoretical and historical analysis in the candidate’s chosen field. Read more
The course furnishes the student with the opportunity to pursue English literary studies at an advanced level, developing the skills and knowledge required for textual, theoretical and historical analysis in the candidate’s chosen field. It offers one-to-one supervision from experts in the field. You are also encouraged to participate in the lively research environment of the School and College, which includes the English Literature research seminar series, scholarly reading groups, workshops and conferences.

The course consists of taught modules (Part One) mainly assessed by essays, followed by a dissertation (Part Two). The modules within the English Literature programme are grouped into four ‘pathways’ . Each of these represents a particular area of research strength at Bangor and offers an aspect of literary study in which MA students may choose to specialise.

The four pathways:

1. Medieval and Early Modern Literature

2. Material Texts

3. Revolution and Modernity, 1750 to the Present

4. Four Nations Literature

Students who prefer not to specialise by following one of the pathways may alternatively pursue a broader portfolio of advanced literary studies in English by completing the compulsory module (see below) and a free choice of three other modules.

Course Structure
Part One:

In the first part of the MA programme, all students are required to study FOUR modules of 30 credits each; for full-time students, this means two modules per semester. Of these four modules, one is compulsory: Literary Theory, Scholarship and Research (in semester 1). This module lays the foundation for the MA by introducing you to key ideas in literary theory, the analysis of texts and the techniques of advanced scholarly writing.

In addition, students are required to choose three further modules from those listed below. You may make an open selection of modules OR follow one of the four pathways described above. In order to complete a pathway, you must choose at least TWO of your three optional modules from that pathway, with the final module being a free choice (from the pathway, from elsewhere in the English Literature MA programme, or from other relevant postgraduate programmes in the School or College).

1. Modules on Medieval and Early Modern Literature:

Pre-Modern Travel
Manuscripts and Printed Books
The European Renaissance
Myth and the Early Modern Author
Women’s Devotional Writing
Medieval Arthur
Post-Medieval Arthur
Advanced Latin for Postgraduates
Editing Texts
2. Modules on Material Texts:

Manuscripts and Printed Books
Material Texts and Contexts
Print, Politics & Popular Culture
Editing Texts
3. Modules on Revolution and Modernity, 1750 to the Present:

Revolution, Modernity: 1790-1930
Welsh Literature in English
Material Texts and Contexts
Modernisms
Print, Politics & Popular Culture
Irish Literature
Editing Texts
4. Modules on Four-Nations Literature:

Revolution, Modernity: 1790-1930
Welsh Literature in English
Modernisms
Irish Literature
Editing Texts
In addition to the above pathway-related modules, the following modules are offered:

Open Essay
The Postgraduate Conference
It is possible to take one optional module from the MA in Creative Writing (if the prerequisites of creative writing experience are met). If you should so wish, and in consultation with the Director of the MA in English Literature, there is also the option of taking one MA module from another School in the College of Arts and Humanities.

Part Two:

After the completion of the four modules which make up Part One of the programme, Part Two consists of a 20,000-word dissertation (60 credits) on a subject of your choice, researched and written under the individual supervision of a subject specialist. If you are following one of the four pathways, you are expected to write your dissertation in a research area relevant to that particular pathway.

Students who have completed Part One of the MA programme but elect not to write a dissertation are awarded the postgraduate diploma.

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The School of Arts offers postgraduate research in a diverse range of areas with specialists available to supervise study in the fields of Film and TV Studies, English, Contemporary Drama and Performance Studies and Music. Read more
The School of Arts offers postgraduate research in a diverse range of areas with specialists available to supervise study in the fields of Film and TV Studies, English, Contemporary Drama and Performance Studies and Music. The School has distinctive expertise in offering practice based MPhil and PhD programmes tailored to your individual interests as well offering the more traditional degree based on the written thesis or a mixture of the two. Research expertise in the School is organised around four groups.

The Body, Space and Technology Research Group make specific and focused interventions in the fields of physical and virtual live performance practices. The group publishes its own online journal and pioneers new developments in both theoretical and practical fields. Performances arising from the research are given regularly in London and internationally. The group’s current project ‘Advanced Interactivity in the Arts’ is investigating digital technology and its impact on performance; motion capture; live video; granular synthesis; web-based applications; body based performer techniques.

The Contemporary Writing Research Group includes researchers and practitioners across the genres and forms of contemporary fiction and poetry. There are four practising creative writers, and a creative writing fellow. Research specialisms in the group include: contemporary poetics, the New York School of Poets, music and writing, popular fictions, postcolonial, multicultural and feminist writing. The group has staged a number of international conferences, including: British Braids (2001), Jewish Women Writers (2002) and Contemporary Writing Environments (2004).

The Contemporary Music Practice Research Centre covers the interfaces between genres of composition and improvisation, technology and human performance, music and society, movement and sound, and between text and music. The group staged a conference, ‘Interfaces – Where Composition and Improvisation Meet’ in December 2000 and hosted the 2001 Annual Conference of the British Forum for Ethnomusicology, which was attended by a large number of international delegates. The theme of the conference was ‘Music and Power’.

The Screen Media Research Centre includes researchers working in many areas of film, television and new media including documentary, British, European and Hong Kong cinema; Hollywood and American independent cinema, political film, cult cinema, animation and representations of gender and sexuality; and generic territories including horror, science fiction and comedy. The group has staged international conferences including ‘The Spectacle of the Real: From Hollywood to Reality TV and Beyond’, in January 2003.

The School has a growing postgraduate community and offers a range of resources to support research. Students also benefit from the recently opened Graduate Centre which provides a dedicated space to meet with fellow postgraduate students. The School also has opportunities for part-time teaching for postgraduates with relevant skills. All postgraduates can apply for financial help to give conference papers and other research related activities.

Awards
The School of Arts may be able to offer a limited number of bursaries or fee waivers. Other financial awards may be available from the Arts and Humanities Research Council and other funding bodies. Some of these funding packages cover tuition fees (at UK/EU rates) and living expenses for the duration of study; others cover the fees, or contribute in other ways towards the cost of study.

MPhil and PhD research supervision is available and includes the following areas:

Drama/Performance Studies
Aesthetic potential of digitised technology for performance (artificial intelligence, motion capture, 3D-modelling and animation)
Somatic practice and performance composition
Interdisciplinary performance
Live capture (sound, film) plus performance
Solo performance and new performance writing

English/Contemporary Writing
Contemporary literature
Creative writing
Twentieth century literature
Victorian literature
The Renaissance
Modern American literature
Popular literature
Postcolonial literature
Contemporary literary theory
Literature and mourning
Innovative, marginal and non-traditional texts
All aspects of literary theory

Film/TV Studies
Five themes provide major strands within which most of the research is organised:
Cult Media and Transgression
Spectacle, Documentary and the Real
The Politics of Representation and Cultural Identity
Dominant and Alternative Cinemas
Videogames and Digital Media

Music
Composition
Improvisation
Electronic music and live electronic transformation
Meeting points between popular, world and ‘classical’ cultures
‘Digital arts’ – the interfaces between different forms of electronic media and live performance
Music in education and community

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The MA in English covers literature and popular culture in their historical contexts from the sixteenth century to the present day, with a focus on literature post-1800. Read more
The MA in English covers literature and popular culture in their historical contexts from the sixteenth century to the present day, with a focus on literature post-1800. It provides you with the opportunity to undertake a comparative study of literature, history and popular culture and develop research skills and methodologies. The programme will appeal if you are interested in combining the study of ‘serious’ literature with popular writing, women’s literature, and topics such as Empire, American national identity, the Victorian period, Holocaust and Second World War, approached as interdisciplinary case studies from the perspective of literature, history, popular culture and print culture. The course enables you to work across subject boundaries and provides excellent preparation if you wish to pursue a PhD in the future.

What will I study?

The programme consists of two compulsory modules (20 credits each), four optional modules (20 credits each) and a compulsory dissertation (60 credits). You will be guided to a combination of optional modules focusing on literature and popular culture, or a combination of literature modules and modules on a historical topic or theme.

If you are interested in literature, the available options cover texts from the sixteenth century to the present day, with a predominant focus on literature post-1880. Themes include gender, popular culture, ‘transgressive’ women’s writing, masculinity, print culture, humour, the gothic, and various theoretical and critical perspectives.

History-related modules focus on themes from the last three centuries, including topics such as Empire, the Holocaust and the Second World War, approached as interdisciplinary case studies involving the study of history, literature and culture (especially popular culture).

How will I study?

You will learn through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials and guided independent learning. Taught sessions take place between 6pm-9pm on weekday evenings. If you are studying full-time you will attend two evenings per week and if you are studying part-time you will attend one evening per week.

[[How will I be assessed?

You will be assessed through a combination of assignments which, depending on the modules you choose, may include essays, critical reviews, critical diaries, presentations and research-based projects, and a dissertation.

Who will be teaching me?

You will be taught by a team of specialist tutors who are active researchers and committed teachers with interests in literature, popular culture, genre studies, modern history, women’s studies, history and print culture.

What are my career prospects?

Graduates in the humanities with a higher degree find employment in a wide variety of careers such as teaching, arts organisation and management, the heritage industry, publishing, advertising, journalism, libraries and learning centres, and management/administration.

Alternatively, upon successful completion of the programme, you may wish to apply to progress onto a research degree such as an MPhil or PhD.

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The Victorian Literature pathway is an opportunity to explore a wide range of literature written in Britain between 1832 and 1900. Read more

The Victorian Literature pathway is an opportunity to explore a wide range of literature written in Britain between 1832 and 1900.

Register your interest

Apply now

The pathway’s compulsory module, ‘Victorian Voices’, introduces you to a range of Victorian literary representations of identity. The module challenges the popular notion that there is a monolithic Victorian view of things by presenting a wealth of different perceptions and perspectives.

Drawing on canonical and non-canonical poetry and prose by male and female Victorian authors, the module explores ways of expressing core aspects of self while also considering the implications of audience and contexts. In addition, you choose from a range of option modules specialising in aspects of the period’s fiction, poetry, drama, and journalism.

You’ll have the opportunity to develop your own individual interests and to conduct independent research through the writing of a dissertation supervised by a specialist in the field of Victorian Studies. QMUL’s Victorian scholars are particularly strong on the historical, cultural, and theoretical contexts for 19th-century writing.

You’ll be taught in small seminar groups and be introduced to key resources for the study of Victorian literature through a module in research methods. You will further benefit from our location in London’s historic East End.

You may also opt to take a cognate elective module offered by the Schools in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and by other Colleges of the University of London. 

Academics delivering the MA Victorian Pathway have diverse interests such as the sublime and the visionary, London and the coast, and print media, but we are all committed to shedding new light on the relationship between aspects of material culture and the Victorian literary imagination. We all approach cultural history from fresh angles, such as the senses, the media, or geography. We have core strengths in both poetry and fiction, and have published on many of the era’s most famous authors such as Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Anthony Trollope, and W. M. Thackeray, but we also advocate for less familiar voices like Edward Bulwer-Lytton, John Addington Symonds, E. W. Hornung, and Vernon Lee.

We have all recently published new books. Matthew Rubery’s The Untold Story of the Talking Book (Harvard University Press, 2016) traces the evolution of sound recordings of literary texts back to the nineteenth century, Catherine Maxwell’s Scents & Sensibility: Perfume in Victorian Literary Culture (OUP, 2017) addresses perfume and the olfactory imagination in Victorian literary culture, while Matthew Ingleby’s Bloomsbury: Beyond the Establishment (British Library, 2017) explores the role one metropolitan neighbourhood has historically played in the production of new ideas, values, and lifestyles. We are all actively engaged in London’s vibrant Victorian studies research culture, convening and otherwise contributing to long-standing forums at the Institute of English Studies, Senate House, such as Media History Seminar and Nineteenth-Century Studies Seminar.


Compulsory modules


Option modules

You choose three modules from a list of options that changes from year to year (one can be from the range of modules offered across the MA English Studies curriculum). 

In 2017-2018 we hope to offer the following. If members of our specialist research staff win research funding it will mean that their module won’t run, so for that reason this list is indicative only. 

You may, subject to availability and the approval of the School, take one of your option modules from across a range offered by other Schools in the Humanities and Social Science Faculty, or from other Colleges of the University of London.



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